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£ibrm}so{ 


William  Watson  Smith 

CLASS  OF  1892 

Memorial  Fund 


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Hiscellanea. 


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€\ft  Cjiombg  Society. 


The  Society  was  formed  in  1889  for  antiquarian  objects  in 
connection  with  Leeds  and  District  Its  publications  include 
the  Leeds  Parish  Church  Register,  Adel  Roister,  Kirkstall  Abbey 
Coucher  Book,  Calveriey  Charters,  and  Miscellanea.  Methley 
Register  is  in  preparation. 

Subscription,  los,  6d,  per  annum.  Life  Fee,  ^5  ss 
President  and  Hon,  Treasurer:  Edmund  Wilson,  F.S.A.,  Red 
Hall,  Leeds;  Hon,  Secretaries:  G.  D.  Lumb,  65,  Albion  Street, 
Leeds;  E.  Kitson  Clark,  M.A.,  F.S.A.,  9,  Hyde  Terrace,  Leeds. 


The  following  is  a  list  of  publications  which  may  be  purchased 
by  members. 

Applications — accompanied   by  remittance — to  be  addressed    to 
the  Treasurer,  Mr.  Edmund  Wilson,  Red  Hall,  Leeds. 

Of  some  of  these  the  stock  is  very  small. 

Cossins'  Plan  of  Leeds,  date  about  1725,  2/6. 

Atkinson's  "Ralph  Thoresby,  his  Town  and  Times,"  2  vols., 
containing  886  pages,  bound  in  buckram,  10/6  (by  post 
11/-).  Published  at  2^5/-  net.  A  most  interesting  and 
valuable  work. 

The  Society's  Publications,  Bound,  viz.: — 

Vol.      I. — Leeds  Registers,  15  7  2- 161 2,  15/9. 
„        n. — Miscellanea,  15/9. 
„      III. — Leeds  Registers,  161 2-1639,  10/6. 
„       IV. — Miscellanea,  15/9. 
„        V. — Adel  Registers,  1606-18 12,  5/3. 
„       VI. — Calveriey  Charters  (in  progress). 
„     VII. — Leeds  Registers,  1639-1667,  15/9. 
„  VIII. — Kirkstall  Abbey  Coucher  Book  (in  progress). 
„       IX. — Miscellanea,  15/9. 
„        X. — Leeds  Registers,  1 667-1 695,  15/9. 


The  publications 

OF 

THE  THORESBY  SOCIETY. 


Miscellanea, 


The   publications 


OF  THE 


Thoresby  Society. 


(ESTABLISHBD   IN   THE  YBAR   MDCCCLXXXIX.)  ' 


VOLUME     XI. 


MISCELLANEA 

Consisting  of  Parts  published  in 
1900,  1902  AND  1904. 


LEEDS:    1904. 


PREFACE. 


^TT^R  Council  of  the  Thoresby  Society  have  pleasure 
in  presenting  to  the  Members  the  fourth  volume 
of  the  "  Miscellanea/'  and  the  eleventh  of  the  publications 
of  the  Society,  consisting  of  the  "Miscellaneous*'  parts 
issued  for  1900,  1902,  and  1904. 

The  important  work  of  which  the  various  papers  of 
these  issues  is  the  outcome,  merits  the  gratitude  of  all 
those  who  are  at  the*ipresent  and  those  who  will  be  in 
the  future  interested  in  the  history  of  Leeds  and  district. 

An  important  addition  has  been  made  to  the  history 
of  early  families  of  the  district  by  a  paper  on  that  of 
Leathley,  in  which  will  be  found  a  remarkable  record 
of  benefactions  to  Kirkstall  Abbey,  Fountains  Abbey, 
and  other  Yorkshire  religious  houses.  The  series  of 
Leeds  wills  extracted  from  the  probate  registry  at  York 
has  been  carried  on  from  1531  to  i537«  These,  with  the 
Yorkshire  Lay  Subsidies  of  the  year  1545  for  the 
Wapentakes  of  Aggbrigg  and  Morley,  provide  material 
for  a  picture  of  the  personal  life  and  a  history  of  the 
development  of  surnames  in  the  sixteenth  century  ;  while 
the  seventeenth  century  is  represented  by  documents 
relating  to  the  Leeds  manor,  to  the  pulpit,  to  the  police 
court,  and  to  military  expenses. 

Captain  Pickering  was  sworn  in  1656  into  the  office 
of  Justice  of  the  Peace,  and  his  note-book  brings  back 
in  racy  fashion  certain  picturesque  and  disreputable 
events  of  that  and  the  following  year. 


1900. Vol. XI,   parti 
publications  of  the 

-I 


Miscellanea 


•X^CTvO: 


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ERRATA. 


Page  65,  line  22.     For  "proved  1633,"  read  "proved  1533.  * 
Page  286,  line  2.     Delete  "  It  is  still  used  as  a  chapel." 


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CJe  J^milg  of  iLeatjjleg  or  lelag^ 

By  W.  PALEY  BAILDON,  F.S.A. 


'TTHE  earliest  holders  of  Baildon,  after  Domesday,  of  whom  we  have 
any  record,  are  the  Lelays.  The  whole  subsequent  manorial 
history  turns  upon  them,  and  it  is  not  improbable  that  they  represent 
the  owner  of  Baildon  in  the  time  of  William  the  Conqueror.  More- 
over, as  they  have  received  scant  attention  at  the  hands  of  Yorkshire 
genealogists,  I  may  be  pardoned  for  treating  their  history  at  some 
length. 

They  were  descended  from  Ebrard  or  Evrard,  a  vassal  of  the 
Percys,  who  held  four  carucates  of  land  in  Ledelai  (Leathley)  at  the 
time  of  Domesday,  besides  other  property  in  the  West  Riding  and  in 
Lincolnshire.  Evrard's  surname  is  nowhere  mentioned.  His  various 
manors  were  as  follows: — 

fo.  301/^.  Land  of  the  King.  Manor.  In  Castelai  (Castley)  Eluuin  had  one 
caracate  to  be  taxed,  and  Berae  and  Elflet  had  one  carucate.  There  is  land  for 
two  ploughs.  Ebrard,  a  man  of  William  de  Perci's,  cultivates  (coltt)  it,  but  William 
does  not  vouch  for  it.     T.R.E.  worth  ten  shillings,  now  sixteen  pence. 

fo.  322,  Land  of  William  de  Perci.  Manor.  In  Ledelai  (Leathley)  Archil  had 
four  carucates  to  be  taxed,  where  there  may  be  two  ploughs.  Now  Ebrard  holds 
it  of  William.  He  himself  has  two  ploughs  there  and  five  villans,  and  three  bordars 
have  two  ploughs;  a  mill  worth  two  shillings;  two  acres  of  meadow.  T.R.E. 
worth  forty  shillings,  now  twenty-four  shillings. 

fo.  321^.     Land  of  William  de  PercL      Manor  and   Soke.     In  Haghedenebi 

(Ilagenby  near  Tadcaster— disappeared)   Archil  had  three  carucates  to  be  taxed, 

idicre  there  may  be  two  ploughs.     The  soke  is  in  Hailaga  [Helaugh].  Now  Ebrard 

has  it  of  WilliaoL     He  himself  has  one  plough,  and  there  are  two  villans  and  n 

bordar    with    one   plough.      Four   acres   of   meadow,  etc.     T.R.E.  value   twenty 
shillings,  now  twenty-four  shillings. 

nJ         fo.  322.     Land  of  William  de  Perci.    Six  manors.     In   Lintone,  Wiber,  Ulf, 

1*^  Raveochil,  Ruschil,  Ber  and  Ulchil  had  eight  and  a  half  carucates  of  land  to  tax, 

V    where  there  may  be  four  ploughs.     Now  Ebrard  holds  it  of  William.     He  himself 

has  ooe  plough,  and  three  villans  and  two  bordars  have  one  plough ;  a  mill  worth 

sixteen  shillings,  etc     T.R.E.  worth  sixty  shillings,  now  forty  shillings. 

•,*  This  paper  is  taken  from  the  Author's  collections  for  a  "History  of 
Baildon,"  to  l)e  published  hereafter ;  the  right  of  reprinting  is  reserved. 


4  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY. 

fo*  354'  Land  of  William  de  Perci.  Lincolnshire.  Manor.  In  Lagesbi 
(Legsby)  AIsi  had  one  carucate  of  land ;  there  is  land  for  two  ploughs.  Evrard,  a 
man  of  William's,  has  there  two  ploughs,  and  six  villans  and  one  bordar  have  one 
plough ;  a  mill  worth  sixpence,  etc.     T.  R.  E.  worth  thirty  shillings,  now  forty  shillings. 

Soke.  In  Houten  (Houghton)  the  soke  of  ten  bovates  of  land  is  in  L^;sby. 
Land  for  two  ploughs.  Evrard,  a  man  of  William's,  has  there  six  socmen  and  ten 
villans  and  two  bordars  with  two  ploughs  and  thirty  acres  of  meadow. 

It  will  be  noticed  that  these  were  all  held  of  William  de  Percy, 
except  Castley,  which,  at  the  time  of  the  Survey,  was  held  directly  of 
the  Crown. 

Evrard's  descendants  made  Leathley  their  principal  seat,  and  from 
that  circumstance  called  themselves  "  de  Lelay,"  that  being  the  early 
way  of  spelling  the  name.  Nothing  further  is  known  of  Evrard 
himself,  save  that  he  had  a  son  Hugh.  He  was  no  doubt  a  Norman, 
like  his  lord,  William  de  Percy ;  he  was  probably  a  young  man  at  the 
time  of  the  Survey,  and  was  very  likely  the  son  of  one  of  Percy's 
original  followers. 

Hugh  son  of  Evrard  gave  lands  in  Stainton  in  Craven*  to  Selby 
Abbey.  This  grant  is  mentioned  in  the  confirmation  charters  of 
Stephen  (1154),  Henry  II,  Richard  I,  John,  and  Henry  III.  Hugh 
also  gave  lands  in  Thorp,  which  grant  is  mentioned  in  the  charters  of 
Henry  II  and  Henry  III  only,  and  is  therefore  in  all  probability 
subsequent  to  Stephen's  confirmation  charter  of  1154.^ 

The  later  Lelays  were  great  benefactors  to  many  of  the  religious 
houses  of  Yorkshire,  especially  to  Fountains.  I  think  the  most 
convenient  plan  will  be  to  give  short  notes  of  their  various  charters 
under  the  headings  of  the  respective  houses,  and  to  reserve  comment 
until  we  resume  the  chronological  story  of  the  family. 

Fountains  Abbey. 

I.  Adam  son  of  Hugh  de  Lelay  quit-claimed  from  himself  and  his 
heirs  all  his  claim  to  half  the  mill  of  Rigton  to  Hugh,  his  eldest 
brother,  and  his  heirs,  in  consideration  of  ten  marks  of  silver.  If 
Adam  or  his  heirs  shall  at  any  time  do  anything  contrary  to  this 
charter,  they  shall  forfeit  thirty  marks  to  the  fabric  of  St.  Peter's  at 
York  by  way  of  penalty.^ 

^  A  hamlet  in  the  township  of  Bank  Newton  and  parish  of  Gargrave. 

2  Selby  Abbey  Coucher,  Yorkshire  Record  Series,  i,  7,  13,  15,  18,  21. 

3  Chartulary  of  Fountains  Abbey,  Add.  MS.  18276,  fo.  202. 


THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY.  5 

II.  Hugh  son  of  Hugh  de  Lethlay  granted  to  Fountains  Abbey 
half  the  mill  of  Rigton,with  the  suit  thereof  and  all  other  appurtenances, 
and  free  right  of  way  throughout  the  territory  of  Rigton  (except  meadow 
and  covert)  to  the  said  mill.  His  men  of  Rigton  shall  keep  up  the 
dam  and  the  house  and  shall  carry  the  mill  stones.  The  monks  shall 
have  in  my  wood  of  Rigton  such  rights  as  belong  to  the  said  half  mill.' 

III.  Hugh  son  of  Hugh  de  Lethlay  grants  to  Fountains  Abbey  a 
carucate  of  land,  that  is,  half  of  all  my  land  in  Rigton.' 

IV.  Hugh  son  of  Hugh  de  Lethlay  grants  to  Fountains  Abbey 
half  of  the  ville  of  Rigton,  with  the  homage  and  services  of  all  the 
free  tenants  and  their  heirs,  and  all  the  natives  with  their  chattels  and 
sequela^  and  half  the  mill  with  the  suit  thereof.' 

V.  Hugh  son  of  Hugh  de  Lethlay  grants  another  charter  in  almost 
identical  terms.^ 

VI.  Hugh  son  of  Hugh  de  Lethlay  acknowledges  the  receipt  of 
one  hundred  marks  by  the  hands  of  Roger  and  Godard,  monks  of 
Fountains,  according  to  the  agreement  made  between  the  Abbat  and 
Convent  of  Fountains  and  the  said  Hugh  concerning  the  land  of  Rigton 
in  1244,  in  the  time  of  John  III,  Abbat.** 

VII.  Hugh  son  of  Hugh  de  lethlay  appeared  at  York  in  full 
county  court  on  Tuesday  after  the  Epiphany,  32  Henry  III,  1248, 
before  Sir  William  de  Midelton,  then  Sheriff,  and  others,  and  fully 
admitted  that  he  and  his  heirs  were  bound  to  indemnify  the  Abbat 
and  Convent  of  Fountains  from  all  suits  due  to  Margaret  de  Rivers,* 
her  heirs  or  assigns,  at  her  court  of  Herwode  or  elsewhere,  in  respect 
of  all  the  land  which  they  hold  in  Rigton  of  my  gift.' 

VIII.  I,  Hugh  de  Lelay,  with  the  consent  of  Christiana  my  wife, 
have  granted  to  Roger  Pictavensis  and  Isouda  my  daughter,  in  frank- 
marriage,  all  the  ville  of  Staynburn,  with  demesnes  and  services,  and 
all  appurtenances,  To  hold  to  him  and  his  heirs  begotten  of  Isouda 
in  frank-marriage.  Witnesses,  William  de  Lelay,  Bertram  de  Stiveton, 
Robert  de  Muhaut,  Serlo  de  Pouel,  William  de  Stiveton,  and  many 
others.' 

*  ChaituUry  of  Fountains  Abbey,  Add.  MS.  18276,  fo.  202. 

«  Ilnd,  ••»  Ibid.  *  Ibid.  fo.  202^.  » Ibid. 

•  Margaret,  daughter  of  Thomas,  Count  of  Savoy,  and  wife  of  Baldwin  de 
Red  vers,  $th  Earl  of  Devon.  He  died  in  1262;  so  that  Charter  No.  25  must  be 
after  that  date. 

^  Chartulary  of  Fountains  Abbey,  Add.  MS.  18276,  fo.  Txyid. 

"^  Ibid,  fo.  2\(id.     Original  pnus  F.  H.  Fawkes,  Esq.,  of  Famley. 


0  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY. 

IX.  William  the  Clerk,  son  of  William  de  Staynburn,  sold  to  Roger 
Pictavensis  two  bovates  of  land  in  Staynburn,  and  three  and  a  half 
acres  in  Croked -ridding  and  Stubbe- ridding,  and  half  an  acre  near 
Eva*s  house.  ^ 

X.  William  son  of  William  sold  to  Roger  Pictavensis  all  the 
tenement  that  Richard  son  of  Thor  held  of  him  (William)  in  Stayn- 
burn, and  all  the  services  and  rent  of  the  same ;  namely,  one  bovate 
of  land.^ 

XI.  Isouda,  formerly  wife  of  Roger  Pictavensis,  in  her  widowhood 
and  lawful  power,  granted  to  Fountains  Abbey  the  whole  ville  of 
cJcaynburn,  />.  all  the  lands,  rents  and  possessions  that  she  had  there, 
as  well  in  demesnes  as  in  services.  The  monks  are  to  do  foreign 
service  for  five  carucates  of  land  where  fourteen  make  a  knight's  fee.' 

XII.  Fine  levied  at  York,  36  Hen.  Ill,  125 1-2,  between  Roger 
Peytevin,  demandant,  and  Stephen,  Abbat  of  Fountains,  tenant,  of  the 
manor  of  Staynburn,  which  Roger  admits  to  be  the  right  of  the  Abbat 
and  church  of  Fountains ;  and  he  quit-claims  the  same  from  him  and 
his  heirs.* 

XIII.  Roger  Pictavensis  junior  quit-claims  to  Fountains  Abbey  all 
his  right  in  the  manor  of  Staynburn,  according  to  the  charter  of 
Isouda,  his  grandmother.*^ 

XIV.  Hugh  son  of  William  de  Lelay  confirmed  to  Fountains 
Abbey  all  the  ville  of  Staynburn,  by  these  bounds :  as  the  river  which 
is  the  boundary  between  Staynburn  and  Lindelay  runs  into  Elnehirst- 
sike,  and  so  to  the  spring  near  the  road  from  Staynburn  to  Famley, 
and  from  the  spring  to  Turse-fen  (?),  and  so  by  the  river  to  Staynburn- 
beck,  and  thence  to  the  bridge  of  Lincroft,  and  thence  to  the  river 
which  runs  between  Kirk-how  and  Norman-rode,  and  thence  by  the 
river  to  Newby,  and  thence  to  the  ditch  above  Huby,  which  is  called 
Mere-dike,  and  so  by  the  ditch  to  the  river  which  divides  Huby  and 
Rigton,  and  so  along  that  river  to  the  spring  at  its  head,  and  so  from 
the  spring  towards  the  east  to  Haukeraitheker,  and  thence  towards 
the  north  to  the  cross  called  Mere-cross,  and  thence  by  a  straight  line 
to  Alumseclyve  (P),*^  and  so  to  the  west  to  (xrai-stane,  and  thence  to 
Wynd-byrkes,  and   thence  to  Hol-sike  as  it  falls  into   Cremple,  and 


^  Chartulary    of   Fountains   Abbey,   Add.  MS.  18276,   fo.  2i6</.      Original   penes 
K.  H.  Fawkes,  Esq.,  of  Farnley. 

2  Ibid,     The  text  of  this  charter  appears  below.  ^  /^^^  4  /^^, 

'^  Ibid.     This  is  given  more  fully  hereafter.  «  Almes  Cliff. 


THE   FAMILY   OK   LEATHLEY   OR   LELAV.  7 

thence  to  the  Standand-stane  on  the  moor,  and  thence  to  Reufhahe- 
stanes  near  Cravene-gate,  and  thence  towards  the  west  to  Sandwath, 
and  thence  to  Eskillstahe  by  the  river,  running  down  the  middle,  and 
thence  to  the  boundary  of  Lindelay,  and  so  along  to  the  first  named 
river.  To  hold  to  the  monks  according  to  the  charter  of  Isouda 
my  daughter.' 

XV.  Another  charter  from  Hugh  son  of  William  de  Lelay  con- 
firming the  same.'* 

XVI.  W de  Plumpton  grants  and  quit-claims  to  Fountains 

all  his  right  in  the  wood  and  moor  of  Staynburn,  so  that  the  monks 
may  hold  and  enjoy  the  whole  of  the  wood  and  moor  which  they  have 
by  a  charter  of  Hugh  de  I-»elay.  Saving  to  me  and  my  heirs  and  my 
men  of  Brakenthwait  herbage  in  the  wood  where  we  have  been  wont 
to  take  it.' 

XVII.  Henry  son  of  Holdewin  de  Rigton  quit-claims  all  his  right 
and  claim  within  the  bounds  of  Staynburn  as  contained  in  the 
charter  of  Sir  Hugh  de  Lelay.* 

XVIII.  Robert  son  of  Nigel  de  Castelay  quit-claims  all  his  right 
in  the  common  of  Staynburn  by  those  bounds  which  they  have  of  the 
gift  of  Hugh  de  Lelay.' 

XIX  Roger  son  of  Alexander  de  Hughby  quit-claims  all  his  right 
within  the  same  bounds.' 

XX.  J  ....  ,  Abbat  of  Fountains,  grants  to  Hugh  son  of  William 
de  Lelay,  that  he  may  have  pasture  in  the  ville  and  territory  of 
Staynburn  all  his  life  for  his  own  animals  belonging  to  his  house  at 
Lelay.     His  heirs  are  not  to  have  this  right.' 

XXI.  Thomas  Hurtescy  quit-claims  all  his  right  in  the  common 
of  Staynburn  by  the  bounds  which  they  have  of  the  gift  of  Hugh  de 
I^lay,  so  that  neither  I  nor  my  heirs  shall  have  any  right  within  those 
bounds  by  reason  of  holding  land  in  Lelay,  except  wood-pasture  for 
ten  cattle  and  thirty  sheep  (bidenies)? 

XXII.  Robert  de  Lelay  granted  to  Fountains  Abbey  thirty  acres  of 
land  and  pasture  for  two  hundred  sheep  in  Staynburn,  viz.:  that  which 
I  bought  from  William  the  clerk  of  Marton.* 


'  Chartulary  of  Fountains  Abbey,  Add.  MS.  18276,  fos.  202^,  225. 

*  Ibid.  » Ibid.  fo.  225.  *  Ibid.  » Ibid. 

*  Ibid,  '  Ibid.  « Ibid.  ®  Ibid,  fo.  225^. 


8  THE    FAMILY   OF   LEATHLEY   OR    LELAY. 

XXIII.  Robert  de  Leleia  granted  to  Fountains  Abbey  land  in 
Stainburn,  and  covenanted  that  if  he  could  not  warrant  it  he  would 
grant  land  of  the  same  value  in  Haggendebi.  Witnesses,  Alan  de 
Catherton  and  others.  Seal  of  brown  wax,  pointed  oval;  an  eagle 
reguardant,  with  outspread  wings.  Legend :  +  Sigill  :  Roberti  :  de  : 
Lelaia  :^ 

XXIV.  Richard  de  Lutrineton  grants  and  confirms  those  bounds 
between  Staynburn  and  Rigton  which  Hugh  de  Lelay  granted  them.' 

XXV.  Margaret  de  Redvers,  Countess  of  Devon,  in  her  widowhood, 
released  all  suits  of  court  belonging  to  her  court  of  Harewood  for  the 
lands  and  tenements  held  by  Fountains  Abbey  in  Staynburn  and 
Rigton,  until  the  ville  of  Lelay  shall  come  into  the  hands  of  the  right 
heir  of  the  late  Hugh  de  Lelay.  If  the  heir  shall  alienate  the  ville, 
then  the  Countess  may  distrain.^ 

XXVI.  William  the  Clerk,  son  of  William  de  Staynboum,  gave  to 
Eva,  daughter  of  William  de  Swillington,  two  bovates  of  land  in 
Staynburn  and  a  messuage  with  a  croft ;  also  an  acre  of  land  in  the 
Hanging  Croft  {in  pmdenti  crofto\  and  the  toft  and  croft  which 
belonged  to  Reginald  son  of  Archill,  and  three-quarters  of  an  acre  in 
the  essart  which  was  Eviet's  (?).  To  hold  of  me  and  my  heirs  in  fee, 
by  homage  and  a  rent  of  fourpence  yearly  for  all  services,  except 
forinsec  service.* 

XXVII.  William  son  of  William  de  Staynburn  granted  to  Eva 
daughter  of  William  de  Swillington,  and  her  heirs,  a  bovate  of  land 
in  Staynburn,  and  the  land  called  Odegate-land  up  to  the  Standing 
Stone,  and  extending  from  the  road  near  the  church  up  to  Hangang 
Croft ;  also  a  rood  and  a  half  of  land  lying  on  both  sides  of  the  croft 
belonging  to  Eva.  To  hold  of  me  and  my  heirs,  paying  twopence 
yearly,  and  doing  forinsec  service.^ 

XXVIII.  Eva  daughter  of  William  le  Palmer  of  Swillington  granted 
to  Fountains  all  the  toft  and  croft  that  she  had  in  Staynburn,  and 
six  acres  of  land  there.* 

XXIX.  Eva  de  Lelay,  in  her  lawful  power  {Le,  in  her  widowhood), 
grants  to  Fountains  three  bovates  of  land  in  Staynburn,  with  tofts  and 
crofts,  viz.:   that  which  William  the'  Clerk  sold  to   me.     To  hold  of 

*  See  engraving  on  the  Pedigree.     Original  petus  F.  H.  Fawkes,  Esq. 

"  Chartulary  of  Fountains  Abbey,  Add.  MS.  18276,  fo.  225^. 

^Ibid,     See  note  to  No.  VII.  ^ Ibid,  ^  Ibid.  ^  Ibid, 


THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY.  9 

me    and   my  heirs   in    frank-alraoigne,  paying   yearly  to    German  de 
Sta3mbum  and  his  heirs  sixpence  for  all  service,  except  forinsec  service.* 

XXX.  William  son  of  Ralph  granted  and  confirmed  to  Fountains, 
so  fiar  as  pertained  to  him,  the  toft,  croft  and  six  acres  which  Eva  de 
Swillington  gave.  Also,  by  another  charter,  the  three  bovates  of  land 
with  tofts  and  crofts  which  Eva  de  Lelay  gave  them  with  three  roods 
of  land.  Witnesses,  Nigel  de  Plumpton,  Robert  fil.  Uckeman,  and 
others.' 

XXXI.  William  the  Clerk  of  Staynburn  grants  three  acres  in  the 
territory  of  Staynburn,  which  lie  rather  to  the  east  in  the  culture  of 
Eadolfriding.  He  also  confirmed  the  gift  of  thirty  acres  of  land  in 
the  viUe  of  Staynburn  and  common  of  pasture  for  two  hundred  sheep, 
the  gift  of  Robert  de  Lelay.' 

XXXII.  Robert  son  of  Ranulf  de  Monkton  confirmed  the  gift  of 
Isolda,  widow  of  Roger  Peytevin.  Helewise,  relict  of  Robert,  also 
confirmed.* 

XXXIII.  Hugh  son  of  William  de  Lelay  quit-claimed  to  Fountains 
Abbey  the  service  of  William  son  of  Gilbert  of  Castley  in  respect  of 
a  tenement  in  Castley.' 

Salley  Abbey. 

XXXIV.  William  son  of  Hugh  de  Leelai  granted  and  quit-claimed 
to  Salley  Abbey  a  rent  of  fifteen  shillings  in  Stainton.  Witnesses, 
Malger  parson  of  Gisbum,  Simon  de  Moualt,  Richard  de  Goldesborug, 
etc* 

XXXV.  Hugh  son  of  Hugh  de  Lelay  confirmed  to  Salley  Abbey 
all  the  lands  and  pastures,  etc.,  which  they  held  in  his  fee  in  Stainton, 
Boulton,  Gasegyle,  Rimmington  and  Famley,  according  to  the  charters 
of  Hugh  his  father  and  of  other  ancestors.  Witnesses,  Hugh  de 
Halton,  William  de  Lindelai,  William  fil.  Arkyl,  etc' 

XXXVI.  William  de  Lelai,  knight,  quit-claims  all  right  in  the 
service  of  Stainton,  as  to  which  there  has  been  some  question,  and 
confirms  all  their  lands  in  Boulton  and  elsewhere  in  his  fee,  whether 
given  by  himself  or  his  sons.  Witnesses,  the  Prior  and  the  whole 
Convent  of  Kirkstall,  Simon  de  Monte  alto,  William  his  son,  etc' 


•  ChartuUry  of  Fountains  Abbey,  Add.  MS.  18276,  fo.  225*. 

•  [bid,  fo.  226.     Original  penes  F.  H.  Fawkes,  Esq. 

•  Ibid.  *  Burton,  Mofu  Bbor.^  p.  201.  ^  Ibid.  p.  157. 
•Chartulary  of  Salley  Abbey,  Harleian  MS.  112,  fo.  lyl. 

T  Ibid,  fo.  14.  «  Ibid. 


lO  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY. 

XXXVII.  Robert  de  Leeleia  grants  thirteen  acres  of  wood  and  moor 
land  lying  between  Fulden  and  Rauenesberth,  and  pasture  for  ten 
cows  and  their  offspring  up  to  one  year  old.  Witnesses,  William  the 
Constable,  Jordan  and  Helias  the  King's  Serjeants,  Hugh  the  Clerk 
of  Boulton,  Walter  de  Wadington,  etc.* 

XXXVIII.  Hugh  de  Leley  grants  the  land  which  he  formerly  held 
of  Salley  Abbey  between  Weston  and  Ascwith,  to  do  as  they  please 
with.  He  also  confirmed  a  bovate  of  land  in  Rimmington  given  by 
Christiana  de  Pathom.  Also  two  bovates  in  Farnley  given  by  Robert 
his  brother.  And  all  lands  in  his  fee  in  (?  Bolton),  Gasegyle  and 
Stainton,  according  to  the  charters  of  William  his  father.  He  will 
warrant  all  lands  in  Boulton  given  by  Robert  de  Lelei  his  brother, 
because  Robert  gave  in  exchange  to  me  and  my  heirs  all  his  land  in 
the  town  and  territory  of  Boulton.  Witnesses,  Oliver  de  Brinckil, 
William  de  Hebbeden,  William  Vavasore,  Philip  de  Rimmington,  etc' 

XXXIX.  William  son  of  Hugh  de  Lelay  confirmed  the  gift  by 
Robert  his  son  of  a  toft  in  Boulton  on  Wikitgibanc  and  ten  acres  of 
land  on  Ravenisberh  and  three  acres  of  land,  and  pasture  on  the 
common  there  for  twenty  cows  and  their  calves  up  to  two  years. 
Witnesses,  Malger  parson  of  Gyseburn,  William  fil.  Robert,  Richard 
Vavasour,  etc.* 

XL.  Robert  son  of  William  de  Lelay  grants  for  the  use  of  the 
church  and  buildings  of  Salley  a  toft  in  Boulton  on  Wikingile-banc 
containing  ten  acres  of  land,  and  three  acres  on  Ravenesberh,  and 
pasture  for  twenty  cows  and  their  calves  up  to  two  years  old.  To 
hold  of  me  and  my  heirs  at  a  rent  of  two  shillings  for  all  services. 
Witnesses,  W.  de  Marton,  John  de  Halton,  Elias  his  brother,  etc.* 

XLI.   Robert    de    Lelay    granted    two    bovates    in  the   territory 

of  Fernley,  free  from  all  service  except  forinsec  service.  The  bovates 

are  those  which  Ernald  and  William   held.     Witnesses,  H.  de  Perci, 
William  de  Leelaya,  Simon  de  Monte  alto,  etc.^ 

XLI  I.  Robert  de  Lelay  grants  common  of  pasture  for  twenty- 
four  beasts  in  the  territory  of  Hagandeby,  everywhere  except  in  com 
and  meadow.  Witnesses,  Oliver  de  Brinkil,  Geoffrey  de  Rufford,  John 
de  Toueton,  Henry  de  Kahale  (?),  Bertram  de  Stiueton,  William  de 
Marisco,  etc." 


^Chartulary  of  Salley  Abbey,  Harleian  MS.  112,  fo.  31. 

'^Ibid,  fos.  31,  148.  ^Ibid,  fo.  310^.  ^rbUL 

^'  Ihid.  fo.  148.  ^  Ibid.  fo.  160. 


THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY.  II 

XLIII.  Robert  de  Lelay  quit-claimed  all  the  tithes  and  lands 
belonging  to  the  church  of  Tadecastre,  which  the  Archbishop  assigned 
to  Salley.  Also  all  the  timber  of  his  grange  of  Hagandeby.  He 
pledged  all  his  rents  in  Goldsbrugh  and  Lelay,  and  the  church  of 
Tadecastre  for  the  fulfilment  of  this  agreement  Witnesses,  Johp 
Roman,  Canon  of  York,  Master  Godard,  the  penitencer,  Master 
Maurice  and  the  whole  Chapter.* 

S.  Peter's,  York. 

XLIV.  Hugh  de  Lelay  grants  to  Walter,  Archbishop  of  York,  the 
church  of  Weston  with  its  appurtenances  in  frank-almoign,  to  augment 
the  lights  in  S.  Peter's  Church,  according  to  the  Archbishop's  discretion. 
Witnesses,  Robert  de  Lelay,  Henry  de  Muhaut,  Nicholas  Wart  (Ward), 
William  Martel,  Adam  and  Henry  chaplains  of  Otley,  Richard  de 
Bereforde,  William  de  Vescy,  Paulin  de  Otteley,  Odo  de  Richmund,  etc. 
Dated  at  Otteley,  the  day  before  the  nones  of  November,  1221.' 

XLV.  Hugh  son  of  Hugh  de  Lelay  confirmed.  Witnesses,  Robert 
Haget,  Canon  of  Hereford,  William  de  Vescy,  Martin  de  Marisco, 
William  Martel,  William  de  Widindon,  Adam  de  Stavel',  Henry  Walensis, 
Rebert  de  Pauilli,  Paulin  de  Otteley,  Reginald  de  Stowa,  clerk,  etc.* 

XLVI.  William  son  of  Serlo  grants  to  Robert  de  Lelay  and  his 
heirs  four  bovates  of  land  in  Farnlay,  which  were  the  dower  of  Idonea 
my  mother,  and  the  third  part  of  the  land  of  Serlo  my  father ;  also 
the  service  of  Roger  son  of  William ;  paying  yearly  twelve  pence  for 
all  service.  Witnesses,  Simon  and  Henry  de  Monte  alto,  Ralph  de 
Bntmhope,  Hugh  de  Lelay,  Serlo  de  Posle  [Poole],  etc.* 

XLVn.  Robert  de  Lelay  releases  to  Walter,  Archbishop  of  York, 
all  right  to  the  land  in  Famle  which  was  William  Malebraunche's, 
and  grants  all  his  land  called  Scales,  and  all  his  other  land  in  Farnlee, 
whether  in  the  fee  of  Serlo  de  Poule  or  not.  Witnesses,  Hugh  de 
Lelay,  William  de  Lindelay,  Ysak  de  Timbel,  Alan  de  Farnelee,  Adam 
and  Paul  de  Newhall,  and  others.* 

XLVin.  Robert  de  Lelai  confirms  to  S.  Peter's  Church,  York,  half 
a  carucate  of  land  and  an  essart  in  Herbert's  croft,  with  six  tofts  and 
crofts  of  his  demesne  in  Appelton,  and  two  shillings  and  eightpence 
rent  from  Gotte  and  his  heirs ;  all  of  which  Ralph  de  Bray  gave  them, 


*  Chartalary  of  .Salley  Abbey,  Harlcian  MS.  112,  fo.  160. 

«  Cotton.  MS.,  Claudius  B.  Ill,  fo.  26^.  ^  Ilnd. 

*  /bid.  fo.  44.  »  /bid. 


12  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY. 

and  which  he  held  of  me  by  the  rent  of  a  pair  of  gilt  spurs  or  four- 
pence.  Witnesses,  William  de  Percy,  Richard  Malebis,  Jordan  de 
Sancta  Maria,  Alan  de  Catherton,  William  de  Scotein,  Robert  de 
Wilesthorp,  Oliver  de  Brinkel,  Fulk  de  Ruthford  (?),  Henry  BusUrd, 
Hugh  de  Stiveton,  Gotte  de  Appulton,  Richard  the  Clerk  of  Homing- 
ton,  and  others.^ 

XLIX.  Hugh  de  Lelay  confirmed  the  charters  of  Ralph  de  Bray 
and  Robert  de  Lelay  his  brother  to  S.  Peter's,  York,  relating  to  Appelton. 
Witnesses,  Robert  de  Lelay,  Hugh  parson  of  Weston,  Robert  his  brother, 
Robert  the  Clerk  of  Hammerton,  and  others.^ 

L.  Robert  de  Lelay  gave  lands  in  Stutton  (Steeton)  which 
appertain  to  his  land  at  Hangandeby.' 

KiRKSTALL  Abbey. 

LL  Roger  son  of  Hugh  de  Leley,  for  the  souls  of  Hugh  and 
Christiana,  his  father  and  mother,  gave  eleven  bovates  of  land  in 
Bramhope,  and  all  the  men  dwelling  on  the  same,  with  their  sequela 
and  chattels,  and  also  three  bovates  there,  two  held  by  John  son  of 
Hugh  and  the  other  by  Helias  PuUus ;  in  free  alms ;  the  monks  must 
do  the  forinsec  service  belonging  to  three  bovates  where  twenty 
carucates  make  a  knight's  fee.  Witnesses,  Hugh  de  Lelay,  Hugh  his 
son,  Nicholas  Ward,  Adam  his  brother,  etc.* 

LIL  Adam  son  of  Adam  son  of  Hugh  de  Lethelay  confirms 
all  the  gifts  of  his  ancestors  in  Bramhope.  Witnesses,  Sir  Richard  de 
Thornhill,  Sir  Richard  de  Tanghe,  William  Warde,  Simon  his  brother, 
parson  of  Gisley,  William  Pictavensis,  etc.* 

LHL  William  de  Lelay  gave  various  lands  and  rights  in 
Horsforth.* 

LIV.  Americus  de  Sancto  Mauro,  Master  of  the  Knights 
Templars  in  England,  quit-claimed  to  Kirkstall  Abbey  those  six 
bovates  of  land  in  Horsforth  which  they  had  of  the  gift  of  William 
son  of  Hugh  de  Lelai.^ 

1  Cotton.  MS.,  Claudius  B.  Ill,  fo.  lOO.  ^  Ibid.  fo.  lood. 

3  Ibid.  fo.  84.     The  Baildon  charters  appear  later. 

*  Mon.  Ang.,  V,  538.     Add.  MSS.  27413,  fo-  2.  ^  Mon.  Ang.,  V,  538. 

®See  KirkstaU   CoucJur  Book    (Thoresby  Society),  pp.  75,  76,  77,  where  five 
charters  of  his  are  given. 

'  Harleian  MS.  802,  fo.  (>^d. 


THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY.  13 

LV.  Henry  III,  Jan.  30,  anno  21,  1237,  granted  free  warren  in  the 
land  in  Horsford  which  the  monks  had  of  the  gift  of  Hugh  de  Lelay 
and  Nigel  de  Horsford.* 

LVI.  Hugh  son  of  William  de  Lelay  gave  a  tenement  in  Mickle- 
gate,  York.' 

S.  Peter's  Hospital,  York,  afterwards  S.  Leonard's. 

LVIL  I,  Hugh  son  of  William  de  Lelay,  have  given,  etc.,  to  the 
Hospital  of  S.  Peter,  York,  two  tofts  and  two  crofts  in  Lelay.' 

LVHL  Roger  son  of  Hugh  de  Lelay  gave  a  moiety  of  the  mills, 
etc,  both  within  the  town  of  I^lay  and  without  in  the  territory  of  the 
same  town,  namely,  the  moiety  which  he  formerly  held  of  the  Hospital.* 

LIX.  Agnes,  relict  of  Roger  son  of  Hugh  de  Lelay,  confirmed  the 
gift  of  her  husband.* 

LX.  William  son  of  Jordan  de  Lelay  and  Margery  his  wife, 
daughter  of  Hugh  de  Lelay  granted  permission  that  the  Hospital  might 
bring  "the  course  of  the  water  of  Walkesbume  (Washbume)  within  our 
lands  of  Kelesall  in  the  field  of  I^lay  to  the  mill  of  Lelay."** 

LXI.  William  Saracen  of  Yorke  and  Alice  his  wife,  daughter  of 
Hugh  de  Lethlay,  granted  "the  course  of  the  water  to  their  (the 
Hospital's)  mill  of  Lelay,  as  in  the  former  charter."  Dated  at  York, 
Twelfth  Day,  1258.^ 

LXII.  Hugh  son  of  William  de  Lelay  gave  the  moiety  of  the 
mills  which  are  to  be  made  in  the  town  of  Lelay,  and  that  bovate  of 
land  there  which  R^inald  son  of  Osbert  held.^ 

LXHL  Emma  Darrell,  late  wife  of  Hugh  de  Lelay,  confirmed  all 
the  gifts  of  her  late  husband.* 

Helaugh  Park  Priory. 

LXIV.  Robert  de  Lelay  grants  to  the  Priory  of  Healaugh  Park 
the  whole  ville  of  Hagandeby,  containing  three  carucates,  with  the 
a^ital  messuage  and  all  demesne  lands.^^ 


iQuirter  Roll,  21  Henry  III,  m.  7.  »  Mon.  Ang.,  V,  549. 

*  Ldger  of  S.  Leonard's  of  Yorke,  2  vol.,  fo.  73.  ^Ibid,  « Ibid. 

''Ibid,  fa  7.  '/^^.  fo.  73.  ®/*'^.  fo.  74- 

» Ibid,  fo.  75.     Harleian  MS.  799,  fos.  6ia,  62. 
>*»  Cotton.  MS.  Vespasian  A.  iv,  fos.  14//,  15. 


14  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEA'lHLEY  OR  LELAY. 

LXV.  Hugh  de  Lelay  grants  the  church  of  Lelay,  so  far  as  it 
belongs  to  him.  Witnesses,  Simon  de  Monte  alto,  William  and  Henry 
his  sons,  Robert  de  Lelay,  and  others.* 

LXVI.  Hugh  de  Lelay  grants  two  bovates  in  Lelay  for  the  fabric 
of  the  church.     Witnesses,  Roger  de  Lelay  (his  son),  etc.^ 

LXVIL  Hugh  de  Lelay  grants  a  rent  of  six  shillings  in  Castley 
towards  finding  fish  for  the  Canons  in  Advent.' 

LXV  in.  Ralph*  brother  of  Hugh  de  Lelay  gave  half  of  his 
demesnes  in  Hagenby,  in  which  town  there  are  contained  three 
carucates.  Witnesses,  Jordan  de  Sancta  Maria,  Robert  de  Cokefeld, 
Hugh  de  Lelay  his  brother,  Oliver  de  Brincel.' 

LXIX.  In  12  22  Robert  de  Lelay  gave  two  parts  of  this  town.* 

Nun  Appleton  Priory. 

LXX.  Isolda  daughter  of  Hugh  de  Lelay  gave  to  Nun  Appleton 
Priory  a  carucate  of  land  in  Castley,  and  an  oxgang  of  land,  with  the 
service  of  Geoffrey  de  Arthington  of  fourpence;  Sir  Hugh  de  Lelay 
confirmed.' 

Bolton  Priory. 

LXXI.  Hugh  de  Lelay  gave  the  homage  and  service  of  William 
Ruffus,  son  of  Liulf,  and  his  heirs,  and  two  shillings  and  sixpence 
which  William  pays  yearly  for  land  held  of  Hugh  in  Rodes  in 
Mensington,  lying  between  Merebeck  and  Blakesike,  in  frank-almoigne. 
Witnesses,  Adam  chaplain  of  Otteley,  Thomas  parson  of  Addingham, 
Symon  de  Monte  alto,  Peter  de  Marton,  Alan  de  Everingham,  then 
bailiff  of  Otley,  etc.« 

William  son  of  Hugh  son  of  Evrard  was  probably  born  about 
1 1 30.  He  occurs  as  a  witness  to  a  very  early  charter,  by  which  Norman 
son  of  Ughtred  confirmed  to  the  poor  men  of  the  Hospital  of  S.  Peter 
at  York  (afterwards  known  as  S.  Leonard's)  four  bovates  of  land  in 
Bramhope,  which  his  mother  had  given  them  out  of  the  lands  she 
held  in  frank-marriage.®    Among  the  witnesses  were  Adam  and  Walter, 

*  Cotton.  MS.  Vespasian  A.  iv.,  fo.  15. 

•^Ibid.  fo.  15^/.  '^Ibid,  fo.  16. 

*  Probably  a  mistake  for  Robert.  "Johnston's  MSB.  V.  C.  I.  p.  169. 
^  Ibid,     Burton,  M(m,  JCbor.t  2S2,  '^  Ibid.  rjT, 

^  Bolton  Priory  Raster,  fo.  122.    Harleian  MS.  802,  fo.  105^.    Dodsworth  MSS. 
cxliv,  fo.  44^. 
0  Rawlinson  MS.,  B  455,  fo.  3.     Thoresby  Society,  Miscellanea,  ix,  p.  232. 


THE    FAMILY   OF    LEATHLEY   OR    LELAY.  1 5 

son  and  brother  respectively  of  Norman,  the  grantor  of  the  charter. 
This  charter  is  probably  not  much,  if  any,  later  than  1160.  We  shall 
sec  that  William's  son,  Hugh  de  Lelay,  married  Christiana,  daughter 
of  this  Adam  fitz  Norman.  The  descendants  of  Norman  were  known 
by  several  surnames,  derived  from  their  different  properties;  two  of 
these,  de  Pathome  and  de  Rimmington,  will  occur  later. 

The  earliest  dated  item  we  have  of  the  de  Lelays  by  that  name 
is  in  the  Pipe  Roll  of  12  Henry  H,  1 165-6.  Among  many  others 
who  were  amerced  for  concealing  the  death  of  one  Cnud,  William 
son  of  Hugh  de  Leeleia  is  set  down  as  owing  loos.  Adam 
son  of  Norman,  mentioned  above,  was  charged  with  131.  4^.  Both 
these  were  in  the  wapentake  of  Claro.  In  the  next  year,  13  Henry  H, 
1 166-7,  Adam  paid  his  mark,  and  de  Lelay  paid  five  marks,  ^^  6s.  Sd, 
He  paid  the  remaining  j£i   13^.  4^/.  in  the  following  year. 

In  22  Henry  II,  he  was  fined  ten  marks,  ^£6  ly.  4</.,  for  a  default; 
of  which  he  paid  half.  In  the  same  year  he  was  fined  fifty  marks, 
^33  6s,  8i/.,  in  the  amercement  of  the  forest ;  he  paid  one  half  down 
and  the  balance  the  following  year. 

In  26  Henry  II,  Adam  son  of  Norman  and  William  son  of  Hugh 
de  Leelai  paid  200  marks,  ;^i33  6x.  8^.,  for  leave  to  marry  Adam's 
daughter  to  William's  son.  They  paid  50  marks  this  year,  50  marks 
in  27  Henry  II,  1180-1;  in  28  Henry  II,  1181-2,  William  paid  30 
marks  and  Adam  70J.;  in  29  Henry  II,  1 182-3,  William  paid  ;;^io 
and  Adam  j£s ;  in  30  Henry  II,  1 183-4,  William  paid  441.  and  Adam 
£6;  in  31  Henry  II,  William  paid  the  balance  of  221.  8^.,  and  Adam 
paid  j£s  ^^'i  leaving  a  balance  of  ;;^i3  6s,  Sd.j  which  he  paid  off 
in  34  Henry  H,  1 187-8. 

We  should  infer  from  the  large  sum  paid  that  Christiana  was  a 
considerable  heiress ;  but  it  is  difficult  to  see  why  the  King's  consent 
was  necessary,  unless  Adam  was  a  tenant  in  capite.  This  he  may  well 
have  been.' 

William  de  Lelay  witnessed  a  charter  of  his  son  Hugh  to 
Fountain's  Abbey,  No.  viii.  He  and  Hugh  witnessed  a  charter  from 
William  son  of  William  (of  Stainbum)  to  Roger  Poictevin,  No.  x. 
Both  these  related  to  land  in  Stainbum;  and  all  were  probably 
shortly  before  or  after  1200. 

•  In    1 166   Adam  son   of  Norman  and   Henry  son   of  Ypolitus  jointly  held  a 
knight's  fee  of  William  dc  Percy.     Black  Book  of  the  Exchequer. 


l6  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAV. 

The  first  dated  document  showing  any  connection  of  the  Lelays 
with  Baildon  is  the  Pipe  Roll  of  28  Henry  II,  1181-2.  The  extracts 
from  that  and  the  succeeding  Rolls  are  as  follows: — 

William  de  Lelay  owes  fifteen  marks  for  having  a  recognition 
touching  land  in  Beildon  against  John  son  of  Aissulf,  to  wit,  that  he 
(John)  had  no  right  (to  it).^ 

The  entries  in  the  rolls  for  29  and  30  Henry  II  are  similar. 

The  roll  for  31  Henry  II  gives  more  information: — 

William  de  Lelay  renders  account  of  fifteen  marks  for  having  a 
recognition  of  land  in  Beldun  which  John  son  of  Essulf  claimed 
against  him  (to  wit),  whether  the  predecessor  of  the  said  John,  who 
was  an  Englishman  {Anglicus\  and  through  whom  he  claimed  the 
land,  was  seised  thereof  on  the  day  and  year  in  which  King  Henry, 
the  grandfather  of  the  Lord  King,  was  quick  and  dead.  (He  pays) 
into  the  Treasury  five  marks,  and  owes  ten  marks. 

William  de  Leelay  renders  account  of  ten  marks  for  having  a 
recognition  of  the  land  of  Beldon,  as  annotated  in  the  Roll  for  the  past 
year.     (He  pays)  into  the  Treasury  jQ^,  and  owes  four  marks.* 

William  de  Leelay  renders  account  of  four  marks  for  having  a 
recognition  of  the  land  of  Beldon.  He  delivers  it  into  the  Treasury, 
and  is  quit.' 

This  interesting  series  of  entries  is  of  the  highest  importance. 
They  show  (i)  that  William  de  Lelay  was  in  possession  of  land  in 
Baildon  in  1181-2;  (2)  that  John  son  of  Essulf,  in  or  prior  to  that 
year,  claimed  certain  land  there  as  his  right;  (3)  that  the  nature  of 
the  action  was  what  was  known  as  the  grand  assize ;  (4)  that  William 
de  Lelay  paid  a  fee  of  fifteen  marks  (;^io)  in  order  to  have  the  case 
tried  in  a  particular  way  known  as  a  recognitio ;  (5)  that  John  claimed 
through  a  "predecessor,"  which  must  here  be  understood  to  mean 
"  ancestor,"  who  was  seised  of  the  property  on  December  ist,  1135, 
the  date  of  the  death  of  King  Henry  I,  and  (6)  that  the  said 
"  predecessor "  was  of  English  descent,  that  is,  that  he  was  not  a 
Norman. 

This,  as  I  have  already  said,  is  the  earliest  record  showing  that 
the  Lelays  had  property  in  Baildon,  but  we  have,  unfortunately, 
nothing  to  tell  us  when  or  how  they  obtained  it.  It  may  well  be 
that  Evrard  was  in  possession  as  under-tenant  at  the  time  of  Domes- 
day, or  perhaps  he  or  Hugh  his  son  married  an  heiress  or  co-heiress, 

1  Pipe  Roll,  28  Henry  II.  '^ Ibid,,  32  Henry  II. 

» Ibid.,  33  Henry  II. 


THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEV  OR  LELAY.  1 7 

and  became  possessed  of  Baildon  in  her  right.  If  the  latter  supposition 
be  the  correct  one,  then  the  dispute  with  John  fitz  Essulf  may  have 
arisen  over  the  partition  of  the  property. 

In  I20I-2,  3  John,  a  fine  was  levied  between  William  son  of  Hugh 
de  Lelay,  plaintiff,  and  Jordan  de  Sancta  Maria  and  Alice  his  wife, 
defendants,  touching  three  hundred  acres  of  wood  in  Helage  Park. 
William  quit-claims  to  Jordan  and  Alice  and  the  heirs  of  Alice.*  A 
fine  of  half  a  mark  was  paid  for  the  licence  of  concord." 

William  de  Lelay  was  living  in  the  third  year  of  King  John,  1 201-2, 
and  as  his  son  Hugh  was  old  enough  to  be  married  in  1180,  we 
may  assume  that  William  was  an  elderly  man;  he  cannot  well  have 
been  less  than  sixty  years  old,  and  was  probably  more,  at  the  date 
mentioned,  1 201-2. 

This  William  de  Lelay  began  the  extraordinary  series  of  benefactions 
to  religious  houses  which  I  have  already  set  out  at  some  length,  and 
which  was  continued  by  his  sons.  The  following  charters  must  be 
attributed  to  him,  and  are  therefore  most  probably  all  of  them  before 
1200; — No.  XXXIV  and  xxxvi  (where  he  calls  himself  "  knight ")  gifts 
to  Salley  Abbey  of  lands  in  Stainton,  Bolton  in  Bowland,  and  elsewhere 
within  his  fee ;  No.  xxxix,  confirming  his  son  Robert's  gift  in  Bolton 
to  the  same  house.  The  Stainton  here  mentioned  is  probably 
Stainton-Cotes,  now  a  farm-house,  in  the  township  of  Bank  Newton 
and  parish  of  Gargrave,  seven  miles  from  Skipton.  He  also  gave 
lands  in  Horsforth  to  Kirkstall  Abbey,  No.  liii,  and  to  the  Templars; 
the  latter  gift  consisted  of  six  bovates  of  land,  which  were  conveyed 
to  Kirkstall  by  the  Master  of  the  Templars,  No.  liv. 

His  children  were  Hugh  and  Robert.  The  Jordan  de  Lelay, 
whose  son  William  married  Margery  daughter  of  Hugh  de  Lelay,*  may 
also  have  been  a  son  of  William's. 

Hugh  son  of  William  de  Lelay  was  probably  born  before  1160; 
at  any  rate  he  was  old  enough,  as  we  have  already  seen,  to  be 
married  in  1180. 

His  benefactions  to  religious  houses  were  very  numerous.  The 
following  numbers  in  the  foregoing  list  refer  to  them : — No.  xiv, 
confirming  the  grant  of  land  in  Stainburn  by  his  daughter  Isolda  to 
Fountains ;  No.  xx,  by  which  the  Abbat  of  Fountains  re-grants  to  him 
certain  rights  of  pasture ;  No.  xxxviii,  granting  to  Salley  Abbey  land 


*  Feet  of  Fines,  Yorks.,  John,  No.  40. 
^G)ram  Rege,  John,  No.  10,  m.  i. 

*  Dodsworth  MSS.,  viii,  fo.  103.     See  Pedigree. 


t8  the  family  of  leathley  or  lelay. 

between  Askwith  and  Weston,  and  confirming  a  grant  of  land  in 
Rinimington  by  Christiana  de  Pathorn  (this  was  probably  a  grant  by 
the  lady  who  afterwards  became  his  wife,  made  before  her  marriage), 
and  confirming  land  in  Farnley  (Otley),  Gasgill,  Stainton  and  Rim- 
mington,  given  by  his  brother  Robert ;  No.  xliv,  granting  the  church 
of  Weston  to  S.  Peter's  at  York ;  No.  xlix,  confirming  the  grants  of 
land  in  Appleton  by  his  brother  Robert  and  Ralph  de  Bray  to  S.  Peter's; 
No.  LV,  relating  to  a  grant  of  land  in  Horsforth  to  Kirkstall ; 
No.  Lvi,  granting  a  tenement  in  Micklegate,  York,  to  Kirkstall; 
No.  LVI  I,  granting  land  in  Leathley  to  S.  Peter's,  afterwards  S.  Leonard's, 
Hospital,  at  York ;  No.  lxii,  granting  half  the  mills  of  Leathley  and 
lands  there  to  the  same  house ;  No.  lxv,  granting  the  church  of 
Leathley,  so  far  as  it  belonged  to  him,  to  Helaugh  Park  Priory ;  No.  lxvi, 
granting  land  in  Leathley,  and  No.  lxvii,  granting  a  rent  in  Castley 
to  the  same  house ;  No.  lxx,  confirming  a  grant  by  his  daughter 
Isolda  of  land  in  Castley  to  Nun  Appleton  Priory;  and  No.  lxxi, 
granting  land  in  Rodes  in  Menston  to  Bolton  Priory ;  No.  xxxiii, 
granting  services  in  Castley  to  Fountains. 

Passing  over  for  a  moment  his  dealings  with  Baildon,  the  following 
notes  record  all  I  have  been  able  to  find  about  him,  except  numerous 
undated  charters  witnessed  by  him.  He  and  Robert  his  brother 
witnessed  a  charter  from  Jordan  de  Sancta  Maria  and  Alice  his  wife 
to  Helaugh  Park.  He  and  his  father  witnessed  the  charter  of 
William  son  of  William  (de  Stainburn)  to  Roger  Poitevin  relating  to 
Stainburn,  which  will  be  referred  to  hereafter. 

Of  dated  documents,  the  earhest  is  in  5  John,  1 203-4,  when  Hugh 
paid  fifteen  marks  for  a  concealment.^  This  probably  had  something 
to  do  with  his  father's  death,  which  happened  about  that  time.  In 
the  same  roll  it  is  recorded  that  Hugh  de  Witon  owed  twenty  shillings 
for  having  an  inquisition  of  lawful  men  whether  Hugh  de  Lelay  and 
William  son  of  Herbert  had  appealed  him  through  hate  or  for  some 
other  cause.'^  A  fine  was  levied  in  Easter  Term,  6  John,  1205,  between 
Walter  de  Faucunberge,  plaintiff,  and  Hugh  de  Lelay,  defendant, 
touching  three  and  a  half  carucates  of  land  in  Apeltone,  which  Hugh 
admits  to  be  the  right  of  Walter.  Walter  grants  the  same  to  Hugh 
and  his  heirs,  to  hold  of  Walter  and  his  heirs  by  the  services  due 
from  twenty-two  and  a  lialf  bovates  of  land,  where  fourteen  carucates 
make  a  knight's  fee,  excepting  out  of  the  said  grant  two  bovates  which 
William  son  of  John  held,  two  bovates  which  John  son  of  John  held, 

1  Pipe  Roll.  2  Pipe  Roll,  5  John,  m.  i6d. 


THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY.  I9 

and  one  and  a  half  bovates  which  AVilliam  de  Capella  heldJ  There 
had  been  some  legal  proceedings  about  this  property,  which  Falconburg 
claimed  as  his  right.'  A  fine  was  levied  in  Michaelmas  Term,  lo  John, 
1208,  between  Hugh  de  Lelay  and  Christiana  his  wife,  plaintiffs,  and 
Alan  de  CoUum,  defendant,  touching  four  carucates  of  land  in 
Lofthus  and  five  bovates  of  land  in  Brakenholm,  concerning  which  a 
recognition  of  great  assize  had  been  summoned  between  them.  Alan 
admits  the  land  to  be  the  right  of  Christiana,  and  releases  and  quit- 
claims all  his  right  to  Hugh  and  Christiana  and  the  heirs  of  the 
latter  for  ever.  For  this  they  have  given  him  twenty  marks  of  silver.^ 
This  probably  related  to  some  of  Christiana's  property,  which  must 
have  been  very  considerable. 

In  1 221  (see  charter  No.  xliv,  ante)^  Hugh  gave  the  church  of 
Weston  to  S.  Peter's  at  York,  I  cannot  say  how  the  Lelays  became 
possessed  of  their  Weston  property.  Weston,  like  Baildon,  and  several 
other  places  where  the  Lelays  had  lands,  had  formed  part  of  the 
Archbishop's  Domesday  manor  of  Otley. 

In  Trinity  Term,  8  Henry  III,  1224,  Robert  de  Percy  complained 
of  Henry  de  Percy,  Walter  de  Percy,  Hugh  de  Lillay,  Richard  de 
Lutrington,  Robert  de  Plumton,  Mathew  de  Brame,  and  others,  for 
robbery  and  breach  of  the  peace.  None  of  them  came.  Among  their 
manucaptors  were  Thomas  fil.  Ralph  de  Plumton,  Mauger  de  Plumton, 
Roger  Blundus,  Gilbert  fil.  Norman,  William  de  Stiveton,  William  de 
Plumton,  William  fil.  Mathew  (?  de  Brame),  Walter  fil.  Mathew 
(?  de  Brame).*  This  note  may  possibly  refer  to  Hugh's  son  of  the 
same  name. 

Hugh  de  Lelei  was  Bailiff  of  the  West  Riding,  probably  in  King 
John's  reign.  In  that  capacity  he  witnessed  an  undated  charter  of 
William  son  of  Michael  de  Brest^visel  granting  common  of  pasture  in 
I)enby  to  Byland  Abbey ;  the  grantor  covenanted  not  to  make  more 
meadow  in  the  common  [fields]  than  there  was  in  the  time  of  King 
Richard ;  stated  to  be  for  the  safety  of  his  soul,  and  in  consideration 
of  fivt  marks  of  silver  which  the  monks  gave  him  (/>.  William)  in 
his  great  necessity.* 

We  must  now  consider  Hugh's  dealings  with  Baildon,  which,  though 
few,  had  a  far-reaching  effect  on  the  history  of  the  manor. 

*  Feet  of  Fines,  York,  6-16  John,  No.  2. 
■Coram  Rege,  John,  No.  65,  m.  12. 

«  Feet  of  Fines,  York,  6-16  John,  No.  80. 

*  Curia  Regis,  No.  86,  m.  2. 
»A<1d.  M.S.,  18388,  fo.  I. 


20  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY. 

At  the  time  of  the  Domesday  Survey,  we  find  that  Baildon  was 
divided  into  two  parts,  not  then  called  manors,  though  they  subse- 
quently became  so.  One  of  these  portions  was  parcel  of  the 
Archbishop's  manor  of  Otley,  the  other  belonged  to  Ernis  de  Burun's 
manor  of  Bingley.  Hugh  de  Lelay,  as  will  be  seen  presently,  held 
both  these  moieties. 

One  moiety,  it  is  doubtful  which,  he  dealt  with  by  the  following 
deed,  which  was  copied  by  Dodsworth  from  Sir  Thomas  Metham's 
evidences.  Presumably  it  got  into  the  possession  of  the  Methams 
through  the  marriage  of  Sir  Thomas  de  Metham  wMth  Elizabeth, 
daughter  and  eventually  heiress  of  Sir  Miles  de  Stapelton  of 
Haddlesey,  circa  1370.  Adam  de  Nereford,  Isolda's  grandson  by  her 
second  husband,  sold  his  Baildon  property  to  John  de  Stapelton 
in   1316.^ 

Ego,  Hugo  de  Lelai,  dedi  Rogero  Pictaviensi  et  Isoude,  filie  mee, 
uxori  sue,  totam  medietatem  ville  de  Baildon,  tam  in  dominicis  quam 
in  serviciis,  cum  omnibus  hominibus  eiusdem  terre,  pro  faciendo 
forinsecum  servicium  quantum  pertinet  ad  duas  carucatas  terre  unde 
xxvij  carucate  terre  faciunt  feodum  unius  miHtis.  Testibus,  Roberto 
Vavasore,  Malgero  Vavasore,  Simone  de  Monte  alto,  etc.^ 

Translation, 
I,  Hugh  de  Lelay,  have  given  to  Roger  Poitevin  and  Isolda  my 
daughter,  his  wife,  the  whole  half  of  the  ville  of  Baildon,  as  well  in 
demesnes  as  in  services,  with  all  the  men  of  the  same  land,  they 
doing  the  forinsec  service  as  much  as  belongs  to  two  carucates  of 
land  where  twenty-seven  carucates  of  land  make  a  knight's  fee. 

The  other  moiety  he  appears  to  have  given  to  his  son  William, 
though  the  deed  evidencing  the  grant  has  not  been  preserved. 

At  some  time  subsequent  to  these  gifts  to  his  children,  Hugh 
gave  first  one  half,  and  then  the  whole,  of  his  Baildon  estate  to 
S.  Peter's  at  York,  as  is  shown  by  the  two  following  charters. 

Omnibus  ad  quos  presentes  littere  pervenerint,  Hugo  de  Lelai 
eternam  salutem  in  Domino.  Noverit  universitas  vestra  me,  divini 
amoris  intuitu,  et  pro  animabus  omnium  antecessorum  et  successorum 
meorum,  et  pro  anima  Christiane  uxoris  mee,  contulisse  Deo  et 
Ecclesie  Sancti  Petri  et  Canonicis  ibidem  Deo  servienlibus,  medietatem 
ville   de   Baildon,  cum  capitali  mesagio  et  omnibus  pertinenciis  suis 


^  See  the  Stapeltons  of  Yorkshire,  by  H.  E.  Chetwynd-Stapylton,  pp.  54,  78. 
^  Dodsworlh  MSS.,  cxxiv,  fo.  57. 


THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY.  21 

sine  aliquo  retinemento,  in  liberam  puram  et  perpetuam  elemosinam 
ct  quietam  ab  omni  exactione  et  consuetudine  et  servicio  seculari. 
Et  ego,  pro  me  et  heredibus  meis,  juravi  super  Altare  Sancti  Petri 
quod  ego  et  heredes  mei  prefatam  elemosinam  dicte  Ecclesie  contra 
omnes  homines  warantizabimus  et  defendemus  imperpetuum,  sicut 
puram  elemosinam.  Et  in  hujus  rei  testimonium,  presentem  cartam, 
sigillo  meo  signatam,  super  Altare  Sancti  Petri  optuli.  Hiis  testibus, 
Hamone  Thesaurario  Eboracensi,  Johanne  Cancellario,  Magistro 
Johanne  Romano,  Magistro  Nicholao,  Petro  de  Capella,  Gilbert©  de 
Malapalude,  Ricardo  Capellano,  Johanne  de  Thoueton,  clerico,  Matheo 
de  Malapalude,  Alano  fratre  ejus,  David,  Ricardo  clerico  Magistri 
Johannis  Romani,  Elia  Pulain,  Adam  Biscop,  Waltero  de  Revest', 
Willelmo  de  Tumba,  et  multis  aliis,' 

Translation, 
Xo  all  to  whom  these  present  letters  shall  come,  Hugh  de  Lelai, 
greeting  eternal  in  the  Lord:  Let  the  universe  know  that  I,  moved 
by  divine  love,  and  for  the  souls  of  all  my  ancestors  and  successors, 
and  for  the  soul  of  Christiana  my  wife,  have  given  to  God  and  the 
Church  of  S.  Peter,  and  the  Canons  there  serving  God,  half  the  ville  of 
Baildon,  with  the  capital  messuage,  and  all  its  appurtenances,  without 
any  retention,  in  free,  pure  and  perpetual  alms,  and  quit  of  all 
exaction  and  custom  and  secular  service :  And  I,  for  myself  and  my 
heirs,  have  sworn  on  the  Altar  of  S.  Peter  for  myself  and  my  heirs 
that  we  will  warrant  and  defend  the  said  alms  to  the  said  church,  as 
pure  alms,  against  all  men :  In  witness  whereof  I  have  offered  this 
present  charter,  sealed  with  my  seal,  upon  the  Altar  of  S.  Peter.  These 
being  witnesses,  Hamo  the  Treasurer  of  York,  John  the  Chancellor, 
Master  John  Romanus,  Master  Nicholas,  Peter  of  the  Chapel,  Gilbert 
de  Mala  palude,  Richard  the  Chaplain,  John  de  Thoueton  clerk, 
Mathew  de  Mala  palude,  Alan  his  brother,  David,  Richard  the  Clerk 
of  Master  J.  Romanus,  Elias  Pulain,  Adam  Biscop,  Walter  de 
Reuester',  William  de  Tumba,  and  many  others. 

This  was  followed,  judging  from  the  witnesses,  almost  imme- 
diately, by  another  charter  granting  the  whole  ville, 

Universis  sancti  matris  Ecclesie  filiis  ad  quos  presens  scriptum 
pervenerit,  Hugo  de  Ixjlai  eternam  in  Domino  salutem.  Noverit 
universitas  vestra  me  divini  amoris  intuitu,  et  pro  animabus  omnium 
antecessorum  et  successorum  meorum  et  pro  anima  Christiane  uxoris 

'  Register  of  S.  Peter's,  York,  Cotton.  MS.  Claudius  B.  Ill,  fo.  62^. 


22  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY. 

mee,  contulisse  Deo  et  Ecclesie  Sancti  Petri  Eboracensis  et  Canonicis 
ibidem  Deo  servientibus,  totam  villam  de  Baildon,  cum  capitali 
mesagio  et  cum  omnibus  aliis  pertinenciis  suis  sine  aliquo  retine- 
mento,  in  puram  liberam  et  perpetuam  elemosinam,  et  quietam  ab 
omni  exactione  et  consuetudine  seculari.  Et  ego,  pro  me  et  heredibus 
meis,  juravi  super  Altare  Sancti  Petri  quod  ego  et  heredes  mei 
elemosinam  dicte  ville  contra  omnes  homines  warantizabimus  et 
defendemus  imperpetuum,  sicut  puram  elemosinam,  et  omne  forinsecum 
servicium,  quantum  ad  predictam  villam  de  Baildon  pertinet,  ex  aliis 
terris  meis  adquietabo.  Et  in  hujus  rei  testimonium,  presentem 
cartam,  sigillo  meo  signatam,  super  Altare  Sancti  Petri  optuli.  Hiis 
testibus,  Hamone  Thesaurario,  Johanne  Cancellario,  Magistro  Johanne 
Romano,  Petro  de  Capella,  Nicholao,  Gilberto,  Ricardo,  capellanis, 
Johanne  de  Taueton,  clerico,  Matheo  de  Malapalude,  Alano  fratre 
ejus,  David,  Ricardo  clerico,  Elia  Pulain,  Adam  Biscop,  Waltero  de 
Revestiar',  Willelmo  de  Tumba,  et  multis  aliis.^ 

Translation, 

To  all  the  sons  of  Holy  Mother  Church  to  whom  this  present 
writing  shall  come,  Hugh  de  Lelai,  greeting  eternal  in  the  Lord : 
Let  the  universe  know  that  I,  moved  by  divine  love,  and  for  the  souls 
of  all  my  ancestors  and  successors,  and  for  the  soul  of  Christiana  my 
wife,  have  given  to  God  and  the  Church  of  S.  Peter  of  York,  and  the 
Canons  there  serving  God,  the  whole  ville  of  Baildon,  with  the  capital 
messuage,  and  all  other  appurtenances,  without  any  retention,  in  pure, 
free  and  perpetual  alms,  and  quit  from  all  secular  exaction  and  custom : 
And  I,  for  myself  and  my  heirs,  have  sworn  on  the  Altar  of  S.  Peter 
that  I  and  my  heirs  will  warrant  and  for  ever  defend,  as  pure  alms,  the 
alms  of  the  said  ville,  against  all  men,  and  I  will  discharge  all  forinsec 
service  as  much  as  pertains  to  the  said  ville  of  Baildon  out  of  my 
other  lands :  In  witness  whereof  I  have  offered  this  present  charter, 
sealed  with  my  seal,  upon  the  Altar  of  S.  Peter  :  These  being  witnesses, 
Hamo  the  Treasurer  of  York,  John  the  Chancellor,  Master  John 
Romanus,  Peter  of  the  Chapel,  Nicholas,  Gilbert  and  Richard,  chaplains, 
John  de  Taueton,  clerk,  Matthew  de  Mala  palude,  Alan  his  brother, 
David,  Richard  the  Clerk,  Elias  Pulain,  Adam  Biscop,  AValter  de 
Revestiar',  William  de  Tumba,  and  many  others. 

By  these  two  documents  Hugh  de  Lelay  parted  with  the  whole  of 
his  interest  in  Baildon,  so  that  the  estates  which  he  gave  to  two  of 
his  children  {see  ante)  must  have  been  granted  previously.     The  first 


1  Cotton.  MS.  Claudius  B.  Ill,  fo.  63. 


THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY.  23 

charter,  there  can  be  little  doubt,  refers  to  the  Bingley  manor;  the 
Otley  manor  being  already  held  of  the  Archbishops.  Then  the  second 
charter  passed  all  Hugh's  remaining  interest,  so  that  the  Archbishop 
stepped,  as  it  were,  into  Hugh's  shoes,  and  became  the  immediate 
landlord  of  all  Hugh's  tenants.  Thus  those  who  formerly  held  of 
Hugh,  now  held  of  the  Archbishop. 

Now  as  to  the  date  of  these  two  documents.  The  name  of  the 
Archbishop  is  unfortunately  not  mentioned,  so  that  our  only  guide  is 
the  names  of  the  witnesses.  Happily  some  of  these  are  officials  whose 
dates  arc  pretty  well  known.  Hamo  the  Treasurer  is  the  first  witness 
to  each  charter;  he  was  Treasurer  in  1204  and  121 5,  and  presumably 
between  those  dates.^  John  the  Chancellor,  the  second  witness  to 
each  charter,  filled  that  office  in  1195  and  1199,  and  is  almost 
certainly  identical  with  John  de  S.  Laurence,  who  was  Chancellor  in 
1201.  Both  these  witnesses'  names  appear  on  a  charter  of  Simon, 
Dean  of  York,  dated  1206.  The  reference  to  the  soul  of  his  wife 
implies  that  she  was  dead,  and  as  she  was  living  in  1208,''  the 
charters  must  be  after  that  date,  while  the  dates  of  the  various 
witnesses  show  that  it  cannot  have  been  much  later.  We  shall 
therefore  probably  be  not  far  wrong  if  we  assign  these  two  Baildon 
charters  to  somewhere  about  the  year  12 10. 

In  1332,  King  Edward  III  confirmed  all  grants  and  concessions 
heretofore  by  various  donors  made  to  the  Abbey  of  Rievaulx.  Amongst 
them  was  the  gift  which  Hugh  son  of  William  de  Lethelai  made  of 
that  meadow,  with  the  appurtenances,  in  Baildona,  which  is  near  the 
beck  {sik€tium\  on  the  southern  side  of  the  said  beck.' 

In  the  absence  of  witnesses  it  is  impossible  to  fix  the  date  of 
this  grant,  even  approximately ;  all  we  can  safely  say  is,  that  it  must 
be  earlier  than  the  grant  to  S.  Peter's  circa  12 10. 

Hugh's  wife,  as  we  have  already  seen,  was  Christiana,  daughter  of 
Adam  son  of  Norman  of  Rimmington  and  elsewhere  in  Craven.  She 
had  a  considerable  amount  of  property.  Stainburn  possibly  belonged 
to  her,  since,  in  charter  No.  viii  above,  Hugh  mentions  that  she  con- 
sented to  his  settling  property  there  on  their  daughter  Isolda.  The 
Rimmington  property  must  also  have  been  hers,  if,  as  seems  clear,  the 
Christiana  de  Paihorn,  whose  grant  of  land  in  Rimmington  Hugh  de 
Lelay  confirmed,  is  identical  with  the  Christiana  afterwards  his  wife 
(charter  No.  xxxviii).     She  was  living  in  1208.^ 


»  Willis's  Survey.  ^  AnU,  p.  19. 

^  Patent  Roll,  6  Edward  III,  part  2,  m.  23. 


24  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY. 

There  is  some  evidence  that  Hugh  survived  Christiana  and  married 
a  second  wife,  named  Emma.  In  an  undated  charter,  No.  lxiii, 
by  which  she  confirmed  all  her  husband's  gifts  to  S.  Leonard's 
Hospital  at  York,  she  calls  herself  Emma  Darrell,  late  wife  of  Hugh 
de  Lelay;  but  whether  Darrell  was  her  maiden  name  or  that  of  a 
second  husband,  there  is   nothing  to  show. 

Hugh's  children  will  be  seen  in  the  pedigree. 

He  seems  to  have  divided  up  his  property  among  them,  to  some 
extent  in  his  lifetime. 

Adam,  the  heir,  had  Leathley  and  property  at  Rigton,  Castley, 
Rimmington,  Steeton  and  Hackenby. 

Hugh  had  property  at  Burley,  Bolton  in  BowlaHd,  Weston,  Rigton 
and  Castley. 

Roger  had  property  at  Leathley  and  Bramhope. 

William  had  half  Baildon. 

Isolda  had  half  Baildon,  Stainburn,  and  probably  property  at 
Castley. 

Robert  de  Lelay,  son  of  William  and  brother  of  the  last  mentioned 
Hugh,  was  probably  younger  than  Hugh,  and  like  him  was  a  great 
benefactor  to  religious  houses.  His  charters  in  the  foregoing  list  are 
Nos.  XXII,  XXIII,  relating  to  Stainburn ;  xxxvii,  xxxviii,  xxxix,  xl, 

XLI,     XLII,     XLIII,     XLVI,     XLVII,     XLVIII,      L,      LXIV,    LXVIII,    and     LXIX, 

relating  to  lands  in  Farnley  (Otley),  Bolton-in-Bowland,  Ravens- 
berthV  Hackenby,  Tadcaster,  Nun  Appleton,  and  Steeton,  given  to 
Fountains  Abbey,  Salley  Abbey,  S.  Peter's,  York,  and  Helaugh  Park 
Priory.  He  nowhere  mentions  a  wife,  and  there  is  no  record  of  any 
children.     A  drawing  o(  his  seal  will  be  found  on  the  pedigree. 

He  witnessed  his  brother  Hugh's  gift  of  Weston  Church  to 
S.  Peter's  in  1221.     (No.  xliv.) 

In  Easter  Term,  1 246,  William  son  of  William  claimed  against  W.' 
Archbishop  of  York  six  bovates  of  land  in  Famelay  as  his  right, 
in  which  the  defendant  has  no  entry  save  through  Robert  de  Lelay, 
to  whom  William  de  Farnelay,  the  plaintiff's  father  (whose  heir  he 
is)  demised  that  land  for  a  term  which  is  ended.  The  Archbishop 
defended,  and  said  that  he  did  not  hold  all  the  said  six  bovates, 
for  Thomas  son  of  Alan  holds  one  and  Ralph  Kempe  holds  two. 
Judgment  for  the   defendant;    the  plaintiff  may  have  another  writ.' 


•  I  cannot  identify  this  place. 
*  Walter  Gray.  J*  Assize  Roll,  No.  1045,  m.  33//. 


THE    FAMILY   OF   LEATHLF.Y   OR    LELAY.  25 

In  1 25 1,  William  son  of  William  claimed  two  and  a  half  acres  of  land 
in  Farley  {sic,  i.e.  Famley)  as  his  right  against  t^aulin  son  of  Roger, 
in  which  Paulin  had  no  entry  save  through  Roger  le  Ryche  and 
Robert  de  Lelay;  to  whom  William  son  of  Serlo  (whose  son  and  heir 
is  the  plaintiff)  demised  the  same  for  a  term  of  years  now  ended, 
namely,  from  year  to  year  at  his  will.  The  defendant  admitted  that 
his  entry  was  through  Roger  le  Ryche  his  father,  and  that  Roger's 
entry  was  through  Robert  de  Lelay,  but  said  that  Lelay 's  entry  was 
not  through  William  son  of  Serlo,  but  through  Richard  de  Scotton, 
who  was  enfeoffed  of  the  land  by  William  son  of  Serlo.  The  plaintiff 
paid  half  a  mark  for  an  enquiry ;  pledge,  Robert  de  Pouele.  After- 
wards they  agreed  that  Paulin  and  his  heirs  should  hold  the  land  of 
William  and  his  heirs,  paying  twopence  a  year  for  all  services.* 

Adam  de  Lelay,  the  eldest  son  and  heir  of  Hugh  and  Christiana, 
was  probably  born  soon  after  1180.  Very  little  is  recorded  of  him. 
He  did  not  apparently  give  any  property  to  the  monasteries.  No 
doubt  he  thought  that  his  inheritance  had  been  already  sufficiently 
diminished  by  such  gifts. 

He  released  his  claim  to  half  the  mill  of  Rigton  to  his  brother 
Hugh ;  charter  No.  i.     He  had  two  sons,  Adam  and  William. 

Adam  de  Lelay,  son  and  heir  of  Adam,  is  mentioned  in  Dods- 
worth's  pedigree.  He  conveyed  the  manor  of  Leathley  to  Henry 
de  Percy,  as  will  be  seen  from  the  following  charter: — 

I,  Adam  son  and  heir  of  Adam  de  Lelay,  for  a  certain  sum  of 
money,  have  quit-claimed  to  Sir  Henry  de  Percy  all  my  right  in 
Lelay,  with  its  appurtenances,  Castelay,  with  its  appurtenances, 
Reminton,  with  its  appurtenances,  Stiveton,  with  its  appurtenances, 
and  Hageneby,  etc.* 

Some  legal  proceedings  long  afterwards  throw  further  light  on  the 
transaction. 

In  1297  Henry  de  Percy  sued  the  Prior  of  Helaugh  Park  to  permit 
him  to  present  a  parson  to  a  moiety  of  the  church  of  Leathley.  He 
says  that  Hugh  de  Letheley  held  the  manor  of  Leatheley  (to  which 
the  advowson  belongs),  and  presented  the  last  clerk,  one  Robert, 
who  is  now  dead.  Hugh  demised  to  Richard  de  Loderyngton  for 
life,  and  he  assigned  his  interest  to  Henry  de  Percy,  the  plaintiff's 
father,  whose    heir  is    the    plaintiff.     From    Hugh   de   Letheley   the 


•  Assize  Roll,  1046,  35  ami  36  Henry  III,  m.  57. 
«  Dodsvvorth  MS.  74,  fo.  2. 


26  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHI.EY  OR  LELAY. 

manor  descended  to  his  son  and  heir,  Adam,  and  then  to  Adam's 
son  and  heir,  another  Adam.  This  last  Adam  de  Letheley 
released  all  his  right  and  claim  to  the  said  manor  to  the  said 
Henry  de  Percy,  the  plaintiff's  father,  and  from  him  it  descended 
to  John  de  Percy  as  son  and  heir,  and  from  John,  who  died  without 
issue,  to  Henry,  the  plaintiff,  as  brother  and  heir.  The  Prior  says 
that  Prior  Henry,  his  predecessor,  presented  the  last  clerk,  whose 
name  was  Walter.     Jury.^ 

As  Hugh  de  Lelay  had  given  the  church  to  Helaugh  Park,  see 
charter  No.  lxv,  it  seems  probable  that  Percy's  claim  was  unsuccessful. 

Adam  also  confirmed  to  Kirkstall  Abbey  all  gifts  of  his  ancestors 
in  Bramhope  (charter  lii). 

Nothing  is  known  of  any  descendants.  An  Adam  de  Lethlay, 
chaplain,  was  fined  6s,  Sd.  for  a  trespass  done  to  Agnes  wife  of 
Robert  Stapel  at  Flasby  in  1348,*  who  may  possibly  have  been  a 
grandson. 

William  de  Lelay,  second  son  of  Adam,  by  an  undated  charter, 
released  all  his  right  in  a  certain  tenement  in  Leathley  to  Henry  de 
Percy,  his  Ix)rd.' 

Hugh  de  Lelay  seems  to  have  been  the  second  son  of  Hugh 
and  Christiana,  though  Dodsworth  puts  him  third. 

His  charters  are  fairly  numerous.  By  No.  11  he  grants  to  Fountains 
Abbey  half  the  mill  of  Rigton,  which  his  brother  Adam  released 
to  him  by  charter  No.  i.  Nos.  in,  iv,  v,  vi  and  vii  also  relate 
to  lands  at  Rigton,  the  last  one  being  dated  1248. 

No.  XXXV  is  a  confirmation  charter  to  Salley  Abbey,  No.  xlv  to 
S.  Peter's,  York. 

In  1225,  Hugh  son  of  Hugh  de  Lelay  brought  an  assize  con- 
cerning lands  in  Burgl'  (Burley)  against  Brian  de  Insula.  It  was 
adjourned  to  the  next  eyre  because  Brian  was  engaged  on  the 
King's  service  in  the  perambulation  of  the  forests.*  I  have  not 
found  any  further  reference  to  the  matter. 

A  fine  was  levied  in  Trinity  Term,  15  Henry  III,  1231,  between 
Agnes  de  Huuerholm,  plaintiff,  and  Hugh  de  Leleg',  whom  Richard 
de  Bothilton  vouched   to  warranty,  touching   four   bovates  and   forty 


^De  Banco,  Hil.  24  Edward  I,  No.  113,  m.  117;  idt'd.  East.  Edward  I,  No.  114, 
m.  844/. 

^  Coram  Rege,  Mich.  22  Edward  III,  Fine  Roll  7. 

•^  Dodsworth  MS.  74,  fo.  3. 

*  Close  Roll,  9  Henry  III,  m.  lOr/. 


THE    FAMILY   OF   LEATHLEY    OR    LELAY.  2^ 

acres  of  land  in  Bothilton  ;*  and  between  Agnes,  plaintiff,  and  Hugh, 
whom  Henry  de  Blackburn  vouched  to  warranty,  touching  eight 
acres  of  land  in  Bothilton;  and  between  Agnes,  plaintiff,  and  Hugh, 
whom  William  fiL  Richard  vouched  to  warranty,  touching  two  acres 
of  land  in  Bothilton ;  and  between  Agnes,  plaintiff,'  and  Hugh,  whom 
Richard  de  Bothilton  vouched  to  warranty,  touching  seven  acres  of 
land  in  Bothilton ;  all  which  lands  Agnes  first  claimed  against 
Stephen,  Abbat  of  Salleg'.  Alice  for  herself  and  her  heirs  releases 
to  Hugh,  and  to  Richard,  Henry  and  William,  and  their  heirs,  and 
to  the  Abbat  and  his  successors,  for  which  Hugh  gave  her  five 
marks  of  silver.^ 

In  Easter  Term,  30  Henry  HI,  1246,  Hugh  de  Lelay  complained 
that  Jeremiah  le  Maunsel  had  unjustly  obstructed  a  certain  road  in 
Burghelay  thereby  damaging  Hugh's  free  tenement  in  Weston.  The 
jury  found  that  the  obstruction  had  been  made  unjustly  and  without 
a  judgment  of  any  court,  and  that  Hugh's  property  was  damaged 
to  the  amount  of  half  a  mark.     The  obstruction  was  to  be  removed.' 

At  the  same  assize  the  Prioress  of  (Nun)  Appleton  sued  Hugh  de 
Lelay  to  exonerate  her  from  the  services  which  Richard  de  Lutrington 
required  from  her  for  the  free  tenement,  viz.: — ^a  carucate  of  land, 
which  she  holds  of  Hugh  in  Castelay  in  frank-almoign.  Hugh  is 
bound  to  acquit  her  of  all  service,  whereas  Richard  has  distrained 
for  scutage,  suit  of  court,  and  other  services.  She  claims  j£s 
damages.  Hugh  admits  the  truth  of  all  this,  and  agrees  to  judgment : 
damages,  twenty  shillings;    pledge,  Alan  de  C^sterton.* 

At  the  same  assize  Richard  de  Benteley  claimed  against  Hugh 
de  Lelay  ten  tofts  and  three  bovates  of  land  (less  one  acre)  in 
Luterington,  of  which  Cecily  de  Luterington  (whose  kinsman  and 
heir  Richard  is)  was  seised  in  demesne  the  day  that  she  died. 
Hugh  vouched  to  warranty  Richard  de  Luterington,  who  warranted  to 
him  and  vouched  to  warranty  Master  Robert  the  Treasurer  of  York, 
but  was  not  able  to  show  why  he  should  warrant.     License  of  concord.^ 

Hugh  seems  to  have  sold  his  Weston  property  to  Robert  de 
Stopham  sometime  before  1249,  ^^^  ^^^^^  '246  (see  above). 

^  Bolton-in-Bowland. 

2  Feet  of  Fines,  York,  15  Henry  III,  No.  20. 

»  Assize  Roll,  No.  1045,  m.  2. 

*  /did.   m.  6t/. 

^  Ibid.  m.  28. 


28  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY. 

In  1 249-50,  the  keepers  of  the  Jews'  chest  at  York  are  commanded 
to  take  out  of  it  a  charter  of  Hugh  de  Lelay,  which  is  there  as 
a  pledge  to  the  Jews,  the  security  being  lands  in  Weston,  which 
Robert  de  Stopham  has  bought  from  Hugh.  They  are  to  deliver 
up  the  said  charter  to  the  bearer  of  these  letters  on  behalf  of 
Stopham.* 

Hugh  appears  to  have  married  a  widow  with  a  daughter. 

In  1247  Hugh  de  Lelay  and  Anna  his  wife  were  summoned  to 
answer  Richard  le  Maunsel,  who  claimed  that  they  should  hold  to  an 
agreement  made  between  them  concerning  the  manor  of  Methelegh, 
with  the  appurtenances.  Richard  says  that  they  agreed  to  give  him 
the  said  manor  with  Anna,  daughter  of  the  said  Anna,  in  [frank] 
marriage,  and  now  refuse  to  do  so.  Hugh  and  Anna  came,  and  the 
matter  was  adjourned  to  Hilary  Term." 

There  is  no  positive  evidence  that  this  Hugh  de  Lelay  had 
any  sons.  Charter  No.  li  suggests  that  he  may  have  had  a  son 
Hugh,  but  it  is  not  very  clear,  and  if  so,  Hugh  the  son  must  have 
died  young.  At  any  rate,  nothing  further  is  known  about  him. 
Hugh  seems  to  have  had  two  daughters,  Margery  and  Alice,  both 
of  whom  had  some  property  at  Leathley,  but  what  or  how  does 
not  appear.  The  former,  Margery,  married  William  son  of  Jordan 
de  Lelay,  and  Alice  married  William  Saracen  of  York;  see  charters 
Nos.  LX  and   Lxi,  the   latter  of  which   is   dated  1258. 

Of  William  Saracen  and  his  wife  I  know  nothing  further,  nor 
can  I  say  who  William  son  of  Jordan  de  Lelay  may  have  been, 
unless  as  has  been  previously  suggested,  he  was  a  grandson  of  the 
first  William  de  Lelaiy  (an fe  p.  17).  He  and  his  brother  Walter  are 
mentioned  in  1278.*  A  William  son  of  Jordan  de  Letheley  was 
living  in  1329,^  but  this  must  be  a  different  person.  Walter  de 
Leathley  above-mentioned,  brother  of  William,  was  probably  settled 
at  Carlton  near  Otley.  By  a  charter,  apparently  granted  in  the  last 
quarter  of  the  thirteenth  century,  Rametta  daughter  of  Walter  de 
Laleye  of  Karletun,  gives  to  S.  Leonard's  Hospital,  York,  an  acre  of 
meadow  in  the  territory  of  Bramhope,  which  she  had  by  the  gift 
of  Ralph   her   brother." 


1  Close  Roll,  34  Henry  III,  m.  8. 

2  Assize  Roll,  No.  81,  m.  ii  (13). 
8  Assize  Roll,  N-1-4,  3,  m.  56. 

*Dc  Banco,  Mich.  3  Edward  III,  m.  107. 
sRawlinson  MSS.,  Bodleian,  B  455,  fo.  5^/. 


THE    FAMILY   OF   LFATHI.EY   OR    LELAY.  29 

Roger  de  Lelay,  son  of  Hugh  and  Christiana,  was  probably  the 
third  son,  though    Dodsworth   puts   him    in   the   second   place. 

He  gave  land  at  Bramhope^  to  Kirkstall  Abbey  (charter  li), 
and  half  the  mills  of  Leathley  to  S.  Leonard's  Hospital,  York 
(charter  lviii). 

This  last  gift  was  confirmed  by  Agnes  his  widow,  in  42  Henry  HI, 
1257-8  (charter  lix). 

William  de  Lelay,  the  fourth  son  of  Hugh  and  Christiana,  is 
mentioned  in  Dodsworth's  pedigree,  where  it  is  stated  hahiiit  terras 
in  Baildon.  The  following  deed,  copied  by  Roger  Dodsworth  from 
the  evidences  of  Sir  Edward  Plumpton  on  the  27th  of  February,  1633, 
relates  to  this  property: — 

Willelmus  filius  Hugonis  de  Lelay  dedit  Nigello  de  Plumptone  et 
heredibus  suis  firmacionem  stagni  de  molendino  suo  de  Hidle  in 
terra  mea  de  Baildona,  reddendo  xij  denarios  annuatim,  etc.  Testibus, 
Nigello  filio  Radulfi  de  Stokeld,  Hugone  filio  Ypoliti,  Roberto  de 
Plumpton.     Carta  27.^ 

Translation, 

I,  William  son  of  Hugh  de  Lelay,  have  given  permission  to  Nigel 
de  Plumpton  and  his  heirs  to  fix  the  dam  of  his  mill  of  Idle  on 
my  land  of  Baildon,  paying  1 2d,  yearly. 

Dodsworth  added  in  a  marginal  note  that  Hugh  son  of  Hippolite 
was  living  in  the  fifth  year  of  Richard  I,  11 93-4,  and  in  the  eighth 
year  of  John,  1206-7.  Nigel  de  Plumpton  died  either  in  12 13  or 
1 2 14.  The  date  of  the  deed  is  therefore  before  12 14,  but  probably 
not  much  earlier.' 

It  is  nowhere  stated  what  these  lands  were,  but  from  later  evidence 
it  seems  clear  that  he  had  two  carucates  at  Baildon,  being  the  other 
moiety,  one  having  been  given  to  his  sister  Isolda  (ante^  p.  20).  The 
deed  of  gift  to  William  from  his  father  has  not  been  preserved,  so 
so  far  as  I  am  aware. 

William  occurs  as  a  witness  to  his  father's  grant  in  frank-marriage 
to  Isolda,  his  (William's)  sister  (No.  viii,  ante\  which  seems  to  be 
the  only  time  that  his  name  is  mentioned  in  these  charters.     In  1226 


*  Sec  Thoresby  Society,  Miscellanea^  ix,  p.  234,  for  some  notes  as  to  his  Bramhope 
property. 

aEKjdsworth  MS.,  No.  148,  fo.  19*. 

^  This  charter  mav  perhaps  refer  to  the  earlier  William  son  of  Hugh ;  it  is  almost 
impossible  to  decide  with  so  few  names  of  witnesses.  Dodsworth,  however, 
attributes  it  to  the  later  William,  as  1  have  done  in  the  text,  and  the  subsequent 
history  of  the  Baildon  property  seems  almost  imperative  that  it  should  be  so. 


30  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY. 

he  acted  as  attorney  for  Eva  de  Swillington  in  a  fine  relating  to 
land  in  Stainburn  (see  post).  This  is  all  the  information  I  can  give 
about  him,  except  that,  according  to  Dodsworth's  pedigree,  he 
married,  and  had  a   son,  also   named  William. 

Hugh  de  Lelay,  son  of  the  first  William  de  Lelay,  had  one 
daughter,  named  Isolda,  to  whom  he  gave  half  the  ville  of  Baildon, 
and  other  property.  The  grant  has  already  been  set  out,  and  it 
will  be  more  convenient  to  postpone  any  account  of  her  for  the 
moment. 

There  still  remains  one  person  who  must  be  mentioned, — a 
somewhat  mysterious  person,  whose  exact  relationship  to  the  Lelays 
is  very  obscure.  I  refer  to  the  lady  who  describes  herself  indifferently 
as  Eva  daughter  of  William  the  Palmer  {paimartus)  of  Swillington, 
Eva   daughter  of  William  de  Swillington,  or  Eva  de  Lelay. 

Her  parentage  seems  clear ;  she  was  the  daughter  of  one  William, 
probably  one  of  the  Swillingtons  of  Swillington  near  Leeds,  who, 
having  made  some  pilgrimage,  was  designated  "the  Palmer."  She 
acquired  land  in  Stainburn  from  William  son  of  William  the  Clerk 
of  Stainburn  (charters  xxvi  and  xxvii),  and  is  probably  the  Eva 
mentioned  in  charter  ix  as  having  a  house  there.  This  property 
she  granted  to  Fountains  Abbey  by  charters  xxviii  and  xxix ; 
in  the  former  she  is  described  as  Eva  daughter  of  William  le  Palmer 
of  Swillington,  in  the  latter  as  Eva  de  Lelay.  She  is  there  stated 
to  convey  in  her  lawful  power,  in  Ugitima  potestate^  a  term  generally 
used  in  conveyances  by  widows,  the  reason  being  that  a  married 
woman  could  not  dispose  of  her  own  property  vnthout  her  husband's 
consent.  It  would  seem,  then,  that  she  married  a  I^lay,  who  was 
dead  at  the  date  of  this  second  grant  In  the  Fountains  Abbey 
Chartulary  after  the  first  of  these  two  deeds.  No.  xxviii,  is  copied 
a  note  of  a  fine  levied  in   1226,  which   is  as  follows: — 

In  Michaelmas  Term,  11  Henry  III,  1226,  a  fine  was  levied 
between  Eva  de  Swillington,  plaintiff,  by  William  de  Lelay  put  in  her 
place  to  win  or  lose,  and  John,  Abbat  of  Fountains,  defendant, 
touching  four  bovates  and  five  acres  three  roods  of  land  in 
Stainburn.  Eva  quit-claims  for  herself  and  her  heirs  all  her  right 
in  the  said  land  to  the  Abbat  and  his  successors  for  ever,  for 
which   he  gave   her  three   marks  of  silver.* 


*  Feet  of  Fines,  York,  ii   Henry  III,  No.  203. 


THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEV  OR  LELAY.  3 1 

If  we  may  take  the  order  of  these  documents  as  a  guide, 
charter  xxviii  was  before  Michaelmas,  1226,  and  charter  xxix 
was  after  that  date.  Now  in  this  fine  it  will  be  noticed  that  Eva 
de  Swillington,  as  she  is  there  called,  appears  by  William  de  Lelay, 
her  attorney.  I  think  he  must  have  been  her  husband,  notwith- 
standing the  fact  that  she  still  uses  her  maiden  name.  In  the  next 
deed  she  calls  herself "  de  Lelay,"  and  uses  words  consistent  with 
her  being  a  widow;  so  that  William,  if  my  surmise  is  right,  must 
have  died  soon   after  1226. 

Eva's  grant  to  Fountains  was  confirmed  by  William  son  of  Ralph 
(charter  xxx).  One  of  her  grants  to  Fountains  is  in  the  possession 
of  Mr.  F.  H.  Fawkes  of  Famley ;  she  grants  the  land,  together  with 
her  body  to  be  buried  at  Fountains.  Witnesses,  Nigel  de  Plumpton, 
Hugh  de  Suinbngton,*  William  de  Lelai  (who  may  have  been  her 
husband's  son  of  that  name),  Henry  de  Castelleia,  Simon  de  Pouele 
(Pool),  and  others.  The  seal  is  still  remaining,  and  bears  three 
flowers  or  branches,  probably  palm,  as  a  canting  device  or  rebus, 
with   the  legend   +  sigill  :  eve  :  filie  :  wilelmi. 

It  may  here  be  noted  that  an  Eva  widow  of  John  sued  Hugh 
de  Baildon  for  dower  in  a  carucate  of  land  in  Castley  in  1206-7. 
The  Lelays  had  property  in  Castley  (see  charters  xxxiii,  lxvii  and 

LXX. 

We  must  now  return  to  Isolda,  who,  so  far  as  is  known,  was  the 
only  daughter  of  Hugh  and  Christiana.  She  was  twice  married,  first 
to  Roger  Pictavensis  or  Poitevin,  and  secondly  to  Adam  de  Nereford. 
She  left  issue  by  both  husbands.  The  first  marriage  must  have 
taken  place  before  her  father's  grant  of  Baildon  to  S.  Peter's,  that  is, 
before  circa  1210.  She  would  then  be  about  twenty  years  of  age. 
Her  father's  gifts  to  her  of  two  carucates  in  Baildon  and  the  ville  of 
Stainbum  have  already  been  set  out  {ante^  p.  20,  and  charter  No.  viii). 
Soon  after  her  first  marriage,  and  presumably  before  the  death  of  her 
first  husband  \cir,  1224],  we  find  Isolda  making  a  purchase  of  land 
on  her  own  account. 

Henry  de  Castellay  has  sold  and  confirmed  to  Isolda,  wife  of 
Roger  Pictavensis,  and  her  heirs,  a  bovate  of  land  in  Castellay, 
viz.: — that  which  Robert  son  of  Huckeman*  held,  lying  between  my 


*  WiUiam  son  of  Hugh  dc  Swillington,  who  was  contemporary  with  Eva,  and 
may  well  have  been  ber  father,  had  a  son  Hugh,  living  in  1257.  See  pedigree, 
Poateftact  Chartulary,  Yorkshire  Archaeological  Society,  Record  Series,  vol.  xxv, 
p.  276. 

•  Of  Plumpton. 


32  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEV  OR  LELAY. 

demesne  and  the  land  of  Hemery  de  Castellay,  for  3^  marks  of 
silver,  to  hold  of  me  and  my  heirs  freely  and  quit  of  all  services, 
save  the  forinsec  service  due  from  one  bovate  where  eight  carucates 
make  a  knight's  fee.  Witnesses:  Ralph  de  Bramhop,  Serlo  de 
Pouele,  Geoffrey  de  Ardyngton,  Malger  Vavasor,  Hugh  de  Tohuse, 
Hugh  de  Creskelde,  Hemery  de  Castellay,  Nigel  de  Castellay, 
William  de  Castelley.' 

Presumably  about  the  same  time,  Roger  purchased  some  land  in 
Stainbum,  no  doubt  in  order  to  improve  his  wife's  property  there. 
As  the  charter  is  unprinted  and  in  private  hands,  and  moreover 
contains  an  interesting  note  of  one  of  the  early  Baildons,  it  is  here 
transcribed  in  full : — 

Sciant    presentes   et   futuri    quod   ego,  Willelmus    filius  Willelmi, 

vendidi   et    quietum  clamavi   de   me   et   de  heredibus   meis   Rogero 

Pictaviensi  et  heredibus  suis  totum  tenementum  quod  Ricardus  filius 

Thor*  de  me  tenuit  in  Stainburne,  et  totum  servicium  suum,  et  totam 

firmam  eiusdem   tenementi,  sine  retinemento;  Et  sciendum  est  quod 

idem   Ricardus   tenuerat  de  me  unam  bovatam   terre  cum  omnibus 

pertinenciis  suis.     Et  ego,  Willelmus,  et  heredes  mei  gwarantizabimus 

prefatam  vendicionem  et  quietam  clamationem  eidem  Rogero  Pictaviensi 

et  heredibus  suis  pro  duabus  marcis  argenti,  quas  idem  Rogerus  michi 

dedit  in  curia  Hugonis  de  Baildon.     Hiis  testibus:  Willelmo  de  Leley, 

Hugone  filio  eius,  Serlone  de  Pouele,  GefTrido   Mansel,  Hugone  de 

Wieton,  Hugone   de  Casteley,   Henrico   filio  Holdewin',  Henrico  de 

Casteley,  Alexandro   fratre   eius,  Helia   de   Stainburn,  Haimerico   de 

Casteley,  Nigello  fratre  eius,  Normanno  Clerico,  et  multis  aliis.' 

Seal  lost. 

Translation, 

Know  present  and  to  come  that  I,  William  son  of  William,  have 
sold  and  quit-claimed,  from  me  and  my  heirs  to  Roger  Poitevin  and 
his  heirs,  all  that  tenement  which  Richard  son  of  Thor  held  of  me 
in  Stainburn,  and  all  his  service,  and  all  the  rent  of  the  same  tene- 
ment, without    any   reservation ;    and    be   it   known   that   the    same 

1  Register  of  Fountains  Abbey;  Cotton.  MS.,  Tiberius,  C.  xii,  fo.  268. 

*  The  grantor  of  this  charter  is  described  as  Willelmus  cUricus  cU  Siainbunu^ 
filius  WiUelmi  filii  Thore  de  Ottelai  in  the  Fountains  Abbey  Register  (Cotton.  MS., 
Tiberius,  C.  xii,  fo.  26gd).     This  Richard  son  of  Thor  was  perhaps  his  uncle. 

3  MSS.  of  F.  H.  Fawkes,  of  Farnley,  Esq. 


THE   FAMILY  OF   LEATHLEY   OR   LELAY.  33 

Richard  held  of  me  one  bovate  of  land  with  all  its  appurtenances. 
And  I,  William,  and  my  heirs  will  warrant  the  said  sale  and  quit- 
claim to  the  same  Roger  Poitevin  and  his  heirs  for  two  marks  of 
silver,  which  Roger  gave  me  in  the  court  of  Hugh  de  Baildon. 
These  being  witnesses,  etc. 

Roger  Poitevin  appears  to  have  died  about  1224;  at  any  rate,  his 
widow  was  married  again  in  1225.  During  the  period  of  her  widow- 
hood she,  by  an  undated  charter,  gave  the  ville  of  Stainbum, 
containing  five  carucates,  to  Fountains  Abbey.*  This  grant  was 
confirmed  by  Hugh  son  of  William  de  Lelay,  her  father,  and  by 
Roger  Poitevin,  her  grandson.' 

The  confirmation  of  the  grant  by  the  donor's  father  was  rendered 
necessary  by  the  fact  that  Isolda's  tenancy  was  in  frank-marriage. 
By  this  tenure  the  land  was  given  to  the  donee  and  her  husband 
and  the  heirs  of  their  two  bodies,  free  from  all  manner  of  service  to 
the  donor  or  his  heirs  until  the  fourth  degree  of  consanguinity  from 
the  donor  was  passed,  the  oath  of  fealty  only  excepted.'  But  on 
failure  of  the  heirs  of  the  marriage,  the  property  reverted  to  the 
donor  or  his  heirs. 

Isolda's  second  husband  was  one  Adam  de  Nereford,  and  she 
was  married  to  him  sometime  before  Martinmas,  1225. 

1225,  Martinmas.  Fine  between  Adam  de  Nerford  and  Isolda 
his  wife,  plaintiffs,  and  William .  de  Coleby,  deforciant,  of  one  third  of 
half  a  canicate  of  land  in  Scardingwell,  which  Isolda  claims  as  dower 
of  the  inheritance  of  Roger  Pictavensis,  her  late  husband ;  Adam  and 
Iv)lda  release  all  their  claim  to  William  and  his  heirs,  for  which  he 
gives  them  four  marks  of  silver.^ 

Roger  Poitevin  and  Isolda  had  two  children,  Thomas,  and 
Hawisia,  who  married  Robert  de  Stopham. 

Thomas  Poitevin  seems  to  have  been  the  only  son  of  his 
parents;  he  was  probably  born  not  later  than  12 13,  as  he  appears  to 
have  been  of  age  in  1234,  when  he  commenced  the  litigation 
respecting  his  property.'  Indeed  it  was  no  doubt  on  his  coming  of 
age  that  the  various  disputes  first  arose. 

*  No.  XI,  anU. 

«  No«.  xii,  XIII,  XIV,  and  xv,  ante. 

*  Goodcvc,  Modem  Law  of  Real  Property, 

*  Feet  of  Fines,  Yorkshire,  10  Henry  III,  No.  39. 

'  He  and  his  son  Roger  had  numerous  lawsuits,  but  the  greater  part  of  them  do 
nm  roncem  the  subject  of  this  paper. 

C 


34  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY. 

In  1234  he  settled  a  dispute  relating  to  some  property  in  Castley, 
possibly  given  him  by  his  mother,  by  the  following  fine : — 

1234,  December.  Fine  between  Thomas  Pictavensis,  plaintiff,  and 
Hugh  de  Montealto,  deforciant,  of  half  a  mill  in  Castellay.  Hugh 
admits  the  property  to  be  the  right  of  Thomas,  and  Thomas  grants 
it  to  Hugh  and  his  heirs,  to  hold  of  Thomas  and  his  heirs  for  ever, 
paying  Ss.  4^.  yearly  for  all  service.' 

In  1235  Thomas  Poitevin,  Isolda's  son  by  her  first  marriage, 
granted  his  Baildon  property  to  Isolda  and  Adam  de  Nereford,  her 
second  husband,  by  the  following  fine: — 

This  is  the  final  concord  made  in  the  King's  Court  at  York  on 
the  Friday  next  after  the  feast  of  S.  Hilary,  19  Henry  III  [1235], 
Between  Thomas  Poitevin  [JRictavensis],  demandant,  and  Adam  de 
Nereford  and  Isolda  his  wife,  tenants,  by  William  Malebisse,  put  in 
the  place  of  Isolda  to  win  or  lose,  concerning  half  the  Manor  of 
Beylden  with  the  appurtenances,  whereof  an  assize  of  mart  d*ancestor 
was  summoned  between  them  in  the  same  Court,  To  wit,  that  Adam 
and  Isolda  admit  that  all  the  said  half  with  the  appurtenances  is  the 
right  of  Thomas,  And  for  this  admission,  fine  and  concord,  the  said 
Thomas  has  granted  the  said  half  [Manor]  with  the  appurtenances 
to  Adam  and  Isolda,  To  have  and  to  hold  to  them,  as  they  previously 
held  it,  for  all  the  life  of  the  said  Isolda,  And  moreover  Thomas  has 
granted  for  himself  and  his  heirs  the  said  half  [Manor]  with  the 
appurtenances,  after  the  death  of  Isolda,  to  Hugh  de  Nereford,  eldest 
son  of  Adam  and  Isolda,  and  to  the  heirs  of  his  body,  of  him  and 
his  wife  married  to  him  begotten,  for  ever.  To  have  and  to  hold  to 
Hugh  and  the  heirs  of  his  body,  of  him  and  his  wife  married  to  him 
begotten,  of  the  said  Thomas  and  his  heirs  for  ever,  doing  therefore 
forinsec  service,  as  much  as  belongs  to  that  half  [Manor],  for  all 
service  and  exaction,  So  nevertheless  that  if  the  said  Hugh  shall  die 
without  heir  of  his  body  and  of  his  wife  married  to  him  begotten, 
then  all  the  said  half  [Manor],  with  the  appurtenances,  shall  revert 
to  Thomas  and  his  heirs,  quit  from  other  heirs  of  the  said  Hugh  for 
ever.^ 

This  document  has  a  further  interest,  inasmuch  as  it  is  the  first 
notice  of  Baildon  as  a  "manor." 

Thomas  Poitevin  was  dead  in  1251,  leaving  two  sons,  Roger  and 
Robert'    We  have  no  clue  to  his  wife. 


*  Feet  of  Fines,  Yorkshire,  19  Hen.  Ill,  No.  10. 
2  Feet  of  Fines,  Yorkshire,  16-19  Hen.  HI,  No.  130. 
•'  Herald  and  Goua'ogist^  v,  238. 


THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY.  35 

Roger  Poitevin,  son  of  Thomas,  appears  to  have  been  bom 
about  1230.  He  seems  to  have  been  an  extravagant  and  somewhat 
turbulent  character.  Almost  the  earliest  dated  notices  we  have  of 
him  show  him  to  be  in  difficulties.  In  1259  he  had  mortgaged  the 
manor  of  Towton  for  ;^2oo,  and  in  127 1  he  had  to  borrow  money 
from  his  aunt,  Hawisia  de  Stopham,  to  buy  a  horse.  He  took  the 
ade  of  the  Barons  in  their  war  with  Henry  HI,  and  his  property 
suffered  in  consequence.     In  1276  he  was  in  prison  in  Corfe  Castle. 

In  1269  there  was  a  serious  riot  in  consequence  of  an  attempt 
to  levy  some  Royal  dues  on  Roger's  land  at  Saxton  and  Towton. 
The  King's  Bailiff  was  assaulted  and  wounded,  and  finally  carried  off 
to  Pontefract  Castle,  where  he  was  kept  in  prison.* 

He  probably  came  of  age  in  1250  or  1251,  when  he  took  up  his 
father's  career  of  litigation. 

1 25 1,  Michaelmas.  Roger  le  Peytefin  claimed  against  Hugh 
Byset  a  rent  of  3/.  per  annum  in  Syntehal  [Snydall],  in  which  Hugh 
has  no  entry  except  through  Adam  de  Neyrford  and  Isolda  his  wife, 
to  whom  Thomas  le  Peytefin  (whose  son 'and  heir  the  plaintiff  is) 
leased  the  same  for  a  term  of  years  which  has  now  expired.  The 
defendant  vouched  Adam  de  Neyrford  to  warrant,  and  he  did 
warrant     Jury.' 

One  of  his  first  acts  was  to  try  to  upset  some  of  the  pious 
gifts  of  his  ancestors  to  monastic  and  charitable  foundations. 

1 25 1,  Michaelmas.  Roger  le  Peytevyn  gave  20s.  for  a  license  of 
concord  with  the  Abbat  of  Fountains  in  a  plea  touching  the  manor 
of  Staynbum.' 

Roger  le  Peytevin,  who  brought  an  assize  of  novel  disseisin 
against  the  Master  of  S.  Leonard's  Hospital,  York,  touching  a 
tenement  and  common  of  pasture  in  Saxton,  withdrew.  He  and 
his  pledges,  William  le  Peytevin  of  Haling*  [«V]  and  Roger  the 
Clerk  of  Saxton,  are  amerced." 

The  attempt  to  oust  the  monks  of  Fountains  from  the  property 
in  Stainbum,  which  his  grandmother  had  given  them,  evidently 
bailed ;  accordingly  we  find  Roger  facing  the  situation  and  confirming, 
with  what  grace  he  could,  the  gift  which  he  was  unable  to  upset. 

*  Yorkshire  Archaeological  Society,  Record  Series,  xii,  p.  109. 
^  AsBze  Roll,  1046,  35  and  36  Heii.  Ill,  m.  37. 

*  /M.,  m.  30/. 

*  Hcadingley. 

'^  Assize  Roll,  1046,  m.  46^/. 


36  THE  FAMILY  OF  LEATHLEY  OR  LELAY. 

Circa  1251.  Roger  Poictevin  grants  and  quit-claims  to  Fountains 
Abbey  all  the  right  and  claim  which  he  or  his  ancestors  have  or 
ever  had  in  the  manor  of  Staynburn,  with  the  appurtenances,  etc., 
as  contained  in  the  charter  of  Isouda,  his  grandmother,  which  charter 
they  have.  Witnesses:  William,  Abbat  of  Melsa,  William  de  la 
Launde,  William  de  Legherton,  Robert  the  Constable,  William  de 
Thoresby,  Robert  de  Nunnewyc,  and  others.     Seal  lost.* . 

The  attempt  on  S.  Leonard's  Hospital  failed,  as  that  on  Fountains 
had  done,  and  Roger  again  confirmed  what  he  was  unable  to  gainsay. 

Roger  son  of  Thomas  Peytevin  confirms  all  the  gifts  of  Roger 
and  Thomas  Peytevin,  his  ancestors,  to  S.  Leonard's  Hospital,  York, 
in  Saxton  and  Woodhouse.     Dated  15  Kal.  July,  1260.^ 

I  am  not  aware  that  either  Roger  or  his  brother  Robert  left  any 
issue,  but  if  they  did,  they  had  ceased  to  have  any  interest  in  Lelay 
property,  and  we  need  not  pursue  them  further. 

Isolda,  by  her  second  husband,  left  a  son,  Hugh  de  Nereford, 
(see  the  Fine  of  1235).  His  son,  Adam  de  Nereford  the  second, 
as  already  stated,  sold  his  Baildon  property  to  John  de  Stapleton 
in  1316. 

The  surname  of  Leathley  is  not  yet  extinct,  but,  so  far  as  I  am 
aware,  there  is  nothing  to  show  the  connection  of  the  later  Leathleys 
with  the  earlier  generations  of  this  interesting  Yorkshire  family.  They 
may  possibly  have  descended  from  some  of  the  younger  sons  I  have 
mentioned. 

One  Thomas  de  Leathley  was  Constable  of  Skipton  Castle,  circa 
temp,  Edward  I,'  and  a  John  Leathley  was  Sheriff  of  the  City  of 
York  in  1468.-* 

I  have  not  found  any  evidence  as  to  the  Leathley  arms. 


*  Original  pmes  F.  H.  Fawkes,  Esq.    See  charters  Nos.  xii  and  xiii. 

2  Harleian  MS.  795,  fo.  53. 

^  Whitaker's  Craven^  417.  *  Drake's  Eboracum^  363. 


XTeetamenta  ILeobtensia, 

{Continued  from  Vol.  IX.,/.  277.) 
Extracted   from  the  Probate  Registry  at  York. 


Robert  Hall,  of  Leventhorpe. 

(x.  32  a.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  xij'**  dale  of  Octo^r,  the  yere  of 
our  lorde  God  mi'  fyv  hundreth  xxix.  I  Robert  Hall,  of  Lenthorp, 
within  the  pishe  of  S\vyllyngton,  in  the  countie  of  York,  yoman, 
hoole  of  mynd  and  goode  remembrance,  make  thys  my  last  will 
after  thys  mann^  foloyng.  First  I  bequeth  my  soule  to  God 
Almyghtie,  and  to  o'  lady  saynt  Mary,  and  to  all  the  holy  company 
of  hevyn,  and  my  body  to  be  beryed  w'in  oure  lady  where  in 
Swyllyngton  churche  in  the  northsyde,  and  my  best  beest  to  be  my 
mortuarie,  if  I  haue  any  at  the  day  of  my  deptyng,  if  no  I  bequeath  xx* 
in  the  name  of  my  mortuarie.  Also  I  bequeith  to  the  byeng  of  a  sute 
of  vestimentf  xiij«  iiij*'.  Itm  I  bequeith  to  Gerge  Hall  my  sonne 
yjJ*  xiij»  iiij**.  Also  I  bequeith  to  Robert  Hall  my  sonne  vj**  xiij*  iiij<*. 
Also  all  the  residew  of  my  goodf  not  bequeathed  I  will  that  Willia  Hall 
mjm  eldest  sonne  and  heir,  George  Hall  and  Robert  Hall  my  foresaid 
sooes,  be  my  full  executors,  to  order  and  dispose  all  my  goodf  as  they 
tbynk  best  for  health  of  my  soule  and  all  goode  cristen  soules.  In 
wytnes  whereof  to  thys  my  will  I  haue  sett  my  seall.  Thes  ber)mg 
wytnes,  S[ir]  Willii  Bromhede,  pishe  preist,  S[ir]  John  Shan,  Robert 
Hcmysworth,  John  Lytster,  w^^  othir. — \Praved  15  Aprils  'SS''] 


Richard  Heptonstall,  of  Featherstone. 

(X.  46  a.) 

In  Dei  noie  Amen :  liij  day  of  Decemfer,  in  the  yere  of  o'  lord  God 
Mkxcccxxxj.     I  Rychard  Heptonstall,  of  hole  mynd  and  seke  of  body, 

makf  this  my  testament my  body  to  be  buryed  within  the 

churche  yerd  of  Alhallowes  at  Fetherston.  In  pmis,  I  giff  to  the  hye 
alter  \f.  And  also  I  will  that  myn  executors  cause  v  messes  to  be  sayd 
for  me  at  my  pishe  kyrk.  Also  I  giff  to  the  kirk  to  the  byeng  of  one 
Antephon  xij**.  Also  I  gyff  to  my  sonne  Charily  x*.  Also  to  my 
sonne  in  law  John  Walthew  a  kow.  To  Willia  Vycars  x*.  And  to  my 
sonne  John  x".  Residew  of  my  goodf,  my  dettf  payd  and  fun'all 
expens  made,  I  giff  and  bequeith  to  Margrett  my  wiff  and  Robert  my 


38  TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA. 

Sonne,  the  whome  I  make  and  ordeyn  myn  executors,  that  they  dispose 
for  my  soull  as  I  haue  putt  y'me  in  trust.  Thes  beyng  witnes,  S  [ir] 
Edward  Wormall  vicar,  Rofct  Schelyto,  Willia  Eu^yngham,  John 
Grenewod,  w'  oy^  moo  as  John,Walt^,  Hewe. — \^Pro7Jed  23  May^  1531-] 


John  Walker,  of  Calverley. 

(x.49b.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  xxvij***  day  of  Auguste,  in  the 
yeire  of  o'  Lord  God  a  thousand  v  hundrethe  and  xxvij.    I  John  Walkar, 

of  Farslay,  holle  of  mynd  and  remebrace,  make  my  testament my 

body  to  be  beryed  in  chyrche  or  chyrchyerd  of  Calu^lay.  Also  I 
bequeth  to  the  hye  auter  for  tethis  forgotten  or  negligently  payd  xx<^. 
Also  to  bye  auter  clothis  for  the  chirche  of  Calu^ay  aforesaid  vj*  viij^. 
Also  I  bequethe  to  Agnes  baylay  doght'  of  Wyllyam  baylay  viij^S  of  the 
wiche  vj*»  xiij»  iiij<*  restf  in  the  handf  of  Wyttm  baylay,  of  the  wich 
vj*»  xiij*  iiij<*  Rychard  baylay  his  son  ys  furth  for  iiij  markf ,  borowyd  of 
Thomas  Alabryge,  and  xxvj*  viij^  of  y*  same  viij**  rest(>  in  the  hande  of 
Thomas  Holyngf .  Also  to  the  said  Agnes  a  great  Awmbery  in  the 
howse,  an  arke  in  the  ou'  chambre,  a  lowe  meyle  cheste  in  the  seller, 
and  half  the  house  w*  apertenawnce  in  pudsay,  wher  George  Lepton 
dwellyth,  rent  vj*  viij<*.  Also  to  Janet  Hall  xl%  or  els  the  valo'  in 
howshold  stufFe.  Also  I  bequeth  to  John  Baylay  a  cownt^  a  langsettyll, 
ij  stone  troghis,  and  a  greate  tubbe  in  the  lath.  All  this  howsholde 
stuffe  to  be  delyu^ed  aJter  the  decease  of  Margaret  my  wyffe.  The 
residew  of  my  guddf  not  bequethid  I  give  to  Margaret  my  wife, 
Christofer  Bayly,  and  Thomas  Bayly,  psts,  whom,  with  my  brother 
RoBt  Walkar,  and  he  to  have  for  his  labor  v",  I  make  my  hoU  executors 
of  this  my  last  wyll,  and  to  ordre  and  dispose  my  guddf  not 
afore  bequethed  as  they  shall  thynke  best  and  most  conenyent  for  the 
helth  of  my  sowll,  so  that  they  pay  accordynge  to  my  wyll,  iij"  iiij<*  to 
some  anomament  for  the  chirche  of  Kirkstall  abbey;  yevyn  the  day 
and  yere  above  wrytyn,  thes  beyng  wjrtnesse,  RoBt  Belhowse,  Sir 
Thomas  Bayly,  Thomas  Alabrige,  Richard  Sharpe,  and  Wyttm  Kytson, 
with  other  dyuerse. — [Proved  29  May^  iSS'-] 


Charles  Hedon,  of  Harewood. 

(x.  58.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  yere  of  o"^  Lord  God  a  thousand 
fyve  hundreth  xxix,  the  x'^  day  of  November.  1  Charls  Hedon,  of  a 
hooU  mynd  and  sane  and  not  seik  in  body,  makith  this  my  testament 
and  my  last  will  in  this  man^  folowing.  First,  I  givest  my  saull  to 
Almyghty  God  and  o'  Lady  Sancte  Marie,  and  to  all  the  sanctf  of 
hevyn,  and  my  body  to  be  buried  in  Harwod  Kirk  or  Kirkyard,  or  els 
where  it  pleasse  Almyghty  God.  Also  I  bequest  my  best  beest  in  the 
name  of  mortuarie.  Also  I  bequeste  to  the  hee  auter  for  offering^  and 
tethis  forgotteyn  xx^.  Also  I  bequest  to  the  Kirkwarkf  of  Harwood 
vj'  viij**,  and  thai  maik  a  rudloft  w4n  the  space  of  iij  yeres  after  my 


TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA.  39 

departing,  I  shall  gyve  them  to  the  said  Roodlofte  xx^  Also  I  will 
gyve  to  Sanct  Robert(>  xx^.  Also  I  bequest  to  the  iiij  orders  of  freres 
of  York,  eu^y  bowse  ij".  Also  I  bequest  to  the  monastery  of  bolton  in 
chanons  vj*  viij**,  to  the  Conuent  their,  to  haue  oon  obit,  and  to  my 
lord  the  por  a  hamblyng  nage  or  xx^  Also  I  bequest  to  the  monastene 
of  Kirkstall  vj*  viij**.  Also  I  bequest  to  the  ladys  of  Appylton  iij^ 
iiij<*.  To  the  beid  bowse  of  Ryther  v".  To  the  chauntre  preistf  of 
Harwod,  eu^y  one  of  them  xij^.  To  viij  honest  p^sons  to  here  me  to 
tiie  Kirk,  eu^y  one  of  them  iiij**.  Also  I  will  have  a  honest  preist  to 
syng  for  me  a  hoile  yere,  and  he  shall  have  iiij^*.  Also  I  will  gyve  and 
bequest  to  my  maister  Harrie  Ryther  my  best  hors  or  meir,  and  all  my 
harnes,  to  be  gud  maister  to  my  wyflf  and  my  childer.  Also  I  bequest 
to  Elynore  Beynkf  xl*.  Also  I  bequest  all  my  Raymet  to  be  deuided 
eaenly  to  RiC  Hedon  and  Herre  Hedon,  my  sonys,  and  to  Wittm 
levet  Also  I  bequest  to  eu^y  bowse  holder  s^unt  man  and  woman  that 
is  w*  me  the  day  of  my  deth,  eu^y  one  of  them  ij*.  To  Sir  John  levet, 
my  sone  in  law,  a  colt  or  a  fele.  To  Sir  Rofet  Holder  a  hawmling  stage, 
or  els  XX*.  To  the  causie  from  Cukscuyll*  to  the  more  wardf  vj*  viij*^. 
To  John  Shadlok  my  wood  knyff.  To  my  godchilder,  vnmaried  man 
and  woman,  eu^y  one  of  thame,  xij**.  Also  I  will  that  Richard  my  sone 
haue  my  int^est  and  leese  of  Stokowfeld.  And  also  I  will  that  Herre 
my  Sonne  haue  my  int^est  and  leez  of  a  hows  in  Shadwell,  w^  leis  more, 
dosse,  and  stokyng.  Also  my  wyflf  to  have  custodie  and  Rule  of  them 
during  the  noneage  of  my  childer,  if  she  keep  hir  unmaried.  Also  I 
ordan  and  make  my  executors,  my  wyfT  Elsabeth  Hedon,  and  Richard 
Hedon  my  sone,  and  Herre  Hedon  and  Robert  Mawe,  theis  for  to 
dyspose  for  my  soull  at  the  day  of  my  berying.  The  Residew  of  my 
guddf  I  brought  furth,  I  will  that  Elsabeth  my  wyflf,  and  Richard  my 
sone,  Herre  my  sone,  and  Margaret  my  doghter,  thay  to  haue  all  the 
Residew  of  my  guddf,  my  dettf  [paid],  and  Robert  Maw  to  haue  xx* 
for  his  labor.  Also  I  make  my  surviors  maister  Wittm  Bapthorp, 
Esqwyer,  and  S[ir]  John  levet,  preiste,  to  se  my  will  p^formed,  and 
maister  bapthorp  to  haue  a  horse  for  his  labo',  or  xxvj*  viij**  money, 
and  Sir  John  levett  to  haue  a  fiir  of  fox  putez  for  his  labor  p^  me, 
Charllf  Hedon.  Witnes  herof,  John  Tolby  and  Umfray  Maw.— [Proved 
29  May,  1 53 1.] 


John  Smyth,  of  Ledstone. 

(X.  61.) 

In   Dei  nomine  Amen :  sexto  die  Aprilis  anno  Domini  millesimo 
quingentessimo  Trigesimo  primo.     Ego  Johannes  Smyth,  agricola,  de 

Ledston,  infra  parochiam  de  Kepax,  compos  mentis corpus  que 

meum  sepeliendum  in  Cimiterio  ecclesie  beate  Marie  de  Kepax.  Item 
lego  summo  altari  eiusdem  ecclesie  pro  oblacionibus  et  decimis  oblitis 
X*.  Item  lego  Johanni  Fenteman  et  fillijs  suis  xiij*  iiij**.  Item  lego 
Alicie  Fentiman  \'f  viij**.  Item  lego  Johanni  EUwek  vj*  viij<*.  Item 
lego  servicio  beate  Marie  in  Ecclesia  predicta  vj"  viij**.  Item  lego 
\Villelmo  Pygott  vnam  vaccam  vnum  porcum.    Residuum  vero  omnium 


40  TESTAMEMTA    LEODIENSIA. 

bononim  meorum  non  legatorum,  debitis  meis  solutis,  do  et  lego 
Georgio  Smyth  filio  meo  et  ilium  ordino  et  facio  meum  executorem, 
ut  disponat  pro  salute  anime  mee  ut  sibi  inde  melius  videbitur. 
Datum  apud  Ledeston  die  et  anno  ut  supra.  Hiis  testibus,  Rychardo 
Layke,  Johanne  Caupland,  et  multis  alijs. — [Proved  14  June^  1531-] 


John  Wilkynson,  of  Featherstone. 

(x.65b.) 

In    Dei   noTi    Amen :    vij   day   of    May,  in    the   yere   of  o*"  Lord 
God  M'cccccxxxj.     I  John  Wilkynson,  seik  of  body  and  hoill  mynd, 

makf  this  my  testament my  bodie  to  be  beried  w'in  the  Kirk 

garth  of  All  hallowis  at  Fetherstone.  Also  I  gyff  and  bequeath  to  the 
hye  awter  for  tethis  forgotten  iij".  And  also  I  will  y'  myn  executors 
cause  one  trentall  of  messe5  to  be  said  for  me  at  my  pishe  Kirk. 
Also  I  bequeaith  to  Agnes  my  doghter  on  acre  of  wheat  at  the  farsyde 
of  langlandf,  and  one  acre  of  beane5  at  the  scotfold,  and  also  on  bay 
fylle.  Also  I  bequeath  to  my  son  John  one  acre  of  wheat  and  a  nother 
of  Beane3,  lying  next  the  other  ij  acres  aforsaid,  also  one  Reid  Whye 
calf,  and  this  besydf  ther  partf .  Also  I  bequeath  and  gyff  to  my  v 
youngyst  childer  besyd  ther  partf  eu^  one  of  thame  one  qwy.  Also  I 
gyflf  and  bequeath  to  o"^  Lady  sluice  vj^  viij<*.  Also  I  gyff  and  bequeath 
to  my  sone  Robert,  and  Elsabeth  my  doghtir,  one  gray  feille  and  one 
blak,  besyd  ther  partf.  The  Residew  of  my  guddf,  my  dettf  paid,  and 
funerall  expens  maid,  I  gyff  and  bequeith  to  Jane  my  wyfT,  and  Wittm 
and  Thomas  my  sonys,  the  whome  I  maik  my  trew  executorf,  that 
they  dispose  for  my  saull,  as  I  have  putt  thame  in  trust.  Moreover  I 
bequeith  to  the  Couent  of  the  howse  of  Sanct  Johis  eungelist  at 
Poumfret  vj*  viiij*^.  Also  I  bequieth  to  my  lord  por  of  Sanct  Johis 
howse  of  Poumfret  vj^  viij*^.  And  makf  and  ordans  his  lordship, 
Thomas  Wilkynson,  John  lee,  Richard  lee,  Thomas  Schelyto  and 
Myles  Cartar  sup^visorf  of  my  will,  and  I  desyre  my  forsaid 
lord  to  be  gud  lord  to  my  wyflf  and  my  childer,  and  y*- 
thes  my  sup^visors  se  order  a  emong  theym,  if  ther  be  any 
dyssencion  or  troobill.  Also  I  will  that  my  wyff,  and  Wittm  and 
Thomas  my  sonys,  and  all  other  my  childer,  as  long  as  yai  can  agre,  and 
y*  my  wyff  kepis  her  vnmaried,  that  thay  occupy  by  the  licence  of  my 
lord  my  farmehold  unto  the  yeres  be  comyn  uppe.  Thes  beyng  witnes, 
S[ir]  Edward  Wormall,  the  vicar  of  the  same,  Thomas  Wilkynson, 
Thomas  Schelyto,  Wittm  Eu^ynggam,  w*  other. — \Proved  by  Joan^wifey 
and   W*"  and  Thomas^  sons,  30  /ufy,  1531.] 


William  Smyth,  of  Harewood. 

(x.  66  b.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :    I  Wittm  Smyth,  of  the  pishirg  of 
Harwod,  hooUe  of  mynd  and  memory,  visited  w*  seiknes,  makf  this  my 

last  will my  body  to  be  beried  w^in  the  chirch  yeard  of 

Alhallowes  of  Harwod.     Also  I  gyff  unto  S[ir]  Wittm  Preston  v^  for 


TESTAMENTA   LKODIENSIA.  4^ 

sayng  certayn  messe3  before  the  Rood  of  Harwod.  Also  I  gyve  unto 
my  eldest  son  on  balchen  of  defence  and  a  Jak.  Itm  to  the  Freers  of 
Sanct  Robert  ii«  Item  to  the  howse  off  Crystall  ij«.  Item  to  the  iiij 
orders  of  freers  ij*  viij**.  The  Residew  of  all  my  guddf  I  gyff,  my 
dettf  paid,  unto  my  wyff  and  my  children.  Also  I  maik  Wittm  Smyth 
and  Isabell  Smyth  my  trew  executors  for  to  dyspose  my  guddf  for  the 
helth  of  my  soole,  as  thay  thynk  best.  Thes  witnes,  Wittm  Smyth, 
VVittm  Preston,  Xpofer  Hyrde,  Richard  Aley  de  Brandone  of  the  hill, 
Richard  Smyth  of  Keiswik,  w'  other  moo.  Maid  the  xxj  of  July  the 
yere  of  o*"  Lord  God  a  mcccccxxxj. — [Proved  3  August,  1531.] 


John  Brere,  of  Gomersal. 

'  (X.  68  b.) 

In  Dei  ndie  Amen ;  the  yere  of  o""  Lord  God  m^cccccxxxj,  the  v**^ 
day  of  the  moneth  of  August.     I  John  Brere,  of  Gom^sall,  of  hooll 

mynd my  body  to  be  beried  in  the  pish  church  of  bristall,  of 

the  hoilly  appostels  Petir  and  Paule,  and  my  mortuary  after  the  forme 
of  the  law.  And  I  gyve  to  the  hye  auter  of  bristall  for  tythis  and 
offerandf  forgottyn  iiij*.  Also  I  gyve  to  Margaret  HoUyngf  ij  stottf  of 
ij  yeres  of  age.  And  I  gyff  to  my  sunt  Margarctt  brere  iiij  noblys. 
Arid  I  gyve  to  Robert  brere  a  qwy  stirk  of  one  yere  old  and  a  fressyd 
Jakit.  And  I  gyff  to  litill  John  brere,  my  godson,  a  gymmar  hog, 
and  I  gyve  to  Wittm  brere  a  nother  gymm^  hog,  and 
to  Ellyn  broke  ij  gymm^  hoggf .  Also  I  gyff  to  John  Void  xij**,  and 
to  Jane  hir  syster  xij^.  More  over  I  wilbe  brgught  furth  of  my 
guddf  hool  togeder,  and  all  my  dettf  cotent  and  paid.  The  Residew 
of  my  guddf  that  remaynes  nather  gyffen  nor  bequeathid  I  gyff  Randall 
my  son  holly,  whome  I  maik  my  executor  after  my  decease,  and  to 
disposse  for  my  saull  he  thynk  f  the  best.  And  os  for  Cuthbert  my 
son,  he  hais  had  his  part  and*  more,  and  ther  for  he  shall  haue  noe 
pennyworth  of  my  guddf  except  y*  my  son  Randall  will  gyff  to  hym 
anything  of  his  ffre  will.  Recording  the  same,  thes  men,  Jamez  byrtbe, 
Richard  Taylyer,  Ric  Speyght,  and  thomas,  that  this  my  last  wilbe 
fulfilled,  writyn  the  yere  and  day  afor  said. — [Proved  26  August,  1531.] 


William  Hewett,  of  Ledsham. 

(x.  74  a.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen  :  the  xxx  day  of  the  moneth  of  March, 
in  the  yere  of  o^  Lord  God  a  thousand  ccccc  and  xxxj.     I  Wittm 

Hewet  of  ledsam,  hoill  of  mynd  and  gud  of  remSbranc my 

body  to  be  beried  in  the  pish  kirke  of  ledsam.  Also  I  bequeith  to  the 
hye  alter  in  the  same  cherche  for  forgottyn  teithis  and  to  be  praid  for 
\j*  viij<*.  Also  I  bequeith  to  the  cherche  warkf  vj"  viij**.  Also  I 
bequeith  to  the  leight  before  Roid  xij<*,  and  to  the  lyght  before  o"^  lady 
xij^  Also  I  bequeith  to  Elsabeth  belhows,  my  wyff  doughter,  vj*  viij**. 
Also  I  bequeith  to  a  honest  preist  to  syng  one  trentall  of  messe3  in 
the  same  cherche  for  my  saull  and  all  my  fryndf  saullf  x^     Also  I 


42  TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA. 

bequieth  to  Richard  my  son  one  Jakit  or  alls  vj*  viij^.     The  Residew 

of  my  guddf I  gyve  to  Jenett  my  wyff,  whome  I  maik  my 

executrix.  Witnes  therof,  S[ir]  John  Studeley,  vicar  of  ledsain,  John 
belhows,  Robert  Johnson,  James  Nalson,  and  Rawff  lusday,  with  other 
moo.— \^Fraved  5  October^  i53i-] 

Ralph  Awnger,  of  Barwick-in-Elmet. 

(x.  80  b.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  yere  of  o"^  Lord  God  M°**V^xxix°'^. 
I  Rauff  Awnger,  of  Barwek  in  Elmet,  in  the  countie  of  York,  hole  of 
mynd  and  seke  in  the  body,  maketh  my  testament  and  will  in  forme 
following,  ffirst,  I  bequeith  my  soull  unto  God  Almyghty,  and  my 
body  to  be  beried  where  it  shall  please  my  executory,  and  y°  to 
distribute  for  my  soull  the  day  of  my  beriall  in  wax  and  in  money,  and 
other  almose  deidf  as  y°*  shall  thynk  c5venient  to  the  pleaso"^  of  God 
and  my  degree.  And  where  I,  the  said  Rauff,  by  my  deid,  infeofiid 
Thomas  Langton  of  Hudleston,  Esquier,  late  decessed,  Roger  Wilber- 
fosse,  and  Witi'm  Jakson,  to  them  to  ther  heires  of  all  my  messuages, 
landf,  tentf,  pastures,  wodf,  mores,  comons,  Rent(^  and  s^uicf,  with 
all  ther  app^ten,  lyeng  and  beyng  in  Redenes,  Skelton,  Houeden,  laxton, 
Keylpyng,  Addygfleit  et  Swynfleit,  in  the  countie  of  York,  as  it  apperith 
by  the  said  deid,  bering  dait  the  x***  day  of  January,  the  xx*^  yere  of  the 
Reign  of  Kyng  Henry  the  viij*^  to  thuse  to  p%rme  my  last  will 
therof  to  be  declared.  I  will  y'  my  executory  shall  take  and  p^ceve 
the  fermes,  Rentf,  and  all  other  pfitts  comyng  and  growyng  of  the 
forsaid  messuages,  fandf,  tenentf,  and  other  the  p"misse3  during  xvj 
yeres  next  after  my  deceasse,  of  which  fermes,  Rentf,  and  pfittf  I 
bequieth  to  Frauncf  *  my  doughter  forntie  poundf  for  the  paymet 
wherof  I,  the  forsaid  Thomas  Langton  and  others,  standith  boundon  by 
o"^  obligacon  to  Wittm  Hungate,  Esquier.  And  also  I  bequieth  of  the 
forsaid  fermes,  Rentf,  and  pfittf  to  Anne  my  doughter  fTourtie  poundf 
to  hir  mariege.  Also  I  bequieth  to  my  chyld  yt  my  wyff  is  now  w^  all 
of  the  said  ffermes,  Rentf,  and  pfittf  other  ffourtie  poundf.  And  I 
will  y'  my  executors  shall  putt  the  forsaid  somes  in  the  kepyng  of  some 
Abbay  or  in  other  sure  keping,  as  thay  doo  receyve  thame  of  the  forsaid 
fermes,  Rentf,  and  pfittf,  thar  to  be  keip  to  my  said  children  come  to 
thage  to  be  maried,  or' to  be  pmoted,  and  if  one  of  thame  fortune  to 
decesse,  than  the  money  to  her  bequethed  shalbe  devided  amongf  the 
other  that  leflff .  And  the  Resydew  of  the  forsaid  ffermes,  Rentf,  and 
pfittf  I  will  that  my  executors  shall  receyve  and  take  to  the  fynding  of 
my  forsaid  thre  children  to  be  maried  or  pmoted,  so  y'  noyn  of  ther 
money  to  theym  bequeathed  be  spendid  nor  waisted.  Also  I  will  y' 
my  executorf  take  and  receyve  ten  poundf  of  John  Mores  landf,  the 
which  is  owing  to  me  of  my  marege  money,  and  shall  haue  all  my  guddf 
and  cattails  to  and  for  the  paymet  of  my  dettf,  and  for  to  dysposse 
for  my  soulle  as  they  shall  thynk  best,  and  for  the  execucon  of  this 
my  testamet  and  last  will,  I  ordan  and  make  Elezabeth  my  wyflf,  my 
uncle    Roger   Wilberfosse,    and    my    cosyn    Wittm    Chamblayn    my 


TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA.  43 

execulorf .  In  witnes  wherof  to  this  my  pnt  testamet,  I  haue  putto  my 
seale.  Thes  wittnesse3,  Nycholas  Aunger,  and  Sir  Wittm  Fenteman, 
preist,  w^  other.  Also  I  will  that  my  executorf  haue  thar  costf  and 
charegf  borne  of  the  hooL  Itm  I  bequeith  to  eu^y  one  of  my  s^uand^ 
xij<*.  Itm  I  bequeith  to  my  suster  Katerine  x*.  Itm  I  bequeith  to 
Wittm  Ellys  iij*  iiij**.  Item  I  bequeith  to  my  suster  Dame  Agnes  vj* 
viij<*.  Itm  I  bequeith  to  my  doughter  Franc3  on  ryng  of  gold  which 
was  hir  mother.  To  John  Ellys*  my  brother  in  law  one  dublett  of 
cremysjm  sattan.  To  my  brother  burton  oo  dublett  of  Russett  sattan. 
I  will  y«  my  s^uand  Peter  haue  my  fresyd  cott  and  fustian  dublett  and 
one  pare  of  hosse,  and  at  the  day  of  my  beriall  to  be  delt  halff  peny 
dolL  I  bequeith  to  Sir  Thomas  Settyll  ij*  to  pray  for  my  soull.  To 
Sir  Wittm  Elington  viij**.  All  other  thyngf  I  putt  in  the  order  of 
myne  executory.  Also  I  bequeith  to  the  church  of  barwik  one  furrid 
tawny  chamlett  gowne  and  x*  of  money  for  to  maik  one  coip  of.  Itm 
I  will  they  be  one  trentall  of  messe3  ^^^^X*^  ^^r  me.  Itm  I  bequeith  to 
my  uncle  Wilberfosse  one  blak  chamblett  gowne.  Itm  I  bequeith 
to  \Vittm  chamberlayn  one  gray  awmlyng  stagge.  Itm  I  bequeith  to 
my  brother  Nicholes  one  tawney  gowne  of  cloith  and  one  Kendall 
colt  Itm  I  ordan  and  make  M'  Thomas  Magnus  director  unto  the 
Dukf  grace  of  Rychmond  and  Som'sett,  myne  euspeciall  gud  maister, 
the  sup^visor  of  this  my  last  will,  yf  it  please  hym.  Thes  heyng  witness, 
Sir  Thomas  Settyll,  the  curatt  of  Barwik,  Thomas  Nawit,  and  Henrie 
Burton,  with  other. — [Proved  6  October^  'SSi-] 


Thomas   Smyth,  of  Pontefract,  Alderman. 

(X.  9«  a-) 

(Surtees  Society,  Test,  Ebor.^  v,  302.) 


Thomas  Smythson,  of  Altofi-s. 

(x.  9a.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  viij  day  of  Novembr,  in  the  yere 

of  o'  Lord  God  on  thousand  ccccc  and  thirty.     I  Thomas  Smythson, 

of  Altoftf ,  of  [whole]  mynd  and  remebrance,  makf  this  my  testamet  and 

last  will  in  man^  and  forme  foloving mjk  [body]  to  be  beried  in 

the  chirch  yerd  of  Normanton.  Also  I  gyve  and  bequeith  unto  the 
chirch  warkf  xl<*.  Also  I  gyff  unto  my  wyff  for  the  terme  of  her  lyefF  all 
my  landf,  boith  flfrehold,  and  copyehold  w*in  the  towne  and  feldf  of 
Altoftf,  and  after  the  deceasse  of  hir,  it  to  retome  agayn  to  Gilbert 
my  sofa  if  he  lyve,  and  if  he  dye  unto  Robert  my  son.  Also  I  gyff 
unto  Thomas  Hill  my  son  in  law  one  Reid  Cow  w^  calff  in  full 
contenta^on  of  his  wyfff  childf  part.  Also  I  gyff  and  bewytt  unto 
the  ffriars  of  Pomfrett  xij<*.  Also  I  gyff  unto  Agnes  my  doughter  one 
whye.      Also  I  gyff  unto  my  doughter  Jane  one  whye.     Also  I  gyf 


*John    EUis   was   of  the    Barnborough    family.      See    Glover's    Visitation    of 
Yorkikire^  p.  1 35. 


44  Tis^STAMENTA    LEODi£NSlA. 

unto  Robert  my  son  my  best  ox.  Also  I  gyff  unto  Margaret  my 
doughter  on  new  brasse  pott  Also  I  gyff  unto  Gilbert  my  son  my 
wayn  and  plought,  w'  yockf,  temes,  harrowis,  and  other  thyngf  therto 
belonging.  Also  I  gyflf  and  bequeith  for  the  saying  of  one  trentall 
of  messes  x*.  Also  I  gyff  and  bequeith  unto  Margaret  Malynson  one 
wyndill  off  wheat.  All  the  Rest  of  my  guddf  not  bewit,  my  dettf 
paid,  my  will  fulfillid,  I  gyflf  unto  my  wyflf,  whome  I  make  myn 
executrix.  Thes  beyng  witnesses,  Sir  Thomas  lond,  preist,  Wittm 
Nalson,  Nycholas  Spynk,  Robert  Nalson,  and  Thomas  Paterik,  w'  other 
moo. — [Proved  26  September^  ^SS'-] 


John  Wilson,  of  Micklefield. 

(x.  93  a.) 

In  Dei  noTe  Amen :  the  flfurst  day  of  August,  in  the  yere  of  o*" 
Lord  God  a  thousand  d  and  xxviij.  I  John  Wilson,  oflf  Mykelfeld, 
beyng  of  hooll  mynd  and  of  gud  memory,  ordans  and  makf  this  my 

psent  testamet  and  last  will  in  man^  foloving my  body  to 

be  buried  in  the  church  yerd  of  Shereburne,  and  y*  the  law  will 
require  in  the  name  of  my  mortuary.  Also  I  bequeith  to  the  hye  alter 
for  my  tethis  forgotten  xij^.  Also  I  bequeith  to  Sanct  Peter  warkf 
at  York  xij^.  Also  I  bequeith  to  Shereburne  church  warkf  iij"  iiij**. 
Also  to  Mykelfeld  chappell  iij'  iiij**.  Also  to  Esabell  my  doughter  x*. 
Also  to  Rychard  my  son  one  Iron  boun  wayn,  one  yook  of  oxen,  a 
yook,  one  Iron  teeme,  one  horse,  and  one  mare.  Also  to  Nycholes 
my  son  vj*  viij^.  Also  to  Agnes  my  doughter  vj*  viij**.  Also  to  Alyson 
my  doughter  vj*  viij^.  Also  to  Margaret  my  doughter  vj*  viij^.  Also 
to  Elsabeth  flfairchild  xl*.  And  also  to  a  preist  to  say  for  my  saull 
and  my  wyflff  saull  one  trentall  off  messe3,  and  he  to  haue  x*.  The 
Residew  of  my  guddf  nott  above  bequethed  I  gyve  to  my  son  S"^ 
Wittm  and  to  Sir  Wittm  Fentaman,  whome  I  make  my  executorf,  to 
pay  my  dettf  and  fulfill  my  will,  and  to  dispose  for  the  helth  of  my 
saull  after  the  discrecion.  Written  the  day  and  yere  abovesaid. 
Witnesses  heroflf.  Sir  Wiflm  Skelton,  John  Gibson,  Rychard  Howdaill, 
w' others  moo. — {Proved  17  November^  iSS'O 


John  Midgley,  of  Headinglev. 

(xi.  3  a.) 

In  Dei  noTe  Amen :  anno  domini  Mittmo  quingentesimo  trigesimo 
primo  Sexto  Idiis  Decembris.     I  John  Migeley,  of  Hedingley,  within 

the  pishe  of  Ledes,  of  hoole  mynde  and  memorie my  bodie 

to  be  beriede  in  the  church  or  churche  yerde  of  Sancte  Peter,  in 
Ledes.  Also  I  bequeath  unto  the  hie  altar  xij^.  Also  I  will  that 
my  son  Richarde  Midgelay  be  contentid  in  like  porcon  for  his  childe 
parte  and  mariadge  good,  and  that  fully,  as  well  as  my  doughtor,  wif 
of  John  Pollard,  was  contented  at  the  tyme  of  hir  mariage.  Also  I 
orden  and  make  my  wif  and  Richarde  my  sone  my  executors,  that 
they  dispose  for  my  saull   helth,  after  the  best  maner  that  they  can 


TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA.  45 

or  maye,  and  after  that  they  haue  brought  me  forth  and  beried  me, 
of  my  hoole  substance  and  goodf  and  my  dettp  paid,  Than  I 
bequeath  the  hoole  residue  of  my  goodf  to  Richarde  my  sone  and 
my  wif,  my  executors.  With  theis  wittenesses,  Richarde  Midgeley  my 
son,  Richarde  Pollard,  Roberte  Midgeley,  with  other. — [^Proved  23 
January,  153 1-2.] 

Ann  Rookby,  of  Spofforth. 

(xi.4b.) 

In  Dei  noTe  Amen :  the  viij'^  day  of  February,  the  yere  of  our 
Lorde  God  M'dxxxj***.  Wittenessith  that  I  Anne  Rookby  voes,  of 
good  hoole  mynd  and  memorie,  makf  my  last  will  and  mynde  and 
testament  in  maner  and  forme  foloing:  ffirst  I  bequest  my  saull 
to  the  Fader  of  hevyn,  to  o**  ladie  Sancte  Marie,  and  to  all  the 
celestiall  company  of  hevyn,  and  my  bodie  to  be  beried  in  Marie 
Magdlen  where,  within  the  pishe  churche  of  Spofford.  Also  I  bequest 
to  one  prest  to  syng  at  the  same  altar  the  spacie  of  thre  yeres  xiij'», 
to  praye  for  my  saiQl  and  my  husbandf  sauUes,  and  al  cristen  sauUes. 
Also  I  gif  to  the  said  altar  a  chales,  a  vestyment,  one  albe,  and  al 
altar  clothes  therto  belongyng.  Itm  I  will  that  eu^y  prest  the  day  of 
my  beriall  sh^ll  haue  iiij**,  and  eu^y  clerke  ij**,  and  eu'-'y  other  creator 
that  will  take  it  j<*.  Also  I  gif  to  Anne  Aldeburghe,  my  maide,  for 
hir  good  s^uicie,  iiij'*  and  hir  hoole  yere  wadges.  Also  I  bequest  to 
the  said  Anne  my  secunde  slope,  my  beste  kirtle,  one  mattres,  one 
par  of  sheitf,  one  cou^lett,  on  par  of  blankettf,  and  all  my  pewder 
vescell,  one  panne,  one  brandereth,  one  litle  spowne,  and  ij  litle 
pilloos.  Also  I  gif  Sir  Roberte  Penycotte  to  pray  for  me  xij«^.  Also 
I  gif  to  eu^y  watyng  sunte  and  the  cooke  in  the  hoose  viij*^,  and  to 
eu^y  other  werke  sunte  man  and  woman  iiij**.  And  to  eu^y  poore 
childer  belongyng  the  howse  ij^.  Also  I  gyve  to  eu^y  howse  in  the 
towne  having  nede  iiij^.  Also  I  gif  John  Poile  one  cotte,  one  dublett, 
one  cap,  one  par  hoos,  and  one  par  of  shoos.  Also  I  gif  to  Neill 
Plompton  xij<*.  Also  I  gif  to  Sancte  Edmudes  altar  at  Knaresburghe 
church  xij**.  Also  I  gif  to  Sir  Edmde  Beyne  to  pray  for  my  saull 
vj»  viij<*.  Also  I  gif  Roberte  Plompton  thelder  xij^.  Also  to  Roberte 
Plompton  the  yonger  one  silu^  spone.  Itm  Denys  Plompton  one 
siluer  spone.  Itm  Jenet  Lambert  viij*^.  Itm  to  Margarete  Dinelay 
ray  secunde  kirtle.  Itm  to  Janet  Talier  one  clothe  kirtle.  Itm  to 
Maistres  Isabell  Plompton,  wiff  of  William  Plompton,  my  best  slope, 
ij  fyne  kerchefTf,  one  smoke.  Itm  to  Maister  William  Plompton  one 
sUu'*  spone,  one  diapor  clothe,  ij  diapor  towels,  one  par  of  fyne  sheitf*. 
Itm  to  Maister  John  Grenefeld  xij^.  Itm  to  Talier  wif  one  smoke. 
The  residue  of  all  my  goodf  and  dettf  due  to  me  at  this  daye  not 
bequeathed  I  will  that  Edmunde  Rawlinson,  whome  I  make  my  sole 
executor,  to  dispose  them,  bothe  dettf  and  goodf ,  for  the  helth  of  my 
saull,  with  ou^sight  of  his  maister  as  sup^visor  of  the  same,  this  my 
last  will  And  I  gif  to  my  executor  for  his  labor  vj"  viij**.  Thies 
p^sones  bering  wittenes,  Maister  John  Grenefeld,  gentilman,  Antony 
Aldburghe,  William  Hill,  Sir  Roberte  Penycott,  prest,  cu  multis  alys. 
— [Proved  ultimo  die  February^ 


46  testamenta  leodiensia. 

Margaret  Newby,  of  Kirk  Fenton. 

(xL  6  b.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  xvj'**  daye  of  June,  in  the  yere 
of  our  Lorde  God  M^xxxj'^.  I  Margarete  Newby,  of  Kirke  fenton, 
Widdo,  hoole  of  mynde  and  of  good  memorie,  intending  to  be  and 
continue  the  sunte  of  God,  make  my  last  will  and  testament  in  this 
man^  and  forme  foloing.  First  I  bequeath  my  saull  to  God  Almyghtie 
to  the  glorious  virg3me  our  ladie  Sanct  Marye,  and  to  all  the  blissed 
company  in  hevyn,  and  my  bodie  to  be  beried  within  the  chancesell 
of  sancte  Michaell,  in  the  pishe  church  of  Fenton  aforsaid.  Also  I 
bequeath  to  the  hie  altar  in  the  forsaid  churche  for  my  tithes 
necligently  forgettyn  ij".  Also  I  bequeath  to  the  sepulchre  v*.  Also 
I  bequeath  to  our  ladie  of  piety  iij*  iiij*^.  Also  I  bequeath  to  my 
pishe  churche  foore  torches.  Also  I  bequeath  to  the  foure  men  that 
beres  the  said  torches  to  the  church  before  my  corse  the  daye  of  my 
beriall  eu^y  one  of  them  iiij*^.  Also  I  witto  a  honeste  prest  forto 
sing  one  hoole  yere  in  the  said  chancell  of  Sancte  Michaell  within 
the  said  pishe  churche  of  Fenton  for  the  helth  of  my  saull  and 
al  cristen  sauUes  seyvyn  marcf.  Also  I  witt  Isabell  Lowde  my 
doughter  my  best  girdle,  a  silu^  pece,  a  grete  brasse  pott,  a  par  lyne 
sheitf,  and  a  par  of  hardyn  sheitf,  a  towell,  and  a  burdclothe.  Also 
I  witte  Margarete  Wadyngton  v  marcf ;  ij  siluer  spones,  a  copberd, 
and  one  pare  of  Corall  beades  w'  silu^  gaudes.  Also  I  witto  Elisabeth 
Edling  xl^  The  residue  of  all  my  goodf  not  bequeathed,  my  dettf 
paid,  and  fun^all  expenses  maid,  I  gif  to  Frances  Newby  my  son, 
whome  I  make,  ordenes  and  constitutes  my  full  executor  of  this  my 
w^ill,  forto  dispose  as  he  thinkes  best  for  the  helth  of  my  sail.  Also 
I  humbly  desire  my  sone  William  Newby  to  take  the  payne  to  be 
sup^viso^  of  this  my  will,  and  for  his  payne  takyn  I  bequeath  hym 
vij*  vj<*.  Wittenes  herof.  Sir  William  Fentaman,  William  Thorpe, 
Roberte  Doclay,  and  Thomas  Cowpe. — [Proved  i8  March^  1531-2.] 


William  Stede,  of  Stede,  in  Otley. 

(xi.8.) 

Xviij"®  die  mensis  Aprilis  anno  dni  millesimo  quingentessimo 
trigesimo  secundo  administraccio  omnium  bonorum  que  fuerunt 
Willelmi  Stede  nuper  de  Stede  parochia  de  Otteley  abintestato 
decedentis  comissa  fuit  Roberto  Stede  de  Stede  predicte  drapor  fratri 
dicti  defuncti,  jurato,  etc. 

William  Lethome,  of  South  Milford. 

(xi.  iz  b.) 

In  noTe  dei  Amen :  the  xxviij*^  daye  of  Septembre,  in  the  yere 
of  our  Lord  God  M'dxxx*^.     I  William  Lethome,  of  South  Mylforth, 

beyng  in  good  memorie my  bodie  to  be  beried  in  the  pishe 

of  Alhallos,  in   Sherebum,  in  the   Mydle  Aley,  as   nere  to  my  stall 
as  may  be  conuenient.     Also  I   gif  and   bequeath   to  the  hie  altar 


TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA.  47 

for  tithes  forgettyn  ther  xij«*.  To  the  churche  warkf  there  v^  Also 
where  as  I  am  in  detto  John  Lethome,  my  sone  and  heire,  for 
certejme  landf  whiche  I  haue  occupied  of  his,  sithe  the  departyng  of 
Agnes  somtyme  my  wif  (whos  saull  God  pdon)  and  moder  to  my 
said  sone  John  x^»  of  farmes,  I  will  y*  he  be  truly  content  and  paid 
therof.  Also  I  gif  and  bequeath  to  John  Lethome  my  cosyn  and 
sunte  one  acre  of  barlie  or  xx",  whedder  it  shall  please  hym.  To 
Elisabeth  Sikes  my  god  doughtor  one  quarter  of  barlie.  The  residue 
of  all  my  goodf  afore  not  witt  gyven  ne  bequeathed  I  gif  and 
bequeath  to  William  Lethome,  sone  and  heire  apparent  unto  my 
forsaid  sone  John  Lethome,  whome  I  make  my  executor,  he  to  dispose 
ther  with  for  the  helth  of  my  saull,  with  thadvice  of  Charles  Jacson, 
whome  I  make  sup^visor  of  this  my  last  will.  Thies  beyng  wittenes, 
Roberte  Heryson,  of  Pontefracte,  John  Boswell,  of  Shereburn,  John 
Sikes,  Sir  Thomas  Lond,  prest,  Sir  John  Talior,  prest,  William  Cold- 
cole,  and  other.  Also  I  bequeth  to  Janet  Halale  a  quarter  of  Barly. 
M**  that  in  the  yere  of  our  Lord  God  mdxxxij'**,  I  the  said  William 
Lethome  thelder,  ordence  and  makf  John  Lethome,  my  sone  and  heire, 
the  rewlar  and  concernar  of  William  his  sone  and  myne  executor,  and 
of  all  suche  goodf,  moueable  and  unmoueable,  as  shalbefall  the  said 
William  his  sone  by  the  reason  of  his  executorshipe,  to  he  be  of 
lowfuU  age.  And  than  I  will  that  the  said  John  delyu^  to  the  said 
William  his  sone  all  and  every  percell  accorddyng  as  it  was  delyuerid 
to  hym.     In  wittenes  herof  I  have  subscribed  my  name. — {^Proved  30 

^^yy  1532.] 

Elizabeth  Shaw,  Widow,  at  York. 

(xi.isb.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  xvj'*»  daye  of  the  moneth  of  Maye, 
in  the  yere  of  our  Lorde  God  Myxxxij'**.  I  Elisabeth  Shaw,  widdow, 
of  pfitte  mynde  and  good  memorie,  makith  and  ordyneth  this  my 
last  will  and  testament  in  man^  and  forme  foloing.  First  I  gif  and 
comend  my  sail  to  God  Almyghtie,  my  creato**,  and  to  his  blissed 
moder  o'  Ladie  Sancte  Marie,  and  to  all  the  celestiall  courte  and 
company  of  hevyn,  and  my  bodie  to  be  beried  where  it  shall  forton 
me  to  dye  within  the  pishe  churche.  Also  I  bequeath  to  the  psone 
of  the  said  pishe  church  xij^.  Also  I  bequeath  the  daye  of  my  beriall 
for  half  a  trentall  of  messes  v*.  Also  I  bequeath  v''  of  wax  the  same 
day.  Also  I  bequeath  for  my  beriall  and  bryngyng  furthe  foure 
markf,  or  at  the  discretion  of  my  executors.  Also  I  bequeath  to  a 
honeste  prest  to  syng  for  me  and  my  husband  saulles  and  alcristen 
saulles  thre  yeres,  one  yere  at  Thomo^  an  other  at  Whitkirk,  the  thirde 
yere  where  it  shall  forton  me  to  be  beried,  and  he  to  be  paid  one  of 
the  thre  yerf  at  the  handf  of  my  sone  in  law,  Mathew  Oggilthorpe, 
and  to  be  acquiete  of  alman^  of  rekenyngf  betwyxt  hym  and  me, 
Elisabeth  Shaw,  so  that  the  prest  haue  vij  markf,  a  sufficient  wadge 
wberby  he  may  lif  and  onlie  sing  for  me  and  my  husband.  And  the 
other  too  yeres  I  will  that  my  son  William  do  pay,  and  he  to  haue 


48  TESTAMENTA    LEODIENSIA. 

vij  mark(^  by  yere  of  suche  good(^  as  he  haith  in  his  handf,  as  it 
doith  appere  by  writyng.  And  I  will  that  the  said  prest  or  prest(% 
whiche  shall  syng  for  me  the  said  thre  yeres,  shall  use  the  trentall  of 
Sancte  Gregorie  as  the  festf  do  fall,  and  to  say  and  use  the  collitte 
of  the  daye  with  placebo  and  dirige,  and  he  to  haue  that  yere  so 
doyng  vj"  viij**  ou^plus  for  his  payns  takyng.  Also  1  bequeath  to 
Mathewe  Ogilthorpe  my  son  in  law  one  silu''  pece,  and  after  decesse 
of  the  said  Mathew  to  his  son  Mathew,  and  vij  yerdes  of  lyne  clothe 
and  foure  silu^  sponys,  ij  kettils,  with  the  residue  of  all  my  household 
stuf  to  thuse  of  his  childer,  excepte  the  bequest  of  this  my  will.  Also 
I  bequeath  to  my  son  John  Shaw  wif  my  best  gold  ryng.  Also  I 
bequeath  to  Agnes  Shaw,  my  doughto*"  in  law,  an  other  gold  ryng. 
Also  I  bequeath  to  my  aunnte  Mawde  Shaw  on  of  my  best  kercheff , 
with  my  velvett  patlett.  To  William  Shaw  my  sone  my  chalis,  and  to 
his  wif  a  kerchif.  To  my  son  Sir  Umfrey  Shaw  a  fedderbed,  with  that 
p^teynyth  to  it,  with  one  silu^  girdle  for  a  prest,  with  one  stag.  To 
my  son  Peter  Shaw  xxxiij*,  that  is  in  the  hands  of  William  Howdon. 
To  Agnes  Shaw,  my  doughto*",  xl*  in  money,  and  my  gowne,  and  my 
kirtle,  and  my  best  belt,  and  my  best  beades,  with  one  crucifix  at  them, 
with  my  silu^  crokf.  To  Marie  Ogilthorpe  one  cowe,  with  one  caldrone. 
To  Anne  Oglesthorpe  one  cowe,  with  one  sangwhen  gowne,  with 
lynyng  of  buccacye.  To  George  Oglesthorpe  a  mace^  and  too  silu^ 
sponys  that  lieth  in  pledge  for  x*^,  and  if  they  be  loste  I  will  that  he 
haue  the  money  that  they  lye  for  and  one  stotte.  To  Agnes 
Oglesthorpe  one  ambrie  and  a  bras  potte.  To  Elisabeth  Oglesthorpe 
a  whie.  To  Grace  Oglesthorpe  a  whie  and  ij*  viij**,  which  Charles 
Geyny  ow  to  me.  To  Clement  Oglesthorpe  one  amblyng  mare.  To 
my  suster  Rawson  my  best  gowne,  one  kerchif,  with  my  hatte. 
To  my  suster  Bath  a  farcenett,  with  a  kerchif.  To  the  iiij  orders 
of  freres  vj*  viij**.  To  Sir  William  Pynder  iij*  iiij**.  To  the  Vicar  of 
Thorno"-  iij"  iiij^.  To  Sir  William  Settill  iij^  iiij^.  To  William  Wike 
wif  a  kerchif  and  a  smoke.  To  my  god  son  Henry  Norton  at 
Secroft  my  pyed  reband.  To  Thorno*"  Kirke  v*  to  by  them  a  crosse 
clothe  with.  To  Richd  wif  a  gowne.  To  Hilton  wif  a  kirtle.  To 
Margerie  Andrew  a  braspott,  one  pewder  dishe,  one  dubler,  and  a 
smoke.  To  Kateryne  my  maide  on  kerchif.  To  Bell  wif  my  kepar, 
a  peticott,  and  a  kerchif.  To  Jenet  Johnson  a  kerchif  and  a  smoke. 
To  Anne  Mason,  Robert  Awike  sunte,  a  pare  of  cette  beades.  To 
William  Reme  wif  a  peticott.  To  the  prisoners  in  the  castell  xij^, 
and  that  to  be  bestowid  in  mette.  To  Margerie  my  hoise  and  shois. 
To  Alicie  Swyndon  ij  yerdes  of  hardyn  clothe.  To  Isabell  Harbatill 
a  blacke  gowne  purfilled  w*  shank (\  Also  I  make  my  sone  John 
Shawe  sup'^viso'  of  this  my  last  will,  and  to  se  it  fulfiUid,  he  to  haue 
for  his  labo'  xl*.  I'he  residue  of  my  guddf ,  my  dettf  paid,  and  my 
will  fulfillid,  and  al  other  expenses,  fun^all  honestly  maid  and  done, 
I  will  that  my  sone  Mathew  Oglesthorpe  and  my  sone  William  Shaw, 
whome  I  make  my  executors  of  this  my  testament  and  last  will,  gyf 
and  delyu^  all  suche  goodf  as  is  dew  to  me,  whiche  is  in  the  handf 
of   my   sone    William,  and   all    other    dettf   to   the   use   of  my   son 


TESTAMENTA    LEODIENSIA.  49 

\lathew  Oglesthorpe  childe^  and  the  said  executors  to  ordre  and 
dispose  the  said  goodf  to  ichone  of  them  as  they  shall  think  most 
necessarie.  And  they  to  haue  for  theire  labo*"  aither  of  them  x*. 
Thies  wittenes.  Sir  William  Marton,  psone  of  crux  churche,  Rauff 
Langley,  Sir  Miles  Walsforthe,  Rauf  HarbatilL— [7V^/^a/<r  granted  8 
August,  1532,  of  the  Win  of  Eliz,  Shaw,  widow,  late  relict  of  John 
Shaw,  late  of  Secroft,  deceased,  to  Mathew  Oglesthorpe,  gentleman,  and 
William  Shaw,  son  of  deceased,  the  executors,] 


Margaret  Brachay,  of  Ledstone. 

(xL  31  b.) 

In  Dei  nomine  Amen :  in  the  xv'^  day  of  Marche,  in  the  yere  of 
our  Lord  God  a  thousand  fL\e  hundreth  xxxj'K     I  Margret  Brachay, 

of  Ledston,  of  holl  mynd  and  gud  remembrance and  my 

bodie  to  be  beried  in  the  churche  or  churche  yerd  of  our  Lady  at 
Kepaxe.  Itm  I  bequeath  to  the  hye  Aulter  xij«*.  Itm  to  the  gray 
fireres  of  Pomfrett  v*  for  one  trentall.  Itm  to  Isabell  Byram  one 
lame,  one  cou^ett,  ij  par  of  shettf,  one  pott  and  a  pan,  a  kettill,  a 
cresset,  a  brandreth,  one  gowne.  Itm  to  Margery  Bramhm  one  gowne 
&  kirttell,  a  petticott,  one  kyrcheffe.  To  Brian  Bramfem  one  lam. 
To  Thomas  Watt^  one  lame,  a  blew  gowne.  To  Agnes  Watt^  one 
kyrttill.  To  Isabell  Wynter  one  CurchefFe,  one  hate,  a  hoode.  (hoc 
facto),  my  dettf  paid  and  my  fun^allf  expenses  maid,  the  rest  of 
my  gudf,  nother  gifFen  nor  bequethed,  I  giffe  and  betake  to  Robert 
Brachay  my  son,  whome  I  make  myne  executo'  of  this  my  present 
and  last  will  that  he  dispose  them  aft  the  mynde  and  ou^syght  of 
Wilim  Lownde,  Richard  Layke,  and  George  Bolton,  whome  sup^visors 
of  this  my  last  will.  Thies  men  beryng  wittenes,  S[ir]  Thomas 
Schamoden,  prest,  John  Bramfem,  Wittm  Londe,  and  Richard  Leyke, 
with  other  moo.  Geven  at  Ledston  the  day  and  yere  abowe  written. 
— [Proved  4  November,  1532.] 

Agnes  Hemsworth,  of  Swillington. 

(xi.  32  b.) 

In  Dei  nomine  Amen :  in  the  yere  of  our  Lorde  Gode  a  thousand 
five  hundreth  therty  and  too,  and  the  xiij**»  day  of  Septimbre.  I  Agnes 
Hemsworth,  wedowe,  w*"  the  pishing  of  Swyllyngton,  of  good  mynde 
and  holl  memory,  maketh  and  ordenyth  this  my  last  will  in  man^  and 
forme  foloying.  First  I  gife  and  bequeath  my  saul  to  Gode  Almyghty 
and  to  his  blissed  mother  our  Lady  Sancte  Mary,  and  to  all  the  holl 
Courte  of  hevyn,  and  my  body  to  be  buryed  within  the  churche  of 
all  Halois  of  Swyllyngton.  Also  I  will  that  Mast^  person,  my  curett, 
haffe  to  pray  for  me  And  for  forgotten  tythes  xx^.  Also  I  gifFe  unto 
the  churche  of  Swyllington  unto  the  bying  of  one  coope  xl*,  one 
kyrcheffe  to  make  a  corprax,  on  alt^  clothe  to  our  lady  alt^  and  a  lyne 
ck>the  to  make  a  hillyng  to  the  sancte.  Also  I  will  that  one  honest 
prest  doo  syng  for  my  husbande  saull  and  myne  and  all  cristen  saullf 


50  TESTAMENTA    LEODIENSIA. 

in  the  sad  churche  of  Swillyngton  one  holl  yere  incontenet  after  my 
deyth.     Also  I  giffe  unto  the  causye  at  est  end  of  Swyllyngton  bryge 
XX*.     Also  to  the  Vicare  of  Ledes  and   to  the  vicar  Whitkyrke,  and 
to  ether  of  them  for  forgotten  tythes  ij*.     To  the  mendyng  of  Tempil 
newsome  lane  xx<*.     To  eu^y  one  of  my  god  childer  iiij^.     To  Thomas 
Hemsworth  and  Margaret  Hemsworth,  my  brother  childer,  to  ether  of 
them    ij    yewes   and    ij   lames.     To   Thomas   Banes  xxvj*  viij**.     To 
Elsabeth    Lane   xl%  in   peny   or   penyworthe.     To   Robert   Lucas   a 
Ryall  in  gold.     To  Agnes  Lucas  his  wif  one  cowe,  which  she  haith. 
To  his  iiij  childer  ycheone  of  them  vij*  vj**.     To  Steuen  Lucas  sex 
shepe.     To   Richard   Grave,  sone  unto   Rauffc  Graue,  ij  shepe.     To 
Rofet    Hemsworth,  Thorns    Hemsworthe   sone,  my    best    Bras   potte, 
puided  that  it  remane  to  hym  or  to  some  of  the  same  name.     To 
Elsabeth  his  sister  vij*  vj<*.     To  Thomas  Hemsworth,  my  sone  wife,  a 
par  of  corall  beadf ,  prouided  that  they  Remane  to  Rotte  hir  sone  or 
to  su  of  his  name.     To  John  Bane  three  sylu^  sponis  or  vj"  viij**.     To 
Poille  of  Thorn^  one  mere,  or  to  be  compounded  to  the  valo^     To 
Richard  Hilton,  Robert  Fenton,  and  to  Wittm  Harison,  eche  one  of 
the  a  mette  of  wheatte  and  a  mette  of  barlye.     To  eu^y  housholde"^ 
within   the   pishing   of  Swyllington   hauyng  noo  come  grouyng  one 
stroke  of  wheate.     To  John   Bane  wifFe  one   kyrtilL     To   Margaret 
Gybson  one  gowne,  withe  a  kirtill.     To  Wittm  Shakilton  wife  a  lyne 
shete.     To  Janet  West^man  a  pettycott,  withe  a  kyrcheff.     To  Wittm 
Haryson,  John   Carleton,  and   Wiftm   Sager,  iche   of  them   ij*.     To 
Issabell  Diche  one  whye  sterke.     To  Jenet  Webster  ij«.     To  Alis  Lee 
X*.     To  Alis  Pleys  a  whye.     To  Jenet  Adm^gill  a  mete  of  whele.     To 
Rauffe  Preston  one  whie.     To  S*^  George  List''  iij*  iiij^.     To  Sir  Wittm 
Brodehed  and  to  s'  Wittm  Shakylton,  ether  of  them  a  shert  cloithe, 
or  els  xx«*.     To  Agnes  Lucas  and  to  Ursile  Hemsworthe  a  s'tan  of 
whyte  wolle  to  make  ather  of  them  a  gowne.     To  the  said  Agnes 
and  Ursule  ather  of  them  a  sylu^  spone.     To  Robert   Hemsworthe 
my  sone  viij***  oxen  and  a  wane,  and  all  that  p^tenyth  therto,  and  vj** 
xiij*  iiij**  to  gett  hym  a  farmehold  withe,  and  x'  to  bye  hym  a  Jakett, 
and  on  holl  bed  and  ij  sylu^  spones.     And  unto  Sir  John  Hemsworthe 
my  sone  xiij*  iiij*^.     Also  unto  the  said  s'  John  my  son,  to  the  bying 
of  one  fetherbed  xl^  in  monye  and  asmych  blewe  yeme  as  will  make 
j   Gowne.     The   residue  of  this  blewe  yerne  I  gifF  unto  Jenet  and 
Elsabeth,  my  doughters.     Also  to  the  said  Jennet  and  Elsabeth  all 
my  appery  wayre,  that  is  to  say,  shetf,  bordclothes,  towellf,  napkyns, 
ij  arks,  and  ij  chistf,  with  all  appery  wayre  within  them.     To  Jenet 
ij  cou^etf  and  one  hillyng  to  a  bed.     To  Elsabeth   ij  cou^letf,  and 
ether  of  them  ij  matt^essis,  ij  pare  of  blanketf,  Codwares  and  bosters 
therto.     To  Jenett  v  carpeft  whishyngf  and  one  pare  of  Beadf,  one 
pare  of  new  silu^  crokf  and  my  best  tache,  ij  silu''  sponis.     To  Elsabeth 
my  best  gyrdill,  a  pare  of  silu^  crokf,  one  tache,  and  ij  silu^  sponis. 
Also  I  will  that  ether  of  them   haue  vj^  xiij*  iiij**  in  monye.     The 
Residewe  of  all  my  goodf,  my  dettf  paid  and  fun^all  expenses  maide, 
I  giffe  unto  Sir  John  Hemsworthe  my  sone,  and  to  Thomas  Hemsworth 
my  sone,  whome  I  make  and  ordenyth  myne  executors.     And  I  make 


TRSTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA.  $1 

Arthur  Dyneley,  Jentilman,  Rauffe  Grave  and  Robert  Lucas  sup^visors 
of  this  my  last  will,  and  that  eu^y  one  of  them  haue  vj*  viij**  for  his 
labor.  Theis  being  wittenes,  Sir  Wittm  Brownhed,  s""  Witfm  Shakilton, 
John  Lytster,  with  the  said  superuysors. — [^Proved  13  November ^  1532.] 


Robert  Atkinson,  of  Holbeck. 

,  (xl  33  b.) 

In  Dei  nomine  Amen:  the  xxij'*  day  of  December,  in  the  yere  of 
our  Lord  a  thowsand  five  hundreth  and  xxxj.  I  Robert  Atkynson, 
of  Holbeke,  of  the  pishyng  of  Ledf,  in  the  countie  of  Yorke,  holl 
concience,  holl  mynd,  makf  my  will  and  testament  in  this  maner. 
First  I  giffe  my  sail  unto  Allmyghtie  God  and  to  our  Lady  Sanct 
Mary,  and  unto  all  sanctf  in  heven,  and  my  body  to  be  buryed  in 
the  churche  of  sanct  Peter  at  Ledf.  Also  I  giffe  unto  Issabell 
Atkynson,  my  sone  doughter,  a  howse  and  a  garthyng,  now  in  the 
tenure  of  George  Sawnder,  and  a  closse  cawled  hellmyer  paying  the"" 
fore  yerely  xvj*  viij<*  unto  the  fader  of  the  said  Elsabethe  \sic'\  after 
my  decesse  and  Elsabethe  my  wiffe.  Also  I  giffe  the  said  Elsabeth 
xl*  of  monye  and  a  belt  of  golde  and  sylu^  price  of  xl^,  and  too  sylu^ 
spones.  Also  I  giffe  unto  Agnes,  my  sone  doughter,  a  howse  and  a 
^Euthyng,  nowe  in  teneor  of  George  Estbume,  and  xl*  of  monye  and 
too  sylu^  spones.  Also  I  giffe  unto  Margarett  Atkynson,  my  son 
doughter,  a  howsse  and  a  Garthyng,  now  in  the  tenor  of  John 
Atkynson,  father  unto  the  said  Margrett,  and  xl*  of  money  and  too 
sfhjp  sponys.  Also  I  give  unto  Jennet  Atkynson,  my  sone  doughter, 
xl*  of  monye.  Also  I  give  unto  Elsabethe  my  wiffe  mj^  holl  take  of 
my  fermeholde  duryng  her  lyf,  and  aft^  hir  decesse  to  remane  unto 
John  Atkynson  my  sone  and  his  assignes.  Also  I  give  unto  Ledf 
churche  xiij»  iiij^  of  a  condicon  that  the  pishyng  sett  forth  the  kyrkf 
side,  and  if  nott  no  mony  to  be  paid.  Also  [I]  orden  and  makf 
myne  executors  Elsabeth  my  wiffe  and  John  Atkynson  my  sone  of 
all  my  goodes  nott  bequeathid.  Also  it  is  my  will  that  my  executors 
deKu^  or  cause  to  be  deliu^yd  viij'»  of  monye  into  the  handf  of 
Gylbertt  Casson,  and  all  other  thyngf  that  belongf  unto  the  said 
childer  partt  or  parttes  a  bowne  said,  and  itto  be  delu^yed  after  my 
decesse.  And  the  said  Gylbertt  Casson  to  haue  all  the  said  goodf 
in  rewll  and  kepyng  to  the  childer  be  hovne,  unto  suche  tyme  thie 
be  abyll  to  gou^ne  it  or  come  to  soker.  Also  I  make  my  ou^sears 
of  all  the  said  goodf  Roland  Atkynson,  John  Kyll3mgbeke,  James 
PaterdalL  Thies  beyng  wittenes,  John  Thomson,  Roger  Lee,  Edmunde 
Fayrbanke,  with  other. — [^Proved  14  Novemhery  1532.] 


Adam  Harrop,  of  Batley. 

(xi.  34.) 

In  £>ei  nomine  Amen.  I  Adam  Haroppe,  of  p^fite  will  and  holl 
mynde,  makf  my  testament  and  last  will  the  xiij^  day  of  Apryll,  in 
the  yerc  of  our  Lord  God  a  thowsand  five  hundreth  xxxij'»,  in  man^ 


52  TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA. 

and  forme  folowyng.  First  I  give  my  sail  to  God  omnipotent,  our 
Lady  Sanct  Mary,  and  to  all  the  fare  company  of  hevyn,  my  body 
to  be  buryed  in  my  pishe  churche  of  All  hallowes  at  Batley,  my 
mortuarye  to  be  paid  accordyng  to  the  Acte  of  pleament.  Also  I 
gif  xij**  to  the  hye  alter  for  forgettyn  tythes.  Also  I  will  that  there 
be  geven  to  Sanct  Anne  alter  vj^  viij**,  the  whiche  is  dett  Also  I 
gif  to  Thomas  Harope  xxxiij*  iiij«*.  Also  I  gif  to  Elyne  Harope  xK 
To  S"-  Wittm  Etley  vj«  viij<*.  To  S'  Umfray  Maill  iij»  iiij<*.  Also  I 
will  that  I  be  honestly  beried  accordyng  to  my  degre.  The  Residewe 
of  my  goodf  not  legatt  my  fun^all  expensis  maid  and  my  dettf 
paid,  I  give  to  Elsabeth  my  wif,  whome  I  make  myne  executrix  of 
this  my  last  will.  Thies  be  sup^visors,  Dame  Kateryne  Bourghe,  Sir 
Wittm  Otley,  S''  Umfray  Maille,  prest.  Wittenessis  thes  Thomas 
Peper,  Thomas  Thornes,  John  Nevell,  with  other. — [Proved  30 
December^  1532.] 


Richard  Grave,  of  Rothwell. 

(xi.  38.) 

In  Dei  nomine  Amen :  in  the  yere  of  our  Lorde  God  a  thousand 
fyve  hundreth  xxxij*^  and  in  the  tente  day  of  January.  I  Richarde 
Grave,  yoman,  within  the  pishe  of  Rothwell,  of  good  mynd  and 
memorye,  makith  and  ordenyth  this  my  last  will  in  maner  and  forme 
folowyng.  First  I  gif  and  bequeath  my  sail  to  God  Almyghtie,  and 
to  his  blissid  mother  our  Ladie  Sancte  Mary,  and  to  all  the  holle 
courte  of  heven,  and  my  bodie  to  be  buried  wythin  the  churche  yerde 
of  the  holie  trinitie  of  Rothwell,  nye  the  palmes  crosse.  Also  I  will 
that  maister  Vicar,  my  gostlye  father,  for  tithes  forgotten  and  to 
discharge  my  conscience  haue  xiij*  iiij<*.  Also  I  bequeth  to  the 
churche  of  Rothewell  to  the  churche  nedis  iij"  iiij*^.  Also  to  the 
upholde  of  Swillyngton  cawsy  vj*  viij**.  Also  to  the  freres  of  Pontfret 
vj*  viij**.  Also  to  the  upholde  of  Medlay  churche  ij*.  Also  to  otter- 
forth  bryge  vj*  viij^.  Also  to  the  mendyng  of  the  butcher  loone  ij*. 
Also  I  bequeath  to  eu^y  one  of  my  godchilder  beyng  on  lyve  ij**.  Also 
to  Swyllyngton  churche  xx*^.  Also  I  bequeath  to  my  lorde  Darcy  my 
best  Awmyllyng  mere,  or  els  one  Awmylyng  stage.  To  Robert  Mores 
and  Agnes  his  wyffe,  my  doughto^  vj'»  xiij*  iiij<*,  with  my  blissyng,  clerely 
to  be  dischargede.  And  if  the  said  Robert  will  not  bee  content  with 
the  said  vj*^  xiij'  iiij<*,  that  then  the  saide  Robert  to  haue  no  peny  bott 
as  the  lawe  will,  or  els  to  take  the  rent  of  my  hous  at  Wrygilsforth 
to  the  said  sme  be  rune  uppe.  To  Agnnes  Mores  one  cowe.  Also  to 
Richarde  Mores  one  ox  styrke  of  too  yeres  olde.  Also  to  Martyne 
Mores  one  oxe  styrke  of  ij  yeres  olde.  Also  to  Henry  Turnay  one 
Kendall  Jaket  Also  to  Wittm  Grame  one  blake  freshe  gowne,  with 
one  pare  of  whyt  hosse.  Also  to  Margret  Nunys  iij*  iiij*^.  Also  to 
Elsabeth  Bingley  iij*  iiij<^.  Also  to  Elsabeth  Smyth  iij"  iiij<*.  Also 
to  Richard  Graue,  sone  to  Rauffe  Graue,  one  gray  nagge.  Also  to 
Martyne  Graue  one  oxe  styrke  of  too  yeres  olde.     To  Elsabeth  Graue 


TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA.  53 

one  whie  of  ij  yeres  olde.  I  bequeathe  to  Bryan  Nunys  and  to 
Wiitm,  to  ether  of  them  a  whie  styrke  of  ij  yeres  olde.  Also  to 
Richard  Handley  one  whye  of  two  yeres  olde.  Also  to  Wittm 
Lyndelay  one  bukkescyne  doyblett.  To  Rauf  Graue  my  sone  all  my 
takkf  and  landis  that  I  haue  w^in  Olton,  and  also  I  bequethe  to  the 
said  Rauf  the  kyngf  demanes  callid  twayte,  w'  all  thereto  belongyng, 
cxcepe  on  closse  callyd  cletf ,  the  whiche  I  will  that  my  wyf  and  Wittm 
my  sone  haue  duryng  the  terme  of  the  takke,  payng  therfore  the  kyngf 
ferme.  To  my  wyffe  and  Wittm  my  sone  my  takke  of  clobeclyfe  and 
crynylsforth,  w4n  the  lordeshype  of  Medelay,  payng  the  ferme  to  the 
lordes  therfore.  To  VVittm  my  sone  one  gyltyd  goblett  w*  one  cou^yng 
belongyng  therto.  To  Jennet  my  wif  and  Wittm  my  sone  vij*^  in  golde, 
immedeatly  to  be  deuided  betwyx  them.  To  Jennet  my  wyife  and 
Wittm  my  sone  xvj^  sylu^  sponys,  indeferently  to  be  deuided  betwyx 
them.  To  Rauf  Grave  my  sone  xxvj"  viij<^,  that  Richard  Cartre  of 
Sowrby  lordeshipe  doth  owe  me.  And  also  I  bequeath  to  the  said 
Rauf  xxvj*  viij<*  that  Olyu^  Bynnys  of  the  pishyng  of  Elande  owe  unto 
me  for  ij  fatt  oxen.  The  residue  of  all  my  guddes  unbequethed,  my 
fun^all  expensis  maide  and  my  dettf  paid,  I  gif  to  Jennet  my  wiffe  and 
Wittm  my  sone,  whom  I  make  and  orden  my  executors.  And  also 
I  will  that  Jennet  my  wif  shall  haue  kepyng  of  all  the  goodf  that  doth 
p'tene  unto  my  said  sone  Wittm,  beyng  at  under  age,  and  if  it  fortune 
the  said  Jennet  my  wif  to  marye,  then  I  will  that  Rauffe  Grave  my 
sone  and  S*^  John  Hemysworth  to  haue  the  kepyng  of  all  the  said 
goodf  p^tenyng  unto  the  said  Wittm,  which  said  Rauffe  and  S' John 
I  nuJce  supervisors  of  my  will,  and  ether  of  them  to  haue  for  ther 
labC  X*.  In  wittenes  therof,  Robert  Lucas,  Robert  Mores,  Thomas 
Bluet,  and  the  said  superuisors. — \^Froved  ii  February ,  1532-3] 


Robert  Midgley,  of  Headingley. 

(xi.  43«) 

In  the   name  of  Gode  Amen :    the  vij^^  ide  of  Nouembris.      I 

Robert  Migelay,  of  Hed3mgley my  bodie  to  be  buried  in  the 

pishe  churche  of  Ledis.  To  the  highe  Aulter  xij**.  Also  I  will  that 
all  my  hooll  goodis  be  equally  deuided  in  thre  partes,  of  the  whiche 
one  part  shall  bryng  me  ftirth,  and  the  seconde  parte  to  my  childeren 
Robert,  Alison,  and  Isabell,  and  the  third  part  to  my  wiff.  And  I  will 
that  the  Residue  of  my  part  aft^  I  be  brought  furthe  remane  in  my 
wif  hand  for  the  helpe  of  S'^  John  my  sone.  Itm  I  gif  to  Elsabeth 
Bateley  vij»  vf.  Itm  to  my  Lord  Abbatt  of  Christall  iij*'  iiij**.  To  the 
Cooentt  of  the  same  x*.  Also  I  will  that  my  draught  carye  xx'»  lodes 
of  stone  or  thyngf  necessarie  for  mendyng  of  the  heghe  waye  betwyxt 
Wetwode  and  Ledes.  And  I  orden  and  make  my  wif  my  soUe 
executrix  and  George  M^shall  superuisor.  Thies  wittenesses,  Richard 
M^elay,  Thomas  Dawson,  Xpofer  Culpon,  Henry  Walker,  and  other. 
"^Proved  i   May,  1533.] 


54  testamknta  leodiensia. 

Lionel  Cowper,  of  Thorparch. 

(xi.  43  b.) 

In  nomine  Dei  Amen :  in  the  yere  of  our  Lord  Gode  a  thowsand 
fyve  hundreth  and  xxxiij'^  and  the  first  daye  of  Nouember.  I  Lionell 
Cowper,  of  the  pishyng  of  Thorpparche,  and  of  a  holl  mynd,  makf  my 
will  and  testament  in  this  man^  First  I  bequeath  my  saull  to 
Almyghtie  God  and  my  bodie  to  be  beried  in  the  kyrke  erde  of 
AUhalows  at  Thorpparche,  and  my  mortuary  to  be  payde  accordyng 
to  the  law.  Also  I  bequeth  to  my  curate  xij«*  to  pray  for  my  saull. 
To  S*^  Robert  Colynson  viij<*.  Itm  I  bequest  to  a  childe  cald  Richarde 
Cowper  XX*.  To  the  iiij  borders  of  Freres  at  Yorke  eu^yone  a  peke  of 
wheatt  To  too  lityll  wenchis  of  Thomas  Leonardf,  ether  of  them  a 
yew  shepe.  The  Rest  of  my  gudes  I  gif  to  Isabell  and  Anne  my 
doughtors,  whome  I  make  my  executrixis  to  pay  my  dettf ,  to  deliu^ 
my  bequest.  And  the  rest  of  my  gudes  to  be  evynly  deuided  betwene 
them  accordyng  to  this  my  last  will,  by  thyes  recordf,  s'  Thomas 
Thomson,  my  curate,  s'  Robert  Colynson,  Thomas  Leonard,  Wittm 
Browne,  and  Richard  Browne,  the  whiche  too  I  make  superuisors,  to 
se  that  my  will  be  fulfillid  as  my  trist  is  to  theme. — \Proved  14 
February,  15334.] 


William  Pickard,  of  Wike. 

(xL  44.) 

In  Dei  nomine  Amen :  the  last  day  of  December,  In  the  yere 
of  our  Lord  a  thowsande  five  hundreth  xxxiij'*.  I  Wittm  Pecarde,  of 
the  townshipe  of  Wyke,  wythin  the  pochyn  of  Harwode,  makith  my 
last  [will]  and  testament  in  forme  her  folowyng.  First  I  bequest  my 
saull  to  Gode  Almyghti  and  my  bodie  to  be  beried  within  the  holie 
sanctuarie  of  the  pishe  churche  of  Allhalos  of  Harwode.  Also  I  will 
that  my  wiffe  haue  all  my  holl  land  or  inheretans  duryng  hir  lif, 
withe  the  ordre  of  my  childer,  to  thie  be  att  lefuU  age,  if  she  kepe  hir 
wedohed,  or  els  to  gif  them  ther  childe  partes,  iff  she  marye,  that 
belongith  them  by  the  lawe.  Also  I  witt  to  iiij  borders  of  Freres  ij*. 
Also  I  ordane  and  makith  my  wiffe  Alison  and  Wittm  myne  eldest  sone 
my  full  executors,  to  accomplishe  and  fulfill  this  my  last  will  and 
testament,  and  to  dispose  my  guddes  for  the  well  and  helthe  of  my 
saull.  The  rest  of  my  part  unbequest,  my  dettes  paid  and  my  body 
beried,  I  will  shall  be  deuyded  emongf  my  wiflfe  and  childer.  Thies 
witnesses,  WiiJm  Peston,  clerke,  Richard  Alen,  Rauf  Pykard,  with 
many  other. — \Proved  14  February,  1533-4'] 


Robert  Hemsworth,  of  Swillington. 

(xi.44b.) 

In  Dei  nomine  Amen :  in  the  yere  of  our  Lorde  God  a  thowsand 
fyve  hundreth  and  xxx'S  the  xxvj  day  of  Aprill.  I  Robert  Hemsworth, 
of  the  gaynry  within  the  pishe  of  Swyllyngton,  yoman,  whatfull  of 
mynde  and  of  holl  memorie,  makith  and  ordens  my  last  will  in  this 


TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA.  55 

man^  folowyng.  In  the  first  I  bequeathe  my  saull  to  God  Almyghtie, 
to  o*^  Ladie  Sanct  Mare,  and  to  all  celestiall  company  of  heven,  my 
bodie  to  be  beried  within  the  churche  of  Allhalos  of  Swyllyngton,  before 
the  crusiiix.  Also  I  bequethe  to  maister  persone,  my  curate,  to 
discharge  me  of  forgotten  tithes,  oblacons  and  other  dewties  of  the 
churche  xxx*.  Also  I  bequeathe  to  the  said  churche  of  Swyllyngton  to 
bye  a  sutte  of  westmentf  iij'*  vj»  viij<*.  To  the  hye  Alter  of  Whitkyrke 
iij*,  and  to  the  churche  warkf  iij*.  Unto  the  hie  aulter  of  Ledis  iij*. 
To  the  churche  warkf  of  the  said  churche  iij"-  To  the  hie  Alter  of 
Aberfforde  churche  iij*  iiij**,  and  to  the  churche  warkes  iij^  iiij*^.  To  the 
hee  alter  of  the  churche  of  Methlay  xx**,  and  to  the  churche  warkf  xx<*. 
To  the  said  churche  of  Methlay  for  tithes  ii'.  To  the  hee  alter  of 
the  churche  of  Rothwell  xx**,  and  to  the  church  warkes  xx**.  To 
Swyllyngton  Bryge  end  vj'  viij^.  To  eu^yone  of  my  childeren  not 
maried  xxvj^  xiij»  iiij<*  for  ther  childes  part.  To  Robert  Lucas 
one  yoke  of  stottes  and  eu^yone  of  his  childer  vj*  viij*^.  To 
John  Hemsworth,  my  Brother,  iiij  oxen,  whiche  he  haith.  To 
Thomas  Pece  ij  oxen  whiche  he  haith.  To  Robert  Peice,  of  Colton, 
one  oxe,  whiche  he  haith.  To  Cecile  Pullen  a  yeryng  sterke.  To 
Margret  Tailyer  a  whie  with  caufe  nexte  yere.  To  John  Bane,  of 
Whitkirk,  a  whye  with  caufe.  To  Richard  Hilton  a  whie  with  cauffe 
for  his  styrke  that  I  haue.  Also  I  will  that  eu^yone  of  my  god  childer 
haue  iiij^  to  pray  for  my  saull  and  all  xpen  sauls.  Also  I  will  that 
Thomas  Hemsworth  childe  haue  vj*  viij<*.  Also  I  will  that  Lawrens 
Bayne,  Rauffe  Graue,  and  Wittm  Shakilton  the  scoler,  eu^yone  of  them 
haue  a  rewarde  at  the  discretion  of  Agnes  Hemsworth  my  wifFe  and 
other  of  my  executors.  Moreover  I  will  bequeath  to  the  churche  of 
Swyllyngton  one  Anthephon^,  I  will  that  it  ly  one  the  dark  side,  and 
that  the  ofsprine  of  me  be  gou^ners  of  itt,  and  to  red  and  to  rede  and 
syng  at  itt  to  s'^'ue  Code  os  long  as  itt  lastf .  Also  I  will  that  the  said 
diurche  of  Swyllyngton  haue  the  same  Calix  that  was  plegyd  to  me, 
and  that  my  ofspryng  haue  itt  at  ther  pleaso*",  when  itt  shall  pleas 
them  to  haue  mes  at  ther  howsis.  Also  I  will  that  xiij  cotegers  of 
Swyllyngton  not  hauyng  no  come  grouyng  haue  eu^one  of  them  a 
stroke  of  wheat.  The  Residewe  of  all  my  guddes  affore  not  gyfne 
nor  bequethid,  my  will  fulfiUid  and  dettf  paid,  I  gifFe  to  A^es 
Hemsworth  my  wiff,  to  S[ir]  John  Hemsworth  my  sone,  and  to 
Thomas  Hemsworthe  my  sone,  and  them  I  make  my  trew  executors 
of  this  my  last  will,  that  thie  ordre  and  disspose  for  the  helthe  of 
my  saull  os  thye  thynke  most  coBenyent  in  tyme  to  come.  Thies 
beyng  testes,  RaufT  Grave,  John  Hemsworthe,  and  John  Pullen,  with 
other  moo.— [Praued  i  June,  1530.] 


Ralph  Hopton,  of  Armlev. 

(xi.  45) 

In  the  name  of  Gode  Amen :   the  xvij***  day  of  Octobre,  in  the 

yere  of  our   Lorde  God   A  thousand   five  hundreth  and  xxxij^'.     I 

Rauffe  Hopton  esquier,  of  Armeley,  within  the  pishe  of  Ledis,  of  holl 


56  TESTA MENTA    LEODIENSIA. 

mynde  and  gud  remembrance,  do  orden  and  make  this  my  last  will 
and  testament  in  this  man''  folowyng.  In  primis  I  bequeathe  my 
sauU  unto  God  Allmyghty,  to  our  lady  sanct  Mary  Virgyn,  and  to 
all  the  sanctf  in  heven,  and  my  body  to  be  beried  within  the  pishe 
churche  of  sanct  Peter  in  Ledis,  beside  my  wiffe.  And  I  bequeath 
to  my  Curate  for  tythes  and  oblacons  forgotten  xiij^  iiij**.  And  also 
to  my  curate  in  the  name  of  my  mortuarye  my  best  hors.  And  I 
bequeth  unto  the  blissed  sacrament  to  helpe  to  bye  anorment  iij* 
iiij**.  Unto  the  mendyng  of  the  hie  waye  at  mylngrene  betwyxt  the 
lanes  xx^  Also  to  the  supprior  of  Chrystall  and  the  conent  of  the 
same  x*  for  mes  and  dirige.  And  also  to  the  prior  of  Selby  and 
the  conent  of  the  same  x^  for  mes  and  dirige.  Also  I  bequeath  unto 
S'  Wittm  Malleuerey  knyght,  and  my  cosyng  Robert  his  sone,  a 
mear  and  a  fole.  Also  I  will  that  one  prest  syng  thre  yeres  at 
Armeley  hall  for  my  sauU  and  all  gud  frendis  saulles,  and  he  to  haue 
in  a  yere  vij  markf,  the  whiche  prest  I  wilbe  S'  Thomas  Bryge,  if 
he  be  so  disposid,  and  if  not,  then  suche  able  prest  aft^  the  discretion 
of  Robert  Malleveray  and  Henry  Ardyngton.  Also  I  will  that  my 
sone  Xpofer  Hopton  haue  my  swerde  and  my  bokler,  and  all  my 
harnes,  and  my  best  gowne,  whiche  as  he  woU  chuse,  and  my  best 
doblett,  and  my  sleueles  coitte  of  blake  veluet  and  damask,  and  my 
little  blake  nage.  Also  I  will  that  Anne  my  wiffe  haue  all  the 
household  gudf  that  she  brought  with  her,  and  all  suche  guddes  as 
is  goyng  in  one  fermehold  called  Wawdon  hede  in  Wensidayll,  and 
one  silu^  saulte  chosse  of  ij  of  my  awne,  and  vj  sylu^  sponys  of  my 
awne,  and  one  pare  of  bedis  gawdied  with  golde,  and  xl  marks  of 
monye,  a  gray  amblyng  nagge  that  she  dothe  ryde  one  her  selffe,  a 
whitte  awmblyng  mare  and  a  foil,  vj  kye  and  iiij  whies,  the  best  that 
she  woU  chuse  if  she  be  content  therwith  and  make  no  ferther  clame 
of  my  guddes ;  and  if  she  be  not  contentyd  therwithe  I  will  that  she 
haue  none  of  the  bequestf  afforesaid  but  as  the  law  will  giffe  her. 
Also  I  bequeathe  unto  my  brother  Xpofer  Hopton  a  bay  hors  whiche 
he  bought  of  me,  and  my  baye  stagge  to  make  hym  a  horsse  of,  and 
my  gowne  of  Chamlett,  if  my  sone  Xpofer  leve  it,  and  my  cremysyn 
veluet  doublett,  and  my  tawney  damaske  Jaket.  And  I  bequeath 
unto  Charts  Hopton  my  blake  furred  gowne,  my  tawnye  satten 
dublett,  and  my  kendall  Jakett  or  my  marble  Cotte,  whether  as  he 
will,  my  best  bonet,  and  my  shert.  Also  I  bequeathe  unto  Brigyd 
Walleworth  xl*,  and  to  my  brother  Marmaduke  Vaueso"^  my  white 
awmblyng  Fille  and  my  best  bowe.  And  to  my  sunte  Agnes 
Thistylethwate  a  kowe.  And  to  Agnes  Flansall  iij*  iiij*^.  And  to 
Margret  Hawmond  iij*  iiij*^.  And  to  James  Thomson  and  to  my 
syst^  his  wyife  iij^^  vj*  viij**,  of  part  of  payment  that  he  dothe  owe  me. 
And  to  S*"  Robert  Hopton  my  gray  awmblyng  stagge  in  the  southe 
feylde.  And  to  S""  Thomas  Bryge  vj^  viij<*.  And  to  Wittm  Fell  a 
jakett,  a  pare  of  hose,  and  a  pare  of  schowes  and  a  doblett.  And 
to  John  Mylner  a  jakett,  a  pare  of  hose,  and  a  pare  of  shewes. 
Also  I  make  myne  executors  of  this  my  last  will  my  sone  Xpofer 
Hopton  and   my  doughtor   Elsabeth   Hopton,  to  fulfill   my  will  and 


TESTAMENTA    LEODIENSIA.  57 

pay  my  dettes  and  all   my  fun^all  expenses.     And  thie  to  have  the 

residewe  of  my  guddes  equally  betwyxt  them.     And  all  suche  costf 

and  chargf  as  shalbe  maid  the  day  of  my  beryall  be  done  aft^  the 

discretion  of  Maist^  Danby  and  S"^  William  Malleuerey,  whome  I  will 

reseue  all  suche  gudf  as  shall  remane  to  my  sone  xpofer  and  my 

doughto*"  Elsabeth,  and  to  put  them   in  salue  custodie  in  Christall 

Abbay   by   byll    indentid,  unto   such    tyme   at   the  said    xpofC  and 

Elsabethe  come  unto  the  age  of  xxj**^  yeres,  if  the  said  Elsabeth  be 

unmaryed,  and  if  she  be  maried  then  I  will  that  all  suche  goodf  goo 

to  her  promotion  and  mariage.     Also  I  will  that  my  doughto^  Elsabeth 

haue  all  suche  somnes  of  money  as  shalbe  reseyuid  of  Maist^  Danby 

for  mariage  of  my  sone,  that  is  to  saye  a  hundreth   poundes  to  her 

manage,  and  the  Residewe  to  her  fyndyng  unto  such  tyme  as  she  be 

mary^  and   if  the  residewe  will   not  fynde  her  to  she  be  maryed, 

then  I  will  that  she  be  founde  of  suche  goodis  as  shall  remane  to 

her  by  her  porcon  accordyng  to  my  will.     Also  I  will  that  S'  WiH'm 

Malleuerey  and   Robert  Malleu^ey  and   Henry  Arthyngton  haue  the 

custodie  and  rewlle  of  ("my  doughto"^  Elsabethe  unto  she  be  maryede 

or  otherwajTS  pmoted,  and  resaue  all  such  somnes  of  money  as  shalbe 

paide  by  Maist^  Danby  or  his  executors  for  the  behoffe  of  my  said 

doughto',  and   put   in    salue   custodie    in    Christall    Abbay   by   byll 

indentid   betwyxt  them  and   the  said  Abbay.     And  also  I  will  that 

all  suche  gudes  as  shall  fall  to  my  executors  at  the  day  of  my  death 

by  the  vertue  of  this  my  will  be  sold  or  otherwais  put  to  pfett  by 

Maister  Danby  and  S*"  Wittm  Malleu^ey  after  ther  discretion,  to  thuse 

and  most  pfett  of  myne  executors,  if  myn  executors  be  not  at  that 

tyme  at  the  fiill  age  of  xxj  yeres  or  otherways  pmotid  as  is  afforesaid, 

and   the  monye  therfore  so  takyn  to  be  put  into  the  monasterie  of 

ipall  Abbay,  by  bill  intendid   betwyxt   Master  Danby  and  S'  Wittm 

Malleu^ey  and  the  said  husse  of  Cristall  as  is  afforesaid.     Also  I  will 

that  my  wiffe  haue  xl  weders  that  I  send  for  to  Wawdonhed,  or  els 

the  price  of  them.     Also  I  will  that  the  day  of  my  beriall  on  trentall 

of  messes  be  song  for  my  saull  and  all  my  gud  frendf  saules,  and 

I  will  that  eu^y  prest  that  sais  mes  of  the  trentall  haue  viij**,  and 

eu'y  other  prest  iiij**,  and  eu^y  pishe  Clarke  ij^  and  eu^y  boye  j^. 

Also  I  will  that  therbe  distribute  unto  pore  people  the  day  of  my 

buriall  x^S  to  be  sent  to  eu^y  townshipe  within  the  pishe  of   Ledis 

aft^  the    discretion    and    mynd    of    Master    Danby   and    S'  Wittm 

Malleu^y.     Also  I  will  that  all  suche  anommentf  as  ar  in  my  chapell 

at   Armeley,  as  well   the   chales  as   other,  remane  styll  in   my  said 

chapell.     And  if  the  Abbat  of  Cristall  and  the  conent  be  content  to 

haue  one  messe  bouke  whiche  thie  haue  in  custodie  for  the  chales, 

the  said  challes  to  remane  in  my  chapell,  and  if  not  the  messe  bouke 

to  remane  in  my  chapell.     And  I  will  that  iiij  nobills  go  to  bye  ane 

chales,  and  it  to  remane  in  the  said  chapell.     Also  I  make  sup^uisor 

of  this  my  last  will  Maist^  13anby  and  S*^  Robert  Neuell,  and  I  will 

that    Mast^  Danby  haue   chosse  of  ray  chrosse  bowe  and    my  litle 

home,  whether  as  he  will,  and  S'  Robert  Nevell  to  haue  the  other. — 

[Proved  4  August,  1533.] 


58  testamenta  leodiensia. 

Robert  Coventry,  of  Batley. 

(xi.  49.) 

In  Dei  nomine  Amen :  I  Robert  Couentrie,  of  pfite  mynde  and 
hoU  will,  maketh  my  testament  and  last  Will  the  iij  day  of  Octobre, 
in  the  yere  of  our  Lord  God  a  thowsande  fyve  hundreth  xxxiij**,  in 

man''  and  forme  folowyng My  bodye  to  be  beryed  in  my 

poche  churche  at  Batley,  my  mortuarye  to  be  paid  accordyng  to  the 
[acte]  of  pleament.  Also  I  giffe  to  Batlay  church,  to  the  kepyng  of 
the  organys,  my  new  howsse  and  the  housse  in  the  lane.  Also  I 
giffe  to  Mawde  Speghe  my  s'unt  the  valew  of  xx*  of  suche  gudf  as 
my  wiffe  may  best  part  w^.  Also  I  giffo  to  Anne  Couentre  a  whye 
of  iij  yeres  olde.  The  residew  of  my  goodf  and  landf  not  legat, 
my  fun^all  expences  maid  and  my  dettf  paid,  I  giffe  to  my  wiffe, 
whiche  wiffe  and  Maist*^  John  Deghton  I  make  my  executors  of  this 
my  last  will  the  day  and  yere  abowne  said.  Theis  men  wittnessyng, 
S""  Umfray  Maill,  my  curatt,  Robert  Wilby,  Ekiwarde  Coplay,  Henry 
Wilby,  with  othir. — [Proved  i  December^  i533-] 


John  Clarkson,  of  Batley. 

fix.  55  b.) 

In    Dei    Noie   Amen:    I   John   Clarkson,  of  p^fitt  will   and  holl 
mynd,  makis  my  testament  and  last  will  the  ix^  day  of  Aprill,  in  the 

yere  of  our  Lorde  God  a  thowsand  Five  hundreth  xxxiij my 

body  to  be  beried  at  my  pishe  churche  at  Batlay,  my  mortuarie  to 
be  paid  accordyng  to  the  acte  of  plyment.  Also  I  giffe  to  the 
sacrement  for  forgotten  tithes  iiij**.  lo  the  churche  warke  vj*  viij**. 
To  Jennet  Jagger  a  yonge  cowe.  To  John  Jagger  a  yewe  and  a 
lame  and  a  whie.  To  Agnes  Jagger  a  whye.  The  residewe  of  my 
guddf  not  legat,  my  fun^all  expences  maid  and  my  dettf  paid,  I  giffe 
to  my  wiffe  and  to  my  sone  Wittm,  and  my  sone  Richard  to  haue 
a  part  with  them.  My  said  wiffe  and  my  sone  Wilifm  I  make  my 
executors  of  this  my  last  will.  Wittenessyng,  John  Nailer  and  Richard 
Webster,  with  other. — [Proved  3  May^  i533>  ^  Matilda  the  relict  and 
William  the  son  of  deceased^ 

John  Byscham,  of  Harewood. 
C«.  56  a.) 
In  *Dei   nomine  Amen :    I    John    Byscham,  of   Harwod,   in  the 

countie  of  Yorke,  Yoman my  bodie  to  be  buried  in  the 

churche  yerde  of  all  Sanctf  in  Harwode  afforesaid.  I  bequeath  to 
the  blissed  sacrement  of  the  Aulter  xx^  for  tythes  forgotten  and 
offeryng  necligently  forgotten.  To  the  pishe  churche  of  Harwod  ij 
torchis  and  a  kercheffe  to  the  crosse.  To  the  iiij  orders  of  Freres 
in  Yorke  iiij*,  and  to  Sanct  Rott,  of  Knaysburgh,  xij**,  and  to  haue  a 
trentall  of  messis  done  for  my  saull  and  my  wiffe  saull  and  all  xpen 
saulls,  and  also  to  haue  a  dirige,  and  eu^y  chantre  prest  to  haue  vj*^, 
and  thie  to  feche  me  from  my  howse  to  the  churche.     Also  I   gife 


TESTAMENTA    LEODIENSIA.  59 

to  Henry  Byscham  my  sone  all  my  intrest  and  reght  of  all  my 
fermeholdf,  and  my  dettf  paid,  and  my  chargis  deducte  and  paide. 
The  residewe  of  my  guddf  not  bequethid,  my  legacie  pformyd  and 
fiilfiUid,  I  giffe  frely  to  Henry  my  sone,  and  my  brother,  vicar  of 
Whiell,  whome  I  orden  and  make  my  executors  of  this  my  last  will 
and  testament,  and  thye  to  distribute  and  dispose  my  said  guddf  as 
it  shalbe  seme  to  them,  so  as  may  be  most  to  the  onor  of  God  and 
to  the  helthe  of  my  saull,  and  I  giffe  and  bequeath  to  my  brother 
Vicar  for  his  labor  &  pane  vj*  viij**.  Wittenes  of  this  my  last  will 
and  testament,  Sir  WiiJm  Preston,  John  Pye,  Henry  Grene,  with  diuers 
other.  Writtyn  and  maid  in  my  house  at  Harwod  aforsaid  the  viij'*» 
day  of  Apriell,  in  the  yere  of  oure  Lord  Gode  a  thowsand  five 
hundrethe  xxxiij**»,  in  the  xxiiij  yere  of  the  reyne  of  Kyng  Henry  the 
cghL— [/V^?i«^  1 6  May,  1533.] 

Agnes  Burton,  of  Sherburn. 

(ix.  57  a.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen:  the  xx'**  day  of  Februarie,  in  the 
yere  of  our  Lord  God  one  thousand  five  hundreth  xxxj.  I  Agnes 
Burton,  of  Shereburne,  wedow,  beyng  of  hoU  mynde  and  memory, 
make  this  my  testament  and  last  will  in  man^  and  forme  folowyng. 
First  I  bequeath  my  saull  to  Allmyghti  God,  and  to  our  lady  sanct 
Mary  and  to  all  the  holy  companye  of  heven,  and  my  body  to  be 
buried  in  the  mydle  Allye,  before  the  crucifix  in  the  pishe  churche 
of  All  Sanctf,  in  Sherburne  in  Ellmet.  Also  I  bequethe  to  mast^ 
Vicar  for  and  in  the  name  of  my  mortuarye  a  Cowe,  and  for  my 
tythes  forgotten  xij«*.  Itm  I  bequeath  to  the  warkf  of  the  cathedrall 
churche  of  Sanct  Peter  in  Yorke  viij<*.  Itm  I  bequeathe  to  the  iiij 
orders  of  Freres  within  the  citye  of  Yorke  viij<*.  Itm  I  bequeth  to 
the  chapell  of  the  holye  Trinitie  in  Barkeston  iij*  iiij^.  Itm  to  the 
mantenyng  of  the  leght  in  our  lady  Chapell  in  Sherburne  iij"  iiij^. 
Itm  I  bequeath  to  the  churche  warkf  of  Shereburn  iij"  iiij*^.  Itm  I 
will  that  S[ir]  Robert  Ardyngton  syng  for  my  sauUe,  my  husbandf 
saulles,  and  my  children  sauUes,  and  all  xpen  saulles  for  the  space  of 
on  holl  yere,  and  he  to  haue  for  his  wagis  vij  mkf,  paid  by  my 
executors.  Itm  I  bequeath  to  Agnes  Rawdon  fourty  shillyngf.  Itm 
I  will  haue  at  the  day  of  my  buriall  for  my  saull  and  all  xpen  saulls 
xliij*  iiij<*.  Itm  I  bequeath  to  my  doughto'^  Elisabethe  Sallay  my  best 
beddf,  one  golde  ryng,  with  a  TapaSion.  To  Isabell  Sallay  my 
doughto'  one  pece  of  sylu^  one  gold  Ryng,  enamellid.  To  S'  WiiJm 
Fenteman,  prest,  one  golde  ryng,  not  enamallid.  Itm  I  will  that  my 
cosyn  Edward  Barkeston  and  S[ir]  Wittm  Fenteman  be  sup^uisors 
of  this  my  last  will  and  testament,  and  thie  and  ether  of  them  to 
haue  forty  pencf  in  gold.  The  Residew  of  my  guddis  not  bequethed, 
my  dettf  paid,  and  legacies  and  fun^allf  fullfillid  and  done,  I  giffe 
and  bequeth  to  Elsabeth  and  Isabell  my  doughtors,  whom  I  orden 
and  make  myne  executrices  of  this  my  last  will  and  testament 
Thies  wittenessis,  S[ir]  Wittm  Skynner  and  S[ir]  Robert  Ardyngton, 
chapplens,  et  ^\}%.— {Proved  31  May^  1532.] 


6o  testamenta  leodiensia. 

John  Dawson,  of  Sherburn. 
(57  b.) 
In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  xiiij***  day  [of]  January,  the  yere 
of  our  Lorde  Gode  one  thousand  five  hundreth  thertie  and  one.  I 
John  Dawson,  hoU  of  mynde  and  gude  memorie,  dothe  make  and 
orden  my  testament  and  last  will  in  forme  folowyng.  First  I  giffe 
and  bequeath  my  saull  to  my  saueo*"  Jfeu  Crist,  my  bodie  to  be 
buryed  in  the  pishe  churche  of  All  Sanctf,  in  Sherburn.  Also  I  giffe 
and  bequeath  for  and  in  the  name  of  my  mortuarie  xiij*  iiij**.  To 
the  heghe  alter  for  my  tithes  necligfitly  forgotten  xij*^.  Also  I  gif  to 
the  churche  warke  of  Sherborn  v*.  Also  I  giffe  to  the  upholdyng  of 
our  ladies  chapell  standyng  in  Shereburn  churche  yerd  iij*  iiij^.  Also 
I  giffe  to  the  rep*rynge  of  Feribrige  Cawsey  iij*  iiij^.  To  the  Reparyng 
of  the  heghe  way  towardf  Ledis,  calde  Salter  lone,  iij"  iiij^.  To  M"* 
[mistress]  Sibell  Ottf  iij^  iiij<*.  To  Agnes  Fomes,  Jennet  Craw, 
Kateren  Bywatter,  my  doughters,  all  my  houssehold  gudf.  To  my 
Sonne  Thomas  the  wode  standyng  and  grovyng  in  one  croft,  callid 
Pall  garthe,  at  Mylforth  and  vj**  xiij*  iiij*^,  of  this  condicon,  that  if  my 
said  sone  Thomas  do  make  imedeatly  aft^  my  decesse  a  lawfull  and 
assure  a  state  of  and  in  all  the  landf  whiche  his  susters  haith  of  the 
gifte  of  ther  mother  by  fyne  surrender  to  thusse  of  theme  for  terme 
of  ther  lives  at  suche  tyme  or  tymes  that  S[ir]  Wittm  Fentyman, 
Peter  Haull,  and  John  Wodhous  shall  require,  or  els  this  my  said 
bequest  to  be  voyde  and  of  none  effecte,  and  it  to  be  distributid 
emongf  my  said  doughters.  Itm  I  giffe  to  my  doughter  Jennet  x". 
Also  I  giffe  to  Wittm  Fentyman,  prest,  one  Angell  nobyll.  Itm  I 
giffe  to  Peter  Haull  one  angell  nobill.  To  John  Wodhous  one  angell 
nobill,  whome  I  make  sup^uiso'*s  of  this  my  last  will  and  testament 
Residew  of  my  gudf,  my  dettf  paid,  my  will  fulfillid,  my  fun^all 
doone,  I  giffe  unto  Thomas  my  sone,  Richard  Fumes,  Robert  Craw, 
and  John  Bywater,  whome  I  make  my  executors.  Thies  wittenessis. 
Sir  Wittm  Skynner,  my  curat,  John  Sykf,  Robert  Alkynson,  with 
other. — [Proved  15  February^  1531-2.] 


Thomas  Rawson,  of  Featherstone. 

(xL  60  a.) 

In  Dei  nomine  Amen:  the  xxx  day  of  May,  in  the  yere  of  our 
Lord  God  a  thousand  five  hundreth  xxxiij.  I  Thomas  Rawson,  of 
Fetherstone,  seke  of  Bdy  and  hoU  of  mynde,  makf  this  my  testament 
and  will  in  forme  folowyng.  First  I  bequeath  my  saull  to  God 
Allmyghti,  and  to  our  Lady  Sanct  Mary,  and  to  all  the  holy  company 
in  heven,  and  my  body  to  be  beried  within  the  churche  of  Fetherston 
before  our  lady.  First  I  bequeth  to  the  hye  aulter  viij<*.  Also  I 
bequeath  to  our  lady  suys  vj*  viij**,  of  the  whiche  there  is  in  the 
handis  of  James  More  sevyntene  grotf  and  ij**.  Also  I  bequeath  to 
Richard  my  sone  ij  stottf,  one  callid  grenehome  and  the  other 
blakman,  and  also  iiij  yewys  and  wode  to  make  hym  a  pleughe  and 
wane  of.     To  Robert  Emlay  my  best  yewe  lame.     Also    I  make  maist^ 


TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA.  6 1 

Hipperon  and  my  brother  Robert  superuisors  of  my  will,  and  I  giffe 
to  maist^  Hippon  one  colt  foole,  amblyng  and  mere  it  dame,  if  he 
will  take  her,  and  I  desyre  hym  to  be  good  maist^  to  my  wif  and  to 
my  childer,  and  if  chaunce  be  that  any  of  them  dy  that  ther  part 
shalbe  deuydid  amongf  the  other  of  my  childer.  Also  I  make  Jennet 
my  wiffe  and  Wittm  my  sone  executors,  that  thie  dispose  for  me  as 
I  haue  put  them  in  trust  The  resydewe  of  my  goodf,  my  dettf 
paid  and  fun^all  expensis  maid,  I  giffe  to  my  wiffe  and  my  childer. 
Also  if  my  wiffe  be  with  childe  I  giffe  unto  hit  xl*  of  my  part  more 
then  to  any  of  the  other.  Moreou^  I  giffe  to  my  brother  Robert 
my  shepe.  Theis  being  wittenes,  S[irJ  Edward  Wormall,  maist^ 
Wittm  Frost,  Maist'  Richard  Hippon,  Robert  Usshir,  Robert  Shelyto, 
and  Robert  Rawson,  with  other  moo. — [Proved  12  July^  ^533-] 


Margaret  Sharpe,  of  Methley. 

(jci  63  b.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  xiiij'**  day  of  January,  in  the 
ycre  of  our  Lord  Gode  Mkixxxij.  I  Margaret  Sharpe,  of  a  hoU  witt 
and  mynde,  makf  this  my  will  and  testament  of  this  man^.  The 
ferst  I  bequeth  my  saull  to  God  Allmyghty  and  to  his  blissid  moder 
Mary  and  to  all  the  blissid  sanctf  in  heven,  and  my  body  to  be 
beried  in  the  churche  yerd  of  Sanct  Oswalde  of  Methlay.  To  the 
hee  Aulter  within  the  said  churche  vj*^.  Also  to  our  ladie  light  iiij^. 
Also  to  the  rode  iiij**.  Also  the  pleughe  leght  iiij<*.  Also  to  the 
use  of  Sancte  Margret  sluice  within  the  said  churche  one  whye,  and 
to  eu^y  one  of  my  god  childer  iiij^.  Also  to  my  cosyng  George 
Sharpe  one  oxe,  one  stage,  and  one  oxe  styrke.  And  to  Jane  Sherpe 
one  half  qrt^  of  mault  and  one  great  panne.  And  to  George 
Sherpe,  Margret  Sherpe,  Agnes  Sherpe,  Kateren  Sharpe,  and  Anne 
Sherpe,  eu^y  one  one  shepe.  Also  to  Jennet  Sherpe  the  grether,  one 
chist  and  one  kyrcheffe.  And  to  Agnes  hir  sust^  one  gowne.  Also 
to  Richard  Sharpe  one  shepe.  And  to  Margret  his  suster  one  shepe. 
And  to  Robert  Sherpe,  sone  of  Richard  Sharpe,  one  whie.  Also  to 
Elsabeth  Duffan  one  whie.  And  to  Robert  Sharpe,  sone  of  Henry 
Sherpe,  one  mere.  And  to  John  Duffan  one  oxe  styrke.  And  also 
George  Gawkroger  one  whie  stirke.  Also  to  S[ir]  Robert  Ward  one 
cowe.  The  resydue  of  all  my  guddf  I  giffe  to  my  cosyng  Agnes 
Sherpe  and  Anne  Doffan,  the  whiche  Agnes  and  Anne  I  orden  and 
makf  my  lauffuU  executrices.  Witte.nes  wherof  is  S[ir]  Richard 
Shanne,  George  Sharpe,  and  John  Dobson. — [Proved  21  August,  ^SZZ-] 


Richard  Lound,  of  Methley. 

(xL  63.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  xxix^  day  of  July,  in  the  yere 
of  our  Lord  Jhu  mWxxxiij.  I  Richard  Lound,  of  a  gud  will  and 
boU  m3md9  makith  this  my  will  and  testament  of  this  man^  folowyng. 
The  ferst  I  bequethe  my  saull  to  God  Almyghtie  and  to  his  bliss^ 


62  TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA. 

mother  Mary  and  to  all  the  blissed  sanctf  in  hevn,  and  my  body  to 
be  beryed  within  the  churche  yerd  of  sanct  Oswald  of  Methley. 
Also  I  bequethe  to  the  hee  ault^  of  the  said  churche  iij*  iiij**.  Also 
to  all  the  sanctf  leght  in  the  said  churche  iij*  iiij**.  Also  to  the  vse 
of  Sanct  Margarett  sluice  in  the  said  churche  iij»  iiij<*.  Also  to  the 
mendyng  of  the  newe  bryge  iij*  iiij^.  Also  to  one  lone  beyond  the 
said  brige  iij*  iiij«*.  Also  to  the  house  of  the  freres  of  Pomfrett,  to 
the  entent  that  thaye  shall  celebrate  fyve  messis  for  my  sauU  and  all 
xpen  saulles,  xx**.  Also  I  witt  to  Alicie  Symes  one  cowe,  one  whie 
of  ij  yeres  old,  one  couplet,  one  blanket,  one  shette.  Also  I  will  that 
Jennet  my  wiffe  have  good  and  honest  kepyng  and  fyndyng  of  all 
the  residue  of  my  guddis  induryng  hir  liffe  naturall.  And  aft^  the 
deth  of  the  said  Jennet  my  wiffe,  the  Residue  of  all  my  gudf  I 
will  that  thie  remaine  to  Helis  Burton  and  Aicie  my  doughto*",  whome 
I  make  my  lawful!  executors.  Also  I  will  that  if  my  said  goodis 
will  not  extend  to  the  necessarye  fyndyng  of  the  said  Jenet  my  wiffe, 
then  I  will  that  she  haue  sufficient  sustentacon  and  kepyng  of  all 
my  landf  whiche  I  am  possesid  in  at  the  day  offorsaid,  the  whiche 
afForesaid  landf,  after  dethe  of  Jennet  my  said  wiffe,  I  will  that  they 
remaine  to  the  said  Ellis  Burton  and  Alice  my  doughter  and  to 
there  heres  of  there  bodies  lawfully  begotten  for  eu^.  Wittenes  herof 
is  S"*  Richard  Shanne,  S*^  Thomas  Burton,  John  Pullayne,  George 
Sharpe,  John  Dobson  and  Robert  E\\\s\ey,—{Pr&ved  21  August,  1533.] 


John  Thomson,  of  Holbeck. 
(65  a.) 
In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  xiiij'**  day  of  August,  in  the  yere 
of  our  Lord  God  one  thowsande  five  hundreth  xxxiij.  I  John 
Thomson,  of  Holbeke,  in  countye  of  York,  beyng  holl  of  mynd,  and 
make  this  my  testament  and  last  will  in  man^  and  forme  folowyng. 
First  I  bequeath  my  saull  to  God  AUmyghty,  to  our  blissed  lady 
Sanct  Mary  the  Virgen,  and  to  all  the  holy  Sanctis  in  hevyn,  my 
lK)dy  to  be  buried  within  the  pishe  churche  of  Sancte  Petre  in  Ledis. 
Also  I  gyffe  unto  the  heghe  aulter  in  the  said  churche,  in  recompence 
of  tythes  forgotton,  xijC  Itm  to  the  Abbay  called  Mewsse,  in 
recompense  of  any  wrong  to  that  housse  by  me  done  and  to  be 
praid  for,  x*.  Also  I  giffe  to  the  Trinytes  in  Yorke  in  lyke  man^ 
yj"  viij**.  Also  I  will  that  my  executors  shall  giffe  unto  some  pore 
prest  to  pray  for  my  saull  v*.  Also  I  will  that  Katryne  my  wiffe 
shall  haue  duryng  the  terme  of  hir  liffe  all  my  fermeholdis  intrest 
and  lease  of  all  the  howsis,  landes,  medowys,  and  closis  whiche  I 
haue  in  lesse  of  the  prio'  and  coftent  of  the  monastery  of  the 
trynytyes  in  Yorke,  in  Holbeke,  and  elswhere  in  the  countye  afforesaid, 
except  one  annvall  rent  of  xx^  which  I  will  that  Elsabeth  Bvnnye, 
wedow,  layt  the  wiffe  of  Richard  Bunnye,  of  Wakfeld,  the  eldre, 
decessed,  haue  receyve  of  one  housse,  with  thappurtenancis  in 
Holbeke,  now  in  the  teno*^  of  coscen  Mathew,  duryng  hir  liffe, 
accordyng  to  one  promes  maid  unto  her,  as  dothe  apere  in  certaine 


TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA.  63 

wrytyng  maid  betwyxt  hir  and  me,  and  after  hir  decesse  to  Katheren 
my  wiffe,  if  she  liffe  after  hir.  Also  I  will  that  after  the  decesse  of 
Katren  my  wiffe  that  the  housse  in  the  whiche  coscen  Mathew  now 
dwellith,  with  all  the  londis,  dosses,  medowes,  and  pastures  theronto 
belongyng  shall  remayne  to  John  Thomson  my  dough ter  and  to  hir 
assignes  duryng  my  holl  terme.  Also  I  will  that  in  medyatly  aft^ 
the  decesse  of  Katren  myne  wyffe  that  Phillipe  Cowper  my  doughter 
shall  haue  other  housse  in  the  whiche  George  Sande"^  new  dwellyng, 
and  one  closse  to  the  said  housse  belongyng,  duryng  the  terme  of  sex 
yeres,  and  after  that  to  thusse  of  my  doughter  Johane  Thomson  and 
hir  assignes.  Also  duryng  my  holl  terme  I  will  that  one  cotage  in 
the  whiche  Richard  Torno"^  now  dwellith,  shall  after  the  decesse  of 
Kateren  my  wiffe,  remane  to  the  prest  syngyng  in  Holbeke  Chapell 
for  the  terme  of  ij  full  yeres,  to  pray  for  my  saull  and  my  wyffe,  and 
after  that  to  Nicholas  Stubbe  for  the  terme  of  eght  yeres,  and  after 
that  to  thusse  of  George  my  sone  and  his  assignes  duryng  my  holl 
terme.  Further  I  will  that  myne  afforesaid  sone  George  shall  haue 
the  therd  partt  with  myne  executors  of  the  pte  of  my  goodis  that 
belongyth  to  the  executors  aft^  the  ordre  of  the  law  ouer  and  besides 
his  childes  parte,  my  dettf  before  paid,  if  he  will  be  ordryd  by  Charles 
Jakson  and  Thomas  Hardwyke,  and  els  he  to  haue  his  childes  part 
and  noo  more  of  my  goodis.  Also  I  giffe  unto  my  doughter  Phillype 
two  oxe  styrke.  The  residewe  of  all  my  gudes  afore  not  gyfne  then 
bequethid  I  giffe  to  Kathren  my  wiffe  and  John  Thomson  my 
doughter,  whome  I  make  my  executrices,  and  the  sup^uisor  of  my 
will  thafforsaid  Charls  Jakson  and  Thomas  Hardwyke.  There  beyng 
wittenesse,  Thomas  Rawdon,  George  Sawe,  Henry  Thornton,  John 
Webster,  Wittm  Coldcoylle  and  other. — [Proved  15  September^  1533.] 


Thomas  Angrome,  Priest,  of  Spofforth. 

(xL  70  b.) 

In  Dei  nomine  Amen:  the  yere  of  our  Lord  a  thowsand  five 
hundreth  xxxiij***,  and  the  xxiij^  day  of  January.  I  S[ir]  Thomas 
Angrome,  prest  of  our  ladies  gilde  in  Spofford  churche,  makf  my 
testament  and  will  in  this  man^  and  forme  folowyng.  First  I  bequeath 
my  saull  to  God  Almyghty,  and  to  our  ladie  Sanct  Marie,  and  to  all 
the  holie  companye  of  heven,  and  my  bodie  to  be  buried  within  the 
churche  yerd  of  my  pishe  churche  of  Alhallos  in  Spofforth.  Itm  I 
bequeath  to  one  prest  to  syng  a  trentall  of  messis  for  my  saull  and 
all  ipen  salles  at  our  ladis  alt^,  that  I  said  mes  at  my  self,  viij*. 
Itm  I  bequeath  to  Thomas  Angrome,  scoler,  my  kynsman,  all  my 
bokf  in  Spofforth  churche  and  in  my  chambre,  except  my  newe 
courchers,  the  whiche  I  bequeath  to  Spofforth  churche,  to  the 
mantenyng  of  Godf  sluice,  and  to  be  praid  for.  Itm  I  will  that  the 
said  courcher  remane  at  our  ladis  aulter  to  my  successor,  and  he  to 
haue  the  custodie  of  it  to  the  use  of  Godf  sluice.  Itm  I  bequeth 
to  the  bying  of  vj»  viij^  land  or  more  to  an  augmentacon  of  the  said 
chauntre  of  our  Ladis  gilde,  to  be  praid  for  eu^more,  pleggf,  dettf ,  or 


64  TESTAMENTA    LEODIENSIA. 

monye,  xx  nobils.  Itm  1  bequeath  to  Thomas  Angrome  a  maser  and 
a  riall,  a  nobill,  a  foldyng  spone  and  my  best  gowne.  Itm  I  bequeath 
to  John  my  kynsman  a  riall,  a  nobill,  a  silu^  dight  home,  ij  sylu^ 
sponys.  Itm  I  bequeath  to  Elsabeth  my  kynswoman  a  Riall,  a 
nobill,  and  ij  sylu^  sponys.  Item  I  bequeath  to  Isabell  my 
kynswoman  a  Riall,  a  nobill,  and  ij  sylu^  sponys  and  my  second 
gowne.  Itm  I  bequeath  to  Agnes  my  kynswoman  a  riall,  a  nobill, 
and  ij  silu^  sponys.  Itm  the  residue  of  all  my  goodis  moueable  and 
unmoueable  unbequethid,  and  not  witt  my  will  fulfillid,  my  dettf 
paid  and  my  fun^all  expeni  deducte,  I  give  to  Thomas  Angrome  my 
kynsman,  whome  I  orden  and  makf  my  holl  executor  of  this  my  last 
will,  that  he  orden  and  dispose  it  for  the  helth  of  my  saull  to  hym 
and  his  frendf  where'  the  most  ned  is  and  the  best  to  be  done. 
Itm  I  orden  Sir  John  Watson,  James  Middilbruke,  Robert  Ball  and 
Robert  Ledis  superuisors  of  this  my  last  Will,  that  thie  see  that  it 
be  performed,  and  thie  to  haue  as  it  pleasith  my  executor.  Item 
wittenes  herof,  Parcivall  Jenkynson,  Robert  Parke,  Richard  Wryght, 
with  other  moo. — [^Proved  28  February^  ^ 533-4-] 


John  Woodburn,  Bailiff,  of  Spofforth. 

(xL  80  b.) 

In  Dei  noTe  Amen :  the  xiij'**  daye  of  Aprill,  in  the  yere  of  our 
Lord  God  Myxxxiij'**.  I  John  Wodburne,  the  Balif  of  Spofford, 
beyng  of  a  hoole  mynde  and  a  hoole  memorie  and  reason,  ordens 
and  makf  this  my  testament  and  last  Will  in  this  maner  of  forme 
foloing.  First  I  bequeath  my  sail  to  Almyghtie  God,  to  our  blissid 
ladie  sancte  Marie  Virgyn,  and  to  al  the  holy  company  in  hevyn, 
and  my  bodie  to  be  beried  in  the  churche  or  churche  yerde  of 
Alhalos  in  Spofford  aforsaid.  Itm  I  bequeath  to  the  psone  of  the 
said  churche  or  to  his  pctor  certen  of  my  goodf  in  the  name  of  my 
mortuary,  accordyng  to  the  acte  therof  last  maid  as  the  Inventary  of 
my  said  goodf  doith  extende  in  dischardging  of  my  conscientie 
aneynst  God  and  my  sail.  Itm  I  bequeath  to  the  reparacons  and 
upholdyng  the  said  churche  vj*  viij^.  Itm  I  bequeath  to  Sir  Thomas 
Angrom  and  other  too  honest  prestf  xv*  to  pray  for  my  sail  and  my 
good  frendes  saules  and  al  cristen  saules.  Itm  I  bequeath  to  John 
Wodburn,  my  broder  William  son,  on  yoke  of  stottf  or  els  on  mare 
and  pte  of  my  rayment,  as  my  wif  shall  thinke  best  to  be  done.  It 
I  bequeath  to  John  Mydlebroke  a  fely  fole.  Itm  I  bequest  to 
Alison  my  wif  and  Katerine  my  doughto^  all  my  good  will  and 
copies,  with  all  other  thingf  as  is  nowe  due  unto  me  and  right, 
accordyng  to  the  costom  of  the  maner  concernyng  all  my  fermholdes 
in  Spofford  lordshipe,  that  is  to  saye,  the  house  that  I  doo  dwell  in 
and  the  care,  and  also  Waltonhed,  and  to  the  longer  lyver  of  them. 
It  I  gif  and  bequeath  unto  Kateryn  my  doughto"^  on  house,  with  all 
that  belongf  unto  hit  lyeng  in  Glanton  in  Northumberland,  beyng  in 
the  pishe  of  Whittingfem,  to  hir  and  hir  heires  for  eu^  Also  I  gif 
and  bequest  to  John  Wodburn,  my  brode*^  William  son,  all  my  title 


TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA.  65 

and  right  of  all  my  landes  the  whiche  is  in  traves,  and  haith  been 
betwixt  me  and  the  prior  of  Gisburne  and  the  chauntre  prest  of 
Chest^,  the  whiche  landf  lieth  in  Wodbum,  in  Redesdale,  and  in 
Tnitlyngton,  Crisdon,  Seiton,  and  Newbigyng,  in  Northumbreland,  to 
hym  and  to  his  heires  for  eu^  Itm  I  bequeath  unto  William  my 
brode'  a  ledde'  dublett  of  roobukeskynnes  and  a  jacket  and  a  paire 
of  hoise.  Itm  I  bequest  unto  eu^yon  of  my  breder  William  childer 
a  yow  and  a  lame.  It  I  bequest  unto  John  Camby  and  to  his  wif 
foure  poundes  sterling  in  relesing  and  forgyveyng  hym  in  parte  of 
payment  of  fourteyne  poundes  of  his  dette  that  he  doith  owe  unto 
me.  Itm  I  bequest  unto  Edmude  Mydlebruke  wif  on  whie  and  to 
cu'y  of  hir  childC  on  lame.  Itm  I  bequest  unto  Nicholas  Camby 
on  cowe  and  a  calf,  and  to  remane  in  the  gou^nance  of  his  grandame 
or  Katerine  his  aunte  to  the  tyme  that  he  come  to  yeres  of 
discretion.  And  al  other  the  residue  of  my  goodf  afore  not  gyven 
and  bequest,  I  frely  gyve  and  bequest  unto  Alison  my  wif  and 
Katerine  my  doughto*",  al  my  dettf  paid  and  fun^all  expenses 
discharged,  whom  I  orden  and  make  myne  executrices  to  order  and 
dispose  for  the  helth  of  my  saull  as  they  shall  seme  the  best.  Thies 
beyng  wittenes,  Sir  Thomas  Angrome,  prest,  Edmude  Myddilbroke, 
John  Bradforth,  John  Smyth,  and  James  Myddilbroke,  with  other  moo. 
Yeven  the  daye  and  yere  aboue. — [Proved  30  May,  1633.] 


Richard  Ryley,  of  Harewood. 

(xi.  82  a.) 

In  Dei  noie  Amen:  the  xv**»  day  of  the  moneth  of  Marche,  in 
the  yere  of  our  lord  God  M^xxxij^**.  I  Richarde  Ryley,  of  hoole 
mynde  and  good  remembrance,  makith  my  testament  and  last  Will 
in  this  maner  and  forme  folowyng.  First  I  gif  and  bequeath  my 
saull  unto  Allmyghtie  God,  and  to  our  lady  sancte  Marie,  and  to 
all  the  sanctf  in  hevyn,  and  my  body  to  be  beried  within  the  churche 
garth  in  what  pishe  that  it  shall  please  God  me  forto  departe.  Also 
I  gif  and  bequeathe  unto  on  honeste  prest  vij  mark^  forto  syng  on 
hoole  yere  for  my  sail  and  al  cristen  saulles  where  it  shall  please 
God  my  body  to  be  beried  at  the  assignement  of  my  executors.  Itm 
I  gif  and  bequeath  unto  eu^y  preist  that  comys  unto  my  dirige  and 
sais  messe  the  day  of  my  beriall  vf.  To  eu^y  scolar  that  comys 
unto  my  dirige  and  helpes  to  syng  messe  j^.  Itm  I  gif  and  bequeath 
to  eu'y  child  that  Cristofer  Beisley  haith  nowe  at  this  tyme  of  lif 
v}»  viij<*.  Itm  I  ^f  and  bequeath  unto  M**  Thomas  Vavaso',  of 
Copinthorpe,  vj*  viij**.  Unto  Thomas  Wynpere  x*.  To  Cristofer 
Bcaslcy  vj»  viij<*.  Unto  the  brede^  of  Bolton  forto  syng  one  messe 
and  dirige  for  my  sail  and  al  cristen  saules  vij*  vj^,  forto  be  equaly 
diuided  emongf  them,  and  to  be  maid  a  brodc  emongf  them  in  their 
bookf.  Itm  I  do  make,  constitute  and  orden  the  above  named 
Cristofer  Beisley,  Thomas  Vavaso*^  and  Thorns  Wynspere  my  executors 
of  this  my  testament  and  last  will,  forto  dispose,  order  and  rule  the 
residue   of  all    my  goodf  and  cattalles  unbequeathed  for  the  most 


66  TESTAMENTA    LEODIENSIA. 

helthe  of  my  sail  afte^  their  discretion,  and  forto  the  helping  of  my 
broder  William  Ryley  aud  my  suste*"  Wynspere  wif.  Thies  wittenes, 
Sir  William  Hardyng,  prest,  Mathew  Harteley,  William  Edmudson, 
with  other  moo,  the  daye  and  yere  aboue  writyn. — \^Proved  8  May^ 
I533-] 


William  Mitteley,  of  Little  Preston. 

(xL  83  a.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  xiij'*»  daye  of  Marche,  the  yere 
of  our  lorde  God  M'dxxxij.  I  William  Mitteley,  of  little  Preston,  of 
the  pishe  of  Kepax,  within  the  countie  of  Yorke,  husbandman,  hool 
of  body  and  good  remembrance,  makf  this  ray  last  Will  afte'  this 
maner  of  forme  foloing.  First  I  bequeath  my  saull  to  God  Almyghtie, 
and  to  o"*  lady  sancte  Marie,  and  to  all  the  holie  company  of  hevyn, 
and  my  body  to  be  beried  in  the  churche  yerde  of  Kepax.  Also  I 
bequeath  to  the  blissid  sacrament  for  forget tyn  tithes  xij*^.  Also 
I  will  that  eu^yon  of  my  v  daughtors  that  is  unmaried  haue  iiij'*  to 
their  barne  parte.  Also  I  will  that  M'garet  my  wif  and  Thomas 
Mitteley  my  son  haue  my  fermhold  that  I  haue  by  lease  as  my 
neburghes  hais  of  o''  maiste'  Sir  Arthur  Hopton,  knyght,  evynly 
betwyxt  them  after  my  decesse  to  the  take  or  lease  be  fully  endid, 
without  the  said  Margarete  do  marie  agayne  within  the  said  yeres, 
and  than  the  said  Margarete  for  to  depte  without  any  trobling  with 
my  sone  Thomas  Mitteley,  and  than  the  said  Margarete  to  haue  my 
house  in  Kepax  that  I  haue  ther  by  copyhold  afte*"  the  costome  of 
the  courte,  now  in  the  holdyng  of  Henry  Elome,  and  the  said  Thomas 
Mytteley  to  kep  upe  the  said  house  with  strawthake  at  al  tymes. 
And  also  the  said  M^garete  to  haue  my  land  at  Rothwell,  afte"*  the 
costome  of  the  man^,  now  in  the  holding  of  William  Knyght,  during 
the  lif  of  the  said  Margarete,  and  afte"^  hir  lif  nafall  to  retorne  unto 
Thomas  Myttelay  my  son,  and  if  he  dye  without  ishue  of  his  body 
lawfully  begottyn,  that  then  it  is  to  retorne  to  the  right  heires  of  my 
body  lawfully  begottyn.  Also  I  will  that  Margaret  my  wif  and 
Thomas  Mitteley  my  son  be  my  executors  to  fulfill  this  my  will,  that 
M'garete  my  wif  to  haue  the  custodie  of  Gracie  Mytteley  and 
Beatrice  Mitteley  my  doughtors,  and  their  barne  partf  to  they  be 
xviij  yeres  of  age,  and  then  either  of  them  to  haue  iiij^*  for  their 
partf  (if  they  demande  it)  by  the  advise  of  freindes.  Also  I  will 
that  Thomas  Mytteley  my  son  to  haue  Isabelle  Mytteley  and  Janet 
Mytteley  my  doughtors  in  his  custod)^  to  they  be  xviij'**  yere  of  adge, 
and  then  aither  of  them  to  haue  iiij*»  for  their  partf  (if  they  demande 
it)  by  the  advise  of  frendf.  Also  I  will  that  Jane  my  doughto"^  haue 
foure  poundes  for  hir  parte  at  suche  tyme  as  she  and  hir  frendes 
can  helpe  her  to  some  good  succor  Also  I  will  that  Margarete  my 
wif  and  Thomas  Myteley  my  son  haue  the  residue  of  my  goodf 
afte'^  that  I  be  broughte  furth,  my  dettf  paid  and  my  will  fulfiUid, 
they  to  diuide  theis  goodf  that  leveth  evynly  betwyxt  them  without 
any  discorde  of  aither  ptie.  Wittenes  herof,  Arthur  Dyneley,  gentilman, 
the  balif,  Richard  Chamer,  John  Shakilton,  John  Newton,  John  Listed 
with  other. — [Proved  28  January^  ' 533-4-] 


testamenta  leodiensia.  67 

Agnes  Coventry,  of  Batley. 

(xi  84  b.) 

In  Dei  nomine  Amen :  I  Agnes  Couentre,  of  p^fitte  mynd  and 
hoole  will,  makf  my  testament  and  last  will  the  xvj***  day  of 
Nouembre,  in  the  yere  of  our  lord  God  Mdxxxiij^**,  in  man^  and 
forme  foFowyng.  First  I  gif  my  sail  to  God  Almyghtie,  to  our  blissid 
Lady,  and  to  all  the  holye  company  of  hevyn,  my  body  to  be  beried 
at  ray  pishe  churche  at  Batteley,  my  mortuary  to  be  paid  accorddyng 
to  the  acte  of  pliament.  Also  I  gif  to  John  Dransfeld  iij*  iiij^.  Also 
1  will  that  the  gifte  that  my  husband  gave  to  the  churche  of 
Batteley  stand  by  my  gifte  as  welle  as  by  his.  The  residue  of  my 
good  not  legate,  my  fun^allf  maid  and  my  dettf  paid,  I  gif  to 
Maiste'  John  Dighton  to  dispose  for  my  sail,  whome  I  make  my 
executor  of  this  my  last  will  the  daye  and  yere  abouesaid.  Theis 
men  wittenesyng.  Sir  Umfray  Maile,  my  curate,  Edward  Coplay,  John 
Bumell,  with  other. — [Proved  i  December^  '533] 


Rowland  Chamber,  of  Collingham. 

(xi.  85  a.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  Anno  D'ni  Mittmo  qui'gen*"^ 
trigesimo  scdo  et  quito  die  mensis  Marcij.  Ego  Rollandus  Chamer, 
comix>s  mentis  et  sane  memorie,  condo  testamentu  meu  in  hu'c 
modum.  First  I  bequeath  my  sail  to  God  Almyghtie,  o*"  lady  sancte 
Marie,  and  al  ihe  sanctf  in  hevyn,  my  body  to  be  buried  in  my  pishe 
churche  of  Colyngham  afore  o'  Lady.  I  will  the  churche  haue  on 
vesiyment.  I  will  that  the  Vicar  of  Colinghm  haue  my  best  good 
for  tithes  forgettyn,  so  that  he  clame  nought  for  or  by  the  statute 
last  maide  in  dischardge  of  mortuaries.  Also  I  will  that  one  pst 
syng  half  on  yere  at  Colynghm  for  my  sail,  my  fade'  sail,  and  mode'" 
and  all  good  frendf  salles.  It  I  bequeath  ij  torches  to  Colyngfem 
churche.  Also  I  bequeath  to  Margarete  Cham^  my  s^uante  on  whie 
of  three  yeres  old.  And  I  bequeath  to  eu^y  of  my  s^uantf  xij^, 
besides  their  wadges.  It  I  will  that  Oswald  my  son  haue  my  portes 
(if  he  be  prest),  and  if  not  then  to  any  of  my  sones  that  is  prest. 
Also  I  make  my  executors  my  wif,  Cristofer  Chamer,  Oswald  Chamer, 
lliomas  Cham^,  Leonarde  and  Margarete,  my  childer,  my  executors. 
Also  I  will  the  residue  of  my  goodf,  my  fun^all  expenses,  my  dettes 
and  bequestis  discharged,  be  equally  diuided  emongest  my  childer 
equaly.  Also  I  make  Xpofer  Marshall  supviso*"  of  this  my  last  will 
and  testament.  Witenes,  the  Vicar,  Cristofer  Marshall,  and  Henry 
Somond.  Also  I  will  that  Cristofer  Marshall  haue  on  whie  for  his 
labo'. — [Proved  18  November,  '533-] 


John  Rodlev,  of  Pontefract. 

(xi.  86  a.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :   the  xxvj**»  day  of   Marchc,  in    the 
yere   of   our    Ix)rd   God    Mdxxxiij*^     I    John    Rodlay,  of    Pomfrete, 


68  TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA. 

hoole  of  mynd  and  good  remembrance,  makf  this  my  last  will  and 
testament  in  this  maner  and  forme  foloing.  First  I  gif  and  bequeath 
my  sail  to  God  Almyghtie  and  to  our  Lady  Sancte  Marie  and  to  all 
the  holie  company  of  hevyn,  and  my  body  to  be  beried  in  the  kirke 
garth  of  Alhalos  in  Pontefracte.  Itm  I  gif  and  bequeath  to  the  hie 
altar  at  the  pishe  churche  of  Pontefract  for  my  tithes  forgetyn  xx**. 
Itm  I  gif  and  bequeath  to  Anne,  Margaret,  Isabelle  and  Edwarde, 
my  childe^,  to  eu^yon  of  them  xl*  of  the  which  sm  of  viij^^  to  be  takyn 
of  the  rentf  of  my  land  lyeng  in  Pudsey  within  the  space  and  terme 
of  ten  yeres,  and  eu^y  on  of  them  to  haue  their  porcon  as  it  is  said 
afore,  xl*,  as  it  maybe  takyn  yerely  of  my  said  landf  and  tenementf 
in  Pudsey.  Itm  I  will  y^  Anne  my  wif  haue  hir  dowry  of  my  said 
landf  duryng  hir  lif.  Also  I  gif  and  bequeath  all  my  landf  and 
tenementf  in  Pudsey  to  Anne  my  wif  for  the  terme  of  ten  yeres 
next  comyng,  forto  p^forme  and  fulfill  this  my  will  as  hit  doithe 
appere  in  my  deide  of  gifte.  Also  I  gif  to  Anne  my  doughto*"  a 
bordcloth  vj  yerdes  lang.  Itm  I  gif  to  Edwarde  my  son  al  my  toles 
belonging  to  my  occupacon,  with  the  sheif  of  tymbre.  Itm  I  bequeath 
to  Lionell  my  son  al  the  rest  of  my  arrowe  tymbre,  or  els  the  said 
Edward  to  gif  to  the  said  Lionell  in  money  to  the  valo*"  of  the  rest 
of  the  said  tembre.  Itm  I  gif  to  Lionell  my  son  a  salett  Jake,  a 
pare  of  splentf,  and  a  swerde.  The  residue  of  my  goodf  aboue  not 
bequeathed,  my  dettf,  my  funu^al  expenses  the  day  of  my  beriall,  I 
gif  them  frely  to  Anne  Rodley  my  wif,  whome  I  orden  and  makf 
my  executrix.  Wittenes  herof.  Sir  Edward  Carvar,  curate,  Thomas 
Chales,  John  Eddrington,  Richard  Heryson,  Thomas  Eddrington, 
with  other  moo,  the  day  and  yere  aboue  writyn. — [^Proved  3  December^ 
IS33-] 


Thomas  Ingle,  of  East  Keswick. 

(xL  99  a.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  in  the  yere  of  oure  Lord  God  a 
thousand  ^wt.  hundreth  and  xxxiiij.  I  Thomas  Ingill,  of  Est  Keswick, 
of  holl  mynde,  makith  this  my  last  will  and  testament  in  man^  and 
forme  folowyng.  First  I  bequeath  my  saull  to  God  Allmyghty,  oure 
lady  sanct  Mary,  and  all  the  sanctf  in  heven,  my  bodye  to  be  beried 
in  Harwod  kirke  garthe.  Itm  I  bequethe  Sir  Wittm  Prestorf  to  pray 
for  my  saull  vj*  viij^.  Item  I  bequeath  to  Robert  Yngill  x*.  Itm  I 
bequeath  to  Percyuall  my  sone  and  his  wiffe  my  croppe  of  corne  in 
the  laythe  and  my  corne  growyng  in  the  feldf.  To  the  same 
P^cyuall  viij  oxen  and  wanys,  pluys,  cowpes,  yokf ,  and  temys,  and  all 
other  thyng  that  therto  belong,  and  sex  yong  nawte,  some  of  iij  yere 
olde  and  some  of  ij  yeris  olde.  Itm  I  bequeath  to  James  Yngill,  the 
sone  of  Wittm  Yngill,  a  whie.  To  Wittm  Yngill,  the  sone  of  Rauf 
Yngill,  a  whie.  Itm  to  Thomas  Yngill,  the  sone  of  Parcyuall,  a 
whye.  I  make  my  executor's  Agnes  my  wif,  Wittm,  Rauffe  and 
Percyuall  Yngill,  my  sones,  of  this  my  last  will.  Wittenes,  Wittm 
Smytbe  and  John  Gayton. — {Proved  20  May^  1534.] 

G.  D.  LuMB. 


3u»ttte's  ^oitSotik  of 
Cairtaitt  3oiw  J|ttketmg,  1656^0, 


Captain  John  Pickering,  the  writer  of  the  note-book  of  which 
the  first  portion  is  printed  below,  resided  at  Tingley  House,  near 
Woodkirk,  and  was  an  officer  of  some  note  during  the  Common- 
wealth, serving  as  a  captain  of  dragoons.  He  married  Deborah, 
daughter  of  Horace  Eure,  and  sister  to  George  and  Ralph,  successively 
Lord  Eure.  The  births  of  Captain  Pickering's  children  are  entered 
in  the  Woodkirk  Register,  with  one  exception,  and  are  as  follows :  — 
Bethia,  bom  4  November,  1652;  Bathshua,  bom  12  May,  1654; 
Hannah,  born  6  March,  1655-6,  and  buried  13  February,  1656-7,  in 
the  Topcliife  burying  ground;  Mercy,  baptized  at  Topcliffe  Chapel, 
12  August,  1657;  and  Elizabeth,  bom  i  April,  and  buried  17  April, 
1659,  at  Topcliffe. 

Bethia  was  married  at  Woodkirk  Church  on  the  30th  July,  1673, 
to  Joseph  Sykes,  of  Leeds,  merchant,  whose  niece,  Anna,  third 
daughter  of  his  eldest  brother,  Richard  Sykes,  of  Leeds,  married 
Ralph  Thoresby. 

Bathshua  was  married  to  John  Lister,  dissenting  minister,  on  the 
15  November,  1682  (ffeywood's  Register)^  and  was  buried  at  Tingley, 
24  February,  1732-3. 

Mercy  was  married  to  Thomas  Elston,  minister  at  Topcliffe,  on 
the  3rd  February,  1685-6,  at  Woodkirk  Church,  and  two  of  their 
children  were  baptized  there,  viz.  Hananiah,  15  January,  1695-6,  and 
Joseph,  10  February,  1696-7.* 

Captain  Pickering  died  on  the  i8th  of  April,  1699,  aged  74,  and 
his  wife  Deborah  died  5  November,  1693,  aged  69,  and  they  are  both 
interred  at   the   burying  ground  at  Tingley.     The  site  was  near  his 

*  Thoresby*s  Dmatus  LeodiensiSy  p.  1 8,  Hunter's  Fatniliae  Minorum  Gentium 
marldan  Society),  p.  153,  and  the  Topcliffe  and  MorUy  Registers^  ed.  by  Wm. 
Smith,  giYC  further  particulars  of  the  family.  The  Rev.  John  Freeman,  vicar  of 
Woodkirk,  has  kindly  allowed  extracts  to  be  taken  from  the  Registers  in  his  custody. 


70  NOTE-BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING. 

residence,  and  was  presented  by  him  to  his  co-religionists.  His 
tombstone  may  still  be  seen  there,  with  four  others,^  in  a  plantation 
on  the  crest  of  a  small  ridge  and  near  to  a  pond. 

In  1642,  although  then  apparently  only  18  or  19  years  old, 
Pickering  was  employed  by  Parliament  on  an  expedition  into  Scotland, 
and  a  warrant  was  issued  on  the  28  February,  1642-3,  by  the 
Committee  of  Safety  of  the  Kingdom,  to  the  Treasurer  of  the  Army, 
to  pay  to  him  ;;£i8o  for  expenses.  That  amount  was  still  unpaid 
on  the  3  November,  1643,  as  on  that  date  another  Warrant  was 
issued  to  the  Treasurer  of  Wars  to  pay  ;£^ioo  out  of  the  money 
received  by  him  from  Anthony  Wither,  being  the  proceeds  of  a  silver 
cistern  seized  from  Sir  Richard  Hubbard,  to  Mr.  John  Pickering,  in 
part  payment  of  ^180  due  to  him  for  service  in  Scotland.  The 
;£*ioo  was  duly  paid,  and  on  the  11  November,  1643,  Edward  Pickering 
gave  a  receipt  for  it,  by  payment  of  William  Jessop,  to  the  use  of  his 
brother,  John  Pickering. 

On  the  6  May,  1645,  i^  ^^  ordered  by  the  Committee  of  both 
Kingdoms  that  Pickering  should  receive  two  months*  pay  as  a  captain 
of  dragoons,  out  of  the  ;;£40o  raised  upon  granado  shells. 

On  the  4  September,  1645,  the  Committee  wrote  to  Robert,  Earl 
of  Warwick,  that  they  had  heard  and  determined  the  difference 
between  Captains  Pickering  and  Langrish  concerning  the  troop  raised 
out  of  the  overplus  horse  of  the  several  counties,  and  found  that 
Captain  Pickering  was  nominated  by  the  Committee  of  the  Eastern 
Association,  having  power  to  do  so  by  ordinance,  and  he  had 
accordingly  received  a  commission  from  this  Committee  to  command 
that  troop.  They  desired  the  Earl  to  give  order  accordingly  to  that 
troop  to  march  under  the  command  of  Captain  Pickering.  On  the 
6  May,  1646,  Pickering  was  despatched  with  his  troop  to  King's 
Lynn. 

Pickering  is  not  mentioned  again  in  the  Calendars  of  State  Papers, 
from  which  the  preceding  extracts  are  taken,  until  after  Cromwell's 
death,  when,  on  the  9  July,  1659,  ^^  was  required  to  report  the 
number  and  condition  of  his  troop  and  place  of  rendezvous. 

He  and  others  signed  a  petition  to  Cromwell,  dated  at  York, 
8  January,  1655-6,  for  instructions  respecting  various  persons  in  office 
not  well  affected  to  the  "publique  peace  and  p'sent  government,  and 
to   the  good    people  who    contributed  their    assistance    in    time    of 

^The  inscriptions  on  the  tombstones  are  given  in  the  Topcliffe  atid  Morley 
Register s^  p.  6,  and  in  the  Northern  Genealogist,  1 896,  p.  206.  The  latter  contains 
an  abstract  of  Captain  Pickering's  will. 


NOTE-BOOK   OF  CA1>TAIN   JOHN    PICKERING.  7 1 

trouble  and  danger  against  the  common  enemy,"  and  stating  that  a 
number  of  the  gentry  had  been  secured  in  the  garrison  of  Hull* 

Shortly  afterwards,  20  August,  1656,  he  was  sworn  to  execute 
the  office  of  a  Justice  of  the  Peace  in  the  West  Riding,  probably  as 
a  consequence  of  the  petition,  and  the  note-book  which  follows  is  an 
interesting  record  of  the  matters  brought  before  him,  and  of  the 
customs  and  habits  of  the  seventeenth  century.  The  marriages  are 
especially  valuable,  as  it  is  believed  that  the  registers  of  some  of  the 
parishes  mentioned  are  defective  for  the  years  1656  to  1660.  For 
example,  the  only  marriages  recorded  in  the  Woodkirk  Register 
during  those  years  are  the  following: — 

1656.     Gulielmus  Aviard  cum  Maria  Browne,  Septem.  die  28^°. 

Thomas  Copley  cum  Margreta  Lee,  Octobris  die  19"°. 

Johannes  Dymond  cum  Jana  Greenwood,  Dec.  die  7"°. 
1658.     Josuah  Astwick  cum  Alice  Brogden,  July  28^. 

Johannes  Dransfield  cum  Anne  Pearson,  Sept.  29. 

Dom :  Christo :  Marshall  cum  Sarah  Neaustead,  Nov.  die  16°. 

It  will  be  noticed  that  the  marriage  in  the  church  often  preceded 
by  a  few  days  the  civil  marriage  recorded  in  the  MS. 

The  Rev.  Oliver  He3rwood  would  be  intimately  acquainted  with 
Pickering.  On  the  9  July,  1677,  He3rwood  breakfasted  with  Pickering, 
and  on  the  11  January,  1686,  visited  him.  In  1678  Hey  wood  records 
in  his  Diary  that  Pickering  and  the  pastor  at  Topcliffe  took  the 
part  of  Joseph  Jackson  in  a  civil  dissension  between  two  brethren 
about  a  horse  which  had  died  when  on  loan,  respecting  which  several 
church  meetings  had  been  held.  Pickering  was  appointed  with 
Heywood  by  the  will  of  Mr.  Gamaliel  Marsden  (who  was  teacher 
at  the  church  at  Topcliffe,  and  had  married,  first,  a  young  woman 
worth  ^40  a  year,  and  secondly,  Mr.  Marshall's  widow,  "lived 
plentifully,  comfortably,  dyed  with  honour,  was  buryed  May  27,  1681, 
left  a  competent  estate  to  his  friends,  wife  having  no  child  ")  to  assist 
bis  widow  to  distribute  ^20  to  poor  ministers,  widows,  scholars, 
godly  poor.* 

£dward  Pickering,  the  brother  of  the  Captain,  was  also  a  person 
of  some  consequence.  On  the  nth  November,  1645,'  Prince  Rupert 
and  Prince  Maurice,  with  the  gentlemen  attending  them,  having 
disengaged    themselves   from   the    King's   service,   were    desirous    to 


*  Yorkshire  ArcfuzologUal  foumal^  vi,  93. 

"  HeywoocCi  Diary ^  cd.  Turner. 

■  The  battle  of  Msurstoo  Moor  was  fought  on  the  4lh  July,  1644. 


72  NOTE-BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING. 

obtain  passes  from  Parliament  to  go  beyond  the  seas,  and  it  was 
ordered  by  the  Committee  of  both  Kingdoms  that  Edward  Pickering 
do  signify  to  Prince  Rupert  that  both  Houses  of  Parliament  have 
granted  a  pass  for  his  Highness  and  for  Prince  Maurice,  besides 
such  officers  and  gentlemen  of  quality,  with  their  servants,  horses,  and 
necessary  baggage,  as  Prince  Rupert  shall  name  and  deliver  a  list 
thereof  to  Mr.  Pickering,  to  pass  freely  and  quietly  to  the  several 
ports  of  Yarmouth,  Dover,  Rye,  and  Southampton,  or  to  any  of  them, 
within  14  days  next  after  the  Prince  shall  receive  his  pass,  so  that 
they  come  not  through  the  city  of  London,  nor  within  the  lines  of 
communication,  and  shall  transport  themselves  at  the  first  opportunity 
out  of  the  King's  dominions,  having  engaged  themselves  upon  their 
honours  and  subscribed  that  they  will  never  more  bear  arms  or  act 
anything  against  both  Houses  or  against  the  Estates  of  Scotland.  A 
convoy  was  to  be  appointed  when  the  list  of  persons  was  received 
by  the  Committee  and  the  port  signified  to  which  they  intended  to  go. 

Prince  Rupert  having  asked  for  some  modification,  Mr.  Edward 
Pickering  was,  on  the  22nd  November,  desired  to  deliver  to  the 
Prince  a  letter  signifying  that  the  Houses  would  not  recede  from 
what  was  formerly  agreed  upon,  and  that  if  their  ofier  was  not 
accepted  within  14  days  they  should  hold  themselves  free  from  their 
former  engagements,  and  Pickering  was  then  to  return  to  the 
Committee. 

On  the  9  December,  1645,  the  Committee  wrote  to  Prince  Rupert, 
mentioning  that  Pickering  had  been  despatched  with  the  letters  of 
22nd  November,  and  that  they  were  informed  he  went  from  Evesham 
to  Worcester  on  the  27  th.  The  time  appointed  for  his  stay  had 
elapsed,  and  they  had  not  heard  anything  of  him.  They  doubted 
not  but  being  employed  to  his  Highness,  the  latter  would  be  careful 
that  Pickering  should  be  safely  returned  unto  them.  On  the  loth 
December  the  Committee  wrote  to  the  Committee  of  Evesham  that 
they  desired  that  a  trumpeter  should  be  sent  to  the  Governor  of 
Worcester,  to  demand  an  account  of  Mr.  Pickering.*  More  is  not 
known,  as  the  Calendars  do  not  refer  to  him  again. 

Captain  Pickering's  Note-Book  measures  11  fin.  x  y^in.,  and  is 
written  on  54  leaves.  At  the  top  of  the  first  page  Thoresby  has 
written  : — "  Cos"  Elstons  gift  to  Ralph  Thoresby,  da  :  of  this  Cap^  Jo  : 
Pickering."  In  the  copy  which  follows  the  entries  of  certain  ofiences 
against  morality  have  been  much  curtailed.  G.  D.  L. 


*  Prince  Rupert  left  the  country  at  Dover  for  Calais  on  the  5th  July,  1646,  and 
Prince  Maurice  on  the  8th  for  Holland.  They  had  a  pass  from  General  Fairfax, 
dated  19  June,  1646.     See  Warburton's  Memoirs  of  Prince  Rupert  ^  vol.  3,  pp.  233-6. 


NOTE-BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN    JOHN    PICKERING.  73 


MEMORAND:  thatt  Wedensday,  20***  off  August,  1656,  I  was  sworne 
to  execute  the  office  of  a  Justice  off  Peace  in  y«  West  Ridd : 
according  to  my  best  skill,  knowledge  &  power. 

Jo:   PiCKERINGE. 

James  Austwick,  p  Swearing.  Saturday,  23*^  August  (56).  James 
Austwick,  sen',  of  West  Ardsley,  was  conuicted  upon  the  oath  of 
Will.  Gotten  of  the  same  ffor  swearing  two  pphane  oathes  &  one 
pphane  curse,  yv^  is  the  first,  second  &  third  offence,  &  warrant 
giuen  to  the  Constable  to  punish  him  accordingly. 

John  Smith,  p  Drunk  :  &  Swearing.  Memorand :  That  John 
Smith  of  West  Ardsley,  collier,  was  conuicted  before  M"*  Ward,  of 
Pomfrett,  upon  the  oaths  of  Will™  Gotten  &  Tho'  Kidson,  of  West 
Ardsley,  the  30**^  of  August  last,  ffor  being  drunke  the  13^  of  ye 
same  month,  &  did  then  also  pphanely  sweare  six  oathes  one  after 
another;  ffor  w**  offences  he  forfeited  one  &  forty  shillings  eight- 
pence;  &  warrant  giuen  by  me  to  the  Gonstable  to  leuy  the  same, 
&  for  want  of  distresse  to  set  him  in  the  stockes  for  the  space  of 
thirty-nine  howers.  Ye  warrant  beares  date  9^  of  September,  1656. 
See  Justice  Ward  warrant. 

Jonas  Tetley.  Married.  M^  :  That  Jonas  Tetley  &  Elizabeth 
Thornton,  both  of  Bradford,  were  duly  married  before  me  the 
eleauenth  day  off  Sept:  1656,  in  pVnce  of  Jeremy  Dixon  of  Heaton 
roides,  John  Taylour  of  littie  Horton,  John  Rhodes  of  Bradford,  & 
Tho :  Smallwood,'  minister  of  Batley,  &  others,  &  certificate  giuen 
accordingly  the  same  day. 

Joseph  Taylour.  Drunkenesse.  M<*:  That  Joseph  Tayler  of 
West  Ardsley,  labourer,  was  conuict  off  being  drunke  13^^  August  last, 
before  me  12***  of  Sept:  56,  &  warrant  giuen  that  day  to  punish 
him  accordingly. 

Tho:  Glouer  &  John  Burnill.  Tipling  on  Lds.  Day.  M^: 
That  Tho:  Glouer  &  John  Burnill  were  conuicted  before  me  upon 
their  owne  confession  for  tipling  at  Paul  Sharpes  upon  27*^  July 
last,  being  L*^  day,  &  warrant  giuen  to  Gonstable  of  West  Ardsley, 
i2**»  Sept:  (56),  to  levy  ye  forfeit. 

M<*:  That  15  Sept:  (56)  a  warrant  of  y*  peace  was  granted 
against  Henry  Wilkinson  of  Chidsall,  upon  the  complaint  &  oath  of 
Sibill  Greene  of  Ghidsall,  his  mother,  to  bind  over  to  the  next 
sessions,  &c 

Recognizance.  17^  Sept:  1656.  M**:  Anthony  Smickersgill  of 
Carlesmoore,  in  the  parish  of  Kirby  Malzard,  husbandman,  acknow- 
ledged himself  by  way  off  recognizance  to  owe  unto  the  U  Protect^ 

*  •*  Mr.  Thomas  Smalwood  (my  neighbour  Atkinson's  father  in  law),  being  a 
Chaplain  in  the  Parliament's  army  in  the  late  wars,  would  sometimes  outbrave  the 
soldiers,  being  able  to  take  up  at  the  arm's  length  three  pikes  tied  together,  which 
requires  a  greater  strength  than  can  be  supposed  without  trial "  (Thoresby's  Duca/us, 
Aprpendix,  p.  147).     Sec  the    Yorkshire  County  Ma^tittfy  i,  p.  262. 


74  NOTE-BOOK    OF  CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING. 

&  his  successors  the  sume  off  20'' :  to  be  levied,  &c.,  iff  he  faile  in 
ye  condition  following,  w<^^  is,  That  he  psonally  appeare  at  next  Genr*' 
Sessions  of  the  peace  for  the  West  Ridd :  to  be  holden  att  Wakefeild, 
&  in  ye  meanetime  to  keep  the  peace  towards  the  L^  Prot:  &  all 
men,  &  cheifely  against  Rich'  Sheffeild  &  Samuell  Knight,  both  of 
Hartshead. 

Recog^-  M^:  That  Gilbert  Smickersgill  of  Kirby  Malzard,  &c., 
whelewright,  acknowledged  himself  to  owe  20^  to  the  L**  Protect, 
&c.,  as  above  in  every  pticular. 

Rich:  Shepley.  Swearing.  M^:  That  17*^  Sept:  1656,  Rich: 
Shipley  of  Murfeild,  yeoman,  was  conuicted  before  me  upon  ye  oath 
of  Edw:  Barrowclough,  for  swearing  two  pphane  oathes  the  16^ 
Instant,  &  war°'  giuen  to  leuy,  &c.,  dated  18*^^  ins*. 

Sarah  Blackburne.  Fornication.  Recog^-  M.^:  That  18*** 
Sept:  (56) 

M^ :  That  iS*-^  Sept:  a  Warrant  of  Leaue  was  granted  against 
John  Legard  of  Dalton,  yeoman,  for  assaulting  &  dangerously 
hurting  in  y®  head  Grace  Wood  of  Dalton ;  another  warrant  against 
Will.  Brooke  of  same,  clothier,  for  the  same  assault;  to  answer  the 
p'misses  &  further  to  be  dealt  withall,  according  to  law. 

Tho:  Sharpehouse.  Fellony.  17*^.  A  warrant  against  Tho : 
Sharpehouse  of  Gauthroppe,  for  stealing  2^  this  day  from  the  wife  off 
Thomas  Thornes  of  the  same,  to  bring  before  me,  &c. 

Joseph   Dixon  &  Sarah   Blackb  :     Ffornication.     2o**»  Sept : 


Rich:  Brooke  &  Eliz:  Robinson.  Married.  2i**»Sept:  56. 
M^:  That  Richard  Brooke,  the  son  off  Arthur  Brooke  off  Milnhill, 
in  Dalton,  &  Elizabeth  Robinson  off  the  same,  were  married  before 
me  the  day  abouesaid,  in  the  p'sence  of  John  Legard  of  Dalton, 
yeoman ;  Richard  Dison  of  ye  same,  clothier ;  Rich :  Brooke  ofiF  ye 
same,  shoemaker;  Will.  Brooke,  clothier;  Alice  Meller,  the  wife  of 
John  Meller,  off  ye  same ;  &  Ester  Hurst,  the  wife  of  Edward  Hurst, 
of  Dalton  aforesaid. 

Recognizance.  21**  Sept:  M<*:  That  John  Legard  of  Dalton, 
yeoman,  &  John  Meller  of  the  same,  clothier,  became  bound  by  way 
of  Recognizance,  each  off  them  in  fforty  pounds ;  &  Richard  Brooke 
off  Dalton,  clothier,  ye  son  off  Arthur  Brooke  of  Milnhill  there,  in 
the  sume  off  forty  pounds,  that  the  said  Richard  Brooke  &  Elizabeth 
his  wife  shall  appeare  at  next  Gen^''  Sessions  off  the  Peace  for  the 
West  Riding,  to  be  holden  at  Wakefeild,  to  doe  &  receive  such  things 
as  by  the  Court  shall  be  enioyned  them,  &  that  the  said  Richard  & 
Elizabeth  shall  be  in  ye  meantime  of  ye  good  behauiour. 

Jo  :  Legard.  Recogn  :  2i**  Sept :  1656.  M^  :  That  John  Legard 
off  Dalton,  yeoman,  became  bound  by  way  of  Recognizance  to  his 
Highnes  the  L**  Protector,  &c.,  in  the  sume  of  twenty  pounds,  to  be 
leuied,  &c.,  in  case  he  make  not  his  p'sonal  appearance  at  next  Gen"^^ 


NOTE-BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING.  75 

Sessions  of  the  Peace  to  be  holden  for  this  division,  &  in  meantime 
to  keepe  the  Peace,  &c.,  especially  towards  Grace  Wood  off  Dalton 
aforesaid. 

Robt.  Wood.  Recogn:  23^^  Sept.,  1656.  M^:  That  Rob'  Wood 
of  Dalton,  clothier ;  Arthur  Brook  of  the  same,  clothier ;  &  Roger 
Brooke  of  ye  same,  clothier,  became  bound  by  Recognizance  in  the 
seu'all  sumes  off  twenty  pounds  a  man,  to  be  levied  upon  their  lands, 
<S:c.,  in  case  the  said  Rob'  Wood  doe  not  make  his  psonal  appearance 
at  the  next  Gen'"  Sessions  of  the  Peace  to  be  holden  for  this  diuision ; 
&  that  in  the  meantime  the  said  Rob'  Wood  be  off  the  good 
behauiour  towards  his  Highnes  &  all  the  good  people  of  this  Coinon- 
wealth. 

Recogn  :  Sept :  25'^  1656.  M^  :  That  Rob'  Poplewell  of  Holbeck, 
clothier,  bound  by  recogn :  in  penalty  of  20",  to  appeare  at  next  Gen'" 
Sessions  of  ye  Peace  to  be  holden  ffor  this  Riding,  at  Wakefeild,  to 
answer  to  such  matters  as  shall  be  obiected  against  him  for  deere 
stealing,  &c,;  in  meanetime  to  be  off  good  behauiour. 

Recogn.  25  Sept.,  56.  M**:  That  Tho:  Caue  off  Bramhup, 
husbandman,  &  Arthur  Suttill  of  same.  Blacksmith  :  each  of  them  bound 
in  20"  to  p'ferre  a  Bill  of  Inditem'  at  next  Sessions  at  Wakefeild, 
against  Will.  Suttle  of  Bramhop,  Blacksmith,  for  having  the  carnall 
knowledge  of  the  body  of  Mary  Kendall,  of  Hunslet,  single  woman, 
&  to  giue  best  euidence,  &c. 

Swearing.  29'**  Sept.,  '56.  M<* :  That  Jeremiah  Schoolefeild  of 
Cawkcliffe,  in  Huddersfeild,  Blacksmith,  was  this  day  conuicted  before 
me  upon  the  oath  of  Arthure  Brooke  of  Dalton,  for  the  pphane 
swearing  of  fower  oathes  upon  Saturday  last ;  &  warrant  giuen  to  Leuy 
23*  4<*  or  21  howers  stockes. 

Marriage.  2"**  Oct.,  '56.  M<*:  That  Wittm  Cooke,  iun,  of 
Bramwith  [?gent :],  and  Sarah  North  of  Liuersidge,  were,  in  p'sence  of 
John  Brooke  of  Liuersidge,  yeoman ;  Witt :  Greene  of  same,  yeoman ; 
Rich :  Beamont  of  same,  yeoman ;  &  Rich :  Nicholson  of  Fenwick 
[?gent.],  duly  married  before  me,  &  Certificate  giuen  accordingly. 

John  Preistlev.  Swearing.  4***  8^',  '56.  M**:  That  John 
Preistley  of  Batings,  husbandman,  was  this  day  conuicted  upon  the 
oath  of  Tho :  Mowburne  of  Batley,  for  pphane  swearing  of  nine 
Oathes,  And  also  of  other  disorders,  &  was  also  drunke,  upon  w*^**  a 
warrant  was  giuen  to  Leuy  both  for  drunkennes  &  swearing,  &  also 
mittimus  to  Goale,  till  he  find  sureties  for  good  behauiour  for  one 
whole  yeare  now  next  ensuing,  &  for  his  appearance  at  the  Gen'" 
sessions,  &c.,  w«^  shall  fall  next  after  expiration  of  the  said  yeare. 

John  Ixk:kwood.  Swearing.  6'*>  8^',  '56.  M^:  That  John 
Ixxrkwood  of  Midle  Shitlington,  yeoman,  was  this  day  conuicted  upon 
the  oathes  off  Will :  Jackson  &  Tho  :  Radford  of  the  same,  for  swearing 
nine  pphane  oathes;  &  warrant  giuen  to  bring  him  before  me  to 
answer  the  pmisses,  &c. 


76  NOTE-BOOK   OF   CAPTAIN   JOHN   PICKERING. 

GenR'-l  Quart"  Sessions,  held  at  Wakefield  ninth  of  Octob',  1656, 
and  all  recogn.  &  swearers  certifyed. 

Jo.  Thomson.  Swearing.  13'^  October,  '56.  M*^ :  That  John 
Thomson  of  Thornhill,  husbandman,  was  this  day  conuicted  of  six 
pphane  oathes  swome  by  him  on  Wedensday  last,  in  the  house  off 
Tho :  Walker,  Alehouskeeper  in  Thornhill,  upon  the  oath  of  Michaell 
Sheard  of  Mirfeild,  skinner. 

Marriage.  15*^  8^,  '56,  M*^:  That  John  Fawcitt  of  Batley, 
husbandman,  &  Grace  Sheard  of  ye  same,  were  this  day,  in  p'sence 
off  Robt.  Turner  off  Batley,  ffreemason ;  Tho :  Mawburne  of  ye  same, 
husbandman;  John  Reyner  of  ye  same,  batchelor;  Joseph  Wood  oflf 
ye  same,  Tanner;  and  diuers  others,  duly  married  before  me,  &c. 

Marriage.  16*^  8^,  '56.  M«*:  That  Miles  Atack  of  Batley, 
carpenter,  &  Mary  Walmsley  of  ye  same,  were  this  day,  in  p'sence 
off  Henry  Jefferson  of  West  Ardsley,  clothier ;  Rich :  Hardwick  of 
Batley,  Register ;  &  Jennett  Hird  off  ye  same,  duly  married,  &c. 

Constable.  22*^  8^',  '56.  M*^:  Tho:  Blackbume  of  Merfeild, 
shoomaker,  was  this  day  sworne  Constable  for  the  yeare  ensueing  for 
the  towen  of  Mierfeild. 

Marriage.  29***  S\  '56.  M<* :  That  William  Aueyeard,  joyner, 
and  Mary  Browne,  booth  of  West  Ardsley,  were  this  day,  in  the  psence 
of  Nicholas  Aueyard,  Joyner ;  Tho  :  Tomlinson,  mason  ;  Tho  :  Ollerton, 
carrier,  all  of  West  Ardsley,  and  Tho :  Copley  of  Aluerthorpe,  labourer, 
duly  married,  &c. 

Marriage.  29'^  8^,  '56.  M*^ :  That  Will :  Wright,  carpenter,  and 
Mary  Wildeman,  both  of  Aluerthorpe,  were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence 
of  John  Wildeman,  labourer,  Tho :  Copley,  labourer,  Mich.  Glouer, 
potter,  and  Richard  Preston,  hatter,  all  of  Aluerthorpe,  duly  married,  &c. 

Recogn\  31th  8br,  1656.  M*^ :  yt  John  Lockwood  of  Middle 
Shitlington,  yeamon,  George  Lee  of  Thornhill,  yeamon,  came  before 
me  this  day  at  Wakefeild,  and  were  bound  by  recognisance,  the  s<* 
Lockwood  in  40^*  &  George  Lee  in  20^*,  to  be  leuyed,  ec.  Condicon, 
that  the  said  Lockwood  appeare  at  the  next  sessions,  &c.,  to  answer  to 
such  matt*^  as  shall  be  Laydd  to  his  charge  for  pphane  swaring  one 
oath,  &  in  the  meane  time  to  be  of  good  behauior. 

Recogn'.  31'^  S\  1656.  M*^:  yt  Witt  Jackson  of  Middle 
Shitlington,  coard  weayuer,  became  bound  before  me  in  20^^  to  preserve 
a  bill  enditment  against  John  Lockwood  affores**  for  swearing,  &c.,  & 
to  giue  further  euidence,  &c. 

John  Awty,  for  swearing.  1*^9^'',  1656.  M^:  yt  John  Auty, 
jun*",  of  the  Moore  side  in  Dewesbury,  clothier,  was  conuicted  before 
me  upon  the  oath  of  Witt  Greene  of  the  same,  cloth"",  for  the  pphane 
swearing  of  two  Oathes,  &c. 

24th  gbr^  >^5  Will  Longley  of  Stanley  was  conuicted  of  drunken- 
esse  before  me. 


NOTE-BOOK   OF   CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING.  ^^ 

Marriage.  3"*  of  Noumb'',  1656.  M*^ :  yt  Will :  Bedford  of  West 
Ardsley,  Labourer,  and  Susan  Godard  of  the  same,  were,  in  the  p'sence 
of  Mary  Rawlin,  Margaret  Nayler,  both  of  West  Ardsley,  married 
before  me,  &c. 

Recogn.  4th  of  Nouember,  1656.  M*^:  yt  John  Mason,  Gil- 
dersome.  Cloth'',  became  bound  before  [me]  in  20^»  to  preferre  a  bill 
of  enditment  against  John  Moore  of  Slaughtwait  for  the  fellonious 
stealling  of  3  yeards  of  Gray  Cloth,  &c.,  &  Rich :  Mason  of  the  same, 
Cloth%  &  John  Gent  of  the  same.  Cloth',  each  in  10'',  to  give  euidence 
against  the  s**  Moore. 

Recogn.  Jackson,  Sen«-  4^^  of  Nouember,  1656.  M^ :  yt 
Joseph  Nayler  of  Osset,  husbandman,  &  Tho :  Bedford,  of  Middle 
Shittlington,  blacksmith,  became  bound  before  me,  each  of  them  in 
2o*»,  &c.;  &  Will :  Jackson,  senior,  of  Middle  Shitlington,  husbandman, 
in  20",  yt  he,  the  said  Will :  Jackson  shall  appeare  at  the  next  Gen" 
Quarter  Sessions,  and  in  meane  time  keepe  the  p[e]ace  towards  all 
people,  &  especialy  towards  John  Lockwood,  &c. 

Recog.  Jackson,  Jun«-  4***  of  Noumb*",  1656.  [Similar  recog- 
nizance in  respect  of  *'  Will :  Jackson,  junier,  of  Middle  Shitlington, 
Coard  weayuer"]. 

Constable.  6  of  Nouemb"",  1656.  M«* :  y*  Christopher  Nettleton 
of  Tong  was  sworne  Constable  before  me  for  the  said  towne  for  the 
yeare  ensueing. 

Recog.  Inchbold.  7***  of  Nouember,  1656.  M<* :  y*  Andrew 
Inchbold  of  Knarebrouge,  lining  weauer,  and  John  Beane  of  Kettering, 
in  the  pish  of  Hampsthwait,  linyeweauer,  became  bound  before  me, 
each  in  40",  that  John  Inchbald  of  Leathley,  husbandman,  shall 
appeare  at  the  next  Gen"  Quarter  Sessions,  &c.,  to  answer  unto  such 
matters  as  on  the  behalfe  of  his  Highnesse  shall  be  obiected  against 
him,  &C. 

Marriage.  12th  of  Nouemb"",  1656.  M'd :  y*  Richard  Wood  and 
Elzabeth  Westerman,  both  of  Elersheaton,  were,  in  the  p'sence  of 
Tho:  Futhergill,  cloth*";  John  Longley  of  the  same,  cloth*^;  John 
Westerman  of  ye  same,  skiner,  duly  married  before  me. 

Recog.     B 13'**  of  Nouember,  1656.     W :    That   Rich : 

Brook  of  Osset,  Wheelwright,  and  Will :  Jowett  of  Gawthorpe,  of  the 
same  townshipe,  yeoman,  became  bound  before  me  this  day,  each  of 
them  in  40**,  that  Will.  Brook,  the  son  of  the  said  Richard,  shall 
appeare  att  the  next  Gen"  Quart*^  Sessions  of  the  peace  to  be  holden 
for  this  Ryding,  to  answer  unto  such  matters  as  shall  be  charged 
against  him,  &  to  doe  &  receiue  such  thingf  as  shall  be  then  & 
there  inioyned  him,  &c. 

Marrige.  14^  of  Nouemb^  '56.  W :  That  Matthew  Gill  of 
Flancell,  in  the  pish  of  Wakefeild,  Labourer,  and  Mary  Burnit  of  the 
same  pish,  were,  in  the  p'sence  of  RoBt  Wad  of  Flancell,  husbandman ; 
John  Oldered  of  Aluerthorpe,  cloth**;  and  Matthias  Pickersgill  of 
Stanley,  cloth',  married  before  me,  &c. 


7^  NOTE-BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING. 

Swearing,  is'^  9^^  C56).  Md  :  That  Rich.  Leeming  of  Wiskett 
Hill,  within  y®  Towneship  off  Tong,  labourer,  was  this  day  conuicted 
upon  oath  of  Quarf  Dickinson  for  swearing  three  pphane  oathes 
at  West  Ardsley  the  7th  instant 

Marrige.  i7^»»of  Nouember,  '56.  Md:  That  Randall  Constable 
of  Drighlington,  husbandman,  and  Dorothy  Street  of  the  same,  were, 
in  the  p'sence  of  Will.  Scott  of  Drighlington,  Tanner ;  John  Scott, 
butcher,  and  John  Scott,  husbandman,  both  of  Drighlington ;  &  diuers 
others,  &c.,  married  before  me,  &c. 

Constable.  17  of  Nouemb*^,  1656.  M^ :  y*  Obidiah  Lee  was 
sworne  deputy  Constable  before  me  for  the  Coroner  of  Dewesbury. 

Marriag.  17**^  of  g\  '56.  M*^ :  y^  Rich.  Crowther  of  Gildersome, 
Cloth',  and  Alis  Atkinson  of  Farnley,  were,  in  the  presence  of  Joshua 
Crowther  off  Gildersome,  smith,  and  Rich  :  Actkinson  of  Farnley, 
cloth*",  married  before  me,  &c. 

Recoge.  iS^**  of  9b^  '56.  Md :  that  Rob*  Wade  of  Osset,  Clothe 
became  bound  before  me  in  20'*  to  prefere  a  bill  of  Indictment  att 
the  next  Assizes  against  Tho:  Jagger  of  Osset  and  Jane  Speight  of 
the  same  for  Feloniously  committing  the  sin  of  Incest,  &c.,  &  bring 
in  further  euidence,  &c. 

Recog.  i8'*>  of  9^^  '56.  M^ :  that  Anthony  Armitage  of  Osset, 
Lingueauer,  became  bound  before  me  in  20'^  to  prefere  a  bill  of 
Indictment  against  Will :  Brook  of  the  same  for  Feloniously  committing 

that  wicked  and  detestable  sin  of and  there  shall  not  dept 

w'**out  Licence  of  the  C^,  &c.,  and  to  bring  in  further  euidence,  &c. 

Recog.  i9'*»  of  9^^  '56.  M<*:  that  Will:  Graue  of  Earlesheaton, 
cloth^  and  Joshua  Roodes  of  the  same,  cloth*^,  and  Rob'  Roodes  of  the 
same,  cloth"",  became  bound  before  me,  euery  of  them,  in  10'',  that  the 
said  Will.  Graue  be  of  the  good  behauiour  for  one  whole  yeare  next 
ensueing,  &c.  [crossed  off]. 

Marriag.  24th  of  9br  ('56).  M*^ :  that  John  Coates,  cloth^  & 
Patience  Smith,  both  of  Lineley,  in  the  pish  of  Huthersfeild,  were 
this  day,  in  the  p'sence  of  Tho:  Cotes  of  Wakefeild,  cloth"";  Adam 
Armitage  of  Linley,  cloth*";  &  John  Robinson  of  Wakefeild,  yeoman, 
married  before  me. 

Marriage.  24«*»  of  9*"^,  '56.  M*^ :  that  Will :  Sympson,  jun'. 
Labourer,  &  Ann  Carter,  both  of  the  pish  of  Wakefeild,  were  this  day, 
in  the  presence  of  Will :  Sympson  of  Wakfeild,  Labourer,  &  James 
Wood  of  Snowhill,  Lin'g  draper,  &  others,  married  before  me. 

Marriage.  26'^  of  9^,  '56.  M^  :  that  Will :  Robinson  of  Earles- 
heaton, cloth"^,  and  Alice  Gunson  of  the  same,  were  this  day,  in  the 
p'sence  of  Tho :  Hemingway  [?  badgger],  Tho.  Futhergill,  cloth"^,  John 
Hemingway,  batchl*",  all  of  Earlesheaton,  &  others,  married  before  me,  &c. 

SwERiNG.  26'»>  of  9^"",  '56.  U^ :  that  Tho :  Beck  of  Wakefeild 
were  conuicted  before  me  for  the  p'phane  swearing  of  one  oath  upon 
the  i9**>  ins'  att  Wakefeild,  &  upon  Justice  Ward  war'  dated  the  2i'*» 
Inst*. 


NOTE-BOOK   or   CAPTAIN  JOHN   PICKERING.  79 

Marriage.  27th  of  9br,  '56.  M<* :  that  Josia  Wadsworth  of  the 
pish  of  Penistone,  yeoman,  &  Sarah  Beamond  of  Darton,  were  this 
day,  in  the  p'sence  of  Tho:  Wadsworth  of  Penistone,  gent.;  Tho : 
Beamond  of  Darton,  yeoman ;  &  John  Wadsworth  of  Darfeild,  eq**, 
and  diuers  others,  &c,  married  before  me,  &c. 

Recogn*.  Alehouskeep'.  6th  Decemb'",  '56.  M^ :  that  ^ill : 
Ludington  of  Osset,  gentl :  became  bound  before  me  in  the  sume  of 
20"'  upon  this  condicion,  that  Alice  Pickard  of  the  same,  widdow, 
shall  not  from  henc[e]  forward  use  sellinge  of  AUe  or  beare  w^^^out 
Licence,  &c, 

Recogniz.  Alehouskeep'.  9*^  of  Decemb',  '56.  M^:  that 
Michell  Wheatley  of  Osset,  Cloth^  &  Rob^  Compson  of  the  same, 
Cardmaker,  became  bound  before  me,  by  way  of  Recognizance  in  the 
sume  of  10^  a  peece  upon  the  condicion  that  Will :  Wilby  of  Osset 
shall  not  from  henceforward  keepe  a  Comon-Alehouse  or  tipleing 
house,  or  use  comonly  selling  of  AUe  or  Beare  w'**out  Licence,  &c. 

Marriage.  8  of  Decemb'',  '56.  M'd :  y'  John  Norcliffe  &  Mary 
Saunder,  both  of  the  pish  of  Darton,  were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence  of 
Rich.  Nightingale  of  Bargh,  husbandman ;  Will.  Feild  of  the  same, 
UTiite  Smith ;  &  Sarah  Feild  of  the  same,  married  before  me,  &c. 

Recog.  Good  behauiour.  9*^  of  Decemb"",  '56.  M'd :  y'  John 
Hall  [Archer  erased]  of  West  Millns,  in  Merfeild,  yeoman  [millner 
erased],  became  bound  before  me  by  way  of  Recognizance  in  the 
sume  of  io*»,  &  Tho :  Waireing  of  Merfeild,  shoomaker,  in  10^*,  &  John 
Archer  of  West  Millnes,  in  Merfeild,  milner,  10^*,  y*  he,  the  sd  Archer, 
shall  appeare  att  the  next  gen'll  Quart""  Sessions,  &c.,  and  in  the  meane 
time  to  be  of  good  behauour,  &c. 

Recog.  Alehouse  keep*.  io'*»  of  Decemb"^,  '56.  M<* :  y*  Will : 
Gill  of  Ossett,  yeoman,  &  James  Ryder  of  the  same,  cloth',  became 
bound  before  me,  each  in  10^,  y*  John  Graue,  aliis  Wright,  shall  not 
from  henceforward  keepe  a  comon  alehouse  or  tipeling  house,  nor  use 
selling  of  Alle  or  Beare,  not  being  ther  unto  Lawfully  Licenced,  &c. 

Recog'.  Good  Behauo^-  io'*>  of  Decemb^  '56.  M^:  y'  Will. 
Jowett  of  Gawthorpe,  yeoman,  became  bound  before  me  in  the  sume 
of  2o*S  &  Will.  Rayner  of  the  same,  husbandman,  &  Will.  Fearnley  of 
ye  same,  cardmaker,  each  in  lo^S  upon  this  condicion,  y*  Will.  Jowett 
shall  appeare  att  the  next  gen'"  Sessions,  &c.,  to  answer  unto  such 
matt"  of  misbiho'  as  on  the  bchalfe  of  his  Highnesse,  &c.,  and  in  the 
meane  time  to  be  of  good  behauiour. 

Marriage  ii*^  of  Decemb',  '56.  M^  :  y*  John  Dimond  of  East 
Ardsley,  gent\  &  Jane  Greenord  of  West  Ardsley,  were  this  day,  in 
the  p'sence  of  Tho :  Grant,  genf ,  Rob'  Shaw,  yeoman,  Edward  Scholey, 
yeom.,  all  of  West  Ardsley,  &  Rob'  Goodaire  of  Stanley,  yeoman, 
were  duly  married  before  me  att  West  Ardsley,  &c. 


8o  NOTE-BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING. 

Recogn^  ii*^  of  Decemb^  '56.  M^:  that  Rob^  Fisher  of  Osset, 
Alehouskeep,  became  bound  before  me  by  way  of  Recognizance,  in 
20^,  to  giue  the  best  euidence  he  can  att  the  nex  Assieses  against 
Tho:  Jagger  of  the  same,  waller,  &  Jane  Speight  his  wife,  &c.,  and 
not  dept  w^^out  leaue  of  the  Co*^,  &c. 

Recog^  for  one  whole  yeare.  ii^  of  Decemb^  '56.  M<* : 
that  Rob*  Dixon  of  Brook  Royde,  in  Batley,  cowper,  become  bound 
before  me  in  40",  &  Rob*  Radcliffe  of  West  Ardsley,  tane',  in  the 
suine  of  20^,  upon  this  condicion,  y'  Joseph  Dixon  of  Brook  Royde, 
in  Batley,  shall  be  of  good  behauiour  for  one  whole  yeare  next 
ensuing,  and  also  to  stand  to  &  abid  such  ord""  as  the  Justices  shall 
app*  for  the  education  of  a  Bastard  Child  when  it  shall  be  borne, 
begotten  of  the  bodye  of  Sarah  Blackbume  of  Bruntcliffe  [en/ry 
struck  out]. 

Cursing.  22*^  of  Decemb^  1656.  M*^:  that  Will:  Aueyard  the 
yonger  of  West  Ardsley,  Joyner,  was  conuicted  before  me  for  the 
pphane  cursing  of  one  curse,  &c. 

Marriage.  24th  of  Decemb^,  1656.  M^ :  That  John  Marke  of 
Wodsome,  gentl:  &  Mary  Oldfeild  of  Lylee,  were  this  day,  in  the 
p'sence  of  Georg  Thurguland  of  Liley,  gent',  &  Richard  Hair  of 
Almonbury,  duly  married  before  me,  &c. 

Recogn"-  26**^  of  December,  1656.  M^^:  That  Matthew  Tod  of 
Morley,  husbandman,  doth  acknowledg  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his 
Highnesse  the  Ld  Protecto'  &  his  successors,  &c.,  the  sufne  of  40'*; 
Georg  Haigh  of  Duningley,  cloth"",  the  sume  of  20";  &  Thomas 
Morton  of  the  same  [husbandman],  the  sume  of  26^*,  upon  this 
condicon,  y*  the  said  Matthew  Tod  shall  appeare  att  the  next  Gen""" 
Quart'  Sessions  of  the  peace  to  be  holden  for  this  Ryding,  to  answer 
unto  such  matt"  of  misdemanour  as  shall  be  obiected  against  him 
concerning  the  felonious  practising  of  Witchcraft,  &  in  the  meanetime 
to  be  of  good  behauiour. 

Recogniz"  Sessions.  26*^  of  Decemb',  1656.  [Henery  Haigh 
of  West  Ardsley,  cloth*",  &  Joseph  Reyner  of  the  same,  to  give  evidence 
against  Matthew  Tod  "for  the  suspecion  of  a  certaine  witchcraft 
committed  by  him."] 

Recogn"-  29*^  of  Decemb',  1656.  M^:  That  Will:  Tompson  off 
Beeston  Pitthill,  Daniell  Glouer  of  Middleton,  husbandman,  acknow- 
Idgeth  themselues  seu*ally  to  oue  unto  His  Hyghnesse  the  Ld 
Protector,  &c.,  the  sume  of  2o^»  pounds  upon  this  condiCon,  that 
Margery  Jackson  of  Middleton  shall  appear  at  the  next  Gen"  Quart** 
Sessions  of  the  peace  to  be  holden  for  this  Ryding,  to  answer  unto 
such  matf",  &c.,  for  the  felonious  practising  witchcraft  Charmes  & 
enchantm**  upon  the  goods  of  Thomas  Askwiths  &  others,  &c 

Recogn"-  Sessions.  29'**  of  Decemb^  1656.  [Tho:  Askwith  of 
Middleton,  cloth  dresser,  in  20",  to  give  evidence  against  Margery 
Jackson  for  the  felonious  useing  witchcraft  upon  his  goods]. 


NOTE-BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN    JOHN    PICKERING.  8 1 

Recognize-  Sessions.  29***  of  Decemb',  1656.  M*^:  That  Francis 
Smith  of  Middleton,  husbandman,  became  bound  before  me  in  the 
sume  of  20",  to  pTerre  a  Bill  of  Inditment  against  Chirstopher  Dixon 
of  Rothwell  Haige,  Miles  Dixon  his  son,  &  Thomas  Johnson  his 
servant,  att  at  the  next  Gen'"  Quarf^  Sessions  of  the  Peace,  &c.,  for 
the  feloniously  takeing  &  carrying  away  certaine  sheafes  off  come  of 
the  goods  of  the  said  Francis  Smith,  &c. 

Marriage.  30'**  of  Decemb**,  1656.  M^^ :  That  Ralph  Worsley  & 
Mary  Feamley,  both  of  the  pish  of  Batley,  were,  in  the  p'sence  of 
Richard  Feamley  of  Batley,  husbandman;  Tho:  Mowburne  of  the 
same,  husbandman ;  &  Ann  Feamley  of  the  same,  duly  married  before 
me  att  West  Ardsley,  &c. 

Recogni'.  Sessions.  31*^  of  Decemb^  1656.  M*^:  That  Edward 
Brook  of  East  Ardsley,  yeoman,  became  bound  before  me  in  the  sume 
of  20^,  to  preferre  a  bill  of  Inditment  against  Tho :  Dobson  for  the 
Fellonious  takeing  a  saddle  of  the  goods  of  the  said  Edward  Brook,  &c. 

Drunkeness.  2**»  of  January,  '56.  M<* :  That  RoBt  Bargh  of 
Ossett  were  conuicted  before  me  for  being  dmnke,  &  also  for  one 
pphane  oath. 

Drunkenesse.  6*^  of  Deceml/,  1656.  M*^ :  That  Will :  Hepworth 
of  Merfeild,  fuller,  were  conuicted  before  me  upon  the  Oath  of 
Will :  Thornton  of  ye  same,  for  being  drunke. 

Recogn'.  Sessions.  12  Jan., '56.  M^:  That  Rich:  Cordingley 
of  Tong,  Clothier,  became  bound  in  10",  to  pferre  a  bill  of  Indit'ent 
against  Dorathy  Walsh  &  Mary  Bakes,  two  prisoners  in  house  of 
Correction,  for  the  Felonious  taking  &  carrys  away  wooll,  sewitt,  beefe, 
bacon,  of  goods  off  ye  s^  Rich :  Cordingley,  at  next  Gen"  Sessions,  &c. 

Drunkeness.  i3'*»  January,  1656.  M^:  That  John  Tomson  of 
Thomhill,  husbandman,  was  conuict  of  dmnkenesse  the  4th  of  Jan', 
at  night,  being  U*  day,  upon  y«  oath  off  Will.  Hall,  constable. 

Gen«*^  Quart"  Sessions,  held  at  Wakefeild  15*^  of  January,  &  all 
Recognizances  &  Swearers  certified. 

Marriage.  20'*^  of  January,  1656.  W:  That  Will:  Graue  & 
Isabel!  Senier,  both  of  Earlesheaton,  were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence  of 
Robte.  Rhoides  of  the  same.  Cloth*",  &  John  Westermon  of  the  same, 
skinner,  married  before  me,  &c. 

Swearing.  Cristopher  Ameson  off  Middleton,  yeoman,  conuicted 
before  me  upon  the  4^  off  January,  for  the  pphane  swearing  of  six 
oathes. 

Drinkeing.  26**»  of  January,  '56.  W:  That  John  Tirie  of 
Gawthorpe  was  conuicted  before  me  for  goeing  about  his  wor[l]dly 
occations :  vizt :  from  his  owne  house  to  a  certain  close  of  his,  to  see 
whether  itt  was  well  ploud  or  noe,  &  went  thence  to  Widdow 
Goodalls  alehousekeep  in  Chidsell,  &  continued  there  all  night,  &c., 
upon  Lords  Day,  the  18*^  of  Jan'  instant 


82  NOTE-BOOK   OF   CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING. 

Drunkenesse.  26^  of  January,  '56.  M*^:  That  Will:  Jewett 
of  Gawthorpe  was  conuicted  before  of  Drunk  [ejnesse — the  19th  Inst, 
upon  the  oath  of  Will :  Reyner  his  father,  &  was  allsoe  conuicted  of 
drinkeing  &  tipleng  upon  the  i8th  Inst,  being  the  Lds  day. 

Swearing.  27th  Jan.,  '56.  M<* :  That  Thomas  Pulley  of  Thornhill 
was  conuicted  before  me  for  the  pphane  swearing  of  one  Oath  upon 
the  1 6th  of  January. 

Marriage.  28th  of  January,  '56.  M^:  y*  Rich:  Walker  & 
Elizabeth  Becroft,  both  of  Dewsbury,  were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence  of 
Ralph  Batty  of  Batley,  Cloth' ;  Rob*  Becw'^  &  Will :  Whitley,  both  of 
Dewsbury,  Cloth*",  &  diuers  others,  duly  married  before  me,  &c. 

Recogn.  28th  Janu%  '56.  Joshua  Auty  of  Dewsbury  Mooreside, 
Cloth*",  Abraham  Greenwod  of  the  same,  yoaman,  acknowledge,  &c., 
10"  apeece,  viz*  that  Will :  Auty  of  the  same  shal  appere  att  Sessions, 
&c.,  concerning  suspicon  of  stealling  an  Iron  melle. 

Recognizance.  2°*^  of  February,  '56.  M<* :  That  Henery  Scoalefeild 
of  Gawthorpe,  &  Will :  Kitson  of  the  same,  &  Richard  Tirie  of  the 
same,  acknowledge  themselves  seu'ally  to  owe  unto  his  Highness,  &c., 
the  suine  of  10"  apeece,  upon  this  condicon,  y*  the  said  Henery 
Scoalefeild  shall  appeare  at  the  next  Gen"  Quarf  Sessions  of  the  peace, 
&  in  the  mene  time  to  keepe  the  peace  towards  his  Highnesse,  &c., 
especially  to  Ann  Grant  off  Gawthorpe. 

Recognizance.  3"^  of  February,  '56.  M*^ :  That  Joshua  Oldham 
of  Huthersfeild,  cloth*";  Thomas  Booth  off  the  same,  yeoman ;  & 
Henery  Talour  of  the  same.  Cloth**',  all  became  bound  before  me  by 
way  of  Recognizance,  each  in  30^*  apeece,  upon  the  condicon  that  the 
said  Joshua  Oldham  shall  appeare  att  the  next  Gen"  Quart*"  sessions 
of  the  peace,  &c.,  &  shall  stand  to  &  abide  such  order  as  the  Justices 
shall  then  appoint  for  the  education  of  a  Bastard  Child  begotten  by 
him  of  the  bodye  of  Grace  Walmeshey  of  Huthersfeld,  single  woman,  &c. 

Marriage.  4'^  of  February,  *56.  M<* :  That  Joshua  Middlebrooke 
of  Ossett,  Cardmaker,  &  Mary  Harrison  of  West  Ardsley,  were  this 
day,  in  the  p  sence  of  Tho :  Harrison  of  West  Ardsley,  yeoman ; 
G[e]orge  Leedall  of  Ossett,  husbandman;  John  Forrist  of  the  same, 
husbandman ;  Will :  Harpe  of  the  same.  Blacksmith ;  &  Will :  Middle- 
brooke of  Wakef'ld,  marcer,  duly  married  before  me  att  West  Ardsley. 

Marriage.  4*^  February,  '56.  M<*:  That  John  Nouell  of  the 
pish  of  Castleford  &  Dorothy  Audsley  of  the  pish  of  West  Ardsley 
were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence  of  Will :  Speight  of  West  Ardsley, 
husbandman,  Tho :  Kitson  of  the  same,  husbandman,  John  Middleton 
of  the  pish  of  East  Ardsley,  husbandman,  duly  married  before  me,  &c. 

Sweringe.  5**»  Feb,,  1656.  W :  That  Will :  Browne  of  Rushollme, 
yeoman,  was  conuicted  before  me  for  the  pphane  swearing  of  one 
Oath,  by  the  Oath  of  John  Stead  of  Bradford,  the  day  &  yeare  aboue 
written. 


NOTE-BOOK    OF  CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING.  83 

Recogniz'.  9  Feb.,  1656.  M*^:  That  James  Cowper  oflf  Wake- 
feild  Woodside,  Cloth*";  Rich :  Preeston  of  the  same,  Felte  maker ; 
Will :  Wright  of  the  same,  Carpenter ;  &  Thomas  Copley  of  the  same, 
Labourer,  acknowledged  themselues  seu'ally  to  owe  unto  his  Highnesse 
the  Ld  Protecto'  the  sume  of  10^  apeece,  upon  this  condition,  y'  Will : 
Pickeringe  of  Wakefeild  outwood,  Labour"",  Elizabeth  Roper  of  the 
same,  widdow,  shall  appeare  att  the  next  Gen"  Quart'  Sessions,  &c.,  to 
answer  unto  such  matt",  &c.,  for  misbehauiour,  &  in  the  meane  time 
doe  be  off  the  good  behauiour,  &c. 

Rkcogniz'.  9**>  February,  '56.  M^ :  y'  Rob'  Crauen  off  Birstall, 
cloth>",  John  Goodall  of  the  same,  husbandman,  acknowledged  them- 
selves seu*ally  to  owe  unto  his  Highnesse,  &c.,  the  sume  off  20* 
a  peece,  upon  this  condition,  that  Grace  Crauen,  wife  of  the  said 
Rob*,  shall  appeare  att  y«  next  Sessions,  to  answer  unto  such  matt", 
&C.,  &  in  the  meane  time  be  of  good  behauiour,  &c. 

Recognizance.  9'**  off  February,  1656.  M**:  That  Samuell 
Feamsids  of  Batley  became  bound  before  me  by  way  of  Recognizance 
in  the  sume  of  io*»,  to  preferre  a  Bill  of  Inditm*  against  Alice 
lliomes,  now  a  p^son*^  in  the  house  of  Correction,  for  felonious 
takeing  &  cariing  away  out  of  the  house  of  the  s^  Samuell  Fearns'ds 
the  sume  of  seauteen  pence  off  siluer,  vizt,  one  shillinge,  two  twopences 
&  a  single  penie  off  the  goods  off  the  said  Samuell :  And  shall  then 
&  there  giue  the  best  eu'dence  he  can,  &c. 

Recogniz*.  12^**  off  February,  1656.  Abraham  Mallinson  off 
Kirkeheaton,  Cloth',  George  Mallinson  of  the  same.  Cloth',  acknow- 
ledged themselues  seu'ally  to  owe  unto  his  Highnesse  the  Ld. 
Protector  the  sume  of  20^  a  peece,  upon  this  condicon,  that  the  said 
Abraham  Mallinson  shall  appeare  att  the  next  Gen"  Quarth'  Sessions 
to  be  held  for  the  said  Riding  there,  to  answer  unto  such  matt"  of 
misbehauiour  as  on  the  behalfe  [of]  his  High  [n]  esse,  &c.,  shall  be 
obiected  against  him,  &  in  the  meane  time  doe  be  off  the  good 
behauio'. 

Rkcogniz.  i4'*»  off  February,  '56.  M^:  That  John  Meller  off 
Dalton  Greene,  Clothier,  Edward  Lee  off  Lepton,  Batcler,  acknow- 
ledged themselves  seu^y  to  owe  [as  before]  the  sume  of  20" 
a  peece,  upon  this  condicon,  that  Francees  Longley,  the  wife  of  Arthur 
Longley  of  Kirkheaton,  Alehouse  Keep,  shall  appeare  [as  in  last 
J^ecognisafue\ 

Recognz.  i4**>  of  February,  1656.  M«* :  That  Cristopher  Auison 
off  Middleton,  yeoman ;  Thomas  Moxon  off  Middleton,  husbandman ; 
John  Horn  off  the  same,  husbandman,  each  in  10^  a  peece,  upon  this 
condicion,  that  Cristopher  Auison  shall  appeare  att  the  next  Sessions, 
&c.,  &  in  the  meanetime  to  keepe  the  peace. 

Recogniz.  14  off  February, '56.  M*^:  That  John  Crowther  off 
Lepton,  Millner,  acknowledged  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnesse 
the  Ld  Protector  the  sume  off  10^*,  upon  this  condicon,  that  the  said 
John  Crowther  shall  appeare  att  the  next  Gen"  session  off  the  peace, 
&c,  there  to  Informe  the  Co"  such  Questions  as  shall  be  asked  him. 


84  NOTE-BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING. 

Recogniz.  17  off  February,  '56.  M^ :  Ihat  Rich.  Clege  off 
Neither  Shitlington,  husbandman,  &  John  Reed  off  Thornes,  in  the 
pish  off  Wakefcild,  husbandman,  acknowledged  themselues  seu''"y  to 
owe  unto  his  Highnesse  the  Ld  Protector,  &c.,  the  sume  off  10^*,  upon 
this  condicon,  that  Mercy  Pickard  off  Ossett,  singlewoman,  shall  be 
off  the  good  behauiour  for  one  whole  yeare  next  ensueing. 

Marriage.  19***  off  Feb.,  1656.  M*^ :  That  Christopher  Corn  well 
&  Elizabeth  Rakestrawe,  both  of  Thornhill,  were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence 
of  Gervas  Battley,  Tho :  Pulley  &  John  Rakestrawe,  all  off  Thornhill, 
duly  married  before  [me]  att  West  Ardsley,  &c. 

Marriage.  23'^  U^ :  That  Will :  Pikering  off  Wakefeild  Out- 
wood,  &  Elizabeth  Roper  off  the  same,  were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence 
off  Ann  Walshawe  off  Osset,  wife  off  John  Walshaw ;  Ann  Dey,  the 
wife  off  John  Dey,  off  the  same;  Rosamund  Haigh  off  the  same, 
single-woman,  duly  married  before  me,  &c. 

Swearing.  26"^  off  February,  '56.  M«* :  That  John  Holland  off 
Ossett,  Alehouse  Keep,  hath  been  Lawfully  conuicted  before  me  for 
the  pphane  swearing  off  one  oath,  upon  the  oath  off  Susan  Wilby  off 
Ossett. 

SwEAkiNGE.  28*^  off  February,  '56.  M^:  That  Jane  Holland, 
wife  off  John  Boland  off  Ossett,  hath  been  Lawfully  conuicted  before 
me  for  the  pphane  swearing  off  one  oath,  upon  the  oath  off  Roger 
Pickard  off  Ossett, 

Swearing.  21*^  off  February,  1656.  That  Rob'  Willie  off 
Dewsbury,  seruant  to  Richard  Oldered  off  the  same,  did  w**^  in  three 
weekes  pphnly  sweare  one  Oath,  conuicted  before  me,  upon  the  Oath 
off  Michaell  Whitley  off  Dewesbury. 

Drunknesse.  2^  of  March,  1656.  M^ :  That  Tobius  Oldered 
off  Dewsbury,  son  off  Richard  Oldered  off  the  same,  hath  been 
lawfully  conuicted  before  me.  for  being  drunke,  being  the  first 
offence :  Upon  the  Oath  of  Michalle  Parker  &  Elizabeth  Sauille  off 
the  Dewsbury. 

Recogn\  3«*  off  March,  1656.  M^ :  That  John  Thorton  off 
Bowling  acknowl**  himselfe,  &c,  the  sume  off  30^  to  p'serve  a  Bill  off 
Indictment  against  one  Jonathan  Holdsworth,  late  off  Greatt  Horton, 
for  haueing  two  wiues  [entry  crossed  out\ 

Swearing.  18  off  March,  '56.  M<* :  That  George  Asquith  off 
Bradford  hath  been  LawfuU  conuicted  before  me  for  the  pphane 
swearing  off  two  Oathes,  upon  the  Oath  of  Richard  Nettleton. 

Recogn'.  io*»»off  March,  1656.  M^ :  That  Henery  Ratcliffe  off 
Wakefeild,  gen*',  acknowledgeth  himself  to  owe  unto  his  Highnesse  the 
Ld  Protector,  &c.,  the  sume  10',  vizt,  upon  this  condicon,  shall  appeare 
att  the  next  Gen"  Quart'  Sessions  off  the  peace  to  be  held  for  the 
said  Riding,  to  answer  his  contempt  for  the  refuseing  to  take  a  poor 
Child,  Lawfull  put  to  him  by  Indenture,  signed  by  the  Churchwardens 
&  ou'seers  off  the  poor  for  Wakefeild,  &  confirmed  by  two  Justices 
off  the  peace,  &  then  &  there  und'goe  the  censure  of  the  Co'^tt,  &c. 


NOTE- BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN  JOHN    PICKERING.  85 

Marri[a]ge.  2^^  March,  1657.  M^ :  Thatt  Witt  Blakley  off 
Flocton,  in  the  pish  of  Thornhill  &  Mary  Williamson  of  the  ffallowes 
in  the  same  pish,  were  this  day,  in  p'sence  of  Crissias  Blakeley 
off  Flockton,  Andrew  Tias  &  John  Senier,  both  of  Kirkeheaton,  duly 
married  before,  &c. 

Recogn.  Assizes.  31^^  of  March,  '57.  Since  last  Assizes.  M^: 
That  Henery  Bruerton  of  Adwalton,  yeoman,  &  Witt  Broone  of 
Gomersell,  Millner,  acknowledged  themselues  seu'ally  to  owe  unto  his 
Highnesse  the  Ld  Proctector,  &c.,  the  sumes  of  10^  a  peece,  upon 
this  condition,  that  att  the  next  assis?es  they  shall  p'ferre  a  bill  of 
Inditment  against  Will:  Barrett  for  the  felonious  breakeing  of  Spen 
Millne,  and  giue  the  best  euidence  they  can  concerning  the  same,  & 
nott  depte  w^N)ut  Leaue  of  the  Co". 

Marri[a]ge.  Aprill  8th,  1657.  M** :  That  John  Rakestraw  & 
Elizabeth  Hepworth  both  of  Thornhill,  were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence 
of  Rob'  Bedford  of  [PGrandye]  gentl.,  Tho.  Pulley  &  Edward  Elmeson 
of  Thornhill,  duly  married  before  me,  &c. 

Recogn.  Sessions.  6  April,  1657.  M<* :  That  SamuelJ  Glouer  of 
Aluerthorpe  became  bound  before  me  in  the  sume  of  ten  pounds, 
upon  this  condiCon,  that  he  shall  att  the  next  Gen''ll  Quart*"  Sessions 
of  the  peace  to  be  held  for  the  said  Riding  preferre  one  Bill  of 
Enditm'  against  one  Will :  Whiteseds  of  Rauchcliffe,  for  the  mixeing  of 
woole  and  sand,  and  sellinge  the  same  in  the  open  markett  att 
Wakefeild  for  good  and  vendable  woole. 

Gen«'  ^  Quart"*  Sessions,  held  att  Pontifractte  the  7th  of  Aprill, 
1657,  &  all  Recognizance  &  sweares  certified. 

Recg"-  Assizes.  Aprill  the  8th,  '57.  Edward  Brooke,  of  Ocken- 
shaw  in  this  Riding,  Tanner,  Roger  Pollard  of  the  same.  Cloth', 
acknowledged  themselues  seu'all  to  owe  unto  his  Highnesse  the  Ld 
Protector  the  sume  of  fortie  pounds  apeece,  upon  this  condicon,  y* 
Witt  Barrett  of  Gomersall,  in  the  county  afforesaid,  shall  psonally 
appeare  att  the  next  (jen"  Goale  deliuery  to  be  held  for  the  said 
County  to  answer  unto  such  matf^  &c,  shall  be  obiected  against  him 
for  feloniously  entering  into  Spen  Mill  and  takeinge  and  carrying 
away  seu'all  goods  and  moneys  out  of  the  millnere  chest  there  And 
then  and  there  und'goe  the  censure  of  the  Co^S  &c.     Fees  paid. 

Recog"  to  p'ferre  a  bill  of  Inditmt  att  Sessions.  April  the  i6*^ 
1657.  M^:  That  Thomas  Wilson  one  of  the  Sargant  att  mase  of 
the  Cittie  of  Yorke,  Samuell  Rusam  of  the  same,  and  Henery 
Woodworth  of  Hunsworth,  became  bound  before  me,  Thomas  Wilson 
in  40*  and  the  other  each  in  20'^  yt  they  shall  appeare  att  Sessions 
and  pferre  a  Bill  of  Enditment  against  Will :  Webb  and  Elizabeth 
his  wife,  Roger  Pollard,  Isabell  Walker  and  Jenett  Brooke  of  Oken- 
shaw,  for  assailteinge  and  makeing  an  affray,  and  alsoe  for  rescuing 
one  Edward  Brooke  of  Ockenshaw,  arrest  by  a  warr'  from  S**  Robertt 
Barricke  kn*,  who  was  formerly  a  p'son*^  in  York,  and  arrested  att  the 
sute  of  Rich.  Atkinson,  and  made  an  ascape. 


86  NOTE  BOOK   OF   CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING. 

Recog^-  Fees  not  p*^.  i6'»>  of  Aprill,  '57.  M<* :  That  Will. 
Hepworth  of  Almonbury,  yeoman,  acknowledgeth  himselfe  to  owe 
unto  his  Highnesse,  &c.,  the  sume  of  20^,  and  Reney  Tr .  .  .  urd  of  the 
same,  maicer,  10*;  yt  y*  said  Will.  Hepworth  shall  psonally  appeare  att 
the  next  Gen"  Sessionf  &c.  to  answer  unto  such  matt"  &c.,  &  in  the 
meantime  be  of  the  good  behauiour  &c.  for  abuses  the  constable  in 
execution  of  his  office,  and  putting  warrant  in  his  pocket  when  he 
shewed  it  him. 

Recog«-  25th  of  April,  '57.  M^ :  That  Will.  Bradford  of  West 
Ardsley,  Cloth'*,  and  Henery  Haigh  of  the  same,  wiere  drawer,  became 
bound,  each  in  40",  y*  Stephen  Browne  of  the  same  shall  appeare 
att  the  next  Gen"  Sessions  of  the  peace  to  be  held  for  the  said 
Riding,  and  in  the  meane  time  to  be  of  the  good  behauio*"  for 
threatning  to  burne  the  house  of  M*"  Greenwood.     Fees  p**. 

Recog^-  27**»  Aprill,  '57.  M**:  That  John  Nettleton  of  Tonge,  Cloth"", 
acknowledgeth  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnesse  y*  Ld  Protecto'' 
&  his  success"  the  suine  of  40^',  &  Christopher  Nettleton  of  the  same, 
tanner,  &  James  I-»aw  of  the  same,  husbandman,  acknowdgd  them- 
selues  as  affors<*  each  in  30^  upon  this  condition,  y'  John  Nettleton 
shall  appeare  att  the  next  Gen^all  Quart*"  Sessions  of  the  peace 
to  be  helde  for  the  said  Riding,  to  answer  unto  such  matt"*  &c. 
concerninge  the  dangerous  hurteing  &  wounding  of  one  William 
Walton  of  Wibsey,  millner.  And  then  and  there  to  doe  and  receiue 
what  by  the  Co^  shall  be  inioyned  him  for  the  same.     Fees  paid. 

Su^YE"  of  y*  Hig[h]waies.  27  th  of  Aprill, '57.  M*^ :  y^  Rich. 
Beamont  of  Liu'seed,  yeoman,  were  sworne  before  me  the  day  afore- 
said, su^'veyo'^  for  the  Highwaies  w*^in  the  pish  of  BurstalL 

Recog»-  Fornication.  29  of  Aprill.  M*^:  y'  Francis  Gill  of 
Ossett,  yeoman,  &  Rob*  Thornes  of  the  same,  Cloth*^,  became  bound 
before  me,  each  in  20',  upon  the  condicon  y'  Francees  Wright  of 
Ossett  aforesaid,  singlewoman,  shall  be  of  the  good  behauiour  for  one 
whole  yeare  now  next  ensueinge. 

Marriage.  30th  of  Aprill,  '57.  M*^:  y'  John  Land  of  Horbury, 
Cloth^,  &  Elizabeth  Johnson  off  Ossett,  in  the  pish  of  Dewsbury, 
were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence  of  John  Awdsley  of  Ossett,  yeoman,  & 
Will.  Awdsley  of  the  same.  Cloth  dresse',  &  Ralph  Wilson  of 
Wakefeild,  Talier,  duly  married  before  me  at  West  Ardsley,  &c, 

Recogn"-  Fornication.  2nd  of  May,  '57.  M^:  y'  Thomas 
Brooke  of  Morley,  husbandman,  Nicolas  Blackbume  of  the  same, 
Cardmak'^,  &  Rob'  Blackbume  of  the  same,  Cardmaker,  acknowledg 
theraselues  seu'ally  to  owe  unto  his  Highnesse  the  Vd  Protecto',  &c., 
the  sume  of  10^  a  peece,  upon  this  condition,  y*  Sarah  Blackbume 
of  the  same,  singlew^,  shall  for  one  whole  yeare  now  next  ensueinge 
be  of  good  behauiour.     Fees  paid. 

Surveyors.  4'^  of  May,  '57.  M<*:  y'  Henery  Casson  &  Francis 
Smith,  both  of  Middleton,  was  sworne  before  me  surveyors  for  the 
highwayes  of  the  pish  of  Rothwell. 


NOTE-BOOR   OF  CAPTAIN  JOHN   PICKERING.  87 

Rkcog*-  Assizes.  4'*^  of  May, '57.  M<*:  That  John  Tirry  of 
Gawthorpe,  cardeboardmaker,  acknowldg  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his 
Highnesse  the  Ld  Protector,  &c.,  the  sume  of  10^,  upon  this  con- 
dition, yt  he  shall  appeare  att  the  next  Gen*^^  Goale  deliuery,  &  then 
&  there  giue  the  best  euidence  he  can  against  Thomas  Jager  late  of 
Osse[t],  Waller,  &  Jane  Speight  of  the  same,  concerninge  Incest,  and 
nott  dept  w^ut  Leaue  of  the  Co'**. 

Marriage.  5th  May,  1657.  M<*:  That  Christopher  Wooffenden 
of  Darton,  and  Martha  Naylor  of  Hoyland,  were  this  day  in  the 
p'sence  of  Rob'  Inman,  minister  of  Hoyland ;  Joshua  Worrall  of  the 
same,  Coradwayner;  Rich:  Nightingale,  Bargh,  husbandman,  and 
diy*  others,  duly  married  before  me,  &c. 

Recog«-  6th  of  May,  '57.  M^:  yt  Rofet  Lily  of  Kirkheaton, 
Blacksmith,  acknowledgeth  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnesse  the 
L'd  Protector,  &c.,  the  sume  of  10',  upon  this  condition,  vizt,  if  the 
said  Robertt  Lilly  appeare  att  the  next  Gen*""  Quarf  Sessionf  of  the 
peace,  &c,  to  answer  his  contempt  for  refuseinge  to  take  a  poore 
Child  an  apprentice  Lawfully  put  to  him,  &c. 

Surveyors.  7^  of  May,  '57.  M**:  yt  John  Crowther  of  Morley, 
yeoman,  Will.  Bumill  of  the  same,  mason,  &  Richard  Austwicke, 
yeoman,  were  swome  suruey"  of  Highwaies  in  the  pish  of  Batley  for 
this  p'sent  yeare. 

Surveyors.  8th  May,  '57.  M^:  y*  Witt  Barber  of  Warton, 
Linen  weauer,  &  RoBt  Gamble  of  the  same,  yeoman,  sworne  surveyors 
of  Highwaies  for  the  pish  of  Sandall. 

Drunkennesse.  8'**  of  May,  '57.  John  Lister  of  South  Henley, 
con[v]icted  before  me  this  day,  of  drunkenesse  att  Wakefeild,  &  paid 
his  fine. 

Su'vEYORS.  la***  of  May,  '57.  M<*:  That  John  Greenwood  of 
Soothill,  yeoman,  &  Richard  Archer  of  Chickeinlay,  yeoman,  &  John 
Rhodes  of  Chidsall  Cooper,  sworne  su'^veyors  of  Highwaies  for  the 
pish  of  Dewsbury. 

SwEARiNGE.  13'**  of  May,  '57.  M*^:  That  Francis  Dixon  of 
Stanley,  milner,  was  conuicted  before  me  for  the  pphane  swearing  of 
one  oath  in  Stanley  upon  the  6th  Apll  last. 

Marriag.  1 8th  May,  '57.  M**:  That  Reonald  Tink'  of  the  pish 
of  Hoyland,  &  Margarett  Wood  of  the  pish  of  Kirkheaton,  were  this 
day,  in  the  p'sence  of  Joseph  Wood  of  Lepton,  Cloth*^;  Rich :  Clayton 
of  Clayton,  Tanner,  duly  married  before  me,  &c. 

Marriage.  19th  of  May,  ('57).  W:  That  Philip  Awty  of 
Dewsbury,  &  Esther  Touleson  of  the  same,  were  this  day,  in  the 
p'sence  of  Rob^  Touleson  of  Earlesheaton,  Cloth*^;  Will.  Touleson  of 
Duesbury,  Cloth^;  Joshua  Awty  of  the  same.  Cloth'';  &  Will.  Hepworth 
of  the  same,  Cloth^  duly  married  before  me,  &c. 


88  NOTE-BOOK   OF   CAPTAIN  JOHN    PICKERING. 

.,  Recog«-  19th  of  May  ('57).  M^:  That  John  Horne  of  Wake- 
feild,  Marchant,  acknowledgth  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the 
Ld  Protecto""  &  his  successors  the  sume  of  10*,  upon  this  condicon, 
yt  he  shall  pferr  a  Bill  of  Enditment  against  one  Christo'  Scott,  his 
late  seruent,  for  the  felonious  stealleing  &  conueying  from  him  one 
sword  &  three  Books. 

Recog^  28th  of  May,  '57.  M<*:  y^  Will:  Jewett  of  Gawthorpe, 
yeoman,  &  Richard  Fearneley  of  the  same,  yeoman,  &  Will :  Feameley 
of  the  same,  Cardboad  maker,  acknowledg  themselues  to  owe  unto 
his  Highnesse  the  Ld  Protecto*"  the  sume  of  lo^,  upon  this  condicon, 
yt  the  said  Will.  Jewett  shall  henceforward  be  of  good  beheauiour, 
&c. 

For  2"**  offence  of  Drunkennesse  pued  upon  the  oath  of  Tho. 
Finey  &  Grace  his  wife. 

Drunkeness.  29th  of  May, '57.  M<*:  That  Will:  Robinson  of 
Upper  Shittlington,  husbandman,  was  conuicted  before  me  of 
drunkenesse  upon  the  Oath  of  Richard  Healey  of  Wakefd. 

Swearing.  29th  of  May,  '57.  M**:  That  Will.  Robinson  of 
Upper  Shittlington,  was  conuicted  before  me  for  the  pphane  swearinge 
of  one  oath  at  Horbury  upon  the  oath  of  Rich :  Healey  of  Wakefeild. 

Recog*-  29^^  of  May,  '57.  M^:  That  John  Setterfeild  of 
Newhall,  in  the  pish  of  Thornhill,  gent',  shall  pferre  a  Bill  of 
Enditment  against  one  Will :  Walker  of  Bankehouse,  in  the  pish  of 
Kirkeheaton,  concerning  the  felonious  takeing  &  carrying  away 
certaine  peece  of  Cleft  oke  wood  out  of  the  woods  att  Shittlington, 
of  the  goods  of  S*"  Edward  Wortley  [gn^ry  crossed  out\ 

Recog=-  2*^*^  June,  '57.  M*^:  yt  Rob'  Killingbecke  of  Middleton, 
Cloth*",  acknowledgeth  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld 
Protecto"^  the  suine  of  20^,  &  John  Man  of  the  same,  Cloth^  the 
sume  of  lo^  &  Richard  Daniell  the  sume  of  10^*,  upon  this  condiCon, 
y'  Rob*  Killingbecke  shall  appeare  att  the  next  session,  &  in  the 
meanetime  to  keepe  the  peace  toward  Elizabeth,  his  wife. 

Marriage.  3rd  of  June,  '57.  M**:  That  Richard  Sheard  of 
Merfeild,  Cloth',  &  Elizabeth  Tompson  of  the  same,  were  this  day, 
in  the  p'sence  of  Thomas  Tompson  of  Merfeild,  yeoman;  Tho. 
Sheard  of  the  same,  Cloth"^ ;  Will.  Hall  of  the  same,  yeoman,  duly 
married  before  att  West  Ardsley  in  the  said  Ridinge,  &c. 

Marriage.  3'*^  of  June,  '57.  M<*:  That  Anthony  Teale  of 
Wakefeild,  Outwood,  Cloth*",  &  Rosamon  Fozard  of  the  same,  were 
this  day,  in  the  p'sence  of  Rich :  Harrison  of  Wakefeild  Outtwood, 
Cloth**;  Clemitt  Bowelinge  of  the  same.  Cloth';  John  lUingworth  of 
the  same.  Cloth*";  &  Tho.  Copley  of  the  same.  Labourer,  duly  married 
before  me  att  West  Ardsley  in  the  said  Riding,  &c. 

Swearing.  3*"^  of  June, '57.  M*^:  That  Elizabeth  the  wife  of 
Tho :  Willans  of  Robbin  Hood  hill  in  Wakefeild  Outt  Wood,  was 
conuicted  before  me  for  the  pphane  swearing  of  two  Oathes  upon 
the  Oath  of  Will  Cassan,  constable  of  Stanley. 


NOTE-BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING.  89 

Marriage.  8***  of  June,  '57.  M^  :  That  John  Morkeson  the  yonger 
of  Kirkeburton,  Tanner,  &  Martha  Robinson  of  high  Burton,  were  this 
day,  in  the  p'sence  of  Georg  Robucke  of  highburton ;  Tho :  Morkeson 
of  the  same.  Butcher;  &  Georg  Like  of  ThorncHffe,  husbandman,  duly 
married  before  me,  &c. 

Marriage.  8th  of  June,  '57.  M^:  That  Samuell  Wood  of  high 
burton.  Cloth',  &  Ann  Booth,  of  the  same,  weer  this  day,  in  the 
p'sence  of  Joshua  Wright  of  high  burtton,  Taler ;  John  Taliour  of 
Smith  Burton,  Cloth'';  &  Joshua  Booth  of  Thorncliff,  shoomaker, 
duly  married  before  me,  &c. 

SwEARiNGE.  9th  of  June,  '57.  M**:  That  Anthony  Sheard  of 
Ossett,  yeoman,  were  this  day  conuicted  before  me  upon  his  owne 
Confession  for  the  pphane  swearinge  of  two  Oathes. 

Recog'.  Sessions.  Fees  not  pd.  loth  of  June,  '57.  M*^ :  That 
John  Dey  of  Ossett,  wyerdrawer,  &  Tho :  Philip  of  the  same.  Card- 
maker,  &  John  Jagger  of  the  same,  acknowldg  themslevs  to  owe  unto 
his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protector  the  sume  of  10^,  upon  this  condicon, 
yt  the  said  John  Dey  shall  appeare  att  the  next  Sessions,  &  in  the 
mean  time  be  of  good  behauiour,  for  quarreling  &  fighting  with 
Ekiw.  Butterfeild  &  John  Maud  in  the  open  Street  at  Ossett  upon 
loth  May  last,  being  Lds-day  about  break  of  day. 

Recog»-  1 2th  of  June, '57.  M<*:  That  John  Harrison  of  West 
Ardsley  &  John  Casson  of  the  same,  yeoman,  acknowledge  them- 
selues  seu'ally  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protected  &c.,  the 
sume  of  10",  upon  this  Condicon,  that  the  sd  John  Harrison  shall 
behaue  himselfe  in  all  things  according  to  the  Statute  for  Alehouses, 
&  allsoe  Joseph  Naylor  of  Ossett,  yeoman,  acknowledg  himselfe,  &c., 
in  the  sume  of  lo^  &  Georg  Otley  of  the  same.  Cloth',  &  John 
Whitley,  Cloth**,  the  sume  of  5^,  upon  this  condiCon,  that  the  sd  Joseph 
Naylour  shall  behaue  himselfe  in  all  things  according  to  the  Statute. 

Recog  Sessions.  Fees  not  pd.  10***  of  June.  Tho :  Shepley 
of  Dewsbury,  yeoman,  &  Nicholas  Naylour  of  the  same,  yeom., 
acknowledgd  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protector, 
&c.,  the  suine  of  10',  upon  this  cdicn,  y*  the  sd  Tho :  Shepley  appeare 
att  Sessions,  &  in  the  meanetime  be  of  good  behauiour. 

John  Tomson,  Swearing,  &  being  the  7 :  &  9 :  offences  cer. 
punished  for  3  Oathes,  20*.  i6th  of  June,  '57.  M*^ :  That  John 
Tompson  of  Hangingheaton,  husbandman,  was  conuicted  before  me 
for  the  pphane  swearing  of  fouer  Oathes  in  the  house  of  Susan  Lee 
of  Thomhill,  Alehouse  keep,  upon  the  i8th  of  May  last  upon  the  Oath 
of  Gorg  I>ee  &  Will.  Jones  of  Thomhill. 

Marriage.  i8»*»  of  June,  '57.  M^:  That  Will:  Hirst  &  Jane 
Ricales  of  Thomhill,  were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence  of  John  Brook, 
Francis  Haigh  &  Joh  Hill,  all  of  Breeswell,  Cloth",  duly  married 
before  me  att  West  Ardsley. 


90  NOTE-BOOK   OF   CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING. 

Swearing.  i8th  of  June, '57.  M** :  That  Hener>'  Wilcock  of 
Slaighwaite,  Cloth',  was  this  day  Lawfully  conuicted  before  me  for 
the  pphane  swearing  of  three  Oathes  upon  the  oath  of  John  Brooke 
of  Adwalton,  gent'. 

Swearing.  19th  of  June, '57.  M^:  That  Widdow  Fearnley  of 
Thomhill,  Alehousekeep,  was  this  day  Lawfully  conuicted  before  me 
for  the  pphane  swearing  of  one  oath  upon  the  oath  of  Anne 
Sheard,  the  wife  of  John  Sheard  of  Dewsbury,  Labourer. 

Swearing.  20th  of  June,  '57.  M^:  That  John  Sheard  of 
Dewsbury,  labourer,  was  this  day  Lawfully  conuicted  before  me  for 
the  pphane  swearing  of  one  oath  upon  the  oath  of  Margrett  Robbertf , 
seruant  to  Widdow  Fearnley  of  Thomhill. 

Marriage.  22th  of  June,  1657.  M^:  That  Michaell  Brodhead 
&  Mary  Nussie  both  of  the  pish  of  Thomhill,  were  this  day,  in  the 
p'sence  of  John  Nussie  of  Thomhill,  naylour,  &  John  Jagger  of 
Ossett,  wierdrawer,  duly  married  before  me  according  to  a  late  Act 
of  Parliam*,  &c. 

Marriage  22th  of  June,  1657.  M**:  That  John  Crosley  of 
Kirkeburton,  shoemaker,  &  Mary  Archer  of  Shepley,  were  this  day, 
in  the  presence  of  Tho.  Hobson,  John  Archer  &  Joseph  Hobson  all 
of  Shepley,  duly  married 'before  me,  &c. 

Recogn.  24th  of  June,  '57.  M**:  y'  Thom.  Holdsworth  of 
Hopton,  Cloth',  &  Thomas  Blackburne  of  Merfeild,  Cordwayner,  & 
Will.  Bameforth  of  the  same.  Cloth*",  acknowledg  themselves  seu'ally 
to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protector,  &c.,  the  [sum  of]  5^ 
upon  this  condition,  yt  the  said  Thomas  Holdsworth  shall  appeare 
att  the  next  Gen*""  Quart'  Sessions  of  the  peace  to  be  held  for  this 
Riding,  and  in  the  meantime  to  keepe  the  peace  towards  his 
Highnes,  &c.,  &  especially  towrds  Edward  Brook  of  the  same. 
Cloth'. 

Marriage.  24th  of  June, '57.  M*^:  That  John  Steele  of  the 
pish  of  Birstall  &  Alice  Deakon  of  the  same,  were  this  day,  in  the 
p'sence  of  Simon  Steele  of  Drighlington,  Taylor ;  Will.  Scott  of  the 
same.  Tanner;  and  Rodger  Pollard  of  the  same.  Cloth',  duly  marride 
before  me,  &c.,  att  West  Ardsley,  &c 

Marriage.  24th  June,  '57.  M^ :  yt  Robt  Lee  of  the  pish  of 
Thomhill  &  Isabell  Cowerd  of  the  sanie,  were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence 
of  Thomas  Wilcoke  of  the  same.  Mason,  &  Gorg  Lee  of  the  same. 
Labourer,  duly  married  before  me,  &c.,  att  West  Ardsley. 

Marriage.  2nd  July,  '57.  M*^:  That  John  Wilson  of  Dewsbury, 
Mason,  &  Jane  Kitson  of  Thornbill,  were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence  of 
Edward  Kitson  of  Thomhill,  Joyner ;  Edard  Elmesell  of  the  same, 
Batcheler;  &  Joseph  Jepson  of  Dewsbury,  mason,  &  others,  duly 
married   before  me  att  West  Ardsley,  &c. 


NOTE-BOOK   OF   CAPTAIN  JOHN   PICKERING.  91 

SwEAREiNG.  8th  of  July,  '57.  M<*:  That  Susan,  the  wife  of 
Joseph  Harrison  of  Ossett,  naylor,  was  lawfully  conuicted  before  me 
for  the  prophane  swearinge  of  one  oath  &  one  curse  att  Ossett  upon 
the  7th  inst,  upon  the  oath  of  Rodger  Hirst  &  Rob'  Dickinson  of 
Ossett  aforesaid;  the  curse  she  confessd. 

Marriage.  9th  of  July,  '57.  M<* :  That  Michaell  Broadhed  of 
the  pish  of  Thornhill,  &  Phebe  Webster  of  the  pish  of  Dewsbury, 
were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence  of  Elkanah  Mitchell  of  Dewsbury, 
gent*;  Matthew  Waterhouse  of  nether  Shittlington,  yeoman;  John 
Spinie  of  Thornhill,  yeoman,  and  diuers  others,  duly  married  before 
me,  &c. 

Recogniz"-  14th  of  July,  '57.  M*^:  That  John  Walshaw  of 
Ossett,  yeoman,  acknowledgeth  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the 
Ld  Protector,  &c.,  the  sume  of  20*,  John  Sugding  of  the  same,  10*, 
Will:  Shepard,  10*,  y'  John  Walshaw  shall  appeare  att  the  next 
Sessions,  &  in  the  meane  time  to  keep  the  peace  towards  his 
Highnes  the  Ld  Protecter,  &c.,  especially  towardf  Georg  Brook  of 
Ossett,  aforesaid. 

SwEAREiNG.  9  July, '57.  M<* :  That  John  Awtie  of  Dewsbury, 
Qoth*",  was  conuicted  before  me  for  the  pphane  swaring  of  nine 
oathes  upon  the  26th  of  June  last,  &  alsoe  att  the  same  being 
dninke,  upon  the  oath  of  Rich.  Oldered. 

Marriage,  ijlh  July,  '57.  M^:  That  Richard  Denton  & 
Elizabeth  Firth  both  of  Darton,  were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence  of 
Richard  Firth  of  Huddersfeld,  carpenter;  John  Denton  of  Darton, 
Blacksmith,  &  diu"  others,  duly  marr'd  before  me,  &c. 

Marriage.  15th  July,  '57.  M^:  That  John  Hill  of  y«  pish  of 
Thornhill,  cloth',  &  Anne  Dolife  of  the  same,  were  this  day,  in  the 
presence  of  Will.  Beitson  of  Whitley;  Richard  Jackson  of  the  same, 
cloth' ;  &  Abraham  Doliffe  of  Kirkheaton,  duly  marrid  before  me,  &c. 

Swearing.  i6th  of  Aprill,  '57.  M**:  That  William  Hepworth  of 
Almonbury,  yeom.,  Lawfullie  conuicte  [of]  one  pphane  oath  & 
Certified. 

Swearing.  i6th  of  Aprill,  '57.  M*^ :  That  Dorothy  the  wife  of 
Michaell  Farrand  of  Almonbury,  Cloth',  lawfullie  conuicd  before  me 
for  the  pphane  sweareng  fiue  oathes  upon  the  oath  of  John  Whewall 
of  Hecmond[wike],  &  warrt  sent  out  to  answer  the  p'misses. 

Quart"  Sessions.  Gen"  Quart'  Sessions  held  att  Leeds  the  i6th 
of  July,  1657,  all   Recognizances  &  sweares  Certified. 

Recog"-  The  i8th  of  Aprill,  '57.  M^ :  y*  Thomas  Brooke  of 
Morley  acknowledgeth  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld 
Protect'  the  sume  of  10*,  upon  this  Condic",  that  Nicolas  Blackburne 
of  the  same,  who  is  Licensed  to  keepe  a  Comon  Alehouse,  shall 
use  &  maintaine  good  rule  according  to  the  Statute,  &  Nicholas 
Blakbume  afors*^  acknowldg,  &c.,  ye  sume  of  10*  upon  the  condicon 
aforsd. 


92  NOTE-BOOK   OF   CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING. 

Marriag.  19th  of  July,  '57.  M° :  That  Thomas  Brooke  of 
Birscall,  &  Ester  Birkehead  of  the  pish  of  Batley,  were  this  day,  in 
the  p'sence  of  John  Hardcastle  of  Batley,  yeoman,  &  Thomas  Walker 
of  Brstoll,  &  others,  duly  marrd  before  me,  &c. 

Constable.  20th  of  June,  '57.  M*^ :  That  John  Hall  was  sworne 
before  me  constable  of  Thomhill  for  the  yeare  ensueing. 

Swearing.  20th  of  July, '57.  M**:  That  Thomas  Wilcocke  of 
Chidsell  was  Lawfullie  conuicted  before  me  of  one  pphane  curse  in 
the  feilde  att  Rothwell. 

Recog«  14th  of  August,  '57.  M^:  That  Farninando  Garnett  of 
Carleton  in  the  pish  of  Snath,  mettleman,  &  Joseph  Fell  of  Wake- 
feild,  Cloth'^,  acknowlg  themsleus  seu'ally  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes 
the  Ld  Protector,  &c.,  the  said  Garnett  the  sume  of  20*,  &  the  said 
Fell  the  sume  of  lo^  upon  this  conditicon,  yt  one  Will  Garnett,  son 
to  the  said  Fardinando  Garnett,  shall  appeare  att  the  next  Gen" 
Quart'  Sessions  of  the  peace  to  be  held  for  this  Riding,  to  answer 
concerning  the  hurting  &  dangerously  woundend  one  Will.  Ellis  of 
Wakefeild,  dyer,  soe  yt  he  is  in  danger  of  Death,  &c. 

Drunkennesse.  14th  August,  1657.  M^:  That  Christopher 
Smith  the  elder  of  Low-Laiths  in  Ossett,  was  this  day  conuict  before 
me  off  being  drunke  at  Aluerthorpe  upon  the  31th  July  last,  upon 
the  oath  off  Will.  Wadsworth. 

Swearing.  14th  Aug:  ('57)  M**:  That  Matthew  Longley  of 
Horbury,  Clothier,  was  this  day  conuict  of  swearing  one  pphane  oath 
at  Horbury  upon  7*^  instant  upon  his  owne  confession. 

Prophaning  Lds-Day.  17  Aug.  ('57).  M^:  That  John  Batty  of 
Aluerthorp,  Milner,  was  this  day  conuict  before  me  of  Grinding 
•  Come  in  the  water  mill  att  Low  Laiths  in  Ossett,  upon  i6th  instant, 
being  Lord's  Day,  &  also  of  doing  worldly  labour  the  same  day  with 
a  spade  about  the  Miln  Dam,  upon  the  oath  of  Christop.  Smith, 
iun',  of  Low  Laiths,  &  also  upon  his  owne  Confession. 

Recog.  17th  of  Aug.  ('57).  M**:  That  Christopher  Anderson  of 
Slightholme  in  the  pish  of  Bow,  in  the  North  Riding  of  the  Countie 
of  Yorke,  acknowledgth  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld 
Protector,  &c.,  the  sume  of  20^,  upon  this  condition,  that  the  said 
Christopher  Anderson  shall  att  the  next  Gen'^"  Goale  deliuery  to  be 
held  for  this  Countie  preferre  a  Bill  of  Inditm^  against  one  George 
Raine,  now  a  prisoner  in  the  castle  off  Yorke,  for  feloniously  stealeing 
&  carrieing  away  a  red  Heifer  of  the  goods  &  chatties  of  the  said 
Christopher  Anderson,  and  then  &  there  glue  the  best  euidence  he 
can  concerning  the  same,  And  nott  dept  w***out   Leaue  of  the  Co"^'. 

Recogn^     19'**  of  Aug:  '57.     M^ :  That    Houmfrey  Beamont  of 

sland,  in  the  West  Riding  of  Yorkshir,  acknowledg  himselfe 

to   owe   unto   his    Highnes   the    Ld  Protector,  &c.,  the   sume  of  lo^ 
upon  this  condition,  that  he  shall   appeare  att  the   next  Gen"""  Goale 


NOTK-BOOK   OF   CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING.  93 

deliu^  to  be  held  for  this  countie,  and  then  &  there  giue  the  best 
euidence  he  can  against  one  George  Rayne,  now  a  p''soner  in  the 
castle  of  Yorke,  concerning  a  red  Heifer  yf^^  he  bought  of  him  w*=^ 
the  said  George  Ra5me  hade  stolen  from  one  Cristopher  Anderson, 
&  nott  dept  w*^out  Leaue  of  the  Co"^'. 

CoNUiCTioN  OF  Fornication.     i8th  of  August,  1657 


Recog=-  i8'*»  of  August,  1657.  M^:  That  John  Tirrie  of  Gaw- 
thorpe,  Cardboard  maker,  acknowiedgeth  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his 
Highnes  the  Ld  Protector  the  suine  of  20',  Henry  Wilkingson  of 
Chidsell,  Husbandman,  &  Will.  Kitson  of  Gawthorpe,  Cloth'', 
acknowledg  themselfes  seu'^ally  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes,  &c.,  the  sume 
of  10*  a  peece,  upon  the  condition  y'  John  Tirrie  shall  appeare  att 
the  next  Sessions,  &c.,  &  in  the  meane  time  keepe  the  peace  towards 
his  Highnes,  &c.,  and  all  people,  especiallie  towards  Will.  Jewett  of 
Gawthorpe. 

Fornication.  i8**»of  August,  1657.  M^i  That  Ann  Dobson  of 
Olton  was  this  day  sent  by  me  to  the  house  of  Correction  for 
want  of  suerties  for  her  appearance  att  Sessions 

Drunken*.  20***  August,  1657.  M**:  That  Will.  Hicke  of  West 
Ardsley  was  conuicted  upon  my  owne  token  of  Drunkenes,  &  warr' 
sent  to  Leuie  5*. 

Recog«-  24^  of  August,  1657.  M^:  That  Tho:  Sheard  of 
Merfeild,  Blacksmith,  acknowledg  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes 
the  Ld  Protecto',  &c.,  the  sume  of  20*,  &  Tho :  Sanior  of  Hopton, 
yeoman,  &  John  Sheard  of  Dewsbury,  labourer,  acknowiedgeth  them- 
selues  seu'ally  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protector  the  sume 
of  lo^  a  peece,  upon  this  condition,  that  the  said  Tho:  Sheard  shall 
appeare  att  the  next  sessions,  to  answer  thereunto  such  matt'*  as  on 
the  behalfe  of  his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protecto*"  shall  be  obiected 
against  him. 

Drunkenes.  Sweareing.  27th  August,  '57.  M** :  That  Francis 
Roberts  of  Oulton,  Bodymaker,  informes  upon  oath  that  Richard 
Booth  of  Temple  Newsam,  yeoman,  was  on  Monday  last  the  24th 
inst  drunke  att  Whitchurch,  &  att  the  same  time  did  pphanely 
sweare  one  Oath.  Warr*  sent  out  to  Leuie  the  forfeiture  of  eight 
shillings  fower  pence. 

Recog«-  iSth  of  August,  '57.  M<>:  That  James  Crabtree  of 
Adwalton,  Cloth*",  acknowiedgeth  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes 
the  Ld  Protect%  &c.,  the  suine  of  10*,  upon  the  condition  that  he 
shall  appeare  att  the  next  Gen"^"  Goale  deliuery  to  be  held  for  this 
countie,  &  then  &  there  giue  the  Best  euidence  he  can  against  one 
Georg  Rayne,  now  a  p''soner  in  the  Castle  of  Yorke,  concerning  the 
felonious  stealeing  of  an  Red  Heifer,  the  goods  of  one  Christopher 
Alderson  of  Slightholme  in  the  pish  of  Bowe,  in  the  North  Riding  of 
the  said  Countie. 


94  NOTE-BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN  JOHN   PICKERING. 

Drunkenes.  3  i«  of  August,  1657.  M<*:  That  George  Boole  of 
O^sett,  Butcher,  was  this  day  Lawfullie  conuicted  before  me  on  the 
oath  of  John  Thornton  of  Wakefeild,  joyner,  that  he  was  this  day 
drunke  att  Horbury;  a  wrr*  sent  out  to  Leuie  5". 

Recog'.  Good  behauV.  15  of  September,  '57.  M^ :  That  Francis 
Reyner  of  Carleton,  husbandman,  acknowledgeth  himselfe  to  owe  unto 
his  Highnes  the  I-^d  Protect',  &c.,  the  sume  of  20*,  &  Rob*  Reyner 
of  the  same,  husbdman,  the  sume  of  10^,  upon  this  condition,  that  the 
said  Francis  Reyner  shall  appeare  att  the  next  Sessions  to  answer  unto 
such  matters  as  on  the  behalfe  of  the  Ld  Protecto'  shall  be  obiected 
against  him  for  hauepng]  a  Bastard  child.  And  in  the  meane  time 
be  of  good  behauiour,  &c. 

Marriage,  i^'  of  Septemb*",  '57.  M*^:  That  Simione  Fox  of 
Soothill,  &  Margeritt  Burton  booth  of  Soothill,  were  this  day,  in  the 
p''sence  of  John  Walker  of  Soothill,  gent;  John  Greenwood  of  the 
same,  yeoman;  &  John  Nettleton  of  Haningheaton,  husbandman, 
lawfully  married  before  mee. 

9  of  Septemb'.  M^ :  That  Edwin  Hanson  of  Staneley  was  this 
day  Lawfully  conuictd  before  me  for  the  pphane  swearing  of  one 
Oath  in  Stanley,  29th  of  July  last 

29th  of  August,  1657.  M^:  That  Will:  Fletcher  informes  y'  he 
tpgether  w'**  other  two,  dranke  6**  a  peece  at  one  widdow  Goodall  off 
Chidsle,  w'*»out  any  Lawfull  occasion  this  day,  &  yt  the  said  Widdow 
Goodall  is  a  woman  of  very  euill  behauiour,  whereupon  I  discharged 
her  from  brewing  &  tooke  in  her  Licence. 

Marriage.  15*^  Sept,  1657.  M«^:  That  Will:  Barber  &  Marye 
Swindall  was  this  day,  in  the  p^sence  of  Will :  Swindell  of  Merfeild ; 
Tho:  JBarkefr  of  the  same;  Edward  Barker  of  the  same,  Cloth"*,  duly 
marrid  att  West  Ardsley  before  me. 

Recog"^  tSth  Septemb',  '57.  M** :  That  Henery  Westerman  of 
Loftus,  yeoman,  acknowledgeth  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes 
the  Ld  Protector  the  sume  of  10*,  upon  this  condition,  yt  he  pferre 
a  Bill  of  Enditment  against  one  Rich :  Townend,  now  a  p''soner  in 
the  house  of  Correction,  concemg  the  stealcing  of  a  Q  ...  of  E  ...  e. 
And  then  &  there  giue  the  best  euidence  he  can  concerning  the 
same,  and  nott  dept  w^out  I.,eave  of  the  Co*^'. 

Conuictd  of  Fornication.  21st  of  Septemb*",  '57.  M^:  That 
Ann  Lupton  of  Dewsbury  was  conuictd   before  me  for  haueing  .... 

Drunkenes.  21st  of  Septemb', '57.  M.^:  That  Philip  Awty  of 
Dewsbury,  cloth**,  was  conuicted  upon  his  owne  confession  for  being 
drunke  upon  the  6st  inst,  being  Lds  Day. 

Marriage.  23th  of  Septemb*",  1657.  M<*:  That  Henery  Wamsley 
of  Batley,  Cowper,  &  Grace  Speight  of  Chidsell,  in  the  pish  of 
Dewsbury,  were  this  day,  in  the  p*^sence  of  John  Rhods  of  Chidsell, 
cowper;  Edward  Mosley  of  Soothill,  cloth'';  &  RoBt  Nettleton  of 
Dewsbury,  Batch',  &  others,  duly  married  before  me  att  West  Ardsley, 
&c. 


NOTE-BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN  JOHN   PICKERING.  95 

Trauilling  on  Lds  Day.  23*  Sept.,  1657.  M**:  That  Henery 
Cockill  of  Woodlsworth,  husbandman,  this  day  conuict  before  me  for 
trauelUng  from  Wodlsworth  to  Hunslet  upon  the  6th  inst.,  being 
Lds  day,  about  his  own  occasions,  &  returned  to  Rothwell  Church 
in  the  aftemoone. 

Information  of  Drunkenes.  26^**  of  Sep:  '57.  M*^:  That 
James  Chadwicke  of  Wakefeild,  Innkeep,  Informd  upon  Oath  that 
Thomas  Taylour  of  Wakefeild  was  upon  the  14th  of  May  last  or 
thereabouts  drunke  att  Wakefe**,  and  therupon  a  warr*  is  sent  out  to 
answer  the  p'^misses,  dated  the  26th  of  September  inst. 

Recog^  6th  of  Octob',  '57.  M^:  That  John  Lister  of  Bolton, 
yeom.,  acknowledg  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld 
Protecto'  the  sume  of  20*,  &  John  Lister  the  elder  of  the  same,  in 
sume  of  10',  &  Will  Hamond  of  Bolton,  in  the  suine  of  10  PJ,  upon 
this  condition,  yt  the  said  John  Lister  shall  appear  att  the  next 
Sessions,  &  in  the  meane  time  keep  the  peace  toward  his  Highnes, 
&c,  especially  towards  Tho.  Stansfeild  of  Bolton. 

Tho :  Taylor.  Conuiction  of  the  2nd  Offence  of  Drunkeness. 
Sth  of  Octob',  '57.  W :  That  Thomas  Taylor  of  Wakefeild,  wheel- 
wright, was  this  day  Lawfully  couictd  before  me  for  being  drunke 
upon  the  14th  May  last,  yt^^  is  the  second  offence  of  drunkenes  by 
him  committed  as  appereth  to  me  by  war'  und*"  the  hand  &  seale 
of  John  Ward,  esq*",  dated  the  loth  of  March  last,  by  w<^  warr*  the 
said  Thomas  Taylor  was  conuicted  before  M'  Ward  for  the  first 
offence  of  drunk[n]es.  And  the  said  Thomas  Taylor  was  by  me 
required  the  day  abouesaid  to  finde  sufficient  suerties  to  become 
bound  in  one  Recognozance  in  the  sume  of  10*,  to  the  use  of  the 
Ld  Protector  &c.,  yt  he  ye  said  Thomas  Taylor  shall  hence  forward  be 
of  good  behau',  the  wich  he  refused  to  doe,  whereupon  I  committed 
him  to  the  Castle  of  Yorke  according  to  Lawe  till  he  become  bound 
as  aforesaid. 

The  Gen"»-«-  Quart"  Sessions  held  att  Wakefeild  the  8«*»  of 
Octob',  1657,  all  Recognizances  &  sweares  Certified. 

Recog"-  14th  of  Octob',  1657.  M^:  That  Edward  Taylor 
seruantt  to  John  Hodgson,  esq.,  acknowledgeth  himselfe  to  owe  unto 
his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protector  &  his  successors,  &c.,  the  sume  of 
io>,  upon  this  condition,  yt  he  shall  psonally  appeare  att  the  next 
Gen'"  Sessions,  &c,  &  pferre  a  Bill  of  Enditm*  against  one  Samuell 
Stockdall  for  the  felonious  stealeing  &  carrying  away  two  yeowe 
sheppe  of  his  sd  Mrs.,  &  then  &  there  giue  the  best  euidence  he  can 
concemg  the  same,  &  nott  deptt  wthout  Leaue  of  the  Co"',  &c. 

Recog«-  Fees  2*.  17th  of  Oct*",  1657.  M^:  That  Matthew  Smirfitt 
of  Morley,  Cloth',  acknowledgeth  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes, 
&c,  the  sume  of  2o\  &  Milles  Towlson  of  the  same,  Housewright, 
10*,  Edward  Esquith  of  the  same.  Cloth',  10*,  upon  this  Condition, 
that  the  said   Matthew  Smirfitt  shall  psonally  appeare  att  the  next 


96  NOTE-BOOK   OF   CAPTAIN   JOHN    PICKERING. 

Genrll  Quart'  Sessions  of  the  peace  to  be  held  for  this  Riding,  to 
answer  his  contempt  of  a  warr't  granted  against  John  Smirfit  of 
Moreley,  Cloth'^,  &  in  the  meane  time  be  of  good  behauiour. 

Drunkenes.  22th  of  Octob'.  M*^:  That  Ehara  Thornton 
seruant  to  John  Holdsworth,  Informes  upon  oath  yt  John  Feamley 
of  Great  Gomersall,  Labourer,  was  upon  the  28th  of  July,  being 
Tuesday  night,  drunke  att  the  house  of  one  Will.  Audsley  of  Greatt 
Gomersall  aforesaid,  Alehousekeep,  &  y'  the  said  Fearnley  pd  5*. 

Mariage.  26th  Octob',  '57.  W:  That  John  White  of  the  pish 
of  Thomhill,  mason,  &  Alice  Beehard  of  Ossett,  were  this  day,  in 
the  p'sence  of  John  Stappleton  &  RoBt  Stappleton,  both  of  Earles- 
heaton.  Cloth",  duly  married  before  me,  &c. 

Recog=-  Sessions.  3"^  of  Noumb',  '57.  M**:  That  Mary 
Claughton  of  Rothwell,  widd :  acknowledgeth  herselfe  to  owe  unto 
his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protector,  &c.,  the  suine  of  40^,  &  Micaell 
Sauell,  Rothwell,  Lingeweauer,  20^,  &  Henery  Whilde  of  Rothwell, 
Labourer,  20',  upon  this  condition,  yt  y®  said  Mary  Claughton  shall 
psonally  appear  att  the  next  Gen""^  Quarf^  Sessions  of  the  peace  to 
be  held  for  this  Riding,  to  answer  unto  such  matt",  &c.,  for  the 
suspition  of  stealleing  a  siluer  spoone  of  the  goods  of  M""  Tho: 
Percie  of  Rothwell. 

Recog"-  Sessions.  3"*  of  Noumb*",  1657.  M** :  That  Ann 
Hartley  seruant  to  M*^  Tho ;  Percie  of  Rothwell,  acknowdg  herselfe  to 
owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protector,  &c.,  the  sume  of  40^  upon 
this  condition,  y'  the  said  Ann  Hartley  shall  appeare  att  the  next 
Sessions,  &a,  &  then  &  ther  pferre  a  Bill  of  Enditm'  against  one 
Mary  Clougton  of  Rothwell,  widdow,  conceminge  the  suspition  of 
stealeing  of  a  siluer  spoone  of  the  goods  of  the  said  M*"  Percie,  and 
then  &  there  giue  the  best  euidence  she  can  concemeinge  the  same, 
and  nott  depte  w%ut  leaue  of  the  Co*^'. 

Doeinge  worldly  Laboure.  4^  Noumb',  '57.  M**:  That  Elline 
Wilby,  wife  to  .  .  .  .  ild :  Wilby  of  Ossett,  Alehouskeeper,  was  Lawfully 
conuicted  before  me  for  goeinge  aboutt  her  worldly  occations,  vizt, 
to  Alice  Booles,  wife  to  Rofet  Bull  of  Ossett,  to  demande  eighteen 
pence  of  Lent  money,  and  alsoe  the  said  Alice  Booth  conuicted  for 
goeinge  to  the  said  ....  ild :  Wilby  house  to  pay  the  said  Eighteen 
pence  upon  the  ith  of  9^^  beinge  the  Lds  day,  for  w*^  offence  they 
haue  forfeited  the  sume  of  10*  a  peece. 

Drunknes.  6^**  of  9^^  '57.  M«* :  That  John  Feamley  of  Greatt 
Gomersall,  Labourer,  was  this  day  Lawfly  conuicted  before  me  for 
beinge  drunke  upon  the  28th  of  July  last  att  Gomersell,  &  pd  5* 
for  the  same  to  be  destribtd  to  the  use  of  the  pore  of  the  pish  of 
Birstall. 

26th  of  OctobS  '57.  W  :  That  Rich :  Shepley,  John  Ledgard, 
Rich.  Cozen,  &  Sam :  Rhodes  all  of  Merfeild,  was  Lawfully  conuicted 
before   me  upon   the  Oathes  of  John    Wilby   &    Isarell    Rhodes   for 


NOTE-BOOK   or   CAPTAIN  JOHN    PICKERING.  97 

drinkeinge  &  tipleinge  att  the  house  of  Edw :  Walker  of  the  same, 
Alehouskeep,  upon  the  25th  inst,  beinge  y*  Lds  Day,  for  w<^  offence 
they  haue  forfeited  lo*  a  peece,  the  w<^  is  paid  &  Leuied  upone 
them,  and  is  putt  into  the  Churchwardens  &  ou'seers  handf  to  be 
implid  to  the  use  of  the  most  nedfuU  poor  of  the  pish  of  Merfcild, 
&  the  said  Sam :  Rhodes  for  doeinge  wodly  Labouer  10*.  And  also 
yt  Christopher  Heaton  &  Nicolas  Hoygate  of  Merfeild  aforsaid, 
was  conuictd  for  drinkeing  and  tipleing  upon  the  said  day  att  the 
house  of  Susan  Sherads,  Aleh'skep,  upon  the  oathes  of  John  Wilby 
&  Rich :  Nettleton,  for  w<*  offence  they  haue  forfeit  10*  or  els  to 
sitt  in  the  Stockes  6  howers,  w^**  Law  haue  been  executed  upon 
them.  And  alsoe  y^  Tho:  Naylor  of  the  same,  &  Tho :  Naylor  of 
Wooley,  was  conuictd  of  drinkeing,  &c.,  the  day  aforesaid  att  the 
house  of  Tho;  Marshall,  Alehouskeep,  upon  the  oathes  of  John 
Wilby  &  Rich:  Nett,  and  war'  sent  out  to  Leuie  or  to  sett  in 
Stockes,  the  w<*  Tho :  Marshall  pd  io»,  &  Tho ;  Naylor.  And  also 
Ed^'d  Wilcoke  of  y*  same,  Aleh'skp,  for  harboureinge  Rich.  Shepley 
man  upon  y*  said  day,  c'd  upon  oath  by  John  Wilby  &  Rich. 
Nettleton,  w^  offence  y*  said  Edw :  Wilcoke  forfeitd  &  paid  10*  to 
be  imprd  for  ye  use  afors**.  And  of  vf^^  the  s^  Churchwdens  &  ou' 
seers  ar  to  giue  me  account  w***in  ten  dayes  how  &  to  whome  they 
haue  distributed  y«  said  penalties. 

Recogn  att  Sessions.  9th  of  Nouember,  '57.  M**:  That  George 
Benson  of  Rothwell  Haye,  yeoman,  acknowledgeth  himselfe  to  owe 
unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protect^  &c.,  the  sume  of  20^,  upon  this 
condition,  yt  one  Will :  Benson  of  Oulton,  [shall]  be  of  good  behauiour 
for  one  whole  yeare  next  ensueinge.  Liberate  dated  same  day. 
Cause  was  for  fornication. 

Swearing.  7th  of  Nouemb*",  '57.  M^ :  That  Abraham  Kid  of 
Ossett,  shoomaker,  was  Lawfully  conuicted  before  me  for  the  pphane 
swearing  of  three  oathes  att  Ossett  aforesaid,  and  alsoe  Elline  VVilby 
wife  to  John  Wilby  of  Ossett,  for  the  prophane  swearinge  of  two 
oathes  att  Ossett  aforsaid,  &  alsoe  one  Alice  Boole,  wife  to  Rob' 
Boole  of  the  same,  pphanely  swere  one  oath  att  Ossett  aforesaid, 
upon  the  oath  of  Christopher  Audsley,  Constable  of  Ossett. 

The  said  Alice  Boole  was  upon  the  3  of  Nouemb''  conuic  for 
swereing  aforesaid. 

Recog"-  Sessions.  loth  of  9br,  '57.  M^:  That  Tho.  Preeston, 
seniant  to  S**  John  Sauille,  became  bound  before  me  by  way  of 
Recognizance  to  the  use  of  the  Ld  ProtectC  in  the  suine  [of]  10*, 
upon  this  condition,  yt  he  shall  the  next  Gen"^"  Quart*"  Sessions  to 
be  held  for  this  Ridinge  pTerre  a  Bill  of  Enditm*  against  one 
Anthony  Awtie  &  o'  Will:  Bartton,  now  p*"son"  in  the  house  of 
Correctione  for  the  felonious  stealinge  &  carrying  away  a  certaine 
[Pcoalt],  the  goods  of  y«  said  Tho.  Preeston,  outt  of  the  Bame  of 
the  [said]  S'  John  Sauille  att  Lupsett,  and  then  &  there  giue  the 
best  euidence  he  can  conceminge  the  same,  and  nott  dept  w'^^out 
Leaue  of  the  Co^t,  &c. 


98  NOTE-BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN   JOHN   PICKERING. 

Marriage.  12th  of  Nouemb^  '57.  M^:  That  The.  Copley  of 
Wakefeild  Outtwood,  the  yonger,  Cloth*",  &  Mary  Williamson  of 
Dewsbury,  were  this  day,  in  the  p'sence  of  Tho :  Copley  the  eld', 
Henery  Jefferson  &  John  Storr,  duly  marrid  before  me,  &c. 

Constable  sworne,  13th  of  9br,  '57.  M^:  That  John  lUingworth 
of  Stanley  was  sworne  deputie  Constable  of  Stanley  for  the  yeare 
Ensueing,  or  untill  another  be  sworne,  or  be  Lawfully  discharged. 

Conuictn  of  SwEREiNG.  17'^  of  Qbr,  *57.  M<* :  That  a  warrt  was 
sent  out  by  y«  hands  of  Ralph  Ashton,  gentl,  to  Leuie  the  sume  of 
2*  6*  eight  pence  of  Marke  Allott  of  Emley,  for  the  pphane  swearing 
of  7  oathes,  being  3"*,  4*^  5*^,  6**^  7'^  8*^  &  9^^  offences  by  him 
committed,  as  ap"  by  warr**  from  S''  John  Sauill,  knt.,  being  formerly 
conuict  of  one  pphane  oath  &  one  curse. 

Recogn«-  Sessions,  fees  4*.  18*^  gbr,  '57.  M^:  That  Will. 
Ludingion  of  Ossett,  gen**,  acknowledgeth  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his 
Highnes  the  Ld  Protector,  &c.,  the  sume  of  20*,  upon  this  condition, 
yt  he  psonally  appear  att  the  next  Gen'"  Quarf  Sessions  of  the  peace 
to  be  held  for  this  Riding,  to  answer  unto  such  mat"  of  euill 
behauiour  as  on  the  behalfe  of  his  Highnes,  &a,  shall  be  obiected 
against  hime  concemeing  the  attempting  to  abuse  the  bodie  of  one 
Mary,  wife  to  Michaell  Whelwright  of  Ossett,  Cloth"^,  when  she  was 
greate  w***  child.  Aii  then  &  there  to  und'goe  the  censure  of  the 
Cc^S  and  in  the  meane  time  be  of  good  behauiour. 

Recogn=^  Sessions.  Fees  2*.  24th  of  9br,  '57.  M^:  That 
Henery  Foxcroft  of  Batley,  yeoman,  &  Connothie  Foxcroft  of  the 
same,  acknowledg  themselues  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld 
Protector,  &c.,  the  suine  of  10'  each,  upon  this  condition,  y'  that  the 
said  Henery  Foxcroft  shall  appeare  att  the  next  Sessns  of  the  peace, 
and  yt  he  shd  abide  the  [order]  of  the  Co*^  concerning  the  begotteng 
of  a  Bastard  child  of  Elizabeth  Taylou""  of  Thornhill,  and  in  the 
meane  time  be  of  good  beheau*". 

Recog*-  Sessions.  27th  of  Nouemb*",  '57.  M**:  That  RoBt 
Turtton,  seruant  to  M""  Will:  Green  of  Cawthorne,  acknowledgeth 
himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protector  the  sume  of 
lo^  upon  this  condition,  that  he  shall  psonally  appeare  att  the  next 
Sessions  att  Wakefeild,  then  &  there  to  pferre  a  Bill  of  Enditm* 
against  one  Marmaduk  Wilby,  now  a  p^'son'  in  the  house  of  Correct" 
for  the  felonious  stealleing  and  carrying  away  certaine  Clothes  of  his, 
vizt.  a  [?  Jump]  Coatt,  a  paire  of  Breeches,  a  paire  of  Shoes  &  knife, 
a  new  sher  &  on  i%  and  nott  deptt  w'^out  Leaue  of  the  Co'tt. 

Recog«-  Sessions.  io^*»  of  Decemb*",  '57.  M^:  That  Joseph 
Rhodes  of  West  Ardsley,  Cloth"-,  &  Mark  Allott  of  Gildersome, 
Cloth"^,  acknowledgd  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld 
Protector  &  his  successo"  the  sume  of  10*  a  peece,  upon  this  con- 
dition, that  Ann  Luptton  of  Duesbury  be  of  good  behauiour  for  one 
whole  yeare,  for  fornication. 


NOTE-BOOK   OF  CAPTAIN   JOHN   PICKERING.  99 

Marriag.  io*^  of  Decemb^,  '57.  M*^:  That  Ralph  Harris  of 
Morley,  &  Elizabeth  Mosse  of  the  same,  were  this  [day],  in  the 
p^sence  of  Tho :  Huetson  of  West  Ardsley,  Cloth';  &  Tho :  Morley 
of  Morlay,  Cloth',  duely  married  before  [me]  att  West  Ardslay. 

Recog=  &  Sessions.  19*^  of  December,  1657.  M** :  That  Richard 
Hirst  of  Cloehouse,  in  the  pish  of  Huthersfeild,  acknowledgeth  him- 
selfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protector  and  his  successors 
the  sume  of  60*,  and  Will.  Rhodes  of  Merfeld,  yeoman,  acknowledgeth 
himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ud  Protector  &  his  successors 
the  sume  of  40*,  upon  this  condition,  y*  the  said  Richard  Hirst  shall 
personally  appeare  att  the  next  Gen'"  Quart'  Sessions  of  the  peace 
to  be  held  for  this  Riding,  to  answ'  unto  such  matf*  as  on  the  behalfe 
of  his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protector,  shall  be  obiected  against  him 
concerning  the  woundeding  of  one  Tho :  Brook  of  Huthersfeild,  soe 
y*  he  is  in  danger  of  death,  and  then  &  there  und'goe  the  Censure 
of  the  C(f^. 

Recogn:  Sessions.  30th  Decembre,  1657.  Toby  Oldred  of 
Dewsbury,  Clother,  Robt.  Wilbie  of  y«  same.  Cloth',  acknowledg  to 
owe  to  his  Highn's  40"  a  man. 

Rich  :  Oldred  of  Duesbury,  clother,  Michaell  Hauroyd  of  same, 
Clother,  acknowldg,  &c.,  20**  a  man. 

Condition  that  Toby  Oldred  &  Rob^  Wilbie  shall  both  of  them 
psonally  appeare  at  next  Gen"  Quart'  Sessions  of  Peace  to  answer 
such  matters  as  shall  be  obiected  against  them  for  burning  a  bark 
stack  &  diuers  boards  of  wood  in  y«  night  time,  neer  Midgley,  the 
goods  of  Samuell  Jepson  of  Kirk[?  burton],  Taner,  whereby  diuers 
dwelling-houses  might  have  been  burnd  had  not  y*  wind  blown 
somewhat  fPaway].  And  in  the  meanetime  that  they  &  either  of 
them  be  off  ye  good  behauiour. 

Recog"-  Sessions.  4th  of  January,  '57.  M*^:  That  Rich: 
Nettleton  of  Earlesheaton,  gent*,  and  Tho:  Bayly  of  Midgley,  Glouer, 
acknowledg  themselues  seu^ally  to  owe  unto  his  Highness  the  L'd 
Protecto'and  his  successo"  the  sume  of  10*  apeece,  upon  this  Condition 
yt  they  shall,  att  the  next  Gen"  Quart^  Sessions  of  the  peace  to  be 
held  for  the  Riding,  pferre  a  Bill  of  Enditm'  against  one  Tho: 
Nettleton,  now  a  p'son'  in  the  house  of  Correction,  for  the  felonious 
stealling  and  carrying  away  a  certaine  White  Gray  Cloake  or  Rokitt, 
the  goods  of  y*  said  Rich :  Nettleton,  &  then  &  there  giue  the  best 
euidence  they  can  concerning  the  same,  &  nott  deptt  w^outt  Leaue 
of  the  Co«^ 

Recog^  Sessions.  4  January,  '57.  M**:  That  Rob'  Walker  of 
Burstall,  rough  mason,  acknowledg  himselfe  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes 
20*,  &  Sam.  Scoalfeild  of  the  same  &  Tho:  Crauen  of  the  same. 
Cloth**,  10*  apeece,  upon  this  condition,  that  whereas  the  aboue  bound 
Rob*  Walker  did,  upon  the  first  of  January,  in  the  euening,  cutt  downe 
a  window  stanchen  &  broake  into  a  certaine  dwelling  house  of  one 
Rob*  Dixon  of  Batley,  &  pulled  up  the  range  &  broake  the  Locke  of 


lOO  NOTE-BOOK   OF   CAPTAIN  JOHN   PICKERING. 

the  dore,  where  by  the  said  house  was  layd  open  to  the  comon 
highway.  Iff  therefore  ye  said  Rofet  Walker  appeare  y*  next  Sessions 
to  be  held  for  this  Rid :  &  in  the  meantime  be  of  good  behauiour. 

Recog^  Sessions.  7'**  January,  '57.  M^:  That  Will.  Brook  of 
Heckmondwicke,and  Elizabeth  Procter  of  the  same,  widdow,acknowledg 
themselues  seu^ally  to  owe  unto  his  Highnes  the  Ld  Protector  and 
his  successors  the  sume  of  10^  apeece,  upon  this  condition,  yt  they 
doe  att  the  next  Gen""^*  Quart*"  Sessions  of  the  peace  to  be  held  for 
this  Riding,  preferre  two  Bills  of  Endictmt  against  one  Isabell  Brook, 
now  a  p'son""  in  the  house  of  Correction,  for  the  felonious  stealeing  of 
10  pence  out  of  the  dwelling  house  of  the  said  Eliz:  and  alsoe  for 
setting  the  house  of  the  said  Elizabeth  Procter  on  fire  in  the  night 
time,  and  then  &  there  giue  the  best  euidence  they  can  concerning 
the  same.  And  not  to,  &c. 

13**^  of  January,  1657.  M^:  That  Arthur  Hurstt  of  Birkeby  of 
Huthersfeild,  Cloth',  Informes  upon  oath  that  Thomas  Brook  of  the 
same,  Cloth',  is  cured  of  the  wound  giuen  by  Rich :  Hirstt  of  the  same, 
yeoman,  soe  y'  the  wound  is  become  a  sleight  wound. 

Quart**-  Sessions.  The  Gen"""  Quart'  Sessions  of  the  peace  held 
att  Wakefeild  the  14'^  of  January,  1657,  and  all  Recognizances  & 
swearers  Certified. 

Swearing.  Conuictd.  25*^  of  January,  '57.  M**:  Thatt  Ann 
Westerman  of  Loftus,  seru**  to  Henery  Westerman  of  the  same,  was 
Lawfully  conuicted  before  me  for  the  pphane  sweareing  of  one  Oath 
att  Loftus  aforesaid,  upon  the  twenth  Inst.  The  penalties  sent  by 
John  Clyffe  of  Carleton  to  the  Churchwardens  of  Rothwell.     Cert 

Swearing.  25*^  of  January,  '57.  M**:  That  Marmaduk  Richardson 
of  Burstall,  Blacksmith,  did  upon  the  23***  inst.  pphanely  swere  two 
oathes  at  Burstall  aforesaid ;  proued  before  me  upon  the  oath  of 
William  Broxupp  of  Batley,  &  a  warr*  sentt  out  to  answer  the  p'misses. 

Swearing  p'ued.  26***  of  January,  '57.  M*^:  Thatt  James  Cowper 
of  Wakefeild  outwood,  Cloth',  did  upon  the  6'^  inst.  pphanely  sweare 
two  oathe,  viz.  by  Gods  hartt  &  by  Gods  flesh,  att  Wakefeild  outwood 
aforesaid,  p'ued  before  me  upon  the  oath  of  Thomas  Copley  of  the 
same,  labourer,  &  warr'  sentt  out  to  answer  the  p'misses. 

CoNUici'ED  OF  Swearing.  Certt.  30^^  of  January,  '57.  M^: 
That  Jennett  Wilkinson  of  Loftus,  singlewoman,  was  this  day  Lawfully 
conuicted  of  one  pphane  oath. 

Swearing  p'ued.  30'*^  of  Jan:  1657.  M**:  Thatt  Will:  Wilby  of 
Ossett,  cloth"",  did  upon  Thursday,  the  seauenth  of  Inst.,  pphanely 
sweare  two  oathes  att  Ossett,  viz.  by  mes  &  Belaydy,  att  Ossett 
aforesaid. 

[To  de  continued.] 


In    H.M.    public    RECORD    OFFICE. 


LAY  SUBSIDIES.  CO. York,  West  Riding  fg, 

OTlapentate  of  aggbrigg  anb  jroorleg, 

Anno   1848. 
[Continued  from  Vol.  IX, /.  316.] 


M. 


OSSETT. 

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— 

x\s 

Ricus  Nailer 

in  terr' 

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iijj  iiij^ 

Totses  Alott 

Thorns  Copley 

in  bofi 

xxli 

— 

xwy  lupa 
iiij.r  iiij^ 

in  bofi 

xxli 

— 

Ro!h9  Whctccars  ... 

in  bofi 

xiij/i 

— 

I02 


YORKSHIRE  LAY  SUBSIDIES. 


Ux*  Wittmi  brook.. 
Issabella  birkhed  ... 
Edward  RotSt 

Johes  RotSt 

Radu9  bemond 
Leofid9  bemond    ... 
Roger9  baynes 
Wittms  colly 


RotJt9  Rawdon      ... 
Maistres  flemmyng 
RotJt9   Ryschwordi.. 


Edus  frobischore 
Ricus  lee    ...    . 


Ricus  bemond 

Ux'  Johis  Saivill  ... 


Henric9  Tallot 
Johes  Walker 


Thorns  Wilkynson... 

Johes  Pilkyngton  ... 

Thorns  Watton  mit 
Johes  brook 


Roger9  mallett 
Johes  laik  ... 
Wittms  Wilson 
Johes  bracton 
Thorns  Nalson 


Issabell  storres 

Roht9  Whetley     ... 

Wittms  Jakson 

Johanna  mathema... 

Ricus  Wright 

Wittms  mUn^ 

Wiitms  hucchonson,  juS . 


Johes  flemyng,  sen 

Ricus  hey 

Johes  Kendall 


Johes  bamby 
Roht9  nettilton 


lOd/i/era/gd.] 
in  bon 
in  bon 
in  boil 
in  boil 
in  bon 
in  terr' 
in  boil 
in  boh 

Crofton. 
in  boil 
in  terr' 
in  bon 

ALTOFTf. 
in  bon 
in  bon 

Whitley. 
in  terr* 
in  bon 

Thrustu'land. 
in  boB 
in  bo& 

Whitwood. 
in  boR 

Kir  KH  ETON. 

in  terr* 

Walton. 
in  terr* 
in  bon 

Normaton. 
in  terr* 
in  terr* 
in  terr* 
in  bon 
in  bon 

SH!TTILLING1X)N. 

in  boil 
in  bon 
in  boil 
in  bofl 
in  bon 
in  bon 
in  bon 

Sharliston. 
in  terr* 
in  terr* 
in  terr' 

Thornhill. 
in  bofi 
in  bon 


xl/i 

— 

xxvjs   viij./ 

xxiUi 

— 

xiiijx  vu)d 

x/i 

— 

ujs  iiijrf 

xx/i 

— 

xiijj  m)d 

xxli 

— 

xujj  ui}a 

ixii 

— 

U}S 

xx/i 

— 

xiijj  iiij</ 

xi]/i 

— 

iiijj 

xxvj/« 

_ 

xvijj  iiijfl^ 

x/i 

— 

ri^  Y3?H 

x/i 

U}S  Uljd? 

x/i 



'^i/  W'H 

x/i 

— 

ii]s  ima 

xxi]/i 
xx/i 


x]/i 
xx/i 


xi)/i 
x/i 


Ixvj/j* 
xv/i 


xx/i 

x/i 

x/i 

x/i 

x/i 


xl/i 

xx/i 

xv/i 

x/i 

x/i 

xx/i 

x]/i 

x/i 
y/i 
v/i 


xx/i 
xx/i 


xxijs 
xiijj  iiij</ 


iijj  viij^ 
xiij  iiij^ 


uijx 

v'}s  viijdf 

u}/i  v)s 
vs 


xxs 

vjj  viijdf 
vjj  viijflf 
ujs  iiijdf 
iiji  iuyi 


xxvjj  viijaf 

xiijx  iiij</ 

vs 

lijs  iiij// 

iijj  iiij// 

xiijj  iiijdf 

iijj  yujd 


v}s  vujd 

xxd 

xxd 


xiijj  injd 
xiijs  mjd 


YORKSHIRE    LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


103 


M. 


Lepton. 

Adm  hucchonson  ... 

in  boft 

xx// 

— 

xiijf  iiij^ 
xiijj  iiijflf 

John  Wood 

ID  boil 

xxli 

— 

Koger9  thewles     ... 

^ in  bofi 

xiij/« 

— 

liijs  'm'}d 

Ou^  Flokton  &  Nether  Flokton. 

Wittms  Claitoii     ... 

in  bon 

xxli 

— 

xiijj  iiiji/ 

RotM9   Sykkf 

in  boft 

West  Bretton. 

xxli 

" 

xujs  m}d 

Ricus  bretton 

in  bon 

xxli 

— 

xiijj  iiij</ 

Jofces  Walker 

in  bon 

xxli 

— 

xiijj  iiijd? 

WHtms  Sykkf       ... 

in  boft 

xxli 

— 

xiijj  iiijflf 

WHhns  Whrtley  ... 

..in  bon 
Crigliston. 

xxli 

~~ 

xiijj  iii]d 

Rotk9  Waid 

in  bofi 

xxli 

— 

xiijj  iiij^ 
xiijj  iiijflf 

Ratfus  blakker       ... 

in  bon 

xxli 

— 

John  leik 

in  bofi 

xli 

— 

u)s  iiij^ 

[Jmfirid9  Spriganell 

in  lerr' 

vijli 

— 

ijj  iiijflf 

Johes  Sbepd 
Thorns  Copley 

in  bon 

xiiij/i 

— 

iiijj  viijflf 

in  bon 

xli 

— 

ujs  iiijdf 

Wittms  Oxley       ... 

in  bofi 

xi]li 

— 

iiijj 

Stephus  boya 

in  terr' 

Warmfeld. 

v'jli 

jj^ 

fohes  Sheffeld       ... 

in  terr' 

xiVjli 
xxij/i 

— 

viiJ5  viijaf 

ohes  bradford 

in  terr* 

— 

xxijj 

Roht9  Qcrk 

in  bofi 

Snydall  cO  Aykton. 

xij/t 

" 

iiij^ 

Thorns  frost 

in  bon 

xxli 

— 

xiij^  iu}d 

Chara]9  Jakson      ... 

in  terr' 

xxli 

— 

xxs 

Thorns  hartley 

in  bon 

xli 

— 

i\}s  ui}d 

Roht9  firere 

in  bon 

HOLMFURTH. 

xli 

iijj  ui'jd 

Johes  Genn 

in  boil 

Xiij/f 

— 

uijs  iiijaf 

Ux' Charlisworth  ... 

in  bon 

Almondbury. 

xli 

ii}s  {iijd 

Wittms  Romysdefi 

in  terr* 

xv/i 

— 

xs 

Ricus  Appal3erd   ... 

in  bon 

xxli 

— 

xii]s  iiijd 

Gilht9  bemond      ... 

in  bon 

xiij/t 

— 

iiijj  iiud 

Petrus  Key 

in  terr* 

Saurby. 

vli 

~ 

xxd 

M^garet  Dikson    ... 

in  terr* 

vli 

— 

xxd 

Johes  farror 
Thorns  holgat 
GUht9  helele 

in  bon 

xxli 

— 

xiVjs  m}d 

in  bon 

xxli 

— 

xiijs  in'jd 

in  bon 

xxli 

— 

xiijj  injd 

RicQs  Sotehill 

in  bon 

T 

— 

iiijx 

Wittms  Waddisworth 

in  bon 

— 

iijj  iiij// 

Wittms  hopk3rnson 

in  boB 

xxli 

— 

xiijj  iiijd 

Wittms  gawkroeer 

in  bofi 

xli 

_ 

iijj  iiij^ 

Joh  list!>      

in  bon 

xli 

— 

iijj  in}d 

Jacobus  dobson     ... 

in  terr* 

viij/i 

— 

ijs  yiijd 

Gilht9  Phelipe       ... 

in  bofi 

xvli 

— 

vs 

John  diksoii 

in  terr' 

vli 

— 

xxd 

George  haldisworth 

in  bofi 

xxvli 

— 

xvjs  viijd 

Ricus  Qey 

in  bofi 

xli 

— 

ujs  \u)d 

I04 


YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


Johes  hopkvnsou   ... 
Ricus  Cart^ 
Kicus  hopkynson   ... 
Edward9  Tal^sall ... 
Nichus  Grenwood... 
Jacobus  Kobynson 
Ricus  gledhill 
Wittms  gledhill     ... 
henric9  p^stley 
Jacobus  Foxcroft  ... 
George  Remysdeb 
Wittms  Saltenstall 
George  foxcroft     ... 
John  foxcroft 
Martin9  foxcroft    ... 
Thorns  foxcroft 


RoTst9  haldisworth  Ctic9.. 

Gim9  Ottf  

Ux'   Patley 

Rofct9  Wat^hous  ... 
Etfus  hanson 
Wittms  Saivell 
Wittms  Wibsey     ... 
Wittms  Mawd 
Johes  Wilkynson  ... 
Ricus  list^,  sen 
Tohes  hardy 
brian9  ferror 
Roht9  Romysden  ... 
Wittms  brodle  of  the  Shay 
Wittms  Metchill   ... 
Ricus  Crowdere     ... 


Thorns  gledhill 
brian9  Wormall 


Thorns  Wilk3nison 
Jacob9  bawmfurth 
Rotit9  Dean 
Johes  Whitley 

Ricus  Best 

Dyonisi9  hilly ngworth 
Johes  Stanclyff 
Johes  Wood,  sen   ... 
Johes  holgatt 


Saurbv  (continued), 
in  boh 
in  bon 
in  boh 
in  bon 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  bon 
in  ten* 
in  terr* 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  bon 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  boh 

Halifax. 
in  terr* 
m  terr' 
in  boh 
in  terr* 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  terr* 
in  boh 
in  terr* 
in  boh 
in  terr* 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  terr* 
in  boh 


Johes  Cokcroft  of  Haldisworth  boundfin  boh 


Edward9  Mawde 
Henric9  brige 
Ricus  Mawd 
Edward9  denton 
Xp6r9  oldfeld 
Ricus  Wat^ous 
John  oldfeld 
Ricus  brige 


Barsland. 
in  terr' 
in  boh 

OVYNDEN. 

in  terr* 
in  terr* 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  boh 


Warley. 
in  terr' 
in  boh 
in  terr* 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  terr* 
in  boh 
in  boh 


xxij/t 

xx/i 

xiijii 

x/i 

xx// 

xx/i 

x/i 

111 

xxlt 

x\U 

xli 

xxli 

xxli 

xxli 

xxli 


xxli 

vli 

xli 

xxli 

xli 

xli 

xli 

vli 

xli 

xli 

Ixvj/f 

vij/i 

xxli 

xxli 

vij// 

xxli 


Sm*    —    xYJ/« 

xli     . 
xxli 


xiujs  \\i}d 
xu}s  mjd 
iiijj  iiij// 
iijs  iii^d 
xiiji  iiiji/ 
xiij^  m}cl 
lijs  iiijdf 

xxd 

xiijf  iiiji/ 
vs 

iijj  nijci 
xu}s  iiij</ 
xiijj  iiijflf 
xiljs  m)d 
x'lijs  in'jd 


—  XXJ 

—  xxd 

—  iijj  iiij^ 

XXJ 

—  ii}s  uijfi 

—  iijj  iiij</ 

—  u}s  iiij^ 

—  xx^ 

—  iijx  uijd 

—  vjj  viijflf 

—  xliii^j 

—  \}s  liijd 

—  xiijj  liijd 

—  xiijx  ui}d 

—  i}s  iii^d 

—  xiijj  liijaf 
xvs  viVjd 


yfiijli 

\li 

xxli 

xxli 

xvli 

xvli 

xiij/t 

xv/i 

xiij// 

xiij/i 

\}li 
xli 
vli 
xli 
xli 
yli 
xli 
xxli 


— 

'jf. 

vuid 

~ 

xiijx 

iu}d 



ijj  \ 

iijd 

— 

xx^ 

— 

xiijf 

iii}d 

— 

xiijj 

uijd 

^~* 

vs 
vs 

— 

iiijj 

nijd 

— 

vs 

— 

iujs 

iiijc/ 

— 

iiijj 

iiijf/ 



ijj 

— 

iijj 
xx^ 

i\}d 

— 

v)/^ 

m]d 

— 

UJJ 

mid 

— 

xx^ 

— 

iijj 

''¥.^ 

— 

xiijj 

uija 

M. 


YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES.  105 


xli}s  iiij</ 
xiij^  iiijd^ 
vs 

vjx  viiiflf 
xiijj  iiij^/ 

iijs  iiij^ 
iijj  iiijflf 
vs 

i}s  uijd 
x\\}s  uijd 
xiijj  in^ii 
xu}s  m]d 
iijj  iiijd 
iijj  injd 
xiiu  iiiW 
xiijx  iiij^ 


XXJ 

xiijx  m)d 
xii^j  iii^d 
xiijj  iiijd 

xxd 


—  xiij^  iu}d 
xvj/«*  xijj  iiijrf 

XXJ 

—  xxvj  iiijrf 

—  xiijj  injd 

—  xiijj  uijd 

—  xiijj  iii'^d 

—  xii^j  iiijrf 

—  xiijj  iiijd 


VUJJ 

xiijj  iiijflf 
iijj  iiijoT 
\}s  m}d 
xiijx  iiij^ 


XXJ 

iiijj  iu)d 
xiijs  iiij</ 
xiijj  iiiji^ 
iijj  iujd 
vs 
xxd 
xxd 

iijs  iiijdf 
xiijj  mjd 
iijj  iiij^ 
xxd 
xxd 


Warlev  (continued). 

Thorns  brige 
GiltJt  Waid 

in  bon 

xx/i 

in  bon 

xx/i 

Brian9  Waid 

in  bon 

xvii 

Johes  Murgatrod  ... 
Kicus  best 

in  terr* 

xli 

in  bon 

xxH 

Hcnric9  Waddisworth 

in  bon 

xli 

Johes  Shay 

Thorns  oldfcld       ... 

in  boil 

xli 

in  boB 

xli 

Ricus   denton 

in  boB 

xvli 

Ricus  Crowd^ 

in  terr' 

v'uli 

Ricus  Longbothom 

in  bon 

xxli 

Johes  oldfeld 

in  lx>n 

xxli 

Xpoi9  oldfeld 

in  bon 

xxli 

Ricus  Shay 

in  boB 

xli 

Johes  Drak 

in  boB 

xli 

Gilht9  brookysbank 

in  boB 

xxli 

Ux*  bargraves 

in  boB 

Migley. 

xxli 

Hugo  laicy 

in  terr' 

xxli 

Henric9  ferror 

in  boB 

xxli 

Ricus  Dean 

in  boB 

xxli 

Thorns  Migley 

in  boB 

xxli 

Withns  ferror 

in  terr' 

vlt 

John  Migley 
Ricus  Sonnd^and... 

in  terr* 

in  terr' 

Staynland. 

[obliUrated]  ...  on 

in  boB 

xxli 

Sm* 

—      XVJ 

3d. 

Skircott. 

[o6lit€rat€d] ...  ill  de 

Copley  ...      in  terr' 

xxli 

Joh  Wat«>hous        ... 

in  boB 

xl/i 

01yuer9  lokwood  ... 
Wttms  kyng 

in  boB 

xxli 

in  boB 

xxli 

Johes  boithes 
Thorns  QyfT 

in  Iwfl 

xxli 

in  boB 

xxli 

Wittms  Wilkynson 

in  boB 

Waddisworth. 

xxli 

Ricus  Nailer 

in  terr* 

xij/j 

Thorns  Drap 
Ux'  Sutclyff 

in  boB 

xxli 

in  boB 

xli 

Ux*  Drap 

in  terr' 

y'uli 

Wiftms  Aikrod      ... 

in  boB 

xxli 

Ux'  Johis  grenwood 

in  boB 

NORTHOUROM. 

xvli 

Xi)0i9  boithes       ... 
Thorns  fomes 

in  boB 

xxxli 

in  boB 

xiij// 

Tho&s  Drak 

in  boB 

xxli 

Wittms  haldisworth 

in  boB 

xxli 

Johes  boy 

in  boB 

xli 

Wittms  Swyft  of  tholeanes         ...       in  bon 

xv/i 

Wittms  Amler       ... 

in  terr* 

vli 

Edward  Staynclvff 
Henric9  grymschey 

in  terr* 

vli 

in  boB 

xli 

Ux*  cravyn 

in  boB 

xxli 

Johes  northend 

in  boB 

xli 

Johes  barstoy 

in  terr* 

vli 

Ricus  gibson 

in  terr* 

vli 

io6 


YORKSHIRE  LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


Stanffeld. 

Ricus  horsfall        

in  boB 

xx/i 



xiijx  iiij^ 

Ricus  MechiU        

in  bon 

xx/i 

— 

xiijj  iu]d 

Ux'  haigraves        

in  bofi 

xx/i 

— 

xu}s  iiij^^ 

Riois  helewell       

in  bon 
HUDD^SFELD. 

xiij/r 

iiijx  m]d 

Thorns  Key           

in  terr* 

xx/i 



xxs 

Ricus  Charlisworth 

in  bon 

xvij/i 

— 

vs  vu)d 

Johes  Annitegc     

in  bon 

xvj/i 

— 

vs  iiijrf 

Johes  brook  de  deighton... 
Thorns  brook        

...      in  boB 

xxU 

— 

xiijx  iiijrf 

...       in  bofi 

xxH 

— 

xiijf  m)cl 

Witfmus  brook      

in  boB 

Xlj/l 

— 

iiij/ 

Edus  brook            

in  boB 

— 

.... 
iiijj 

Xp0r9  brook          

in  boB 

xij/i" 

— 

Roger9  brook        

in  boB 

xij/i 

— 

iiijj 

Edward9  brook     

...      in  bofi 

xij/« 

— 

Uljf 

M5maduc9  brook 

...      in  bon        ... 

xij// 

— 

] 

Ffernley  tias. 

Arthur9  Key         

in  terr* 

Ui 



b 

Thorns  Snape        

in  boB 

xli 

— 

u}s  mjd 

Sma 

—    xxj/i 

iijj  viij^ 

HiPP^OM  &  Brighous. 

Johes  Ryschworth 

James  Wat^ous 

..        in  terr* 

xxli 



xxs 

...      in  boB 

xxxli 

— 

xxs 

Ricus  brighous      

in  boB 

xvH 

— 

vs 

Edward9  brodley 

in  boB 

xii 

— 

i\}s  iiijflf 

Ricus  brodley        

..       in  boB 

xli 

— 

iijx  iiij^ 

Wittms  bemond     

in  boB 

xxli 

— 

xiijj  iiij^ 

Thorns  Smylh        

in  terr' 

y)li 

— 

>JJ 

John  holms 

in  boB 
Dalton. 

xx/i 

xiijs  uijd 

Johes  key 

in  boB 

xi\/i 
v/« 

— 

ims 

Edus  hurst 

in  terr* 

— 

xxd 

M^SDEN. 

Ra^us  heldf          

...      in  boB        ... 
HeptOstall. 

xli 

^ 

u}s  iiiji/ 

Thorns  Grenwood 

...      in  terr' 

xli 

— 

vjj  viijd 
ills  uijd 

/ohes  Grenwood 

in  boB 

xli 

— 

'  ohes  Sutclyff       

in  terr' 

vli 

— 

xxd 

Thorns  grenwood  de  leryngf 

in  boB 

xxli 

— 

xiijs  iiij</ 

Wittms  Mechill 

in  boB 

xli 

— 

iij5  iiijflf 
xu}s  liij^ 

Thorns  grenwood  de  Golden 

in  boB 

xxli 

— 

Wharmbv. 

Johes  With 

in  terr* 

xxli 



xxs 

Edward9  hurst      

...      in  bofi 

xxli 

— 

xiijf  iii^d 

RotJt9  hurst           

in  boB 

xxli 

— 

xii^x  iiij^ 

Thoiiis  hanson       

in  boB 

xiij/i 

— 

iiijx  imd 

George  thewles     

Rot5t9  Aynley        

Thorns  Saivit!       

in  terr* 

vli 

— 

xxd 

in  boB 

xli 

— 

iijj  iiijrf 

...       in  boB 

xli 

— 

ii]j  iu^d 
njs  m}d 

Ricus  birkhed        

in  bofi 

xli 

— 

YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES.  107 

Arryngdon. 

Georgius  fomes     in  bon  ...  xxii  —    xiijj  iiijflf 

Jofccs  Sutclyff        in  boii  ...  x\/i  —    xiijj  iiij^ 

John  Migley  in  boR  ...  xli  —    iijj  iiiji 

Langfeld. 

Johes  horsfall         in  bon  ...  xx/f  —    xiijj  iiijflf 


in 


Sm*    —    xjii  xvijs 


M.  6. 
VbiB  S-n^Clltf  maide  the  xxyj**  day  of  Octot5r  in  the  xxxvij  yere  of  the  Reign  of 
our  sou^eign  lord  king  Henry  the  viij">  by  the  grace  of  god  of  Inglond  france  and 
Irelond  king  defender  of  the  faithe  and  in  Erthe  of  the  Churche  of  Inglond  and 
Ireland  Supme  heed  JSCtWi^t  S'  Henry  Saivelle  Thomas  grice  John  Peck  Arthur 
kay  Roger  Mallett  and  Tristfm  lx>ullinge  Auctorised  emonges  oders  by  o*"  said 
Sou^eign  lordf  heighe  Coroission  to  execute  that  o'  grant  of  the  subsidie  maid  and 
gruntted  unto  his  Maiestie  in  the  xxxiiij  yere  of  his  most  noble  reign  and  to  be 
paled  in  the  yerf  then  next  foUoinge  As  by  the  said  Acte  more  at  large  doth 
appeir  and  asseigned  by  dyuision  for  the  last  paymet  of  the  same  grunt  to  the 
Wapentakes  of  Agbrige  A  Morley  in  the  westr^  of  the  countie  of  Yorke  of  thone 
ptic  And  Robert  foumes  of  Mirfeld  in  the  same  countie  gentilman  of  thoder  ptie 
TOl^C00ftbC  that  thafforsaid  Comyssion^s  haith  assigned  &  appointted  the 
abonenamed  Robert  foumes  to  be  collector  of  thafTorsaid  Wapint  of  Agbrige  and 
Morley  and  w'^'in  the  same  to  levie  and  gether  all  suche  some  &  somes  of  money 
and  of  suche  psons  as  in  diu^s  wrytingf  in  pchemet  annexed  unto  this  p'sent 
Indents  and  at  the  length  is  declared  over  and  besidt  the  Anticypacon  of  the  said 
last  paymet  whiche  thafTorsaid  Robert  foumes  getherid  before  this  tyme  and  also 
to  pay  the  same  Residewe  of  thafTorsaid  last  payment  to  the  use  of  o'  said 
Sou^eign  lord  accordinge  to  the  teno<^  effect  and  meaning  of  thafforsaid  Acte  and 
grante  &c.  Jll  TPQlStflCB  Whe'of  thafforsaid  ComLssion^s  to  this  p'sent  indentf 
haith  sett  thar  sealls  and  subscribed  their  names  the  day  and  yere  aboue  wrytten. 

Henri  Savile  k. 

Thorns  gryce 

John  Pek 

Arthur  key 

Rogere  Malett 

Tristram  boUyng 
M.  7. 

Wapintagiu  de  Agbrige  West?  Com  Ebor*. 

Westgait  in  Waikfeld. 

xxj  —  ]d 

xxs  —  jd 

iij/i  —  iijdf 

y/i  —  xd 

...      y'nj/i  —  xv\d 

..       xLf  —  ijd 

vli  —  xd 

xxs  —  jd 


RotJt9  Grenwood 

in  bon 

Wittms  baxst^ 

in  bon 

Wittms  Jopson 

in  boil 

U.x'  baitman 

in  boil 

Xpor9  standley 
Wittms  Stanffeld 

in  boil 

in  boil 

Ux'  hanson 

in  boil 

WiHms  ley... 

in  bon 

io8 


YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


Westgait 

IN  Waikfeld  (continued). 

Ricus  Toller          

in  bon 

XXJ 

Thoins  liktwirowe 

in  bon 

viij/i 

Thorns  Symson     

in  bon 

XXJ 

Witfms  Key          

in  bon 

iij// 

Roger  Wynditt      

in  bofi 

XXJ 

Thorns  Rawden     

in  bon 

xlj 

Thorns  noble        

in  bon 

xb 

Henric9  barker      

in  bon 

.       xb 

Wittms  Wilson      

in  bon 

ws 

RotJt9  Dawson      

in  boil 

vli 

Ric  Turton             

in  bon 

.      v/t 

[otles  smizerd         

in  boii 

iiij/« 

[Ienric9  gillis        

in  bon 

XXJ 

Georgius  stubley 

in  boS 

XXJ" 

Ric  Musgrave        

in  boS 

XXJ 

Johes  fowler          

in  boa 

XXJ 

Johes  gren 

Johes  Dawson       

in  bon 

XXJ 

in  bofi 

vj/r 

Gilis  burton            

in  bon 

vj/i 

Wiitms   Atkynsoii 

...      in  boii 

iiij/« 

Ricus  Clyff. 

in  boil 

XXJ 

Thorns  Storre        

in  boil 

iij/i 

RotJi9  Denton       

...       in  bon 

XXJ 

Wiitms  Nodder     

in  bofi 

.       xIj 

RicWigley 

in  terr' 

xlj 

James  grenwood 

in  boil 

.       y\\]H 

Xp6r9  Turton        

in  bofl 

\\\]li 

Johes  Jakson          

in  boil 

iij/i 

Roht9  bedfurth      

in  boil 

XXJ 

Withns  Casson       

in  boil 

XXJ 

Wittms  Tattersall 

in  bon 

Y}H 

Henric9  Nicolson 

in  bon 

\\\U 

Wiihns  burse         

in  bon 

Henric9  Tomson 

in  bon 

iij/i 

Roht9  burton         

in  boil 

Roht9  Ukbarow     

in  boB     *  .. 

X  J 

Roland9  aikrid  of  Kendall 

in  terr' 

.      xb 

Ric  Wellf 

in  boB 

XXJ 

Ux»  frankisch         

in  bon 

XXJ 

Johes  admondson 

in  bon 

.       xlj 

Thorns  Sheffeld     

in  boil 

XXJ 

Lionel9  Clyff        

in  bon 

XXJ 

Jacob9  Gibson       

Edward9  hoppey  p  ux'  sua 

in  bofi 

XXJ 

in  boh 

v/i 

Sm»    - 

KiRKGAIT. 

Pet  ball      

in  bon 

xlj 

Thoins  Calice,  Junh 

in  boil 

.       x/i 

Rad  Jakson            

in  bon 

\]li 

Johes  CoUenson     

in  bon 

XXJ 

Wiitms  birkhed     

...       in  boil 

iij/« 
iiij/z 

Thorns  laiborn 

in  boil 

Johes  Denton,  Sen 

in  terr* 

.       xLr 

Roger  Slait^          

Wittms  Wood        

in  boil 

XXJ 

in  boil 

\\]li 

Ric  Denton            

in  boil 

.       xU 

Matheus  brown      

in  bon 

XXJ 

Wittms  Rouston 

in  bon 

xlj 

Ric  Spynk 

in  terr* 

xLr 

XVJflf 

id 
ijrf 

yi 

ni 
xd 

id 
id 
}d 

xiia 
xi}d 
iiij</ 

i\}d 

i}d 
iiiji/ 

XVJ(/ 

iiije/ 
iu}d 
id 

xij^ 
iijrf 
xijd 
xij^ 
iijflf 

ijd 

iiijdf 

]' 

xd 


—    xixj  yd 


ujj  uijd 
xi\d 

ujd 
iiij^ 
iiij^ 

u}d 

1}J 

iiijti 


YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


109 


KiRKGAlT  (coniinued). 


M. 


fohes  Denton,  Jun 
Edward9  Roodf    .. 

in  bofl 

xb 

in  bon 

XXJ 

Wiitms  Alan 

in  bon 

XXJ 

Xp0i9  Cowp 
Thorns  Claphaia    .. 

in  bon 

xb 

in  boil 

XXJ 

Gcorg  dymond 

in  boil 

x.\x 

Roland9  gravesoh  .. 

in  bon 

ws 

Thorns  Alan 

in  boB 

\'\i]li 

RotJt9  Wilsun 

in  bon 

xxs 

[ohes  Slaiden 

in  boft 

v/jf 

[<oUt9  Crosby 

in  bon 

xviii/j 

Thorns  musgrave  .. 

in  terr' 

xb 

RotJt9  Ogden 
Withns  Hill 

in  bon 

iij// 

in  bofi 

v// 

Ric  Sawnd^son      .. 

in  bon 

XX  J 

Tacob9  Gorrell       .. 
Wittm  dymond 

in  boil 

iiii/z 

in  boil 

Xb 

Johcs  Wyndle 
JUc  Thornhill 

in  bon 

xb 

in  bon 

xb 

Ux'  georgi  hill      .. 

in  bi)n 

iij/t 

Ux'higgcfi 

in  bon 

xxs 

Ric  Thomson 

in  bon 

xxs 

Wittms  suiter      .. 

in  terr' 

xxs 

Rot5t9  Tvdyng 
Alcxand^  Dikson,  S 

in  terr' 

xb 

cot9,  null  bon 

Gcorg  Johnson,  an 

aliannt,  null  bon 

NORTHGAIT. 

Sma    — 

Wittm9  Dighton    .. 

in  bon 

xxr 

Ux*  thurlston 

in  bon 

v// 

Ux*  Caruer 

in  bon 

XXJ 

Ric  oxenfeld 

in  bon 

XX  J 

Ric  RediaU 

in  boii 

iij/i 

Milo  Tal3cr 

in  bon 

xb 

Thorns  Wwott 
Alex  Sayven  at  mai 

Ux'  lynley 

Jobes  hadcok 
7  d. 
Francisc9  grunt 

in  bofi 

xxs 

tt        ..          ...       in  bon 

xxs 

in  boB 
in  bon 

xxs 

xb 

in  bon 

iiij// 

Ric  ellis      

in  bon 

v}/i 

Roger9  yongsmyth 
Edward9  madhope 

in  terr' 

in  bon 

xxs 

v/i 

Jeffiray  Richardson 

in  bon 

vli 

Ric  harbor  .. 

in  bon 

xxs 

Angnes  Mylnes 

in  bon 

xxs 

Johcs  Killyngbeck 

in  bon 

iiij// 

Laur  Drak 

in  bofi 

xb 

Ricus  ncllott 

in  bon 

xb 

Thofiis  Worthlcy,  Ji 

in      in  boB 

xxs 

Thorns  baitman     .. 

in  bon 

y/i 

Roger  baitf 
Wittms  Cookson  .. 

in  bon 

viij// 

in  boB 

iiij/» 

Thorns  Saxston 

in  boB 

yj// 

Hcnric9  brodle      ... 

in  terr' 

xb 

Thorns  pkvnson    .. 
Brian9  nailer 

in  bofl 

xxs 

in  bon 

xxs 

Thonis  Worthlcy,  S 

eB     in  lerr' 

xb 

Johes  brown 

in  bon 

iiij/i 

-  ijrf 

-  j^ 

—  yi 

-  K^ 

—  \i\}a 

-  )d 

—  Xii 

~  ^If 

—  m)d 

—  \\)d 

—  xd 

-  \d 

—  \\\)d 

-  ijor 

-  ii.'' 

—  y^ 

—  iij</ 

—  yd 

—  \d 

—  \\\yd 

—  iiij^ 

—  \\\)d 

xviijj  y\d 


yi 

■nd 

lljtf 

1J</ 

iiiji/ 
xijrf 

¥ 

xd 
xd 
id 

nij^ 

ijd 

\d 

xd 

xy\d 

iii^^ 

x\}d 

uijd 

m)d 
iiij^ 


no 


YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


/oties  Rawson        

^c  norres 

in 

boB 

xxs 

in 

terr* 

XXX 

Ric  Wilson 

in 

bon 

xxs 

Rot5t9  hanson        

in 

boil 

xxs 

Edward  3edon       

in 

bon 

xxs 

Rot5t9  peper          

...      in 

bon 

x\s 

Edmond9  Carlynghall      ... 

in 

boS 

XXJ 

RotJt9  Powge 

in 

terr* 

.       iiij/r 

Johes  Hoill           

Elizabeth  Tomsori 

in 

terr' 

XXJ 

in 

boR 

.       xx// 

MWet  Tomson 

Rofet9  brigf  of  Kendall  ... 

in 

bon 

xxvUi 

in 

terr' 

.       v/i- 

Sma    — 

Standley. 

RotJt9  Clerkson     

in 

boa 

xlj 

Ux'  bell      

in 

bon 

XXJ 

Rot5t9  cilson          

Leon^d9  Cassofi 

in 

bon 

.       xlx 

in 

l)on 

.       xlx 

Johes  hyndle         

in 

bon 

XXJ 

Henric9  Sherpe     

in 

bofi 

vij// 

Wittms  hobson      

in 

bon 

.       x\s 

Johes  Sugden        

in 

boft 

.       xb 

Wittms  Clerkson 

in 

terr'       . 

iiii/j 

Totles  barker          

in 

bon 

.       v/i 

*Roger9  Wilson      

in 

bon 

.       xlj 

Georg  Kent           

in 

bon 

vij/« 

Georg  gryin           

Johes  Clerkson      ... 

in 

bon 

XXJ 

...      in 

bon 

xlj 

Roger  bekkett       

in 

boii 

.       xlj 

ohes  pchard         

in 

boii 

XXJ 

[licus  Clerk           

in 

bon 

viiUt 

Johes  grym 

in 

boB 

.       xlj 

Roht9  bekkett       

in 

bon 

.       xIj 

Ux'  mokson           

in 

bon 

.       xlj 

Wittms  haldisworth 

in 

bon 

.       xlj 

Brian9  Clerkson 

in 

bon 

xIj 

Wittms  Comsmyth 

in 

bon 

iiij/i 

Brian9  Smyth        

in 

bon 

XXJ 

Roht9  hunter         

in 

bon 

.      xlj 

Roht9  Clerkson     

in 

boB 

Yii 

Johes  Pekard         

...      in 

bon 

xxs 

Johes  Walker        

in 

boB        . 

XXJ 

Thonis  Cokkell     

in 

boB 

iiij// 

[ohes  Arnold         

'R.icus  Swyft           

in 

boB 

..      v// 

in 

boB        . 

XXJ 

Carol9  prust           

in 

boB 

iij// 

Nicholus  Skott      

...       in 

bofi 

ohes  Wright         

in 

boB 

iiij/f 

ohes  Kycchynma 

in 

boB 

XXJ 

'tland  Stable          

...      in 

boB 

XXJ 

Ricus  birre 

in 

boB 

XXJ 

Lionell9  Raynalles 

in 

boB 

xlj 

Thorns  Dawson     

in 

boB 

.      x\s 

Wittms  Turton      

in 

boB 

XXJ 

Roht9  Totty          

in 

boB 

XXJ 

Roht9  Aitmer        

in 

boB 

vi// 

Wittms  farebam 

in 

boB 

.      xlj 

Thonis  Androwe 

in 

boB 

XXJ 

Thonis  glouer        

in 

boB 

XXJ 

Georg  forma          

...       in 

boB 

XXJ 

ijof 

vuja 
i}J 

xiijf  iiijt/ 
xvijj  iiijrf 
xxd 


•J/ 
xnija 

viij^ 
xd 

xinja 

fa 
xv}d 

fd 

iiij</ 

iiij^f 
xd 

\\yi 
myi 
\\\)d 

\)d 

xijrf 
ijrf 

yi 


YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


Standlev  (cmttnued). 

Wittms  Tal5er       

Hcnric9  Rotit        

in 

bon 

xxx 

— 

]d 

in 

bon 

i\]li 



\]d 

Ricus  Middilton 

in 

bofl 

xxs 

— 

yd 

[jiV] Sheppd 

in 

bon 

xlx 

— 

\]d 

Thonis  Arnold       

in 

bon 

T 

— 

ra\d 

[ohcs  Tal3er         

in 

terr'       .. 

— 

iiijrf 

,  ofces  KighUey      

£dward9  piynce 

...      in 

bon 

xh 

— 

ijrf 

in 

bon 

7LXS 

— 

i'' 

Thoffis  Crakeld     

in 

bon 

xls 

— 

Ijrf 

Ux'  R^cr           

RotJt9  Sergenson 

...      in 

bon 

x\s 

— 

ijV 

...       in 

terr'       .. 

xxs 

— 

irf 

Ricus  Arnold          

in 

bon 

xxs 

— 

K 

[otics  Coopu          

'^cns  grcn 

in 

bon 

xU 

— 

iyi 

in 

bon 

xxs 

— 

& 

Rol5t9  Ald^ley       

in 

bon 

xb 

— 

Jotoes  Avyson        

in 

bofl 

xb 

— 

¥ 

Wittms  Perker      

in 

terr' 

XXJ 

— 

ijrf 

Ux'  Moore 

in 

terr'       .. 

.  T 

— 

?/ 

Ricus  Smyth          

in 

boR 



Thorns  Saivitt       

in 

bon 

xls 

— 

\]j 

Withns  Smyth       

in 

bon 

v\/i 

— 

x\\d 

Ellis  necob 

in  terr* 

vli 

— 

xxd 

Ux'  townnend       

in 

bon 

xh 

— 

\\d 

Alanus  Nicolson  of  Kendall 

in 

terr'       .. 

XXJ 

— 

ii 

Sma    — 

xxs 

xd 

M.  8. 

HORBURY. 

Thorns  Cowy        

Tohes  langfeld       

Wittms  Tagger      

Wittm9  RoSt         

in 

bon 

.      xU 

— 

¥ 

in 

terr'       .. 

x\s 

— 

iiij^ 

in 
in 

bofl 
bon 

.      vij/i 
vij// 

— 

x\\\]d 
xiiijrf 

Edward9  lee         

in 

bon 

xii 

— 

ij^ 

Edmond9  crle        

...      in 

bofl 

x\s 

— 

id 

Johes  Waryn         

in 

bon 

ii\H 

— 

\\]d 

Edward9  Romysden 

in 

bofl 

Sf 

— 

iij^ 

Wittms  dicconsofi 

...       in 

bon        .. 

— 

ijrf 

Ux*  Stephi  megsofi 
Wittms  Thomes 

in 

bofi 

xxr 

— 

K 

in 

boil        .. 

x\s 

— 

V 

RotJl9  Megsofi       

in 

bofi 

xxs 

— 

Y^ 

Henric9  Jakson     

in 

bofi 

xxs 

— 

U 

Edward9  megsofi 

in 

bofi 

xxs 

— 

}d 

RotJt9  Thomes      

in 

boB 

iiij/i 

— 

iiij^ 

Johes  Medley        

in 

terr»       .. 

iij// 

— 

vj^ 

Roht9  Jagger        

in 

bofi        .. 

iij/r 

— 

iiV 

Nicholaus  no  well 

in 

boB 

XXJ 

— 

J^ 

Ricus  fleccher        

in 

boB        .. 

xls 

— 

V 

Thorns  hall            

in 

boB 

xxs 

— 

y 

foheshall 

in 

boB 

xxs 

— 

d 

7acob9  megson      

in 

boB 

xls 

— 

iid 

Wittms  harrison 

in 

bon 

xxs 

— 

]d 

Geoigius  Sykkf     

...      in 

bofi 

iiij/« 

— 

m\d 

Wittms  longlcy     

in 

boB 

xlx 

— 

\d 

Wittms  boith         

in 

boB        .. 

xxs 

— 

)d 

Alida  nowell         

in 

boB 

i\]U 

— 

lij^ 

Sm*    — 

vjj 

xjd 

Crofton. 

Thorns  ellis           

in 

terr' 

Uj/i 

— 

yjd 

Jacobus  ereil         

fUcus  oxTey           

in 

boB        .. 

\xlt 

— 

xviiiflf 

...      in 

bofi 

vij/i 

— 

xiiij^ 

Thorns  AvysoA      

in 

boB 

vij/« 

— 

xiiij^ 

112 


YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


Ux'  lokwood 

Matheus  totehill    ... 

Brian9  Wraith 

Thorns  Wynk 

Xp0i9  field,  husbondma  .. 

GilBt9  Wraith       ... 

Wiitms  Roidhous  ... 

Johes  tutehill 

Thorns  Downs 

Johes  henrison 

Xpor9  feld 

Ricus  atowght 

Brian9feld 

Ux*  Watson 
Wiitms  Johnson    ... 
Ux*  birkhed 


MUo  Cokkell 

}ohes  Tomson 
ohes  barght 
Thorns  garlik 
Thorns  Atkynson  .. 
Johes  townnend     .. 
Johes  lowkt 
Ricus  frobischore  .. 
Georgius  thomtotl.. 
Wiitms  Whitt 
Johes  Shillito 
Xp5r9  lowge 
Jacobus  brige 
Ricus  stanffurth 
Roht9  Wyndebank 
Johes  Kitson 
Wiitms  scott 
Johes  Darley 
Ricus  Darqr 
Johes  Shillito 
Johes  Roger 
Nicolas  lowkf 


Witims  Whetley    ... 
Thorns  Claiton 
Johes  Yssott 
Johes  Slaik.. 
Henric9  Whetecare 
Edward9  lokwood... 
Johes  Syffer 
Ricus  Diksoii 
Thoins  haight 
Ricus  Claiton 
Lauf  baildon 

Ux*  haight 

Roht9  Cowp 
Johes  hawmschire... 
Johes  bedlorth 


Crofton  (fonlinued). 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  boil 

...       in  bon 

in  bon 

in  bo& 

in  boB 

in  bon 

in  boil 

in  bou 

..       in  hoii 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  boil 

in  bon 

Norm  ANTON. 

in 

bon 

in 

bon 

in 

bon        ... 

...      in 

bon 

in 

boii 

in 

boil 

...      in 

terr*       ... 

in 

boil 

in 

boil        ... 

...      in 

boh 

in 

boJi 

in 

boii 

..       in 

bon 

in 

boii 

in 

bon 

in 

boii 

in 

boii 

in 

bon        ... 

in 

bon 

in 

boii 

in 

bon 

in 

boii 

Emlev. 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  boii 

..       in  bori 

in  bon 

..       in  bon 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  bo5 

\\\li 

—    iij^ 

iij// 

—    "K 

vj/i 

Xljflf 

\\\)li 

—     i\\]d 

iiij/r 

—     iiij^ 

iij/« 

—    iij^ 

iij/« 

—    \i]d 

XXJ 

-    K 

XXJ 

-    \d 

xb 

~    %d 

xU 

-   iK 

xU 

-      X)d 

xb 

-  !if 

XXJ 

~    'i 

XXJ 

-  ]d 

vli 

—  %d 

Sm''    - 

—    viijj  xrf 

iij/< 

—    \\]d 

iiij/j 

—    'ixi^d 

iiij/t 

—    iiijrf 

iij/« 

—   "K 

\\\li 

—    w]d 

wH 

—    xd 

%\s 

-    iiijrf 

iiij/r 

—    iiijV 

iij/i 

—  ilK 

iij/i 

—    u}d 

iij/j 

—    n}d 

T 

—    iij^ 

-  ijrf 

Xl5 

-  ijrf 

iij/r 

—    iijrf 

XXJ 

-    J'' 

XXJ 

-  H 

XXJ 

-  H 

XXJ 

-  H 

XXJ 

-  ii 

XXJ 

-  iff 

iij/j 

—    u]d 

Sm« 

—    vx  iijflf 

iiij/f 

—    vii)d 

iij/r 

-    v]d 

xU 

—    iiij</ 

vj// 

—    xijd 

vj// 

—  •  ^K 

y\H 

XlJ^ 

xU 

-    ij^ 

XXJ 

-  V 

x\s 

XXJ 

—  )d 

XXJ 

—     d 

XXJ 

—     d 

XX5 

—     d 

XXJ 

—  d 

-  i]d 

x\s 

Sm» 

—     VJ  y\d 

YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


113 


Alida  birkby 
Nicolaos  Walker  ... 
Edward9  birlc 
Thorns  barsto 
Wittms  WhiUey    ... 
Wittms  Dransfeld... 
Rogers  Dransfeld  ... 
Wittms  Carter 
M^garet  Carter 
Thonis  barber 
Thorns  gawnt 
RoUl9  bcdfiirth      ... 
Wittms  Richardson 
Johcs  Awtty 
M.  8  d. 

Rotw9  femley 
Johes  mylns 

Ro1k9  ball 

Matheus  barbor 


Thorns  Rowley     ... 
Jacob©  hey... 
Edward9  lokwood 
Wittms  mares 
Johes  Walker,  yonger 
Adm  hirst  ... 
Petr9  Strickland 
Matheus  mares 
Wittms  lokwood 
Riois  Jillott 
Tboids  boti^rod 
Dciuall9  blakborn 
Thorns  mares 


Ricns  Swalo 
Johes  brook 
Agnes  Wood 
Thorns  Wood 
Kal^ma  Copley 
Johes  Mariott 
Johes  Imigley 
Edward9  thorpe 
Thorns  m^chand 
Wittms  Walker 
[x^]  Tbomkynsofi 

Thonis  Walker 

Johes  Aschton 
ohes  ottt  ... 
Ddual9  helmsall 


Deusbury. 
in  terr* 
in  bon 
in  bon 
n  bon 
n  bon 
n  bon 
n  bjfi 
in  bon 
n  bon 
n  terr* 
in  bon 
in  bon 
n  terr* 
in  terr' 

in  boB 
in  bon 
in  boil 
in  bon 


Thurst'nland. 


y/i 

x\s 

iiij/i 

vij// 

xxs 

x\s 

xh 

xU 

x\s 

xxs 

x\s 
x\s 

vj/t 
xh 
v/i 
x\s 
Sm»    - 


Ou^  Flokton  & 


Thonis  Cart*^ 
Johes  CUitoQ 
Kicus  Claiton 
Johes  Hucchonson 
Xput9  Dikson 


m  terr' 

xxs 

in  bon 

xxs 

in  bon 

...       xlx 

in  bon 

xxs 

in  bon 

xxs 

in  bon 

xxs 

in  bon 

xxs 

in  terr' 

xxs 

in  terr' 

xxs 

in  boR 

...       x\s 

in  boR 

xxs 

in  bon 

xxs 

in  bon 

xxs 

TLEY. 

Sum» 

in  boft 

xxs 

in  bon 

iij/t 

in  bofi 

...      xb 

in  bon 

XXJ 

in  boil 

xxs 

in  bon 

xxs 

in  bon 

xxs 

in  bofi 

xxs 

in  bofi 

...       xlr 

in  boa 

...       x\s 

in  boR 

xxs 

in  bon 

xxs 

in  boR 

...       x\s 

in  boR 

xxs 

in  boR 

xxs 

Sm' 

Nether 

Flokton. 

in  terr' 

...       x\s 

in  boR 

...       \ii]/i 

in  boR 

iij/j 
...      yj/.- 

in  boR 

in  bon 

iuj/« 

—  iixjd 

—  xd 

—  xyd 

—  iiijrf 

—  xliij^ 

—  J^ 

—  IK 

—  \]d 

—  iiij^ 

—  xij^ 

—  myi 

—  iiijd^ 

—  xij</ 

-  ijrf 

V\)5  \\\d 

-  \jd 

-  ¥. 

-  Jjrf 

-  )<' 

-  yi 

-  ¥. 

—  lyd 

—  iW 

—  J'' 

—  J^ 

-  xviijaf 

—  iijrf 

—  ijrf 

—  y^ 

—  }d 

—  id 

—  ¥. 

—  \)d 

—  jrf 

—  \)d 

—  jrf 

-  )d 

—  xx]d 


—  u\]d 

—  \\\]d 

—  iijrf 

—  x\]d 

—  \\\)d 


114 


YORKSHIRE  LAY  SUBSIDIES. 


Ou^  Flokton  &  Nether  Flokton  (continued). 


.  Ricus  Sikkt 
Thorns  Wittmson 
Kadus  Claiton 
Ricus  honley 
Ux*  Wilkok 
Thorns  halmschire 
Johes  bedforth 
Robt9  halmschire 
Wiihn9  bedforth 
Executr  Rici  ellf 
Ricus  Robook 
Ux*  Dikson 


Wittms  bolland 

Johes  morehous 

Georg  Cook 

Stephus  Rowley 

Henric9  heward 

Laur  norton 

Johes  gren  ... 

Johes  beuer 

Ricus  beuer 

Ux'  Castill... 

George  Castill 

Johes  gren  ... 

Thorns  Rydyng 

Gilis  Roht  ... 

Thorns  hynscl)rff 

Jacob9  genii 

Withns  Charlisworth 

Laur  Charlisworth 

Ricus  Crosland 

Wittms  Speight     ... 

Henric9  gren 

Jacob9  haight 

Laur  haight 

Xpor9  haight 

Johes  Swalo 

Thoiiis  Charlisworth 

Johes  moorhous     ... 

Johes  Moorhous,  clothier 

Roht9  beiiere 

Thorns  Roidf 

Petr  Key 

ThofSs  Tynker      ... 
Johes  Tynker 
Thorns  brodhed     ... 
Wittms  Rohts 
Johes  Castill 
Wittms  hynchcl)rff... 
Roht9  hynchclyff  ... 
Johes  gren  of  grenhowse 
Thorns  birdsill 
Johes  ^refi  de  holm 
Ricus  littilwood     ... 
Johes  littilwood     ... 
Thorns  littilwood  ... 
Gilhi9  Castill 


•• 

in  bon 
in  boil 
in  terr* 
in  terr* 
in  bon 
in  boR 
in  boh 
in  Iwh 
in  boil 
in  bon 
in  boh 
in  boh 

HOLMFIRTH. 


in  boh 

in  boB 

in  boh 

in  boh 

in  bon 

in  bofi 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  boil 

in  bon 

in  boil 

in  bon 

in  boil 

in  boil 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  boh 

in  boil 

in  boh 

in  bon 

in  boh 

in  boh 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

r            ...      in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

i            ...       in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  terr' 

in  terr* 

in  terr* 

in  terr' 

xxs 

— 

rf 

XXJ 

— 

}<i 

iij// 
xLr 

— 

v 

— 

iiij</ 

iiij/« 

— 

iiud 

XXJ 

— 

xxs 

— 

x\s 

— 

i\]h 

— 

iiji/ 

xxs 

— 

H 

xxs 

— 

ii 

xxs 

— 

yf 

Sm»    — 

iiijx 

vd 

x\s 



ijrf 

iij// 

— 

iijrf 

xxs 

— 

ijrf 

x\s 

— 

xxs 

— 

jrf 

xxs 

— 

K 

xxs 

— 

jrf 

xxs 

— 

K 

iij// 

— 

U}d 

iij/i 

— 

iij(/ 

xxs 

— 

i<f 

x\s 

— 

ijrf 

xxs 

— 

jd 

x\s 

— 

ijrf 

xh 

— 

ijrf 

T 

— 

iij^ 

— 

¥. 

iiij/* 

— 

myi 

iiij// 

— 

iiiW 

XXJ 

— 

xh 

— 

XXJ 

— 

Jrf 

XXJ 

— 

irf 

x\s 

— 

xjd 

iij/j 

— 

ii}d 

xlx 

— 

iiij^ 

T 

— 

yjrf 

— 

iu}d 

xlx 

— 

iii^flf 

xh 

— 

iiij</ 

xxs 

— 

■K 

xxs 

— 

ijrf 

xxs 

— 

ijrf 

iij/i 

— 

:ii:f 

xxs 

— 

i)J 

xU 

— 

itijii 

xxs 

— 

ijrf 

xxs 

— 

m 

xxs 

— 

ijrf 

xxs 

— 

ijrf 

xxs 

— 

■]<' 

x\s 

— 

m)d 

xxs 

— 

H 

xxs 

— 

H 

xxs 

— 

ijrf 

YORKSHIRE  LAY  SUBSIDIES. 


"5 


HOLMFIRTH  (continued 

. 

Edmond9  brodhed 

in  terr' 

x\s 

—    iuid 

Johes  brodhed       

in  terr* 

xxs 

-    i)d 

Thorns  littilwood 

in  terr* 

xxs 

—    i)d 

Withns  ycrnschay 

in  terr' 

xlx 

—    iijd 

Sma 

—    xs  }d 

M.  9.                                                Sharliston. 

Johes  flemyng,  Jun5 

in  lerr* 

.       xk 

—    m\d 

Ricus  Ranc            

..       in  bon 

xxs 

—    ]d 

RotJt9  bowk          

..      in  bofi 

xxs 

Roht9  Avyson       

in  boh 

xxs 

Robt9  fcld 

in  bon 

.      vli 

—    xd 

Ricui  Clerk            

m  bon 

xxs 

-    \d 

M^garet  milnthorpe 

in  bon 

U)li 

-    \}^ 

Geoige  flemyng 

in  bon 

iiij// 

—    iijjrf 

Withns  Sager        

in  bon 

iiij/i 

—    iiiV 

Johes  hey 

in  boB 

.       xh 

-    -iyd 

Koht9  Roidhous 

in  boh 

iij/x 

-    %d 

Thorns  lyster         

in  boh 

xxs 

-    \d 

Johes  Claitofi         

in  bon 

.      x\s 

-    ijd 

Roht9  laur 

in  bon 

x\s 

-    ijrf 

Ric  felian 

in  boh 

xxs 

-  ii 

Johes  foxe 

in  bon 

xxs 

Thorns  Dey,  a  scott,  nut!  bon 

iuja 

Sm* 

—  y9d 

\ 

Vhitwood. 

Witims  laik           

in  bon 

.       xls 

-    ijrf 

Wittms  bawgy       

in  boh 

.       xls 

-    ijrf 

Henric9  dalton      

in  bofi 

.       xls 

-    ijrf 

Thonis  monkhed 

..       in  bon 

.       xh 

-    i  rf 

[ohes  monkhed     

..       in  bon 

xh 

-    ijrf 

Edward9  Candye 

in  bon 

.       xb 

-    i^ 

Johes  Adm 

Kat^ina  laik          

in  bon 

.      xls 

-    ijrf 

in  boh 

.       xls 

-    ijrf 

Roger  hopkynson 

Wi&ms  Abbott      

in  bon 
in  boh 

xls 
xxs 

=    ? 

Ricus  Totell          

..       in  bon 

xxs 

-          d 

Withns  holdfeld 

in  boh 

xxs 

—         d 

Hen?  Smyth          

in  bon 

.       xls 

—        11^ 

Angnes  monkhed 

in  boh 

xU 

—        Ijrf 

Alida  monkhed 

in  bon 

.       xls 

-        ij^ 

Roht9  ShiUito        

in  boh 

xls 

-        lid 

Sm* 

—    ijj  vd 

ALTOFTf. 

Anna  fristofi          

in  terr' 

:  T 

—    i)s 

Johes  Shayn          

in  terr' 

—    m]d 

M^garet  frobischor 
Nicholaus  Spynk 

in  boh 

iiii/i 

—    iiijflf 

in  bon 

....  . . 

mj/r 

—    liijd 

Withns  brige         

in  boh 

.      vii 

—    xd 

Thorns  Patrik        

in  bon 

viij// 

z  p' 

Dciuall9  firiston      

in  boh 

.       xb 

Georgeus  brige      

Gill5t9  nawte         

in  boh 

iiij/i 

—    iujrf 

in  bon 

.       xb 

-  ijrf 

Withns  Wright 

Withns  Lowkf      

in  boh 

.       xb 

-  ijrf 

in  bofi 

XXJ 

-   id 

Thorns  Thornton 

in  bofi 

..       vii 

—    xrf 

Rot»9  Woodward 

in  bofi 

xxs 

-  i''. 

Matheus  denton 

in  bofi 

viij/j 
v)li 

XVJtf 

Johes  laik 

in  boh 

=  f 

Johes  Wright         

in  bofi 

xxs 

ii6 


YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


RotJt9  Wright 
Johes  Amerson 
Rotit9  Spvnk 

Rot5t9  elhs 

Johes  Awstwyk 
Thofiis  Smythson  .. 
Thorns  Moo5 
RotJt9  brige 
Wittms  Johnson    .. 
Withns  Smythson.. 
Gilht9  Smythson  .. 
Edtoond9  Spynk   .. 
Johes  Spynk 
Witfms  nalson 
Wittms  brige,  sen 
Johes  Wright,  Jufi 
Roht9  ffiriston 


Bennett  Medley    ... 
Rotk9  Speight       ... 
Ux*  Johis  gren 
Roht9  Sherphous  ... 
Johes  brook 
Kicus  Kitson 

Ux'Kitson 

Johes  oldred 
Matheus  Speight  ... 
Roht9  Whetacars  ... 
Ricus  brown 
Johes  baildon,  Juh 
Johes  grave 
Wittms  Scolfeld    ... 
Rohl9  Wilkynson... 
£dward9  hucchonson 
Jacobus  Wetecars  ... 
Johes  boy 


orgii 
Roht9  norton 
Thorns  Catlyn 
Ricus  Thornton 
Johes  hargait 
Ricus  haight 
Arthur9  haight 
Wittms  pell 
Johes  Waid 
Ricus  bilclyff 
01yuer9  Sharpe 
Johes  blakker 
Johes  hoolay 
TOttms  Spriganell.. 
Ux'  boith   ... 
Radus  foster 
Johes  norton 
George  miln^ 
Johes  miln^ 
Roht9  haight 


ALTOFlt  {continuid). 

•             ... 

in  terr* 

in  bon 

in  bon 

in  bon 

. 

in  bon 

, 

in  boB 

in  bon 

in  bofi 

, 

in  bon 

.       in  bon 

in  boil 

, 

in  bon 

in  bofi 

. 

in  bon        ... 

in  bofi 

in  bon 

.       in  bon 

SOTKHILL. 
n  bon 
n  bon 
n  bon 
n  bon 
n  bon 
n  bon 
n  bon 
in  bofi 
bon 
bon 
bofi 
bofi 
bofi 
bofi 
bofi 
terr' 
in  bofi 
in  bofi 


Crigliston. 


,, 

in 

bofi        ... 

in 

bofi 

.. 

in 

bofi 

.. 

in 

bofi 

. 

in 

terr* 

.. 

in 

bofi 

in 

bofi 

.. 

in 

bofi 

.. 

in 

bon 

. 

in 

bofi        ... 

. 

in 

bofi 

in 

bofi 

. 

in 

bofi 

in 

bofi        ... 

. 

in 

bofi        ... 

in 

bofi 

. 

in 

bofi        ... 

in 

bofi 

.      in 

bofi        ... 

in 

bofi       ... 

XXJ 

xlj 

XXJ 

—    d 

XXX 

—    d 

vuj^- 
v/i 

z  :^' 

XXJ 

-  id 

xlj 

-  ild 

xU 

-  ij^ 

y]li 

—    id\d 

vli 

—    xd 

vU 

—    ^ 

iij/i 

—    iijflf 

xb 

-  !i^ 

xxr 

-  w 

XXJ 

-    -^ 

y/i 

-    xd 

Sm*    — 

xvjx  vi}d 

xxr 

-  i''.. 

ix// 

—    xviijflf 

XXX 

-    j^ 

yjli 

—     xij^ 

Wi 

—    xd 

XXX 

—    i)d 

xlx 

VJ/f 

—   B^ 

iii/» 

-   '')^, 

Vj/l 

- ;/ 

XXX 

XXX 

-  d 

XXX 

—     d 

XXX 

—     d 

XXX 

-    ]\d 

XXX 

-    Ijd 

XXX 

-    J^ 

xb 

-    ij^ 

Sma 

—    vjx  xd 

ix/i 

—    xvii}d 

vij/» 

—    xliijd 

xv/i 

—    vx 

iiij// 

—    iiijflf 

xUi 

—    iiijflf 

iij/i 

—    iijflf 

li^/t 

—    \i}d 

iiiUi 

—    iii\d 

—    xd 

vi\/i 

—    xiiijrf 

y]li 

—    xij^ 

XXX 

-    j^ 

xb 

-    i]d 

xb 

-    ij^ 

xb 

—    iyd 

XXX 

-    \]d 

xlx 

XXX 

-    j^ 

v/i 

-    xd 

vj// 

—    xij^ 

YORKSHIRE   LAY  SUBSIDIES. 


117 


c 

^RIGLISTON  {continued). 

Henric9  hirst         

in  bon 

..       xb 

-  i;y 

Thorns  Roo           

in  bon 

XXJ 

Thorns  hopkynson 

in  bon 

XXJ 

Thorns  harmitage 

in  bon 

iiij/i 

?  Ricus  Walker      

in  bon 

iiij/t 

—    iiiiflf 

—  i<^ 

Johes  Denton        

m  bon 

XXJ 

Jacob9  demon       

in  bon 

xxs 

Robt9  hadfeld       

in  bon 

xxs 

—  ]d 

Wiihns  batty         

in  bon 

xxs 

Nicholaus  lee        

.9d. 
Thorns  Sparke      

in  bon 

xxs 

...       in  bon 

[Unreadable, 

Walther9  Redman 

in  bon 

^Unreadable:, 

Sm*    - 

-    xvijx 

[C/nreadadi^,] 

Johnson,  a  heigh 

alman       in  bon 

..      iiij/i 
v/i 

—    iiij^ 

Rogei9  brook        

Nicholaus  Watson 

..      in  bon 

-    xd 

in  bon 

XXX 

—  j^ 

Johes  Tomlynson 

^ohes  henrison       

in  boB 

..       vli 

-    xd 

in  bon 

iiij// 

—    iiije/ 

rhoms  Saivill       

in  terr' 

..      vj/i 

zf 

Wiihns  belhous     

in  bon 

..      iuj/» 

Thorns  nailer         

in  bon 

XXJ 

Ux'  Walker           

in  bon 

..       x\s 

-  \]d 

Edward9  bilclyff 

in  bon 

xh 

-  })i 

—     Ilia 

Wiihns  hirst          

in  boil 

::  xlf 

Ricus  Pogson         

in  bon 

-  id 

Edward9  tomlynson 

in  bon 

xxs 

-  ¥, 

—    lid 

Umfrid9  Snowden 

in  bon 

x\s 

RotJt9  Sykkt         

in  bon 

...       x\s 

Ux*  hell      

in  bon 

xxs 

-    K 

Rotk9  heU 

in  bon 

xxs 

-     5 
=    & 

Ricus  glewe           

in  bon 

xxs 

Thorns  Jackson     

in  bon 

..      xLf 

Sm^    — 

vjx  ixd 

OSSETT. 

Ux'  Saxtofi            

in  boil 

v]li 

—    xiirf 

Ro6t9  Saxton         

in  bon 

..       xlr 

-    ijrf 

[oties  Saxton         

in  bon 

XXX 

-  E. 

—    mja 

Johes  fairbarn        

in  terr' 

..       xlr 

Laur  gill 

...      in  bon 

XXX 

-  K 

Rot»9  tias 

in  bon 

..       iij/i 

—    liirf 

ohcs  towmecnd  [su] 

in  terr* 

XXX 

-    ijrf 

ohes  Allan           

Ux'  Madley          

in  terr' 

..      xlx 

....    . 

—    nud 

in  terr' 

XXX 

-  ijd 

Thoffis  Sykkf        

in  boB 

..       xlx 

-  ijd 

Wiihns  Oxley       

in  terr' 

XXX 

-  ¥. 

—  ijrf 

Nicholaus  Qerk 

in  terr' 

XXX 

Wiihns  Smyth       

in  boB 

XXX 

-  Z'' 

Johes  gren  .           

Thorns  gom^sall 

Tho&s  Waid         

in  terr' 

XXX 

-  ijd 

...      in  bofi 

viij/j 

—  xvjd 

-  IH 

—  Ijd 

in  bon 

..       xh 

Ricus  dicconson     ... 

in  terr' 

XXX 

Wiihns  dischfurth 

in  terr' 

XXX 

-    ijd 

Stephus  Tomson 

in  bofi 

XXX 

-i 

Edward9  gren       

..      in  bon 

XXX 

Hcnric9  Tomson 

in  boB 

XXX 

-    ]d 

Johes  tias 

in  bon 

..       vli 

-    xd 

Sma    — 

yjx  \\\d 

ii8 


YORKSHIRE   LAY  SUBSIDIES. 


Wittms  Clerk 
Wittms  Medley 
Johes  Jube... 
Ricus  butler 
Withns  friston 
Thorns  dollyff 
Rot)i9  beuer 
Lionell9  feld 
Ux*  Johis  ffriston  , 
Thorns  ffriston 
Wittms  Sheffeld    . 
Rot5t9  lyster 
Ro1it9  Talsore 
Walther9  preston  . 
Jotles  Walker 
Jane  blakker 


Johes  stonn 
Thorns  goldthorpe 
Jacob9  goldthorpe... 
01yuer9  Stevynson 
Johes  pogson 
Radus  Saffar 
RotJt9  WorUey      ... 
Johes  Smyth 
Nicoles  birdsell     ... 
Johes  Archer,  jun  .., 
Johes  Coldwell      ... 
Edward9  hepwortb 
Wittms  morehous  ... 
Adm  Copley 
Alicia  Roht 


Edward9  horn 
Johes  gessope 
Roht9  hurst 
Edmond9  oxley,  Sen 
Henric9  oxley 
Thorns  horn 
Edmond9  oxley,  Jun 
Johes  haight 


Wittms  lynley 
Xp6r9  Tal3or 
Wittms  baitf 
Wittms  goodfeloy  . 
Ricus  birkby 
Johes  townnend 
Johes  lee     ... 
Johes  fossard 
Koger9  fomes 
Alic  lynley... 
Ricus  Crowd 
Xp6r9  hell  ... 
Wittms  Wolfath    . 


Warm  FELD. 

in 

boh 

vj// 

—    xijflf 

in 

terr'       .. 

xxs 

-    i]d 

in 

bon 

x\s 

—    \yd 

in 

bon 

xlx 

in 

bon 

iiij/r 

—    iiij^ 

in 

bon 

vii 

—      7id 

in 

bon 

T 

—    md 

in 

bon        ... 

-    \]d 

in 

bon 

viij/« 

—    xyjrf 

in 

terr'       ... 

xxs 

-      X]d 

in 

bon 

j\s 

-    ijrf 

...      in 

terr'       ... 

XXJ 

-    ijrf 

in 

bon 

xxs 

-    }d 

in 

bon        ... 

XXJ 

-i 

...      in 

boh 

XXJ 

in 

terr' 

XXJ 

-    \\d 

Sm*    — 

vx  iiijdf 

Shepley. 

in 

terr»       ... 

iiij// 

—    viijdf 

...      in 

terr' 

iij/« 

-  :9f 

in 

terr'       ... 

XXJ 

-  1  </ 

in 

terr'       ... 

XXX 

-  !K 

—  ijrf 

...      in 

terr'       ... 

XXJ 

in 

bon 

xb 

-  ik 

in 

bon 

XXX 

—  irf 

in 

bon 

XXJ 

in 

bon        ... 

XXX 

-  ¥ 

in 

bon 

XXX 

—  ¥ 

...      in 

bofi 

XXX 

in 

bon        ... 

XXX 

in 

bon 

XXX 

-  jrf 

in 

bon 

XXX 

-  ¥ 

in 

terr'       ... 

XXX 

-  V 

Sm»    — 

ijj  viiyi 

BERWORTH 

[  Halff. 

in 

bon         ... 

iij/* 

—    iijrf 

in 

terr'       .. 

xxx 

-    ijrf 

in 

bon 

xlx 

-    ijrf 

in 

bon 

xlx 

-    ijrf 

in 

bon 

xxx 

-    ¥ 

in 

bon 

xxx 

-  ¥ 

in 

bon 

xxx 

-  ¥ 

...      in 

bon 

xlx 

-  ijrf 

Sm«    - 

-    xiiijdT 

West  Ardislay. 

in 

bon 

vij// 
vii// 

—    xiiijflf 

in 

bon 

—    xiiij^ 

in 

bon 

vj// 

—    xijd^ 

in 

bon 

v/i 

--    nd 

in 

bon 

iiij/i 

—    m]d 

in 

bon 

mli 

—    \\\d 

in 

bon        ... 

iijA- 

—    u]d 

in 

terr' 

xlx 

—    m\d 

in 

bon 

xlx 

-  ijrf 

in 

terr' 

xxx 

-  ijrf 

in 

lx)n 

xlx 

-  ijrf 

in 

bon 

xlx 

-  irf 

in 

bon 

xlx 

-  ijrf 

YORKSHIRE   LAY  SUBSIDIES. 


119 


M. 


West  Ardislay  {continued). 

Thorns  lee 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

j^ 

Wittmslee 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

j^ 

Henric9  Wynt^rii 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

k 

Johes  haldisworth ... 
Johes  ^remond     .. 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

)d 

in  bon 

XX5 

— 

')d 

MWt9  bradley  ... 
M^'^ei9  nailer     ... 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

\d 

in  bon 

xb 

— 

ijrf 

Johes  lee,  SeB 

in  terr' 

XXJ 

— 

ijrf 

Gill5t9  Syggsfeld    ... 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

¥ 

RoUt9  bowlyng      ... 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

\d 

Sm»     — 

vijj 

ij^ 

Sandall. 

Wittms  garfurth    ... 

in  bon 

Xy/f 

— 

Tf\\\\d 

Ux*  Shay 

Thorns  Speight      ... 

in  terr* 

iij// 

— 

in  bon 

iiij/j 

— 

{\\\d 

Thorns  furton 

in  bon 

xlj 

— 

\\d 

Johes  Croft 

Ratfus  Waddisley  ... 

in  bon 

iij/f 

— 

n]d 

in  boil 

ix// 

— 

xviijrf 

Matheus  Wood      ... 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

K 

Ux*  ston      

in  terr' 

xlj 

— 

m\d 

Thorns  fcld 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

\^ 

Thorns  Grenwood  ... 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

\d 

Johes  boswell 

in  bon 

iiij/i 

— 

imd 

Thorns  Sykkf 

in  boil 

iij/t 

— 

uW 

Thorns  Robynson  ... 

in  boil 

XXJ 

— 

¥ 

Johes  blackborn     ... 

in  bon 

v/» 

— 

xrf 

Thorns  Seill 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

\<i 

in  boii 

vli 

— 

xrf 

Ux*  haigh 

in  boil 

XXJ 

— 

]d 

Ricus  Arrndell       ... 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

'  d 

Johes  Smyth 

in  boii 

v// 

— 

xd 

Henric9  Jube 
Robt9  Child 

in  bon 

xlj 

— 

ij</ 

in  terr' 

iij/z 
xIj 

— 

vjrf 

Otuel9  norton 

in  boii 

— 

ijrf 

Ux»  boy      

Roht9Roo 

in  boii 

v]li 

— 

xi\d 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

Johes  miln^ 

in  boii 

xlj 

— 

Ricus  Wilson 

in  bon 

v// 

— 

irf 

Johes  standrow 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

yi 

Ricus  bankf 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

K 

Thorns  kirke 

in  boii 

XXJ 

— 

U 

Edward9  bedftirth  ... 

in  bon 

xlj 



ijd 

Robt9  Copley 
Thorns  Cart*^ 

in  terr' 

xb 

— 

luja 

in  boii 

iiij/« 

— 

uhd 

Edmond9  Waid     ... 

in  boii 

iij// 

— 

ii]d 

Hcnric9  norton      ... 

in  boii 

XXJ 

— 

id 

Sm*    — 

xijj 

u]d 

Thornhill. 

Thorns  ball 

in  bon 

yj// 

— 

x\]d 

Edmond9  Wilby    ... 
Thorns  helrasall     ... 

in  bon 

viij/z 

— 

xvjd 

in  boii 

iij/« 

— 

i\\d 

Wittms  Cosyn 

in  bon 

xlj 

— 

ijd 

Ricus  Porter 

in  bon 

vj/i 

— 

x\\d 

Ricus  Jakson 

in  bon 

iij/i 

— 

md 

Ux*  Amyas 

in  terr' 

\\}li 

— 

VjV 

Laur  best 

in  bon 

mli 

— 

liid 

ThoiBs  bumett 

in  boii 

xlj 

— 

mjd 

Johes  honley 

in  bofi 

iiij// 

— 

I20 


YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


Thornhill 

(coniinued). 

Thorns  lee 

n  bon 

iiij// 

Edmond9  hales     

in  bon 

XX5 

Roger  Copley        

Wiihns  hall            

n  bon 
in  bon 

xU 

XXJ 

Ux»  Whaite           

n  bofi 

XXJ 

Ux*  Diksoii            

in  bon 

y\s 

Johes  Diksoii         

in  bon 

y\s 

Edmond9  Scolffeld           

n  boii 

xb 

RoUt9  hicc 

in  bon 

XXJ 

Wittms  Sou5erd 

in  bon 

XX5 

Jacobus  Waryng 

n  bon 

Vj/I 

Thorns  gledhill      

n  bon 

xb 

Nicolaus  brown     

n  terr' 

x\s 

Georg  Copley 

n  bon 

\xs 

Johes  hepworth 

Ux'  Phefipe           

n  bon 

\xs 

in  boh 

xxs 

Sm* 

Shittillyngton. 

Johes  byngley        

n  boH 

iiij/i 

Ricus  Carter          

n  bofi 

vij/j 

Wittms  hall 

n  bon 

iij/« 

Carol9  hawysworlh           

n  bon 

xlr 

Wittms  nettilton 

n  bofi 

XXJ 

Wittms  Cleye        

n  bon 

x\s 

Johes  Shay ] 

n  bon 

viij// 

Roger  dikson         

n  bon 

vfi 

Ricus  matheman 

n  bon 

Alexand  haight      

m  bon 

xxs 

Johanna  billclyff 

n  bon 

iij/f 

Agnes  bilclyff        

n  bon 

iij/« 
xls 

Johes  brodley        

Johes  hall 

n  bon 

n  bon 

xxs 

Thorns  bedforth     

in  bon 

xls 

Ricus  Knotton       

in  bon 

xls 

Thorns  byngley      

in  bon 

yli 

Henric9  Claiton     

in  bon 

viij/i 

Radus  burmam      

in  bofi 

vij/« 
iij/« 

Thorns  Walker      

in  bofi        ... 

Roht9  Robynson 

in  bon 

xls 

Johes  byngley        

in  bofi 

xls 

Roht9  botherrod 

in  bon 

\\\]U 

Wittms  hucchonson          

in  bofi 

iiij/« 

Wittms  bedforth 

in  bofi 

viz 

Ricus  Populwell 

in  bofi 

y/z 

Roht9  Walker        

in  bon 

xU 

Ricus  Walker        

in  bofi 

xls 

Wittms  Stokkf      

in  bofi 

iiij// 

Elzabeth  bilclyff 

in  bon 

iij// 

Isabell  bilclyff       

in  bofi 

uuz 

Ricus  Carter          

in  bon 

xU 

Wittms  bedfurth 

in  bofi 

xxs 

Anna  bedfurth       

in  bon 

*  xxs 

Alicia  bedfurth      

in  bofi 

xxs 

Ricus  langfeld        

MVret  Wright 

Wittms  helwysse 

in  bofi 

iiijiz 

in  bofi 

iij/« 

in  bon 

iiij// 

Georg  Richardson 

in  bofi 

iij// 

Johes  mathema      

in  Ixjfi 

u\lz 

Elzabeth  matheman          

in  bofi 

y/i 

VUJ] 


iiij^ 

xxyi 

\]d 

iiij^ 

iiij^ 
y\\\}d 
\\]d 
\]d 

xvuja 

iixyd 

xd 

\i}d 

■lid 
K 

'& 

x'V]d 
xm)d 
iij^ 

M. 

\\\]d 
\\\]d 
xd 
xd 

\\\)d 
iij^ 
iij</ 
ij^ 

^V 

i< 

\\\]d 
\\)d 
m}d 
\\]d 
iij^ 
xd 


YORKSHIRE   LAY  SUBSIDIES. 


Shittillyngton  (conitntud). 


Johcs  bedfurth       

Wittms  bedfurih 

in  bo5 

XXJ 

-  K 

in  bon 

XXJ 

Roftt9  bedfurth      

...      in  bon 

XXJ 

M.  lo  d. 

Jofccs  Wright        

..       in  bon 

XXJ 

-   i<i 

Ekabeih  m^sden 

in  bon 

XXJ 

-  jrf 

Rolk9  byngley       

in  bofi 

ws 

-  u 

Sma    — 

xvs  ixd 

KiRKHBTON. 

Roger9  harbor       

in  boil 

.       v/z 

—    xd 

Laur  bemond         

in  boB 

.       xU 

—     'i)d 

Georgius  thewles 

in  bon 

.       xb 

-    lid 

Thorns  Stafford     

in  boil 

.       vli 

-    id 

Edward9  north      

..       in  bon 

XXJ 

-    j^ 

Wiihnslile 

in  boil 

iij/j 

—    i\]d 

Edmond9  Ryschworth      ... 

..       in  bon 

mil 

—    iiij^ 

Lanr  Copley          

in  boil 

.       x\s 

-  IK 

Edward9  hepworth 

in  bon 

x\s 

Johes  lile 

in  bon 

.       x\s 

-  ¥, 

—    md 

Thorns  Hie 

in  boil 

.    ii;/l 

xls 

Laur  Armitege      

in  bon 

—    iija 

.  ohcs  Souzerd        

in  boii 

~  '4d 

ohes  hepworth     

Thorns  north         

...       in  bon 

.       vli 

—  ^ 

in  boil 

iiij/i 

—    iiijd 

Radus  Souzerd      

in  bon 

iij/i 

—    iij^ 

Sm»    — 

vs  u}d 

K 

IRKBURTON. 

Thorns  hucchonson 

in  bori 

.      iiij/« 

—    iujd 

Rogef9  Shay          

in  boil 

iij/i 

—    iijdf 

Ricos  hucchonson 

in  boil 

iii// 

—    n}d 

jacob9  Chapell      

in  bon 

.       xls 

-    ijd 

LJinfrid9  Key         

in  bon 

xls 

-    iV 

Wiihns  Armit^e 

..       in  boil 

xxs 

-    J^ 

Riois  Cogan          

in  bon 

xxs 

—     d 

Johes  byns 

in  boil 

xxs 

-      d 

Thorns  bemond     

in  bon 

xxs 

—     d 

Elias  Souzer          

in  bon 

xxs 

—     d 

Kicus  genn 

in  bon 

xxs 

—     d 

Johanna  boith        

in  bon 

xxs 

—  ;^ 

Sm»     - 

—     xx}d 

W 

ESTBRETTON. 

Ricos  Went  worth 

in  bon 

vj// 
iiij// 

—     xij^ 

Wittms  Roger       

in  bon 

—     m]d 

Johes  oxley            

RotSt9  Cowden      

in  bon 

iiij/« 

—    iiij^ 

in  bon 

iiii/« 

—     iiud 

Ricus  Jenkynson 

in  bon 

.       xli 

^    i]d 

Thorns  SykkC        

in  boii 

xxs 

-    ')d 

Sma    — 

\]s  i\]d 

Lepton. 

ohes  Wood,  Sen 

■lotk9  Crawschay 

in  bon 

.      yii 

-      xd 

in  bon 

iiij/t 

—    iiij^ 

Ricus  Sampson      

in  boii 

iiij/* 

—    m\d 

Edward9  Copley 

in  terr* 

xxs 

-  ijrf 

Riais  bemond        

in  boii 

.       xU 

-  ijrf 

Johes  estwood        

in  boh 

xxs 

-  jrf 

Antony  norton       

in  boii 

..       x\s 

-  ijrf 

Roht9  baildon       

in  bon 

.      x\s 

-  ijrf 

Tacob9  Cogan        

in  boh 

..'         XXJ 

-  yi 

YORKSHIRE   LAY  SUBSIDIES. 


Lepton  (continued). 

Rot5t9  Shepd 

in  bon 

x\s 

-    j^ 

Wittms  Cook 

in  terr' 

xLf 

—    iiij^ 

Rot5tus  dransfeld  ... 

in  bon 

XXJ 

—  i^ 

Arthur9  Wood       ... 

in  bon 

y\s 

-  ijd 

RoUl9  Wood 

in  boil 

x\s 

~  ijd 

Ricus  byns 

in  bon 

xxs 

-  id 

Johes  dollyff 
Thoins  Atkynson  ... 

in  boil 

xxs 

~  u 

in  bon 

xxs 

-  u 

Sma 

—    iijj  vd 

Shelley. 

[ohes  Nethgait 

in  terr* 

x\s 

—    m)d 

'Rot)t9  Wood 

in  boil 

iiij// 

—    n\}d 

Joties  hucchonson  ... 

in  bon 

iij/j 

—    iud 

'Ro^t9  demon 

in  boil 

xls 

—    i}d 

[ohes  dodworth     ... 

in  bon 

xLf 

[oties  Wright 

in  terr* 

xxs 

-    iid 

Ux'  ecti  brook       ... 

in  terr* 

xxs 

-    ijd 

Thorns  denton 

in  boil 

xxs 

-    Id 

Ricus  denton 

in  bon 

xxs 

-     d 

James  lokwood 

in  bon 

xxs 

—     d 

Edward9  harmitege 

in  boB 

xxs 

—     d 

Rot5t9  firth 

in  bon 

xxs 

-      d 

Ricus  dison 

in  bon 

xxs 

—     d 

George  dison 

in  bon 

xxs 

—     d 

Wittms  dyson 

in  bon 

xxs 

—     d 

Wittms  Artol 

in  bon 

xxs 

-     d 

Wittms  lokwood    ... 

in  bon 

xxs 

-  u 

Sm^ 

—    ijs  vd 

Snydai.l  cu  Aikton. 

Johanna  Redman  ... 

in  bon 

V)li 

—    xiW 

Milo  Cart^ 

in  bon 

vli 

-    xi 

Wittms  becars 

in  bon 

\li 

—    :ui 

Ux'  hewetson 

in  bon 

xxs 

—  K 

Johes  boyn 

Edmond9  Shillito  ... 

in  boil 

x\s 

—    ii</ 

in  boil 

x\s 

-    ijrf 

Roht9  blom,  Jun  ... 

in  bon 

xxs 

—  K 

Wittms  blom 

in  bon 

xxs 

-  U 

Wittms  Shillito      ... 

in  bon 

x\s 

-  iid 

Ricus  blom 

in  boii 

x\s 

-  i  rf 

Johes  burton 

in  bori 

x\s 

-  irf 

Rohi9  Jakson 

in  bon 

iiii/« 

—    ni]d 

Thorns  Stanfurlh  ... 

in  boil 

x\s 

-  iji 

Thorns  lowkf 

in  bori 

iij/z 

—    n)d 

Carol9  Smythson  ... 

in  bon 

iij// 

—    iijd 

Sma    - 

—    iiijs  ixd 

Halyfax. 

Edward9  Kent       ... 

in  bon 

iiij/« 

—    iiij^ 

Johes  lyst^ 

in  boil 

—    xiiixd 

Johes  barstow 

in  boii 

Yii 

-    xrf 

Edward9  hoppey   ... 

in  bon 

v]li 

—    xiid 

Ux'  Rici  Kent       ... 

in  boii 

xxs 

-  yi 

M.  II. 

Wittms  Watman    ... 

in  boB 

vii 

—    yd 

Rohi9  Hall 

in  bon 

xlj 

—    iW 

Jacobus  hailey 

in  bon 

XXJ 

-    /</ 

Ricus  hailey 

in  bon 

iij// 

—    iij^ 

Michaell  Otlt 

in  bon 

wli 

-     xLf 

Edward9  myln^     ... 

in  boB 

yh 

—    xd 

YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


123 


Halyfax  (continufd). 

Ux'  Rofcti  foraes  ... 

in  bon 

xlx 

— 

\\\d 

Wittms  stokkf       ... 

in  bon 

— 

\]d 

Rofti9  barstey 

in  boil 

XXJ 

— 

)d 

Jofces  barstey 
'Edward9  barstey  .. 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

\d 

in  bon 

.       xlj 

— 

ij^ 

George  Swansofi   ... 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

\d 

Wiitms  baroclought 

in  terr* 

XXJ 

— 

i]d 

Ricus  barstey 

in  terr' 

.       xIj 

— 

iiij^ 

Robt9  brodley       ... 

in  terr' 

.       xb 

— 

iiij^ 

Rol5t9  barstey 

in  boil        . 

..       xlj 

— 

ij^ 

>!ies  Thorns 
Ricus  lyst^  Jun     ... 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

d 

in  bon 

iiij// 

— 

\i\d 

Edward9  brodle    ... 

in  terr' 

XXJ 

— 

\yd 

Johes  holden 

in  bon 

.      x\s 

— 

¥ 

Thorns  mechell     ... 

in  bon 

iiij// 

— 

\u\d 

Brian9ottf 

in  boB        . 

.       v/j 

— 

xd 

Jofces  p*stley 
Thomas  maysofi    ... 

in  bon 

vli 

— 

xd 

in  bon 

iiij/r 

— 

iiij</ 

Ricus  haldisworth ... 

in  bon 

..        V/l 

— 

xd 

Rofct9  mawd 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

\d 

Wittms  mechUl      ... 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

¥ 

Ux'  Wittmj  brodley 
Wittms  Dikson      ... 

in  bofi 

in  bon 

.       xl^ 
.       vli 

:: 

xd 

Wittms  Clyff 

in  terr* 

.       xb 

— 

ui}d 

Wittms  Clyff,  iuii  ... 
Ux*  Thome  blakwocd 

in  bon 

vij/« 

— 

x\\\}d 

in  bon 

..      vli 

— 

xd 

Rofct9  balmfurth    ... 

in  boil 

.       xlj 

— 

ijd 

Elizabeth  lokwood 

in  bon 

vj// 

— 

xi)d 

Alex  brown 

in  boil 

.       xLr 

— 

iid 

Wittms  birley 

in  bo8 

XXJ 

— 

i^ 

Ricus  hargraves      .. 

in  bon 

..       xU 

— 

iid 

Wittms  Romysden 

in  bofi 

.       vli 

— 

xd 

Xpor9  haldisworth 
Wittms  brodley     ... 

in  bon 

iiij// 

— 

uiid 

in  terr* 

:  T 

— 

vid 

Rofcl9  medley 

in  bofi 

— 

ijd 

Jofces  haldisworth ... 

in  bon 

iiij// 

— 

iiijd' 

Rofcl9  brown 

in  bofi 

XXJ 

— 

)d 

Thorns  ley 

Jofces  Wilson 
Thorns  hervson      ... 
Ux*  Tofcis  haldisworth 
Ux*  Jofcis  Romysden 

in  bon 

.      iiii// 
v/i 

— 

iiij*/ 

in  bon 

— 

xd 

in  bofi 

iiij// 

- 

iiijt/ 

in  bofi 

XXJ 

— 

i'i 

in  bofi 

.      xb 

— 

ijrf 

Wittms  Shakiltoii... 

in  bofi 

iiij// 

— 

iiije/ 

Rofct9  Shepley      ... 
Thorns  hoill 

in  bofi 

..       xb 

— 

ij^ 

in  bofi 

xIj 

— 

ij^ 

Jofces  fomes 

in  bofi 

XXJ 

— 

}d 

Rofct9  fomes 

in  bofi 

XXJ 

— 

}d 

Sm»    — 

xxijj 

id 

OVYNDEN. 

Wittms  brodle       ... 

in  terr* 

iij// 



vjd 

Jacob9  bawmfiirth... 

in  bofi 

.       vli 

— 

xd 

Henric9  Cokcroft  ... 

in  bofi 

.       iij// 

— 

i\}d 

Wittms  hillyngworth 
Jofces  Cokcroft 
Thorns  baittf 

in  terr* 

.       u]li 

— 

viijrt^ 

in  bofi 

.       vj// 

— 

Xljtf 

in  bofi 

•      !?^* 

— 

xv\\\d 

R6fci9  hillyngworth 

in  lerr' 

iij// 

— 

vjrf 

Henric9  hiUyngworth 

in  bofi 

viij// 

— 

xv'yd 

Jofces  Cros' 

Tho&s  Shay 

in  lerr* 

iiij// 

— 

viij^ 

in  terr' 

.       xlj 

— 

iiija^ 

124 


YORKSHIRE   LAY  SUBSIDIES. 


OVYNDBN  (continued). 


Ricus  haliday         

in  boll 

..       vli 

— 

xd 

Ux'  Wittmj  grenwood     

in  boil 

..       vli 

— 

xd 

Xp6r9  denton 

in  bon 

.       vli 

— 

xd 

Ricus  dean 

in  bon 

v'yli 

— 

xijaT 

Withns  Rydyng 

in  terr* 

\\}li 

— 

v]d 

Edward9  Slaidcn 

in  bon 

.       vli 

— 

xd 

Johes  mawd           ...          

in  bon 

vli 

— 

xd 

Wittms  doighti      

in  terr* 

.       xlx 

— 

iiijrf 

ohes  Cokcroft      

in  boB 

\n\li 

— 

\md 

ohes  Wood           

in  bon 

.      vli 

— 

xd 

Jx  Rici  Awmler 

in  bon 

.      v]li 

— 

xiid 

Ux'  Ria  borsley 

n  terr' 

xxs 

— 

\yd 

Ux'  Wood 

in  bon 

.      xLr 

— 

¥ 

Wittms  lyster        

in  terr' 

x\s 

— 

m]d 

Nicolaus  Takson 

in  bon 

iij/j 

— 

md 

Johes  W(;od          

in  bon 

.       vli 

— 

xd 

Ricus  Sherd           

in  bon 

iiij/r 

— 

m\d 

Wittms  dean          

in  bon 

.      yii 

— 

xd 

ITioms  Campynolt            

in  bon 

iij/« 

— 

iij^ 

Johes  best 

in  bon 

iij/i 

— 

i\\d 

Johes  hillyngworth           

in  bon 

.       xb 

— 

'¥, 

Ricus  hciley           

in  terr* 

.       xlj 

— 

\\\]d 

Ricus  barrett         

in  bofi 

iii// 
xb 

— 

md 

Ux'  Rohti  Whetley          

in  bon 

— 

ijrf 

Ricus  boithes         

in  bon 

iuli 
xls 

— 

iii^ 

Jacobus  best          

in  bon 

— 

ijrf 

Johes  heton           

in  bon 

.       x\s 

— 

\]d 

Johes  farnsid          

in  bon 

.       x\s 

— 

\)d 

Johes  grenwood 

Johes  barstay        

in  terr' 

.       x\s 

— 

liija 

in  terr' 

.       xh 

— 

m\d 

Roht9  Awmler      

in  bofi 

..       xU 

— 

¥ 

Wittms  doughty 

in  bon 

iiij/r 

— 

iiiW 

Johes  oldfeld         

in  terr* 

xxs 

— 

ijrf 

Xpor9  Cos}Ti         

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

\^ 

Ricus  Mawde        

in  terr' 

xxs 

— 

V 

Johes  Sallonstall 

in  terr' 

xxs 

— 

ijrf 

Johes  Wilkynson 

Johes  Aumlcr        

n  bofi 

xxs 

— 

id 

in  terr* 

xxs 

— 

>jrf 

Jacobus  oldfeld     

in  bofi 

iiij/f 

— 

iiijrf 

Ricus  hillyngworth           

in  terr' 

xxs 

— 

'¥ 

Johes  hillyngworth           

in  boii 

xxs 

— 

K 

Ux*  Rohti  tomsoii            

in  bofi 

vnjlt 

— 

xyjtf 

Ricus  Tomson        

in  bon 

— 

xvj^ 

Ux' Johis  barstey 

in  bon 

v]li 

— 

x\]d 

Sm*    — 

xxvijj 

¥ 

[Skir] 

COlTf. 

/ohes  Saltonstall 

Tohes  Mawd,  sen 

in  boil 

vij/i 

— 

xiiij^ 

in  terr' 

.       x\s 

— 

iiij^ 

Johes  Mawd,  jun 

in  bon 

.       x\s 

— 

Kyi 

Wittms  brodle       

in  terr* 

iij// 

— 

vjrf 

Johes  Saivill          

in  terr' 

iiij/< 

— 

viiji/ 

M.  II  d.    . 

Johes  Smyth,  sefi 

in  terr' 

.       x\s 

— 

myd 

Johes  Smyth,  jun 

in  terr* 

xxs 

— 

¥ 

Thorns  Saivill        

in  terr' 

'm)li 

— 

viijrf 

johes  boy 

acob9  myln^        

[lohti  myln^           

in  terr' 

\\}li 

— 

vjrf 

in  terr' 

xxs 

— 

ijrf 

in  terr* 

xxs 

— 

ijrf 

[ohes  myln^           

in  terr' 

xxs 

— 

ijrf 

YORKSHIRE  LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


125 


Steptius  myln^ 
Roto  Wat^hous   ... 
Edward9  Wormall 
Wittms  Pulley       ... 
Ricus  Waterhous  ... 
Edward9  Mawde  ... 
Henric9  Pighils     ... 
Robtus  thorpe 
Ricus  helewell 
Johes  horsley 
Thorns  Rayn^ 
Wittms  Mawd 
Johes  Thorns 
Edmond9  barstey  ... 
Wittms  burnley     ... 
Elizabeth  Waterhous 
Agnes  Wat^ous  ... 
Issabella  Wat^hous 

Johes  byke 

Ricus  burnley 
Henric9  hilton 


Johes  Sund^^d   ... 
Jacobus  grenwood  ... 
Ricus  ColpoD 
Ux*  Sutclyff 
Thorns  fleccher     ... 
Wittms  fleccher     ... 
Edus  fornes 
Gill5t9  grenwood   ... 
Wittms  grenwood... 
Thorns  aikrod 
Johes  Crabtre 
Thorns  grenwood  ... 
Ux*  grenwood 
Johes  mawd 
Wittms  bothomley 
Johes  bothomley  ... 
Ux'  banyst^ 
Ux*  fleccher 
Wittms  Sutehill    ... 
Edward9  oldfeld   ... 
Jacob©  helele 
Thorns  Stansfeld  ... 
Edward9  helele      .. 
George  helele 
Thorns  brokysbank 
Tho&s  fornes 

Johes  lom 

Roht9  aikrod 
Edward9  baitf      ... 
Edmond9  Waterhous 
Ricus  Wood 

Xpdr9  Roo 

Johes  Wood 
Johes  Riley 
Edmond9  lom 
Ux'  gledhill 


[SKlRjcont  (continuecf). 


in  terr* 

xx^ 

— 

{]d 

in  terr' 

...          TS\S 

— 

ii\)d 

in  bon 

iiij/i 

— 

iiijd 

in  boB 

XXJ 

— 

}^ 

in  lesses 

xLr 

— 

liijrf 

in  bon 

...      bdi 

— 

xviij^ 

in  bon 

...      v/i 

— 

xd 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

\d 

in  bon 

..       vli 

— 

xd 

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

i)d 

in  bo& 

...       x\s 

— 

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

i)d 

in  bon 

xU 

— 

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

K 

in  terr* 

xxs 

— 

% 

in  bon 

..      iu/i 

— 

in  bon 

..       iii/i 
..      iij/« 

— 

\\\d 

in  boil 

— 

i\]d 

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

id 

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

yi 

in  boil 

xxs 

— 

jrf 

JRBY. 

Sma    — 

xjs 

iijflf 

in  boil 

iiij/f 



iiij^ 

in  bon 

...      x\s 

— 

'¥.. 

in  bon 

vij/« 
x\s 

— 

xiiij^ 

in  bon 

— 

¥ 

in  bon 

...       xU 

— 

m\d 

in  bori 

iiij/« 

— 

in  bon 

...       xUt 

— 

i\d 

in  terr* 

xxs 

— 

\]d 

in  terr* 

xxs 

— 

i)d 

in  bon 

..       vli 

— 

id 

in  terr* 

n]ii 

— 

y]d 

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

J^ 

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

d 
{]d 

in  boil 

..       x\s 

— 

in  bon 

..       yit 

— 

xd 

in  bon 

mUi 

— 

ivd 

in  terr' 

ihj/i 

-- 

viud 

in  bori 

xxs 

— 

\d 

in  bon 

...       v/« 

— 

xd 

in  bon 

vij// 
v/t 

— 

xiiij^ 

in  boil 

— 

xd 

in  boii 

iij/i 

— 

\\}d 

in  bon 

iij// 

— 

md 

in  boh 

XXJ 

— 

'yi 

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

ft 

in  boh 

...       x\s 

— 

in  boh 

xxs 

— 

fe 

in  boii 

..      x\s 

— 

in  terr* 

xh 

— 

m\d 

in  boii 

..       x\s 

— 

\yd 

in  bon 

viij/« 

— 

vjrf 

in  boh 

..       x\s 

— 

ijrf 

in  terr* 

..       x\s 

— 

iiijrf 

in  bon 

iiij// 

— 

m\d 

in  boh 

..       x\s 

— 

ijrf 

in  boh 

..       xLr 

— 

ijrf 

126 


YORKSHIRE  LAY  SUBSIDIES. 


M. 


Johes  Crowd^        

Ricus  Crowd^        

Rot5t9  baitf  

Johes  Janyn  

Ux*  Janyfi 

Ux*  Jotiis  dikson 

Roftt9  lech,  jun      

Jotles  Riley,  Sen 

Gilt5t9  baitf  

Johes  Riley  

Ux*  gaukroger      

Johes  gaukroger 

Ricus  gaukroger 

Johes  fairbank       

Gilhl9  haldisworth 

Xpor9  bentley       

Johes  baitf 

Wittms  gledhill     

£dward9  hopkynson 
Edinond9  Tatersall 

Johes  briche  

Exlmond9  hepe     

Johes  foxcroft        

Georg  Smyth        

Edmond9  haill      

Jacob9  Smyth        

Ricus  gaukroger 

GUht9  Sharpe       

Georg  helewell     

Johes  Smyth  

Johes  hoill 

Johes  Smyth         

Johes  gaukroger 

Thorns  dobsoii      

Laur  ferror  

Johes  murgatrod 

Johes  ferror  

Johes  powll  

Ricus  grenwood    

Georg  Riley  

RohtS  Rodd  

Johes  holrod         

Roht9  Whitley      

Ricus  Whitley       

Elias  Woodhed     

Brian  Roidf  

Georg  firih 

Johes  dobsoii         

Thorns  Crosley      

Thorns  Milner       

Roht9  townnend 

John  townnend  de  le  gatt 

Ux*  p'stley 

Johes  townnend    

12. 

Ux'  Roidf 

Johes  townnend     

Johes  firth 

Edward9  lom 


Saurby  (coniiniud). 

in  bon 

iij/i 

in  bon 

T 

in  terr* 

in  bon 

\H 

in  terr' 

XXJ 

in  boB 

smli 

...       in  boB 

x\s 

in  terr* 

xb 

in  terr* 

xU 

in  bon 

iij/« 

in  terr* 

XXJ 

in  terr' 

mli 
iiij/r 

in  boB 

in  terr* 

xas 

in  boB 

viij/« 
mli 

...      in  boB 

in  boB 

vii 

in  terr' 

x\s 

in  boB 

x\s 

in  boB 

vij/j 

in  terr' 

x\s 

in  boB 

xxs 

in  terr* 

xxs 

in  terr* 

xLr 

in  boB 

xU 

in  boB 

xxs 

...       in  terr* 

xxs 

in  boB 

XXJ 

in  bon 

XXX 

in  terr' 

iij/i 

Vlj/f 

in  boB 

...       in  boB 

T 

in  boB 

in  terr* 

xxs 

in  terr' 

xxs 

in  boB 

x\s 

in  terr' 

xxs 

in  bon 

x\s 

in  boB 

vli 

in  boB 

T 

in  boB 

in  boB 

xxs 

in  boB 

T 

in  terr' 

in  bon 

x\s 

in  terr* 

x\s 

in  boB 

viij/i 

in  terr* 

xxs 

in  boB 

iiij/« 

...      in  boB 

xli 

in  boB 

x\s 

in  terr' 

iij/i 

'     ...      in  boB 

V/I 

in  boB 

xxs 

in  terr* 

x\s 

in  boB 

x\s 

in  terr* 

xxs 

in  terr' 

xxs 

—  md 

—  \\]d 

—  iiij^ 

—  xd 

—  xvj<r 

-  ¥.. 

—  iiij^ 

—  \\]d 

-  ijrf 

—  \]d 

—  m]d 

—  xvj<r 

—  iiji 

—  xd 

—  iiij^ 

-  ijrf 

—  x\\\)d 

—  iiij^ 

-  K 

—  \\\]d 

—  iW 

—  ;,rf 

-  i 

—  yw/ 

—  xiiiia 

—  iija 

-  ¥. 

-  ¥. 

-  iH 

-  ¥. 

-  ¥. 

—  xyi 

—  xd 

—  m)d 

—  xd 

—  nja 

—  ih}d 

—  ijd 

—  iiijrf 

—  xv'jd 

-  ¥.. 

—  uija 

-  ¥. 

-  lid 

—  V)d 

—  xd 

—  id 

—  m]d 

-  ¥. 

-  ¥. 

—  \)d 


YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


127 


Thoix&s  haurison    . 
Hen?  Hoill 
George  Remysden 
Wittms  Tatersall  .. 
Thorns  Crosley 


Thodis  stansfeld    ... 
Thorns  stansfeld,  Jun 
Gi»k9  Cokcroft 
Thorns  Sutclyff 
Rotit9  SutclyjBT 
Tohes  Cokcroft 
Wiihns  estwood 
Ricus  fornes 
Wiihns  Riley 
Jacobus  fleccher 
Ricus  fornes 
Johanna  fornes 
Kicus  normanton 
Georgius  fornes 
Edward9  stansfeld 
Ricus  grenwood 
Thorns  Sonnd^^land 
Rofct9  hemyngwey 
Wiitms  normanton 
Georg  normanton .. 


Ricos  Ajmley 
Ux'  Ria  Jagger    ... 
Edward9  Jagger    ... 
Ux*  gilftti  Aynley... 
Johes  Aynley 
Wiihns  moure 
Ux*  Johis  townnend 
Johes  townnend    ... 
pciualI9  townnend... 
Edmond9  townnend 
Withns  Wilkynsoii 
Ux»  JohU  Wormall 
Bamard9  dentofi  ... 
Ro1U9  townnend  ... 
Hugo  townnend    ... 
Wifims  Wilson      ... 
Ux*  Nichli  Woodhed 
Laur  gledhill 
George  helewell    ... 
JoJto  p'stley         ... 
Thorns  Walker 
Thodis  helewell    ... 
Johes  Wilkynson  ... 
Brian9  Mawde 
Johes  gledhill 
Gilftt9  bothamley  ... 
Edward9  Wilson  ... 


Saurby  (conUniud). 

in  bon 
in  terr* 
in  bon 
in  boil 
in  terr* 

Arrvngden. 


xU 
iij/f 
iij/« 
xIj 
xIj 
Sma    — 


—  \]d 

—  y]d 

—  '\\}(i 

-  lid 

—  iiij^ 
xxxvjj  iij^ 


in  terr* 

.       iij/« 

— 

v\d 

in  terr' 

XXJ 

— 

ijd 

in  bon 

.       vli 

— 

xd 

.       in  bon 

.       xlj 



\]d 

in  boil 

.       vH 

— 

xd 

in  bon 

..       v/i 

— 

xd 

in  bon 

.       xb 



\]d 

in  bon 

•:  T 

— 

iijr/ 

in  terr* 

— 

m\d 

in  boil 

.       xb 

— 

\]d 

.       in  bon 

Xlf 

— 

\\d 

in  bon 

.    iij/« 

— 

•••  f 

in  terr* 

xIj 

— 

md 

in  terr* 

XXJ 

— 

iji 

in  bofi 

XXJ 

— 

d 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

.       in  bon 

xxs 

— 

d 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

d 

in  boil 

XXJ 



'  d 

in  bon 

XXJ 

— 

'  d 

rAYNLAND. 

Sm'^    — 

vs  viij</ 

in  bon 

.       v// 

___ 

xd 

in  boil 

XXJ 

— 

id 

in  boii 

x\s 



u 

in  boil 

xxs 

— 

K 

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

U 

in  boil 

xxs 

— 

jrf 

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

U 

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

K 

in  lioii 

xxs 



U 

in  boil 

xxs 

— 

yi 

in  boil 

xxs 

— 

\d 

in  bon 

xxs 



U 

in  bon 

xxs 



in  bon 

xxs 

— 

in  bon 

xxs 



U 

in  bon 

xxs 



y 

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

U 

in  bon 

xxs 

— 

U 

in  terr* 

xU 

— 

....  , 
uija 

in  terr* 

.       x\s 

— 

uijd 

.      In  boil 

.      xls 



ijd 

in  bofi       •. 

xxs 



u\}d 

in  terr* 

xU 

— 

in  boil 

.       xls 



iid 

in  bon 

iij// 



i\]d 

hi  boil 

.          Xlf. 

— 

ijrf 

in  boil 

.       xLr 

— 

ik 

Sm»    — 

iiijf 

iij^ 

128 


YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


Gill5t9  stansfeld     

Wittms  bent  ley     

Ux'  Wittmj  mechill 
Ricus  drape,  jun 

Ricus  Sutclyff        

Johes  mechill        

Hen?  Sutclyff       

Johe  mechill  de  farrend  town 

Ricus  Ro^tshey     

Thorns  Crabtxe      

Johes  Crabtre        

Ricus  mechill         

Johes  u  I  ley 

Johes  mitton         

Johes  Weidhope 

Johes  Crabtre        

Johes  mechill         

Ricus  Drape 

Roht9  bentley       

Tacob9  mechill      

Ux*  Thoe  bentley 

Patrik  huyk,  Scot9,  nutt  bon 


Heptenstall. 

in  feodf 
n  bon 
R  terr* 
n  bon 
n  terr' 
in  terr' 
in  boh 
in  boh 
in  tenr* 
in  boh 
n  ten* 
n  bon 
;n  boh 
n  boh 
n  terr* 
n  boh 
in  boh 
n  terr' 
in  terr* 
in  boh 
n  terr* 


MiGLEY. 


iiij/« 

xU 

xb 

iiij/i 

xIj 

XXJ 

iiij/t 

y'jlt 

x\s 

iiij// 

xxs 

xU 

vli 

iiij/j 

i\)U 

iiij/i 

iiij// 

xl^ 

x\s 

xls 


Ricus  dean 

in  terr' 

..      iiij// 

Ux*  Johis  dean      

in  terr' 

..      xli 

Ricus  patchett       

in  terr* 

iiij// 

Ux'  Thome  p'stley          

n  terr* 

..       xb 

Ricus  Slaiden        

in  terr* 

..      x\s 

Ricus  Shay i 

n  terr* 

xxs 

Ux'  Jacoby  Shay 

n  terr* 

.;          XXS 

Ux*  fohis  helewell           

in  terr' 

XXS 

Roht^  haldisworth            

in  terr' 

..       x\s 

johes  bemond       

'Roht9  Thorns        

n  terr' 

..       xls 

n  terr* 

XXS 

[ohes  Shay            

Jx'  cdwardi  Shay           

in  terr' 

xxs 

n  terr' 

xxs 

Ricus  migley         

in  bon 

..      yj// 

Wittms  grenwood 

in  boh 

vj// 

Ricus  migley         

in  boh 

..    iiij// 

Roht9  mygley        

Edward9  Slaiden 

in  boh 

iiij// 
..       iiij// 

n  boh 

Wittms  ferror        

in  boh 

..       xl} 

Johes  ferror           

in  boh 

..      x\s 

Roht9  helewell      

n  boh 

..       x\s 

Johes  ferror           

m  boh 

..       xli 

[licus  drape           

m  boh 

..       x\s 

Thorns  Drape        

in  boh 

..       x\s 

Johes  hargraves     

in  boh    ^  . 

x\s 

Ux'  Nicolay  mygley        

n  terr' 

xxs 

Roht9  townnend 

m  lK)h 

..      xls 

Henric9  Phelipe 

m  boh 

xxs 

Ux'  Wittmj  catrenson     : 

Jacob9  oldfeld       

n  boh 

xxs 

in  boh 

xxs 

[.  12  d. 

Ricus  Shay            i 

n  terr' 

xxs 

Ux'  Wittmj  mechill         i 

n  boh 

xxs 

Georg  gwykwham            

in  terr* 

..       xU 

viij^/ 

¥. 

uija 
iiij// 
iiij^ 

¥. 

nijtf 
xijflf 
iiij^ 
iiij^ 

xd 

iiij^ 

\}d 

\\\]d 

\\\]d 

in]d 

iiij^ 

\]d 
m]d 


Sm*    —    viijx 


—  v\\]d 

—  iiijrf 

—  v\\]d 

—  iiij^ 

—  \\\}d 

—  i]U 

-  ijrf 

-  !i^ . 

—  iiija 

—  m]d 

—  \]d 

—  \]d 

—  xi^d 

—  x\}d 

—  iiijfl? 

—  iiij^ 

—  iiij^ 

-  !K 

-  y5 

-  ij</ 

-  i]d 

-  ¥. 

-  ij</ 

-  ijrf 

-  ¥. 

—  i\d 

—  \d 

-  yi 

-  xyt 

-  ^. 

-  iiij^ 

ixs  m]d 


Sm»    — 


YORKSHIRE   LAY   SUBSIDIES. 


129 


Shelf. 


Ux'  umfridi  Wat^ous     ... 

in  terr' 

..       xlt 

—  iiijaT 

—  iiij^ 

Withns  Cowp        

in  terr' 

..       xU 

Ricus  mawde         

in  terr' 

xb 

—    iiijdf 

Wittms  Saltonstall 

in  terr' 

XX  J 

zig 

RotSt9  dicconson 

in  bon 

xlj 

Arthur9  bentley 

in  terr' 

..       xb 

—  l)d 

Wiitms  fomes        

in  bon 

XX  J 

Ux*  cdwardi  mawde 

in  bon 

..       xb 

Sma 

—    xx}d 

Warley. 

Joties  Wat^ous 

in  bon 

\\s 

-    id 

Ux'  Wittmj  Mawd 

in  bon 

viij/i 

—    xvj^ 

Jacob9  Mawd 

in  terr' 

\\s 

-  ijrf 

Edmond9  oldfeld 

in  bon 

\\s 

-  y'. 

Jacob9  mawd         

in  bon 

\'\\]li 

—     XV]d 

Ux'  Rici  mawde 

in  bon 

..       v// 

—    xd 

Edward9  Spek      

in  bon 

iij/« 

—    nid 

Ricus  longbothom 

in  boil 

iiij// 

—     u\}d 

Edward9  longbothom 

in  boii 

iiij/« 

—    uijd 

Ricus  holgat          

in  bon 

..       vjA 

—     xij^ 

Wiftms  dean          

in  bon 

..       xb 

-     lid 

Edward9  brokysbank 

in  bon 

..       xb 

-    iid 

plan  of  %eeb6,  \S06. 


TTHE  plan  of  Leeds  which  I  have  been  asked  to  describe  is  dated 
1806,  and  appears  to  rank  next  in  point  of  time  after  the 
second  of  the  two  which  were  reproduced  in  Volume  IX  of  the 
Society's  Transactions,  and  so  well  described  by  Colonel  Wilson.^ 
It  was  found  amongst  some  papers  which  had  belonged  to  my 
grandfather,  Thomas  Benson  Pease,  who  died  in  1846,  and  who, 
though  not,  I  believe,  a  native  of  the  town,  lived  all  his  life  in 
Leeds,  and  took  a  very  active  interest  in  its  affairs.  He  was  one  of 
the  Commissioners  named  in  the  Leeds  Improvement  Act  of  1824, 
which  authorised  the  removal  of  **the  Middle  Row." 

The  plan  was  published  by  John  Heaton,  who  was  a  well  known 
bookseller  and  publisher  in  Leeds,  but  there  is  no  internal  evidence 
as  to  its  author.  He  can  hardly  have  been  a  surveyor  of  any  note, 
since  the  work  is  extremely  crude ;  indeed  the  principal  streets  might 
have  been  traced  by  a  ruler,  they  are  so  extraordinarily  straight  and 
generally  at  right  angles  to  each  other.  From  the  point  of  view  of 
accuracy  in  delineation,  the  plan  is  almost  valueless;  but  it  is 
interesting  as  a  link  between  its  predecessor  of  1771,  and  the 
beautiful  survey  of  181 5  by  Netlam  and  Francis  Giles;  and  as 
illustrating  the  growth  of  the  town.  The  Leeds  of  1 771,  as  shewn 
by  the  map  of  that  date,  is  very  little  different  from  the  Leeds  of 
Thoresby's  time,  as  portrayed  by  the  earlier  map,  which  is  dated  1725 
by  Colonel  Wilson.  Some  of  the  main  roads  have  more  buildings 
alongside  them,  but  there  is  no  laying  out  of  streets  or  appropriation 
of  fields  and  gardens  for  building  purposes.  In  1806,  after  an 
interval  of  thirty-five  years  which  separates  the  plan  of  1771  from 
that  now  under  consideration,  a  great  change  has  come  over  the 
town.  On  every  side  we  see  expansion,  though  on  the  north  and 
south  less  building  has  taken  place  than  on  the  west  and  east. 
Commercial  Street  (called  Bond  Street  at  its  eastern  end)  has  been 

^  I    have  just  learned  that  a  plan  of  Leeds  dated  about  1780  is  in  the 
possession  of  Mr.  T.  Blair,  but  I  have  not  seen  it. 


OLD  PLAN  OF  LEEDS.  13I 

cut  from  Briggate  to  Albion  Street,  and  all  the  ground  to  the  west 
of  Lands  Lane,  which  in  1771  appears  as  fields  and  gardens,  has 
been  laid  out  in  streets  and  squares.  To  the  east  of  the  Parish 
Church,  the  Mill  Garth  and  the  land  adjoining  Timble  Beck  have 
nearly  all  been  built  over. 

The  town  is  no  longer  in  that  condition  which  induced  Leland 
two  and  a  half  centuries  before  to  say  it  was  not  so  quick  as 
Bradford,  but  has  started  on  the  career  of  prosperity  which  is  to 
characterise  it  for  the  next  hundred  years. 

It  is  impossible  now  to  decide  whether  the  publisher  had  any 
definite  purpose  in  issuing  this  plan.  I  thought  at  first  it  might 
have  been  intended  to  illustrate  a  directory  or  guide  to  the  town. 
The  directory  of  1797  was  published  by  Thomas  Wright,  the 
proprietor  of  the  Leeds  Intelligencer^  who  lived  in  New  Street  leading 
to  St  John's  Church,  and  had  a  bookseller's  shop  in  Briggate.  I 
believe  subsequent  editions  were  published,  and  indeed  my  copy 
(which  belonged  to  Griffith  Wright)  is  corrected  in  manuscript  for 
1798,  as  if  for  the  printer.  But  I  do  not  know  that  John  Heaton 
had  any  business  connection  with  the  Wrights,  or  that  he  ever 
himself  published  a  directory  or  guide.  The  Leeds  Guide  of  1806 
was  printed  by  Edward  Baines  "for  the  Author."  The  reprint  of 
1808  was  printed  by  John  Ryley,  and  sold  by  (amongst  others) 
J.  Heaton.  But  it  has  no  plan.  Nor  has  the  little  compilation 
entitled  "-4  Walk  through  Leeds^^  dated  1806  and  published  by  John 
Heaton.  The  directory  of  181 7,  which  was  published  by  Edward 
Baines,  has  no  plan  of  Leeds,  and  I  know  of  no  intermediate  work 
of  that  kind.  One  must  conclude,  in  the  absence  of  further  evidence, 
that  the  issue  of  this  plan  was  a  venture  on  the  part  of  John  Heaton, 
unconnected  with  any  particular  object.  And  I  think  the  edition 
must  have  been  very  limited,  as  I  never  saw  or  heard  of  a  copy 
before. 

Turning  now  to  the  plan  itself,  we  find  that  Briggate  still  ends  at 
the  Middle  Row,  and  that  the  Prison  still  stands  on  the  south  side 
of  Kirkgate.  It  was  not  removed  till  18 13,  when  the  new  Court 
House  and  Prison  in  Park  Row  was  completed.  The  Middle  Row 
was  removed  in  1825  under  the  powers  of  the  Improvement  Act  of 
1824.  So  long  before  as  1765  these  buildings  were  felt  to  be  an 
inconvenience,  as  appears  by  the  following  from  the  Leeds  Intelligencer^ 
10  September,  1765  : — "The  inhabitants  at  the  Back  of  the  Shambles 
"began  last  week  to  take  in  their  Shop  windows  and  pull  down  their 
"Penthouses  in  order  to  make  a  better  Passage  for  carriages;  the 


132  OLD   PLAN   OF  LEEDS. 

"want  of  which  has  been  long  and  loudly  complained  of:  but  much 
"more  to  the  credit  of  this  opulent  town  wou'd  it  be  to  purchase 
"the  whole  Pile  of  Buildings  which  are  in  the  Middle  and  so  greatly 
"obstruct  the  passage  of  that  otherwise  noble  street  (Briggate) " 

The  new  street  opposite  Kirkgate  and  extending  to  Albion  Street 
is  called  Bond  Street  on  our  map  as  far  as  Lands  Lane,  and 
thenceforward  Commercial  Street.  It  is  so  named  ip  the  plan  of 
1 815  and  in  Charles  Fowler's  plan  of  182 1,  and  it  was  not  till  the 
extension  to  Park  Row  was  carried  out,  some  time  between  1821  and 
1826,  that  the  present  names  were  bestowed.  Commercial  Street 
from  Albion  Street  to  Lands  Lane  must  have  been  laid  out  some 
time  before  the  Bond  Street  of  our  map.  Mr.  C.  D.  Hardcastle,  in 
his  paper  on  "Leeds  in  my  Grandfather's  Days,"  says  that  on  the 
1 2  th  April,  1806,  all  the  materials  of  the  tenements  in  Briggate,  lately 
occupied  by  Mr.  Hugh  Bell  and  nine  under-tenants,  were  advertised  for 
sale :  "  This  range  will  be  pulled  down  forthwith,  to  make  a  projected 
"  new  street  from  Briggate  to  Commercial  Street."  Probably  Commercial 
Street  was  laid  out  about  the  same  time  as  Albion  Street.  The  plan  of 
182 1  shews  a  projected  extension  of  Commercial  Street  in  a  straight 
line  across  Albion  Street  to  Park  Row,  but  this  must  have  been 
abandoned  for  some  reason  and  the  present  curved  street  constructed 
before  1826,  as  it  is  so  shewn  in  Fowler's  plan  of  that  date.  The 
Bond  Street  of  to-day,  from  Park  Row  to  East  Parade,  was  constructed 
before  182 1,  and  was  in  the  first  place  called  Russell  Street.  In  the 
early  years  of  the  last  century, , a  sedan  chair  was  kept  for  hire  in  a 
cellar  in  Commercial  Street,  and  my  mother,  who  was  born  in  18 14, 
remembered  riding  in  it  as  a  child.  The  following  advertisement, 
taken  from  the  Leeds  Mercury  of  November  3rd,  1804,  shews  that 
Commercial  Street  was  not  yet  a  street  of  shops : — "  To  be  let  two 
"newly-erected  messuages  in  Commercial  Street,  Leeds,  each  containing 
"  2  good  cellar  kitchens  with  oven  grates  and  pots  therein,  2  rooms  on 

"the  ground  floor  with  6  lodging  rooms  above Commercial 

"Street  is  one  of  the  most  pleasing  airy  and  healthful  situations  in 
"Leeds  and  very  convenient  for  trade  and  market." 

Our  plan  shews  the  whole  of  the  land  in  these  two  streets  as 
built  over,  but  this  cannot  have  been  the  case,  as  in  the  map  of 
181 5  there  is  vacant  ground  in  both  of  them. 

The  inns  in  Briggate  are  much  the  same  as  in  1771,  but  the 
old  King's  Arms  is  soon  to  disappear  from  the  list.  It  was  kept  in 
1797  by  J.  Hick,  but  in  January,  1813,  it  had  ceased  to  be  an  inn. 
The   building   is   still   standing,  and   is   occupied   by   Mr.   Bean,  the 


OLD   PLAN   OF    LEEDS.  133 

bookseller,  and  others,  but  it  has  been  acquired  by  the  Corporation 
and  will  be  removed  in  the  widening  of  Duncan  Street.  It  was  the 
scene  of  rioting  in  1 753,  when  the  people  resisted  the  introduction  of 
turnpikes^  and  in  front  of  this  house,  in  which  the  magistrates  met  to 
deliberate,  the  military  fired  with  fatal  effect  upon  the  mob.  In  1797 
it  must  have  been  the  principal  coaching  house  in  the  town,  since 
five  coaches  left  for  London  and  other  places,  while  from  no  other 
inn  did  more  than  three  depart.  It  belonged  to  Joseph  Wood,  a 
hatter  in  Briggate,  who  gave  his  name  to  Wood  Street  (now  demolished 
by  the  Leeds  Estates  Company),  and  who  dwelt  in  St.  Peter's  Square, 
and  it  remained  in  his  descendants'  possession  till  the  Corporation 
bought  it. 

Lower  down  Briggate  the  name  "Hotel"  appears.  In  the  Directory 
of  18 1 7,  under  the  heading  "Inns,  Tavern,"  &c.,  is  the  following:— 
"Hotel,  Sarah  Greaves,  Briggate."  It  is  curious  as  being  the  only 
house  called  a  hotel,  and  was  probably  the  first  to  be  so  designated. 
I  imagine  it  is  the  same  as  the  Royal  Hotel,  so  long  kept  by 
Stanwix.     In  the  map  of  1815,  it  is  called  Greaves'  Hotel. 

Boar  Lane  presents  very  much  the  same  appearance  in  our  plan 
as  in  that  of  1771,  except  that  the  ground  between  what  is  now 
Albion  Street  and  Bank  Street  is  apparently  built  over.  Alfred 
Street  is  not  yet  in  existence,  but  it  was  laid  out  very  soon  afterwards. 
I  have  just  come  across  some  particulars  of  sale,  dated  1809,  of 
property  belonging  to  Richard  Lee,  a  merchant  and  manufacturer,  and 
who  appears  to  have  been  also  receiver  of  land  tax  and  other  duties. 
He  made  default  in  his  accounts,  and  a  writ  of  extent  was  sued  out 
against  him  in  the  Court  of  Exchequer,  under  which  his  lands  were 
seized  and  sold  by  the  Deputy  Remembrancer.  Lot  VII  is  described 
as  "a  capital  messuage  situate  on  the  south  side  of  Boar  Lane 
"in  Leeds  now  in  the  occupation  of  John  Kemplay  with  the 
"bookbinder's  shop  occupied  by  Henry  Dodsworth,"  and  other 
buildings,  "with  the  yard  and  part  of  the  garden  containing  900 
"square  yards  or  thereabouts  including  240  yards  now  staked  off  on 
"the  west  side  of  the  said  yard  and  garden  for  the  purpose  of 
"forming  part  of  a  certain  intended  new  street  of  15  feet  wide  or 
"thereabouts  to  be  called  Union  Street  and  to  lead  from  Boar  Lane 
"aforesaid  into  a  certain  other  intended  new  street  of  26  feet  wide 
"or  thereabouts  to  be  called  Fenton  Street." 

Then  follow  other  lots  of  land,  some  abutting  upon  Union  Street 
and  some  on  Fenton  Street,  with  rights  of  way  for  some  of  the  latter 
through  White  Horse  Yard,  and  for  all  of  them  through  a  covered 
passage  into  Briggate. 


134  OLD   PLAN   OF   LEEDS. 

It  seems  to  me  clear  that  Union  Street  is  the  present  Alfred 
Street.  John  Kemplay  seems  to  have  bought  Lots  VII  and  VIII, 
and  I  find  from  the  Directory  of  1817  that  John  and  Mary  Kemplay 
carried  on  a  "ladies'  seminary"  in  Alfred  Street;  and  from  that  of 
1826  that  John  and  Mary  Kemplay  and  Daughters  carried  on  "a 
"ladies*  boarding  and  day  boarding  seminary,"  at  18,  Boar  Lane.  The 
house  was  probably  at  the  corner  of  Boar  Lane  and  Alfred  Street, 
with  the  entrance  from  the  latter  street.  It  cannot  have  borne  the 
name  Union  Street  very  long,  and  the  change  was  no  doubt  made  to 
avoid  confusion  with  another  street  of  the  same  name  near  the  Mill 
Garth.  But  why  it  was  renamed  Alfred  Street  I  cannot  guess. 
Fenton  Street,  which  was  to  run  at  right  angles  to  Union  Street, 
is  clearly  the  present  Wormald's  Yard.  I  have  not  met  with  a  copy 
of  the  sale  plan  referred  to  in  these  particulars. 

There  was  a  school  in  Boar  Lane  in  1765,  as  appears  from  the 
following  extract  from  the  Leeds  Intelligencer  of  24th  September: — 
"At  the  Boarding  School  in  Boar  Lane,  Leeds,  Young  Ladies  are 
"genteelly  boarded  and  carefully  instructed  in  all  kinds  of  Needlework 
"upon  reasonable  Terms,  By  Mrs.  Dawson  and  proper  Assistants. 
"The  Young  Ladies  are  also  instructed  in  the  following  languages, 
"viz.  English  and  French,  grammatically;  Writing  and  Arithmetic; 
"Modern  Geography;  Drawing;  Music  and  Dancing,  by  able  Masters 

" N.B.  The  above  situation  is  airy  and  pleasant,  and  the 

"greatest  part  of  the  leisure  Hours,  allowed  to  the  Young  Ladies,  are 
"employed  in  such  amusements  as  are  both  useful  and  entertaining." 

This  school  must  have  been  afterwards  removed  to  Park  Row,  as 
in  the  Directory  of  1797  the  name  of  "Mrs.  Dawson,  boarding  school, 
"  Park  Row,"  occurs. 

Richard  Lee,  above  referred  to,  acquired  the  house  in  Boar  Lane 
under  the  will  of  his  aunt,  Mrs.  Jane  Shepley,  who  died  in  1797,  and 
whose  maiden  name  was  Markham.  He  lived  at  the  house  in 
Woodhouse  Lane,  now  occupied  by  the  Girls*  High  School,  having 
bought  the  site  in  1795,  and  probably  erected  the  house  soon  after- 
wards. It  was  sold  in  181 1  to  Philemon  Land, — who  is 'described 
as  a  distiller  and  brandy  merchant,  of  27,  Woodhouse  Lane,  in  the 
Directory  of   181 7. 

Mr.  Hardcastle  tells  us  that  the  formation  of  Trinity  Street  was 
thus  announced  in  the  Leeds  Mercury  of  the  17th  August,  1805  : — 


OLD   PLAN   OF   LEEDS.  1 35 

"To  the  inhabitants  of  this  town  and  neighbourhood  of  Leeds. 
"Notice  is  hereby  given,  that  Mr.  Richardson,  of  Burley  Lodge, 
"intends  in  the  month  of  May  next  (if  not  sooner)  to  open  a  foot 
"horse  and  carriage  way  from  Boar  Lane,  along  Trinity  Lane,  into 
"Lands  Lane,  for  the  convenience  of  the  said  town  and  neighbour- 
"hood,  and  which  intended  public  road  will  communicate  with 
"  Briggate,  Commercial  Street,  Bank  Street,  and  Albion  Street."  This 
new  street  is  shewn  on  our  map,  and  styled  Trinity  Lane.  It  is  so 
described  in  the  Directory  of  1817,  but  as  Trinity  Street  in  that  of 
1826;  though,  curiously  enough,  it  is  Trinity  Lane  in  the  accom- 
panying map.  The  advertisement  shews,  however,  that  a  street  known 
as  Trinity  Lane  already  existed.     It  is  not  mentioned  in  1797. 

Albion  Street  is  shewn  as  laid  out  from  Upperhead  Row  to  Boar 
Lane,  though  not  yet  entirely  built  up  on  both  sides.  The  old 
Music  Hall  now  occupied  by  Messrs.  Denby  &  Co.  was  built  in  1792, 
as  appears  by  the  following  extract  from  the  Leeds  Intelligencer  of 
July  9th,  1792  : — "We  have  the  pleasure  to  inform  our  readers  that  the 
"  first  stone  of  the  intended  Concert  Room  was  laid  on  Monday  last 
"(July  2nd)  in  the  street  now  making  from  Boar  Lane  to  Upperhead 
"  Row,  and  which,  we  understand,  is  to  be  called  Albion  Street"  The 
Butts  Lane  of  the  map  of  18 15  (now  Basinghall  Street)  is  here  styled 
"Back  of  Park  Row,"  and  is  no  doubt  the  same  street  as  is  marked 
"Mill  Hill  Lane"  in  the  map  of  1725.  There  is  nothing  as  yet 
erected  on  the  open  ground  surrounded  by  Park  Row,  South  Parade 
and  East  Parade,  but  these  streets  are  otherwise  built  up.  Park 
Square  is  in  nearly  the  same  condition  as  in  181 5.  For  some 
reason  it  is  called  St  Paul's  Square  in  the  Guide  of  1806  and  the 
reprint  of  1808;  though  in  the  Directory  of  1797  I  find  the  Reverend 
Miles  Atkinson,  minister  of  St  Paul's,  Park  Square ;  and  in  the  Walk 
through  Leeds  of  1806,  it  is  called  Park  Square. 

Crossing  Leeds  Bridge  we  find  Simpson's  Fold,  now  Dock  Street, 
on  our  left.  Here  dwelt  Joseph  Blackburn,  the  attorney  who  was 
hanged  at  York  in  181 5  for  forging  stamps  on  deeds.  The  name 
of  the  street  would  appear  to  have  been  derived  from  a  family  named 
Simpson,  or  Sympson,  who  lived  there  and  probably  owned  the  site 
at  a  very  early  period.  In  the  register  of  baptisms  at  the  Parish 
Church  we  find,  "1573,  August  23,  Elizabeth,  child  of  Robert 
Sympson,   Bryge   end;"    and    in    the    register   of   burials   for    1692, 


136  OLD   PLAN   OF   LEEDS. 

Simpson  Fold  is  described  as  Bridge  end.  A  Robert  Sympson 
(probably  the  same)  appears  in  the  Subsidy  Roll  of  the  39th 
Elizabeth  (1596-7)  as  the  owner  of  lands  in  Leeds  Mainriding,  which 
were  valued  at  thirty  shillings,  the  highest  assessment  but  one  in  that 
division  in  respect  of  lands.  So  that  he  must  have  been  a  person 
of  consequence. 

A  little  further  on  we  come  to  Gray's  Walk,  now  Grey  Walk. 
The  former  mode  of  spelling  the  name  is  probably  correct,  as  it  is 
no  doubt  derived  from  the  family  of  Gray,  formerly  of  Leeds  and 
Kippax  (see  Piatt  and  Morkill's  Whitkirk^  p.  89),  who  owned  land 
there.     Edward  Gray  was  Mayor  of  Leeds  in  1749  and  1768. 

The  suburbs  of  the  town  are  very  imperfectly  portrayed  in  this 
plan,  and  the  roads  are  laid  out  with  very  little  regard  for  accuracy. 
It  is  disappointing  as  a  picture  of  Leeds,  the  more  it  is  examined, 
as  one  feels  how  little  reliance  is  to  be  placed  upon  it,  whether  one 
regards  it  from  the  point  of  view  of  the  position  of  the  streets  or 
of  the  buildings  abutting  upon  them. 

I  am  greatly  indebted  to  Mr.  Lumb,  the  painstaking  Hon. 
Secretary  of  the  Society,  for  the  references  to  the  Leeds  Intelligencer 
and  Leeds  Mercury,  and  other  sources  of  information. 

John  Rawlinson  Ford. 


ViiL  XI»  MfsuJ/anm^  p.  ijo. 


XEborc0bi?   Society 


REPORT  FOR  1900. 

'^^HE  Council  of  the  Thoresby  Society  have  the  pleasure  to 
present  their  Twelfth  Annual  Report  During  the  year  one 
Life  and  sixteen  Annual  Members  have  joined  the  Society,  and 
the  number  on  the  Roll  at  the  end  of  the  year  was  322,  of 
whom  49  were   Life  and   273  Annual. 

Further  parts  of  the  "Miscellanea"  and  "Leeds  Parish  Church 
Roisters''  have  been  issued  to  the  members  for  the  year  1898. 
The  "Miscellanea"  contained  an  Account  of  Mangy's  Trial,  with 
Notes ;  a  paper  on  Bramhope,  and  further  portions  of  local  Wills, 
proved  1527  to  1531;  Leeds  Manor  Rolls,  Musters  in  Skyrac 
Wapentake,  with  Notes;  and  Lay  Subsidies  of  Agbrigg  and  Morley 
Wapentakes, 

During  the  summer  successful  excursions  were  made  to  Edling- 
ton,  Conisbrough  Castle  and  Church  and  Sprotborough  Church,  to 
Helmsley  Castle  and  Rievaulx  Abbey,  and  to  Cowthorpe,  Walton, 
Wighill  and  Marston  Moor,  under  the  skilful  guidance  of  Messrs. 
Barran,  Witherby,  Kitson,  Braithwaite  and  Clark. 

The  Council  regret  that  they  have  lost  by  death  the  valuable 
services  of  their  colleague,  Mr.  William  Henry  Broadhead,  who  was 
one  of  their  most  useful  members,  especially  in  regard  to  photographing 
and  noting  old  buildings  in  I^eds,  and  to  regular  attendance  at 
meetings. 


The  Council  gratefully  acknowledge  gifts  from  their  Vice- 
President,  Mr.  J.  H.  Wurtzburg,  of  20  valuable  sepia  drawings  of  the 
battlefields  of  Yorkshire,  by  Wagstaffe,  in  a  mahogany  case  ;  from  the 
Government  Stationery  Office,  84  volumes, — being  i  vol.  Close  Rolls, 
Edward  II  (1307-1313);  75  vols.  Chronicles ;  4  vols.  Record  Works  ; 
and  4  vols.  Scottish  Records.  Three  framed  engravings, — views  of 
Old  Leeds, — from  the  Rev.  N.  Egerton  Leigh ;  an  old  Leeds 
School  Book,  from  Mr.  J.  R.  Ford ;  and  one  engraving  from  Mr.  S. 
Denison. 

Special  reference  must  be  made  to  a  very  important  question 
with  which  the  Council  have  had  to  deal  during  the  past  year. 
Among  the  objects  for  which  the  Society  was  established  the 
first-named  in  the  Rules  is  the  collection  and  preservation  of  books, 
and  other  objects  relating  to  the  town  and  neighbourhood  of  Leeds. 
It  is  obvious  that  it  is  not  possible  to  do  much  in  this  direction 
until  a  home  has  been  secured  for  the  Society.  The  Council  have 
had  this  matter  under  consideration  from  the  formation  of  the 
Society,  but  it  was  not  until  the  year  1896  that  an  opportunity 
presented  itself  of  securing  satisfactory  premises  in  conjunction  with 
the  Yorkshire  Archaeological  Society.  These  premises  formed  part 
of  the  Old  Medical  School,  No.  10,  Park  Street,  and  they  were 
secured  for  a  term  of  five  years  from  the  ist  of  November,  1896, 
at  a  rent  of  ^^43  per  annum.  The  remainder  of  the  Medical 
School  Estate,  extending  to  nearly  three-quarters  of  the  whole  area, 
was  and  still  is  occupied  as  a  clothing  factory;  but  it  was  one  of 
the  terms  of  the  lease  that  the  Societies  were  to  have  the  option 
at  any  time  during  the  five  years*  term  of  purchasing  the  whole 
premises  for  ^^3,000.  It  has  been  deemed  desirable  that  this  option 
should  be  exercised,  and,  with  the  concurrence  of  the  members  of 
the    Yorkshire    Archaeological    Society,  this    has    been    done.      It  is 


Ill 

intended  that  the  premises  shall  be  held  jointly  and  equally  by  the 
two  Societies,  and  this  will  necessitate  the  payment  of  ;^  1,500  by 
the  Thoresby  Society.  The  funds  available  for  the  purchase  consist 
at  present  only  of  the  accumulated  Life  Fees,  but  the  Council  wish 
to  impress  upon  the  members  the  important  fact  that  they  have  in 
their  store-rooms  a  large  stock  of  publications,  the  sale  of  which 
would  enable  them  at  once  to  complete  the  purchase.  It  is  hoped 
that  all  members  who  have  not  a  complete  set  of  the  publications 
will  take  the  present  opportunity  of  completing  their  sets.  The 
various  volumes  are  issued  handsomely  bound,  and  the  terms  can 
be  ascertained  on  application  to  the  Treasurer. 


o 
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LIST  OF  OFFICERS  for  1900. 


pre6t^cnt 
Edmund  Wilson,  F.S.A.,  Red  Hall,  Leeds. 

John  Rawlinson  Ford,  Quarrydene,  Weetwood. 
John  Henry  VVurtzburg,  Clavering  House,  Leeds. 
Daniel  H.  Atkinson,  Grove  Cottage,  Starbeck. 
Rev.  E.  C.  S.  Gibson,  D.D.,  The  Vicarage,  Leeds. 

CouncfL 

W.  Paley  Baildon,  F.S.A.,  Lincoln's  Inn,  London,  W.C. 

J.  N.  Barran,  St.  PauPs  Street,  Leeds. 

F.  W.  Bedford,  Greek  Street  Chambers,  Leeds. 

Godfrey  Bingley,  Thomiehurst,  Headingley. 

W.  Braithwaite,  St.  George's  Terrace,  Headingley. 

W.  S.  Cameron,  57,  Caledonian  Road,  Leeds. 

The  Rev.  C.  Hargrove,  M.A.,  10,  De  Grey  Terrace,  Leeds. 

A.  E.  Kirk,  13,  Bond  Street,  Leeds. 

S.  D.  KiTSON,  Greek  Street  Chambers,  Leeds. 

W.  T.  Lancaster,  Yorkshire  Banking  Co.,  Leeds. 

S.  Margerison,  The  Lodge,  Calverley. 

W.  H.  WiTHERBY,  M.A.,  2,  Woodsley  Terrace,  Leeds. 

1)on.  Xtbrattan  and  Curator. 

S.  Drnison,  4,  St.  George's  Terrace,  Headingley. 

1)on.  Q:rea0urer. 
Edmund  Wilson,  Red  Hall,  Leeds. 

1)on.  Secretarfea. 

G.  D.  LUMB,  65,  Albion  Street,  Leeds. 

E.  KiTSON  Clark,  M.A.,  F.S.A.,  9,  Hyde  Terrace,  Leeds* 


Eycutstons. 


EDLINGTON,  CONISBOROUGH,  and  SPROTBOROUGH. 

May  26th,  1900. 
(No.  28.)  For  the  first  excursion  in  1900,  to  Edlington  Church, 
Conisborough  Church  and  Castle,  and  Sprotborough  Church,  Mr.  J.  N. 
Barran  acted  as  guide,  and  spoke  of  the  historical  facts,  and  Mr.  J. 
Bilson,  F.S.A.,  described  the  architecture.  The  party  drove  from 
Doncaster,  visited  the  places  in  the  above  order,  took  tea  at  the  Star 
Inn,  in  Conisborough,  and  returned  to  Doncaster.  They  left  Leeds 
i-io,  and  arrived  in  Leeds  about  8-45.  The  district  in  which  this 
excursion  lies  is  rich  in  historical  and  antiquarian  interest,  and  bears 
evidence  {e^g.  in  its  place-names  and  the  fosse  in  Edlington  wood) 
of  very  early  settlements.  It  falls  just  within  the  point  where  the 
magnesian  limestone  meets  the  coal  measures,  and  still  possesses 
much  picturesqueness  of  feature,  particularly  in  the  wooded  valley  of 
the  Don  between  Conisborough  and  Sprotborough. 

EDLINGTON. 

Edlington  Manor,  "the  town  of  the  Atheling  or  younger  son,"  is 
of  great  age.  Granted  at  the  Conquest  to  William  de  Perci,  it  has 
passed  through  a  multitude  of  hands,  including  the  Fitz  Warrens, 
Scropes,  Whartons,  and  Molesworths,  some  of  whose  monuments  are 
now  to  be  seen  in  the  church.  The  old  manor-house  stood  near  by, 
and   Hunter  saw  it  in  1802,  though  much  had  been  pulled  down  in 

1775- 

The  Church. — The  plan  of  the  Church  comprises  a  western 
tower,  nave  with  north  aisle  of  two  bays  and  south  porch,  chancel 
and  north  chapel  of  one  bay.  The  original  church  consisted  of 
oblong  nave  and  chancel  only,  dating  from  the  middle  of  the  twelfth 
century.  Almost  all  this  structure  remains,  with  a  fine  south  doorway 
and  window  to  east  of  it,  and  chancel  arch.  Notice  also  the  original 
corbel  tables  to  the  eaves  on  both  sides  of  the  church.  At  the  end 
of  the  twelfth  century  a  north  aisle  was  added  to  the  nave,  and  a 
tower  at  the  west  end  of  the  nave;   the  corbelled  shafts  supporting 


VIU  EXCURSIONS. 

the  east  tower  arch  recall  the  influence  of  Roche.  The  north  chapel 
is  an  addition  of  the  second  quarter  of  the  fourteenth  century,  when 
some  of  the  chancel  windows  were  also  inserted.  The  south  porch 
was  probably  added  late  in  the  fourteenth  century.  In  the  fifteenth 
century  the  belfry  stage  and  angle  buttresses  were  added  to  the  tower, 
and  the  nave  walls  were  raised  and  finished  with  a  battlemented 
parapet.  The  nave  pews  and  pulpit  retain  some  woodwork  of  the 
fifteenth  century.  The  font  bears  the  date  1590.  There  are  two 
brasses  in  the  north  chapel — Philip  Wharton,  1684-5,  ^"^  Lady  Mary, 
wife  of  Sir  Thomas  Wharton,  1672. 

CONISBOROUGH. 

Conisborough,  or  as  the  old  and  better  spelling  gives  it, 
Coningsburgh,  is  the  city  or  fortress  of  the  king,  and  was  therefore  a 
royal  residence  in  Saxon  times.  Its  present  remains,  no  less  than 
the  extent  and  history  of  its  honour,  are  worthy  of  its  name  and 
origin.  The  legend  connecting  it  with  Hengist  may  be  put  aside,  but 
it  was  probably  held  by  Ethelred,  and  certainly  by  Harold,  and  at  the 
Conquest  was  given  to  the  Conqueror's  son-in-law,  the  Earl  of  Warren. 
The  family  of  Warren  came  to  an  end  in  1347,  and  the  honour 
passed  to  a  son  of  Edward  III,  and  became  a  private  fief  of  the 
Crown  till  granted  away  by  Elizabeth.  The  Castle  has,  ever  since  the 
fourteenth  century,  been  in  gradual  decay,  and  thanks  to  this  it 
escaped  dismantling  at  the  time  of  the  Civil  War.  Leland  scarcely 
mentions  it.  After  various  vicissitudes  it  has  come  into  the  hands  of 
its  present  owner.  Lord  Yarborough. 

Conisborough  Castle  is  famous  as  the  place  pictured  by  Sir  Walter 
Scott,  as  the  palace  of  Athelstane,  and  scene  of  the  funeral  feast 
described  in  chapters  xli,  xlii  of  Ivanhoe,  The  circumstances  of  his 
visit  to  it,  and  "its  romantic  effect  in  the  early  dawn,"  are  given  in 
vol.  iii  of  Lockhart's  Life  of  Sir  Walter  Scott 

The  Church. — Of  the  church  mentioned  in  Domesday  there 
appear  to  be  no  remains.  A  large  aisleless  church  seems  to  have 
been  erected  in  the  middle  of  the  twelfth  century,  of  which  the 
chancel-arch  remains.  The  aisles  extend  to  the  west  face  of  the 
tower,  and  were  added  towards  the  end  of  the  twelfth  century,  the 
north  aisle  being  a  little  earlier  than  the  south.  A  squint  from  the 
north  aisle  points  to  a  position  in  the  chancel,  where  probably  the 
original  chancel  ended.  The  south  door  is  an  excellent  work  of  the 
end  of  the  twelfth  century,  and  the  doorway  of  the  south  porch 
belongs  to  the  early  part  of  the  thirteenth  century.     In  the  fourteenth 


EXCURSIONS.  IX 

century  some  windows  were  inserted,  and  in  the  fifteenth  century  the 
chancel  was  rebuilt  and  the  greater  part  of  the  western  tower  was 
constructed.  The  font,  of  the  middle  of  the  fourteenth  century,  has 
a  representation  of  the  Resurrection  on  its  east  face  and  a  Majesty 
on  the  west  face.  There  arc  several  sepulchral  memorials  of  interest, 
the  most  notable  of  which  is  a  fine  Norman  tomb-cover,  length  5  feet 
8  inches,  width  at  head  i  foot  10  inches,  at  feet  i  foot  5  inches, 
ridged,  covered  with  sculpture.  Early  Norman,  cf,  work  in  Durham 
Cathedral  and  on  Bible  of  William  of  St  Carileph ;  on  the  top 
roundels,  enclosing  signs  of  zodiac  (?) ;  on  the  side  bishop,  r.h. 
benediction,  l.h.  pastoral  staff;  a  knight,  r.h.  sword,  l.h.  water  shaped 
shield.  See  Associated  Societies  Reports  and  Papers^  1867,  vol.  ix, 
P.  I,  pp  70,  71  (Raine).  Romilly  Allen,  Christian  Symbolism  in  Great 
Britain  and  Ireland^  1887,  p.  270,  gives  drawing  of  above  under  the 
head  of  St  George  and  the  Dragon.  In  a  window  in  the  vestry 
«  there  are  fragments  of  excellent  fifteenth  century  glass. 

The  Castle. — The  castle  occupies  a  fine  site  overlooking  the 
Don.  It  is  approached  across  an  outer  ward  on  the  west  side,  which 
is  separated  from  the  inner  ward  by  a  deep  ditch  which  surrounds 
the  latter.  From  the  outer  ward  the  ditch  is  crossed  by  a  causeway 
which  replaces  the  drawbridge,  and  from  this  we  pass  through  the 
remains  of  the  gatehouse  and  along  an  oblique  passage-way  to  the 
entrance  to  the  inner  ward.  The  inner  ward  is  an  irregular  figure, 
following  the  natural  outline  of  the  ground.  The  older  parts  of  the 
curtain  probably  date  from  the  first  half  of  the  twelfth  century,  and 
the  domestic  buildings  of  the  castle  were  built  along  the  inside  of 
the  curtain,  on  the  north,  west,  and  south  sides.  The  keep  is 
probably  the  finest  cylindrical  keep  remaining  in  England.  It  stands 
near  the  north-east  angle  of  the  curtain,  which  it  interrupts.  It  is  a 
cylinder  of  52  feet  external  diameter  above  the  spreading  plinth, 
divided  equally  by  six  massive  buttresses,  tapering  on  plan.  The 
interior  consists  of  a  basement  and  four  stages.  The  basement  is 
vaulted,  and  approached  only  from  the  floor  above,  by  an  opening  in 
the  vault,  below  which  is  the  well.  The  keep  was  entered  on  the 
first  floor  by  an  external  stair,  and  light  drawbridge;  the  first  floor 
has  no  window  or  opening  except  the  entrance  doorway,  and,  like  the 
basement,  was  probably  a  store.  The  second  floor  is  lighted  by  a 
two-light  window,  and  has  a  fine  fireplace.  The  third  floor  is  similarly 
lighted,  and  has  a  smaller  fireplace.  The  south-eastern  buttress 
contains  a  charming  little  oratory,  of  two  bays,  covered  with  a  ribbed 
vault,  with  a  small  vestry  to  the  north  of  it.     The  fourth  floor,  in  the 

b 


X  EXCURSIONS. 

roof,  was  surrounded  by  an  open  rampart  walk.  The  buttresses  rose 
above  the  parapets,  and  in  two  of  them  steps  remain  which  gave 
access  to  small  platforms  on  the  top ;  in  another  is  an  oven.  The 
staircases  and  garderobes  are  contrived  in  the  thickness  of  the  wall, 
which  is  about  15  feet  above  the  tapering  base.  The  keep  is 
doubtless  the  work  of  Hameline  Plantagenet,  half-brother  of  Henry 
II,  who  married  Isabel  de  Warren  in  1163,  and  died  in  1202.  The 
castle  is  well  described  and  illustrated  in  G.  T.  Clark's  Mediaval 
Military  Architecture, 

SPROTBOROUGH. 

Sprotborough  Manor,  derived  more  obviously  than  probably  from 
a  Saxon  "Sprot,"  can  be  traced  to  the  Confessor's  reign.  It  was 
granted  at  the  Conquest  to  Roger  de  Busli,  and  descended  direct 
in  "a  beautiful  line  of  hereditary  lords "* (Hunter)  for  over  eight 
hundred  years  to  its  last  owner,  Sir  Joseph  Copley,  with  whose  death 
the  direct  line  died  out.  For  four  hundred  years  of  this  period  it 
was  held  by  the  great  Fitzwilliam  family,  and  the  church  monuments 
are  principally  in  the  names  of  Fitzwilliam  and  Copley. 

The  Church. — The  plan  of  the  church  comprises  a  western 
tower,  nave  with  north  and  south  aisles  of  three  bays,  north  and 
south  porches,  chancel,  and  two-storey  sacristy  on  the  north  side.  The 
earliest  parts  of  the  church  are  the  responds  of  the  north  arcade  of 
the  nave,  which  represents  an  aisle  added  in  the  second  half  of  the 
twelfth  century  to  probably  an  aisleless  nave.  The  chancel  was 
rebuilt  c.  1300.  The  nave  arcades  were  reconstructed  in  the  first 
half  of  the  fourteenth  century,  when  the  aisles  were  no  doubt 
widened.  The  tower  was  rebuilt  in  the  fifteenth  century.  The 
church  contains  many  interesting  monuments.  In  the  south  aisle  are 
the  effigies  of  a  knight  and  a  lady,  the  latter  under  an  arch  in  the 
south  wall — possibly  Sir  William  Fitzwilliam,  who  died  before  1342, 
and  his  widow,  Isabel,  who  in  her  will  dated  1348  leaves  her  body  to 
be  buried  in  the  chapel  of  St.  Thomas  the  Martyr  in  the  Church  of 
Sprotborough  (Hunter's  South  Yorkshire^  i»  337)-  On  the  chancel 
floor  is  a  brass  with  effigies  of  William  Fitzwilliam  (d.  1474),  and  his 
wife,  Elizabeth,  daughter  of  Sir  Thomas  Chaworth.  In  the  chancel 
is  the  tomb  of  Philip  Copley  (d.  1577),  son  of  Sir  William  Copley 
and  Dorothy  Fitzwilliam,  and  his  wife,  Mary  (d.  1597),  daughter  of  Sir 
Brian  Hastings.  There  is  a  remarkable  stone  chair  (fourteenth 
century)  in  the  south  aisle.  The  nave  pews  contain  much  early 
sixteenth  century  woodwork. 


EXCURSIONS.  XI 

RIEVAULX  ABBEY  AND   HELMSLEY   CASTLE. 

June  23RD,  1900. 

(No.  29.)      In    the   second   excursion   of    1900    members   visited 

Rievaulx   Abbey  and   Helmsley  Castle,  under   the  guidance  of  Mr. 

W.  H.  Witherby  and   Mr.  S.  D.  Kitson.     The  following  short   notes 

appeared  in  the  programme: — 

RIEVAULX  ABBEY, 

the  first  Cistercian  house  in  Yorkshire,  was  founded  in  1131  by 
Walter  Espec.  It  was  colonised  direct  from  Clairvaux.  Owing  to 
the  nature  of  the  site  it  lies  almost  north  and  south,  but  the  points 
of  the  compass  are  here  treated  conventionally. 

The  first  buildings  in  stone  were  raised  soon  after  1145.  ^^^ 
plan  no  doubt  resembled  that  of  Kirkstall,  an  aisleless  presbytery  of 
•  two  bays,  flanked  by  three  chapels  on  each  side,  opening  out  of  the 
transepts.  The  only  existing  remains  are  the  ends  and  west  sides  of 
the  latter  and  part  of  the  south  wall  of  the  nave.  The  architecture 
was  of  the  plainest  possible  type.  The  nave  probably  remained 
Norman  to  the  end.  There  was  a  west  window  of  many  lights 
(probably  Perpendicular).  At  the  west  end  was  a  Galilee,  as  at 
Fountains. 

About  1 193-1203  a  further  storey  was  added  to  the  transepts. 
The  east  chapels  of  the  north  transepts  were  then  built.  The  present 
choir  was  next  built  {circa  1230),  starting  from  the  east,  and  the 
building  proceeding  westward  to  the  Norman  presbytery,  which  was 
then  taken  down  and  the  new  work  joined  on.  The  east  chapels  of 
the  south  transept  were  completed  last.  The  above  gives  the  order 
in  the  work  of  construction  which  has  been  accepted,  but  the  last 
word  has  yet  to  be  said. 

The  choir  and  presbytery  each  filled  two  bays  and  a  half;  the 
bay  behind  the  high  altar  was  open  for  processions,  and  against  the 
east  wall  was  a  row  of  five  small  chapels. 

The  monastic  buildings  sadly  need  clearing.  The  frater  is  of 
great  size,  and  built  out  over  a  vaulted  under-croft.  West  of  it  was, 
as  usual,  the  kitchen,  and  east  the  warming-house.  The  chapter-house 
had  five  aisles  and  an  apse.  Over  it,  as  usual,  was  the  monks'  dorter, 
and  the  stair  in  the  gable  leading  from  it  to  the  church  is  still 
traceable.  The  site  of  the  gatehouse  may  still  be  seen,  and  the  ruins 
of  the  capella  extra  portas. 


Xll  EXCURSIONS. 

The  stone  used  in  the  buildings  is  of  two  kinds,  and  came  from 
separate  quarries.  It  was  brought  to  the  Abbey  by  "guteriae"  or 
canals,  filled  from  the  Rye,  some  remains  of  which  are  still  visible. 
Interesting  evidence  with  regard  to  these  may  be  gained  from  the 
Chartulary  of  Rici^aulx  (Surtees  Society,  vol.  Ixxxiii). 

At  the  Dissolution,  in  1539,  the  site  and  buildings  passed  to 
Thomas,  Earl  of  Rutland.  From  a  survey  then  made,  and  now 
preserved  at  Belvoir,  much  valuable  information  has  been  gained 

HELMSLEY   CASTLE 

stands  near  the  river  upon  a  large  mound,  strengthened  with  earth- 
works of  uncertain  date.  There  is  a  double  moat.  The  keep  was 
originally  built  about  1200  by  Robert  de  Ros,  who  held  the  lordship 
from  1 184  to  1226.  The  existing  portion  is  96  feet  high,  and 
contains  three  storeys.  During  the  Civil  War  it  was  held  for  the 
King,  besieged  by  Fairfax,  and  surrendered  on  honourable  terms.  It 
was  then  blown  up  by  order  of  Parliament. 

The  main  entrance  is  by  a  gatehouse  flanked  by  circular  towers, 
and  is  mainly  Late  Norman  or  Early  English;  but  the  portcullis 
groove,  with  all  before  it,  is  of  the  14th  century. 

The  range  of  buildings  west  of  the  inner  court  is  mainly 
Elizabethan,  and  was  probably  built  by  Edward,  third  Earl  of 
Rutland  (pb,  1587). 

It  was  the  favourite  residence  of  the  second  Duke  of  Buckingham, 
whose  trustees  sold  it  to  Sir  Chas.  Duncombe,  ancestor  of  the  present 
Lord  Feversham. 


COWTHORPE,  MARSTON   MOOR,  HILTON,  WIGHILL, 
AND   WALTON. 

July  28th,  1900. 
(No.  30.)  On  July  28,  1900,  the  third  excursion  of  the  year  was 
conducted  to  Cowthorpe  Oak  and  Church,  Marston  Moor,  Bilton 
Church,  and  Walton  Church,  by  Mr.  W.  Braithwaite.  The  party 
detrained  at  Wetherby,  and  after  tea  at  the  Royal  Hotel,  Boston  Spa, 
returned  by  train  from  that  place.  Descriptions  were  given  by  Mr. 
Witlierby  and  Mr.  E.  Kitson  Clark. 


EXCURSIONS.  Xlll 

COWTHORPE   OAK. 

The  celebrated  Oak  has  been  described  by  Empson  in  1842. 
But  no  earlier  history  is  recorded  by  him  than  the  report  that  a 
branch,  90  feet  long,  fell  in  1722.  In  1829  the  oak's  girth  at  the 
ground  level  was  60  feet,  at  3  feet  from  the  ground  45  feet.  The 
age  of  the  tree  has  been  estimated  at  1,600  years. 

There  appears  in  the  Leeds  Mercury  of  January  13,  181 6,  the 
following  advertisement: — "Cowthorpe  oak,  22yds.  round  the  bottom, 
to  be  sold  by  auction  or  by  ticket  at  the  house  of  Mr.  Fletcher, 
nnkeeper,  in  Shipbridge  Lane,  near  York,  on  Friday,  the  26th  day  of 
January,  1816." 

COWTHORPE  CHURCH  (St.  Michael  and  All  Angels^. 

Cowthorpe*  Domesday  Book — Coletorp.  "Three  carucates  to  be 
:axed,  where  there  may  be  three  ploughs.     Godefoid  de  Alselin  has 

it  of  Wm.  Percy There  is  a  church  there Manor  .... 

Value  T.  R.  E.  20X.,  now  531.  4^." 

The  site  of  the  church  mentioned  in  Domesday  is  ascribed  to  a 
field  now  known  as  Chapel  Field,  but  no  trace  of  the  building 
remains.  The  present  church  was  built  probably  as  it  stands  now  in 
1455-8,  at  the  cost  of  Sir  Bryan  Roucliffe.  "Because  the  parish 
church  was  far  from  the  village,  and  the  road  very  wet,  muddy,  and 
noxious,"  a  commission  was  issued  to  certain  men  (among  them  the 
vicar  of  Bilton,  John  Hovingham)  to  enquire  into  the  case.  A  new 
church  was  sanctioned  February  13th,  1455-6,  and  forty  days*  indul- 
gence granted  to  all  who  assisted  in  the  work.  The  church  was  con- 
secrated August  17th,  1458.  The  church  is  aisleless,  having  a  chancel 
slightly  narrower  than  the  nave,  walls  about  three  feet  thick.  This 
simple  plan  is  to  be  found  at  all  periods  in  England  for  a  small 
village  church.  The  tower  at  the  west  end  is  remarkable,  its  eastern 
face  is  corbelled  inside  the  church,  and  the  rest  of  it  carried  by  a 
pointed  arch  and  vaulting  outside  the  west  wall. 

The  masonry  suggests  that  the  tower  and  church  are  of  the  same 
date,  and  this  appears  to  be  confirmed  by  the  fragments  of  a  most 
interesting  brass,  in  which  the  donor  is  represented  with  the  church 
in  his  hand.  This  brass  has  suffered  at  the  hands  of  thieves  of 
the  present  half-century.  According  to  Waller  in  the  Yorkshire 
Archaologuai  Journal^  Ivii,  p.  10,  it  was  dated  1494,  and  at  his  date 
(1845)  it  was  laid  as  a  base  for  a  large  stove.  There  remain,  the 
effigy  of  Sir  Brian  Rouclyff,  the  church,  the  bier,  a  shield  with  Rouclyff 


XIV  EXCURSIONS. 

and  Ughtred,  and  iwo  pieces  of  the  finial  of  the  canopy.  On  the 
church,  above  the  nave  door,  is  a  chess  "  rook,"  the  badge  of  Rouclyff. 
Sir  Bryan's  father  was  Recorder  of  York.  He  gained  this  estate 
through  his  mother,  and  was  raised  to  the  bench  as  third  Baron  of 
the  Exchequer  in  1458,  and  died  1494.  His  will  (Surtees  Society, 
liii,  p.  102)  is  full  of  interest.  He  left  money  for  the  poor  of 
Colthorp,  to  the  rector  of  Colthorp  his  cloak  and  cape,  to  Blind 
Carlill  de  Colthorp  2d.  per  week,  etc 

There  are  shields  in  the  windows  which  can  be  connected  with 
his  family,  a  font  with  shields,  and  a  fine  chest.  The  chalice  is 
Elizabethan,  and  the  Registers  begin  in  1568.  The  earliest  bell  is 
dated  1622. 

The  old  Manor  House  of  Cowthorpe  is  the  first  house  on  the 
right  as  one  comes  from  Wetherby. 

BATTLE  OF  MARSTON  MOOR  (fought  on  July  2nd,  1644). 

When  maps  had  been  distributed  to  members,  a  full  description 
was  given  embodying  the  following  particulars : — 

The  Parliamentarian  forces  and  their  Scottish  allies  were  besieging 
York.  Prince  Rupert  was  advancing  from  Lancashire  by  way  of 
Skipton,  Denton,  and  Knaresborough  to  its  relief  Fearing  to  be 
caught  between  the  Prince  and  the  Duke  of  Newcastle,  who  was  in 
command  at  York,  the  Parliamentarians  raised  the  siege,  and  occupied 
the  rising  ground  above  Long  Marston,  hoping  to  bar  the  advance  of 
the  relieving  force.  Rupert,  however,  by  a  wide  flanking  movement, 
crossed  the  Ure  at  Boroughbridge,  the  Swale  at  Thornton  Bridge,  and 
seizing  the  enemy's  bridge  of  boats  over  the  Ouse,  joined  forces  with 
Newcastle.  Meanwhile,  the  Parliamentarians,  alarmed  for  the  safety  of 
the  Midlands,  had  begun  to  retire  southwards,  when  news  was  brought 
of  Rupert's  advance  for  battle.  They  quickly  reoccupied  their 
position,  while  the  Royalists  were  placed  along  a  ditch,  which  may 
still  be  traced,  running  north  of  and  parallel  to  the  road  from 
Tockwith  to  Ivong  Marston.  In  numbers  the  Parliamentarians  had 
a  considerable  advantage,  though  the  actual  figures  vary.  After  some 
hours  of  mutual  inaction,  at  about  seven  p.m.  the  Parliamentarians 
made  a  sudden  charge ;  and  in  spite  of  a  temporary  check,  Cromwell 
and  Leslie  routed  Rupert,  who  commanded  the  right  wing,  and  drove 
him  "along  Wilstrop  Woodside,"  The  Royalist  right  under  Goring 
was  completely  successful  but  carried  pursuit  and  plunder  too  far. 
The  battle  was  really  won   by  the  steadiness  of  Cromwell,  who  kept 


EXCURSIONS.  XV 

his  men  in  hand,  and  routed  Goring's  Cavaliers  on  their  return.  In 
the  centre,  Newcastle's  "Whitecoats"  retired  fighting  hard  to  an 
enclosure  called  White  Syke  Close,  and  died  there  almost  to  a  man. 
See  History  of  the  Great  Civil  War,  by  S.  R.  Gardiner;  Battles 
Fought  in  Yorkshire,  by  A.  D.  H.  Leadman;  Markham's  Life  of 
Fairfax,  &c. 

BILTON  CHURCH. 

Domesday  Book — Biletone.  No  church  mentioned  There  is, 
however,  a  pre-Norman  cross  of  great  interest,  which  should  be 
photographed — two  figures  on  shaft,  one  with  club,  the  other  with 
object  resembling  a  dumb-bell.  The  head  of  the  cross  has  four  equal 
arms  tied  by  a  circle,  and  figures  in  each  arm,  their  heads  to  the 
centre;  decoration,  the  interlaced  pattern  usually  ascribed  to  Celtic 
influence.  The  church,  eleventh  century  nave  (length  twice  its  breadth), 
north  and  south  aisles  pierced  by  Norman  arcade,  which  was  restored 
by  Sir  G.  Scott.  There  are  zigzag  mouldings  on  either  side  of  round 
chancel  arch,  and  unusual  ornaments  on  the  capitals  of  the  Norman 
arcades.  The  bases  of  the  pillars  show  distinctly  late  mouldings. 
The  Norman  corbels  of  the  original  chancel  roof  appear  in  the  north 
and  south  aisles.  The  picturesque  nave  roof  is  covered  with  stone 
tiles,  and  timbered  inside  with  unusual  strengthening  pieces.  There 
is  a  monument  in  the  south  aisle  ascribed  to  a  prioress  of  Synning- 
thwaite  ;  dress,  fourteenth  century ;  font,  Early  Norman. 

The  Registers  begin  in  1571.  Capt.  J.  Carmichael  and  Capt. 
D.  Ashton  were  buried  there  in  1644,  the  date  of  Marston  Moor. 
On  November  i,  1666,  there  was  paid  to  my  Lord  Major  of  Yorke 
"the  some  of  fower  pounds  fifteen  shillings,  collected  in  the  parish 
of  Bilton,  concerning  the  great  fire  of  Ix)ndon." 

WIGHILL  CHURCH. 

In  Domesday  Book — two  Wicheles  are  mentioned;  no  church, 
Wighill  was  first  owned  by  Bertram  Haget,  who  founded  Helaugh 
Priory,  and  probably  built  the  first  church  at  Wighill  in  the  twelfth 
century.  The  manor  passed  through  several  hands,  and  was  sold  to 
Sir  Brian  de  Stapilton  in  1375.  In  the  church  there  are  numerous 
monuments  commemorating  this  family,  who  held  the  manor  for  450 
years.    The  most  remarkable  is  a  full  length  figure  of  Robert  Stapilton, 


XVI  EXCURSIONS. 

who  died  Mar<;h  nth,  1635, — a  graceful  marble  figure  in  cuirass  and 
gorget,  with  short  peaked  beard,  moustaches  pointing  upwards,  accord- 
ing to  the  fashion  set  by  the  King.  A  touching  inscription  is  added 
by  his  widow,  who  subsequently  married  Sir  M.  Boynton,  a  widower 
with  eleven  children,  and  after  his  death,  a  third  and  fourth  husband. 

The  church  has  no  chancel  arch,  has  not  had  the  plaster  removed, 
has  a  north  aisle  (probably  end  of  twelfth  century),  with  Lady  Chapel 
at  its  east  end,  a  very  small  priest's  door,  low  side  window,  and  a 
devil's  door,  and  benches  (?  fourteenth  century)  of  bleached  oak,  with 
simple  poppy  heads  at  the  ends.  There  are  excellent  gargoyles  or 
the  tower,  representing  musicians  and  jesters ;  but  the  chief  attractioi 
of  Wighill  Church  is  its  very  perfect  Norman  west  door,  which  require, 
photographing,  and  would  repay  careful  study.  There  is  a  fine  viev 
from  the  east  end  over  the  plain  of  York.  The  Vicar  has  posted  up 
a  list,  complete  as  far  as  evidence  can  be  obtained,  of  his  predecessors. 
It  would  be  a  most  excellent  thing  if  this  were  made  a  general 
practice  in  all  churches. 

Before  reaching  Walton  Church  an  Early  manor  house  is  passed 
(windows  walled  up  in  the  days  of  the  window  tax).  In  the 
field  which  surrounds  it  are  mounds,  which  mark  a  still  earlier 
enclosure  which  merits  attention,  and  a  building  standing  by  itself, 
reported  to  be  the  Assize  Court. 

WALTON  CHURCH. 

Domesday — Waletone.  No  church  mentioned.  The  land  of 
Osbern-de- Arches,  Le,  from  Arques,  near  Dieppe ;  perhaps  Thorp  Arch 
recalls  the  name  of  the  Norman  owner  of  Walton. 

The  plan  consists  of  an  aisleless  nave,  western  tower,  south  porch, 
and  chancel.  The  plain  Norman  tower  arch,  with  chamfered  imposts, 
is  the  earliest  work  in  the  church,  but  the  present  nave  may  possibly 
represent  the  lines  of  the  original  Norman  nave.  The  tower  has  a 
remarkably  big  plinth  on  its  western  side,  perhaps  designed  to  ensure  a 
firm  foundation  on  the  sloping  ground.  The  chancel  was  reconstructed 
in  the  second  quarter  of  the  fourteenth  century;  the  east  window  of 
?iWQ  lights  and  a  window  of  three  lights  on  the  south  side  are  of  this 
period,  and  both  are  filled  vrith  reticulated  tracery.  The  nave  is 
lighted  by  two  tall  square-headed  windows  on  each  side,  which  are 
apparently  a  little  later  than  the  chancel  windows.  On  the  north  side 
of  the  chancel  is  an  arched  recess,  foiled,  and  with  a  crochetted  ogee 
hood  mould  springing  from  slender  pinnacle  shafts :  in  this  recess  is  a 
stone  effigy  of  a  knight  in  armour  of  the  latter  part  of  the  fourteenth 


EXCURSIONS  XVll 

century ;  he  wears  a  pointed  bassinet,  with  camail,  short  tight  surcoat, 
with  its  lower  edge  cut  into  leaf  forms,  below  which  appears  a  fringe 
of  mail ;  the  defences  of  the  arms  and  legs  are  entirely  of  plate,  with 
cup-shaped  coudes  articulated  above  and  below,  and  similar  knee-caps ; 
the  knight  wears  gauntlets,  and  a  horizontal  belt  decorated  with  roses, 
with  dagger  on  the  right  and  sword  (broken)  on  the  left;  his  feet 
rest  on  a  lion,  and  his  head  on  a  tiltmg  helmet,  the  crest  of  which  has 
been  broken  off.  At  the  west  end  of  the  nave  is  a  polygonal  font 
with  a  very  shallow  recess  for  the  water,  which  might  be  ascribed  to 
the  beginning  of  the  thirteenth  century. 

An  inscription  to  Nicolas  Fairfax  (lyof)  recalls  the  fact  that  the 
elder  branch  of  this  great  Yorkshire  family  had  its  seat  at  Walton, 
and  it  is  possible  to  connect  the  unknown  knight,  whose  effigy  is 
described  above,  with  Thomas  Fairfax,  whose  will  was  signed  at  Walton 
1394,  and  is  more  than  usually  interesting.  The  earliest  forms  of 
surnames  appear  therein.  He  leaves  bequests  to  Edmund  Coke, 
Hugh  Gardiner,  Symon  Dyker,  John  Coke,  Agnes  Nuresse,  Adam 
Carter,  John  Swynhird,  etc.;  and  further  on  a  connection  between  the 
Rouclyff  family  is  found  in  the  one  piece  of  silver,  signed  with  "  rokes." 


At  the  conclusion  of  the  Society's  visit  to  the  Museum  at  Adel 
on  June  22nd,  1899,  a  collection  was  made  among  the  members  on 
the  spot,  and  the  sum  realised  was  offered  to  the  Rector  for  the 
purpose  of  providing  a  better  light  to  the  building,  and  also  for 
making  shelves  on  which  to  place  the  smaller  objects  for  their  being 
better  exhibited.  This  has  now  been  done,  and  a  balance  of  about 
jCj  is  still  left,  which  might  be  used  for  printing  a  small  catalogue 
of  the  objects  if  one  were  drawn  up. 


Ubc  Uborcsbp  Society. 


LIST  OF  MEMBERS 

{Corrected    to  October^    1901). 

Those  marked  (*)  are  Life  Members. 

Ambler,  Thomas  . .         . .         . .  Broomhill,  Moor-Allerton 

•  Appleton,  Charles  . .         . .         . .  Outwood  House,  Spencer  Place,  Leeds 

Appleton,  Henry  79,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Armistead,  Edwin  39,  Louis  Street,  New  Leeds 

Armytage,  Sir  George,  Bart.,  F.S.  A.  . .  Kirklees  Park,  Brighouse 

Arnold,  Edmund  James  . .         . .  8,  Cumberland  Road,  Leeds 

Asquith,  William  England       . .         . .  Hunslet  New  Road,  Leeds 

•Atkinson,  Rev.  Eidward,  D.D.  ..  Clare  College,  Cambridge 

Atkinson,  Hy.  Geo 28,  The  Calls,  Leeds 

Atkinson,  John  Cecil Butts  Court,  Leeds 

Atkinson,  George  Wm.  ..         ..  i,  Mark  Lane,  Leeds 

Badcock,  Miss  Isabel  Baynes  . .         • .  Somerlcaze,  Wells,  Somerset 

Bailes,  Miss  Kate  G. . .  . .         . .  Ridge  Villa,  Meanwood  Road,  Leeds 

Bailes,  Richard Ridge  Villa,  Meanwood  Road,  Leeds 

Baildon,  William  Paley,  F.S.A.  ..  5,  Stone  Buildings,  Lincoln's  Inn,  London, 

W.C. 

Banks,  Joseph Neville  Hill,  Pontefract  Lane,  Leeds 

Barker,  Aldred  F.  44,  Ash  Grove,' Bradford 

Barker,  Joseph  Henry  . .         . .         . .  Perseverance  Mills,  Kirkstall  Road,  Leeds 

Barran,  Alfred     . .         . .         . .         . .  Moor  House,  Headingley 

Birran,  John  Nicholson,  M.A.  ..  St.  Paul  Street,  I^eds 

Barran,  Miss  Edith        The  Hollies,  Weetwood,  Leeds 

•Barran,  Rowland  Hirst  ..         ..  Beechwood,  Roundhay 

Barraclough,  Samuel Aire  and  Calder  Navigation,  Leeds 

*Barwick,  John  Marshall,  M.A.  ..  24,  Basinghall  Street,  Leeds 

Batley,  Edwin  William 99,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

•Batlie-Wrightson,  William  Henry      . .  Cusworth  Park,  Doncaster 

Beaumont,  James  St.  John's  Cottage,  Leeds 

Beck,  Wm.  James  Basinghall  Street,  Leeds 

Beckett,  Ernest  William,  M.  P.  . .  Kirkstall  Grange,  Letds 

Bedford,  Miss 14,  Monkbridge  Road,  Headingley 

Bedford,  Charles  Samuel  . .         , .  Broomleigh,  Chapel  Lane,  Headingley 

Bedford,  James Woodhouse  Cliff,  Leeds 

Bedford,  James  Edward,  F.G.S.         ..  Shire  Oak  Road,  Headingley 

Bedford,  Francis  W.,  A.R.I.B.A.      ..  Greek  Street  Chambers,  Leeds 


LIST   OF  MEMBERS.  XIX 

Jlcevers,  Charles  92,  All)ion  Street,  Leeds 

Belhell,  W Rise  Park,  Hull 

Bilson,  John,  F.  S.  A Hessle,  Hull 

Bingley,  Godfrey  Thomiehurst,  Headingley 

Birchall,  Edward,  F.R.I.B.A Inglemoor,  18,  Moorland  Road,  Leeds 

Blackburn,  Walter  Stephen      . .         . .  Central  Bank  Chambers,  Leeds 

Bodington,  Nathan,  M.A.,  Litt.D.      ..  Field  Head,  Shire  Oak  Road,  Headingley 

Boston,  Richard 9,  Boar  T^n?,  Leeds 

Bowman,  W.  Powell Messrs.  Goodall,  Backhouse  &  Co.,  Leeds 

Bowring,  Henry  Illingworth    . .         . .  AUerton  Hall,  Gledhow 

Bowring,  Miss  S.  C Allerton  Hall,  Gledhow 

Bradley,  John 80,  Church  View,  Kirkstall 

Braithwaite,  Walter St.  George's  Terrace,  Headingley 

Braithwaite,  Walter   Samuel    . .         . .  6,  South  Parade,  Leeds 

Branson,  Fredk.  Woodward,  F.CS.  ..  14,  Commercial  Street,  Leeds 

*  Bray,  Geor^je Belmont,  Headingley 

Brigg,  William,  B.  A Harpenden,  Herts 

Briggs,  Arthur  N.  c/o    Messrs.     Miiligan,    Forbes    &    Co., 

Bradford 

•Brooke,  John  Arthur Fenay  Hall,  Huddersfield 

Brown,  William,  F.S. A.  ..         ..  W hi lehouse,  Northallerton 

Bruce.  Wm Greek  Street  Chambers,  Leeds 

Buckley,  John  Camm Longfield,  Headingley 

Bulmer,  Miss  Ada         Blenheim  Lodge,  Leeds 

Bulmer,  George  Bertram,  F.R.LB.A...  Central  Bank  Chambers,  Leeds 

Burrell,  B.  A 5,  Mount  Preston,  Leeds 

Burrow,  Alfred  Linley Ridge  Mount  Villa,  Cliff  Road,  Leeds 

Butler,  Ambrose  Edmund        . .         . .  Kepstorn,  Kirkstall,  near  Leeds 

Cadman,  His  Honour  Judge  . .         . .  Ackworth,  Pontefract 

Cameron,  James  Spottiswoode,  M.D.  6,  Ridge  Mount,  Leeds 

•Cameron,  William  .S 57,  Caledonian  Road,  Leeds 

Carter,  Francis  Richard  . .         . .  Savile  House,  Pottemewton 

Chadwick,  Jas.  Geo . .  Burley  Grange,  Leeds 

Chad  wick,  Samuel  Joseph,  F.S.  A.     ..  Church  Street,  Dewsbury 

Chambers,  James  Edmund  F The  Hurst,  near  Alfreton 

Chambers,  Joseph  Charles       . .         . .  7,  Cardigan  Road,  Headingley 

Cheesman,  William  Norwood . .         . .  The  Crescent,  Selby 

Chorley,  Harry  Sutton 15,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

•Clark,  Edwin  Kitson,  M.A.,  F.S.A.  ..  9,  Hyde  Terrace,  Leeds 

•Clark,  Mrs.  E.  Kitson 9,  Hyde  Terrace,  Leeds 

Clay,  John  William,  F.S.A Rastrick  House,  Brighouse 

Coats,  Thomas 25,  Inglewood  Terrace,  Leeds 

•Collins,  Francis,  M.D Pateley  Bridge 

Colman,  Rev.  Frederick  Selincourt,M.  A.  The  Rectory,  Barwick-in-Elmet 

Comber,  John Abermaed,  near  Aber}'stwyth 

Connon,  J.  Wreghitt,  F.R.LB.A.       . .  15,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

Cookson,  Rev.  Edwnrd,  M.A.  ..  Marlesford   House,  34,  Warrington  Road, 

Ipswich 

Cooper,  Aslley,  F.C.S.,  F.LC.  ..  Astley  House,  Spencer  Terrace,  Leeds 


XX 


LIST   OF   MEMBERS. 


Cousins,  William  James 
Crampton,  William  Thomas 
Croysdale,  Charles 


Dalton,  Thomas . . 

Darwin,  Francis,  M.A. 
*Denison,  Samuel 

Denison,  Herbert 

Denison,  Miss  Frances 
*  Denison,  George  Henry 

Derry,  William   . . 

Dodgshun,  Edward  J. 

Dodgson,  E.  O.  .. 

Draper,  Rev.  Wm.  Hy. 

Duke,  Rev.  Rashleigh  E.  II. 

*Eckersley,  James  Carlton 
*Eddison,  John  Edwin,  M.D. 

Edmondson,  Thomas 

Elliot,  Douglas   . . 

Elsworth,  Alfred 

Embleton,  Henry  C. 
•Emmett,  James  . . 
•Eshelby,  Henry  Douglas,  F.S. 


Farr,  Wm.  Edward 
*Ferrand,  W. 

Fillingham,  George 
*Ford,  John  Rawlinson 

Foster,  George    . . 

Foster,  J  no.  Wm. 

Fourness,  John  William 


Gardner,  Wilson 

Gibson,  Rev.  Edgar  Charles  S, 
•Gill,  Christopher  Coleman 

Gordon,  John     . . 

Grant,  Prof.  Arthur  J.^  M.A. 
*  Green,  John  Hartley     .. 

Greenwood,  Arthur 


Haigh,  Frederick 
Hainsworth,  Lewis 
Hall,  Rev.  Hy.  Armstrong,  B. 
Hannam,  S.  J.  W. 
Hannam,  Wm.  Simpson 
*Hansom,  Joseph  Stanislaus 
Hardcastle,  Melvill  Joseph 
Harding,  V/.  Ambrose  . . 
Hargrove,  Rev.  Charles,  M.A, 


D.D. 


Greek  Street  Chaml)ers,  Leeds 

Parcmont,  Roundhay 

I02,  Cardigan  Road,  Headingley 

65,  Albion  Street,  L,eeds 
Creskeld  Hall,  Arthington,  Leeds 
4,  St.  George's  Terrace,  Headinglgy 
10,  East  Parade,  Leeds 
The  Grange,  Methley 

32,  Clarendon  Road,  Leeds 
Municipal  Buildings,  Leeds 
14,  Park  Square,  Leeds 
Souihleigh,  Kirkstall  Lane,  Headingley 
The  Rectory,  Adel 

Maltby  Rectory,  Alford,  Lincolnshire 

Carlton  Manor,  Yeadon,  Leeds 

The  Lodge,  Adel 

Cardigan  Lodge,  Cardigan  Road,  Xeeds 

28,  Bond  Street,  Leeds 

Ivy  House,  Meanwood 

Central  Bank  Chambers,  L>eeds 

Reuben  Street,  Leeds 

80,  Shrewsbury  Road,  Oxton,  Birkenhead 

Sun  Buildings,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

St.  Ives,  Bingley 

16,  East  Parade,  Leeds 

Quarrydene,  Weetwood,  Leeds 

Bleak  House,  Harehills,  Leeds 

74,  Briggatc,  Leeds 

Victoria  Chambers,  Leeds 

10,  Norwood  Terrace,  Headingley 

The  Vicarage,  Leeds 

42,  Park  Street,  Bath 

I,  Bond  Street,  Leeds 

Yorkshire  College,  Leeds 

Hartley  Hill,  Leeds 

16,  Great  George  Street,  Westminster 

The  Holme,  Bramhope,  Leeds 
Oakwell  Cottage,  Farsley,  near  Leeds 
The  Rectory,  Methley 

33,  Cromer  Terrace,  Leeds 
4,  East  Parade,  Leeds 

27,  Alfred  Place  West,  South  Kensington, 
Bank  of  England,  Leeds  S.W. 

Doddington,  March,  Cambridgeshire 
10,  De  Grey  Terrace,  Leeds 


LIST   OF  MEMBERS.  XXI 

•Harvey,  William  . .         . .         . .  The  Grove,  Roundhay,  Leeds 

Harvey,  William  Marsh  . .         . .  58,  Queen's  Gate  Terrace,  South  Kensing- 

ton, London,  S.W. 

•Hawk«bury,  The  Right  Hon.  Lord.  |  ^irkham  Abbey.  York 

Hawkyard,  Arthur         138,  Jack  Lane,  Hunslet 

Hayes,  William 53,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Ilebblethwaite,  Rhodes  . .         . .  Ilusthwaite,  near  Easing  wold 

Hepper,  Edward  Henry  . .         . .  Woodcote,  Wood  I^ane,  Headingley 

Heppcr,  John      . .         . ,         . .         . .  East  Parade,  Leeds 

Hep  worth,  Joseph         Hazel  wood,  Torquay 

Hepworth,  Norris  Rhodes       . .         . .  Torridon,  Headingley 

Hick,  Edwin Rose  Villa,  Scotland  Lane,  Horsforth 

Hindle,  J.  E 10,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

Hirst,  John  Audus         5,  East  Parade,  Leeds 

Hobson,  Walter  Arthur  . .         . .  82,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Holbrook,  Wm 4,  Monkbridge  Road,  Headingley 

Horsfield,  Richard  Marshall    . .         . .  West  Garth,  Meanwood,  Leeds 

•Hovenden,  Robert,  F.S.A Heathcote,  Park  Hill  Road,  Croydon 

•Illingworth,  William Bramhope  Manor,  Leeds 

Ingham,  Samuel Headingley  Hall,  Leeds 

Iveson,  Lancelot  105,  Mount  Street,  London,  W. 

Jackson,  Richard  Commercial  Street,  Leeds 

'Jackson,  The  Rt.  Hon.  W.  L.,  M.P. . .  Allerton  Hall,  Leeds 

Kelsey,  Hy.  T.,M.A The  Grammar  School,  Leeds 

Kendell,  Daniel  Burton,  M.B.  ..  Thomhill  House,  Walton,  Wakefield 

Kinder,  Fred Woodlands,  Kirkstall 

Kirk,  Albert  Edvrard,  A.R.LB.A.     ..  Buckingham  Villas,  Headingley 

Kirk,  John  Castle  Grove,  Headingley 

Kirk,  Jno.  Croisdale 39,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

Kirk,  Miss  Hannah Buckinghim  Villas,  Headingley 

•Kitson,  Sir  James,  Bart.,  M.P.  ..  Gledhow  Hall,  Leeds 

•Kitson,  Frederick  J Gledhow  Grove,  Leeds 

Kitson,  Albert  E.  Cloughton,  near  Scarborough 

Kitson,  Miss  (Ethel) Elmet  Hall,  Leeds 

Kitson,  Miss  J.  Beatrice  . .         . .  Elmet  Hall,  Leeds 

Kitson,  Sydney  D . .  Greek  Street  Chambers,  Leeds 

Knight,  Arthur  Langford         . .         . .  Water  Lane  Works,  Leeds 

Knight,  John 47,  Boar  Lane,  Leeds 

Lancaster,  William  Thomas    ..         ..  The  Yorkshire  Banking  Co.  Ltd.,  Leeds 

Lawson,  Edward  Ernest  . .         . .  2,  Osborne  Terrace,  Leeds 

•Lawson,  Frederick  William     . .         . .  Oaklands,  Adel 

Leadman,  Alex.  Dionysius  H.,  F.S.A.  Oak  House,  Pocklington,  near  York 

Leather,  George  Herbert         . .         . .  Central  Bank  Chambers,  Leeds 

Legard,  Albert  George,  M.  A Gibraltar  Cottage,  Monmouth 

Leigh,  Rev.  Neville  Egerton,  M.A.  ..  The  Vicarage,  Kirkstall 

Levitt,  Robert 1 7 A,  East  Parade,  Leeds 


Xxii  LIST   OF  MEMBERS. 

Littlewood,  Henry,  F.R.C.S 40»  Park  Square,  Leeds 

•Lumb,  Alfred  Overton 574,  Old  Broad  Street,  London,  E.G. 

•Lumb,  George  Denison 65,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Luplon,  Charles,  M.  A.  . .         . .  The  Harehills,  Leeds 

Lupton,  Francis  Martineau,  M.A.      ..  Rocklands,  Newton  Park,  Leeds 

*Lupton,  Sydney,  M.A 102,  Park  St.,  Grosvenor  Sq.,  London,  W. 

Malleson,  Rev.  H.  H -  Manston  Vicarage,  Crossgates 

•Margerison,  Samuel Calverley  Lodge,  near  Leeds 

Marshall,  G.  W.,  LL.D Samesfield  Court,  Weobley,  R.S.O. 

Marshall,  Thomas,  M.A Ilighfield,  Chapel  Allerton 

Mason,  Charles  Letch 12,  East  Parade,  Leeds 

Maude,  William  C Brackenwood,  Bournemouth 

May,  Rev.  Thos.  IL,  M.A Ileswall  Rectory,  Chester 

Mayne,  Frederic  George  . .         . .  York  Union  Bank,  Leeds 

Middleton,  Arthur         Calverley  Chambers,  Victoria  Sq  ,  Leeds 

Midgley,  James White  Horse  Street,  Leeds 

Miles,  James Guildford  Street,  Leeds 

Milnes,  Edward  Owthom,  Wakefield 

Mitchell,  Fred 9,  Upper  Fountaine  Street,  Leeds 

♦Morkill,  John  William,  M.A Ncwfield  Hall,  Bell  Busk,  via  Leeds 

Motley,  Lewis Spen  Lane,  Kirkstall,  Leeds 

Nixon,  Sidney  Ernest St.  Chad's  Hill,  Far  Headingley 

Norfolk-Johnson,  W Cliffe  Cottage,  Horbury,  near  Wakefield 

Nussey,  Geo.  Leathley,  B.A Ardenlea,  Ilkley 

Gates,  Charles  Geo Mganwoodside,  Leeds 

♦Oxley,  Rev.  William  Henry,  M.A.     ..  Petersham  Vicarage,  Surrey 

Palmer,  Henry  John 192,  Chapeltown  Road,  Leeds 

Pape,  William 39,  Aire  Street,  Leeds 

•Parker,  Major  John  W.  R Browsholme  Hall,  Clitheroe 

Patchelt,  Alfred 37,  York  Road,  Birkdale,  Soulhport 

•Peake,  A.  Copson  24,  Basinghall  Street,  Leeds 

•Peatc,  Jonathan Nun  Royd,  Guiseley,  near  Leeds 

Peck   Harry  Wadkin Yorkshire  Banking  Company,  Hunslet 

•Pegler,  Thos.  Boyne 12,  Great  Geoi^e  Street,  Leeds 

Pemberton,  Alfred  Cooper       . .         . .  c/o  J.W.  Fourness,  Esq., Victoria  Chambers, 

South  Parade,  Leeds 

Piercy,  Thomas 16,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

•Pocklington,  Henry 20,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

•Powell,  Sir  Francis  Sharp,  Bart.,  M.P.  Horton  Old  Hall,  Bradford 

Prater,  T.  Herbert         Parlington,  Aberford,  near  Leeds 

Ramsbotham,  Samuel  Henry,  M.D.  ..  16,  Park  Place,  Leeds 

Redmayne,  John  79.  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Richardson,  Walter  W i,  Montpelier  Terrace,  Cliff  Road,  Leeds 

Rider,  Haywood  Ashwood  Terrace,  Headingley 

Rider,  James 5,  South  Parade,  Leeds 


LIST   OF  MKMBERS.  XXUl 

*Riley-Smith,  Henry  Herbert    . .         ...  Toulston  Lodge,  Tadcaster 

Robins,  Rev.  Hy.  Temple       ..         ..  13,  St.  George's  Terrace,  Leeds 

Robinson,  Percy 72,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Robinson,  W.  P.  c/o  C.  L.  Woodward,  78,  Nassau  Street, 

New  York,  U.S.A. 

Roebuck,  William  Denlson,  F.L.S.    ..  259,  Hyde  Park  Road,  Leeds 

Rooke,  Chas.  Staveley Newton  Hill,  Leeds 

Roscoe,  James Oatlands,  Harrogate 

Rowc,  Geo.  Herbert Lyddon  Hall,  Leeds 

Rowley,  Walter,  F.S..\ Alder  Hill,  Mean  wood,  Leeds 

'Ryder,  Charles Gledhow  Hill,  Leeds 

Scattergood,  Bernard  Page,  M. A.      . .  Moorside,  Headingley 

•Scott,  John,  Junr.  High  Street,  Skipton 

Scott,  Joseph 98,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Shackleton,  Wm.  Architect,  Pudsey 

•Simpson,  John King  Lane,  Moor- AUerton 

Simpson,  Rev.  James  Gilliland,  M.  A.  Clergy  School,  Leeds 

Singleton,  James  43,  Delph  Mount,  Hyde  Park,  Leeds 

Skcvington,  Thos.  Wm.  . .         .  •  Wood  Rhydding,  Ilkley 

Slee,  W.  W 30,  Duncan  Street,  Leeds 

Smith,  Edmund Nelson's  Yard,  Leeds 

*Smith,  Geo.  Alderson    . .         . .         . .  Wheatcroft  Cliff,  Scarborough 

Smith,  Stephen  Ernest,  F.R.LB.A.  ..  South  Parade,  Leeds 

Spark,  Fredk.  Robert Hyde  Terrace,  Leeds 

Stables,  Rev.  Wm.  Herbert     . .         . .  Runcorn,  Cheshire 

Stead,  John  Walter       3,  Cookridge  Street,  Leeds 

*Sykes,  Arthur The  Grange,  Roundhay 

Taylor,  Rev.  Richard  Vickerman,  B.A.  Melbecks,  Richmond,  Yorks. 

Teasdale,  Washington 255,  Hyde  Park  Road,  Leeds 

Tempest,  Mrs.  Arthur Broughton  Hall,  Skipton 

'Tetley,  Chas.  Francis,  M.A Spring  Bank,  Headingley 

Thonger,  Charles  W. ..  ..         ..  139,  Victoria  Parade,  Filzroy,  Melbourne 

Thompson,  Walter,  F.R.C.S 4,  Park  Square,  Leeds 

Thrippleton,  John  Burley  View,  Leeds 

Tyers,  George     . .         . .         . .         . .  Bond  Street,  L.eeds 

Vincent,  Rev.  Matson,  M.  A Great  Ouseburn,  York 

Ward,  William 36,  Hyde  Terrace,  Leeds 

•Ward,  George,  F.LC,  F.C.S.  ..  Messrs.  Hirst,  Brooke,  &  Hirst's,  Manu- 

facturing Chemists,  Leeds 

Ward,  tL  Snowden Golden  Green,  Tonbridge,  Kent 

•Watson,  George Donisthorpe  House,  Moor- Allert on 

Webb,  Joseph  Stenson 26,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

White,  John       Osborne  House,  144,  Chapeltown  Road, 

Leeds 

WTiitehcad,  Tom  St.  Michael's  Terrace,  St.  Michael's  Road, 

Headingley 


XXIV  LIST   OF  MEMBERS. 

Whitehouse,  Edwin 89,  Clarendon  Road,  Leeds 

Wilkinson,  Wm.  Musgrave      . .         . .  Brecondene,  220,  Newton  Hill,  Leeds 

Wilkinson,  Jno.  Ily 53,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Wilson,  Charles  Henry 5,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

♦Wilson,  Edmund,  F.S.A Red  Hall,  Leeds 

Wilson,  Henry,  M.A.,  F.S.A.  . .  F'amborough  Lodge,  Farnborough,R.S.O. 

(Kent) 

Wilson,  Col.  Jno.  Gerald,  C.B.  ..  Cliffe  Hall,  Pierce  Bridge,  Darlington 

Wilson,  Jas Ormonde  House,  Headingley 

Wilson,  Richard Lloyds  Bank,  Limited,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

•Wilson,  Henry  S.  Lee The  Hall,  Crofton,  Wakefield 

Wilson,  Robert  Lancelot         ..         ..  21,  Lyddon  Terrace,  Leeds 

Witherby,  Walter  H.,  M.A.     ..         ..  2,  Woodslcy  Terrace,  Leeds 

Woffindin,  Mrs.  Mary . .  ..         ..  i,  Albion  Place,  Leeds 

Wood,  Rev.  Canon  Fred.  Jno.,  M.A.  The  Vicarage,  Headingley 

Woods,  Sir  Albert  Wm.,  K.C.M.G.,  ..  69,  St.  George's  Road,  Warwick  Square, 
C.B., F.S.A.  London,  S.W. 

*Wurtzburg,  John  Henry  . .  . .  2,  De  Grey  Road,  Leeds 

Wylde,  Rev.  John,  M.A.  . .         . .  St.  Saviour's  Vicarage,  Leeds 

Yorke,  Reginald  S The  Hall,  Burley-in-Wharfedale 

Yewdall,  Zechariah        Brook  field,  Calverley 


LIBRARIES   AND   PUBLIC    INSTITUTIONS. 


LIBRARIES   AND    PUBLIC   INSTITUTIONS. 


Barrow-iD-Fumess  Free  Public  Library. 

Battersea  Central  Public  Library,  265,  Lavender  Hill,  S.W. 

Berlin,  The  Royal  Library  (Asher  &  Co.,  13,  Bedford  Street,  Covent  Garden,  W.C, 

Bingley  Free  Library.  Agents). 

Birmingham  Central  Free  Library. 

Boston,  Public  Library  of  the  City  of,  U.S. A  (Kegan  Paul,  Trench,  TrUbner  &  Co. 
Limited,  Paternoster  House,  Charing  Cross  Road,  W.C,  Agents). 

Bradford  Historical  and  Antiquarian  Society. 

Bradford  Free  Library. 

Buflfalo  Public  Library,  Buffalo,  N.Y.,  U.S.A.  (G.  E.  Stechert,  Agent). 

Cambridge,  St.  Catherine's  College. 

Chetham's  Library,  Manchester. 

Chicago,  U.S.A.     The  Newberry  Library  (Stevens  &  Brown,  Agents). 

Comell  University  Library,  Ithaca,  New  York,  U.S.A.  (E.  G.  Allen,  Agent). 

Dewsbury  Public  Free  Library. 

Detroit,  The  Public  Library  of,  U.S.A.  (B.  F.  Stevens  &  Brown,  4,  Trafalgar  Square, 

Glasgow,  The  Mitchell  Library.  W.C,  Agents). 

The  Guildhall  Library,  London. 

Hali&x  Public  Library. 

Harrogate  Public  Library. 

Leeds  Church  Institute. 

Leeds  Institute  of  Science,  Art,  and  Literature. 

Leeds  Library. 

Leeds  Public  Library. 

Lincoln's  Inn  Library,  W.C. 

Manchester  Free  Library. 

Manchester.     The  Jno.  Rylands'  Library,  Deansgate. 

Newcastle  Literary  and  Philosophical  Society. 

Newcastle-upon-Tyne  Public  Libraries. 

New  York  Historical  Society,  170,  Second  Avenue,  New  York. 

New  York  State  Library  (G.  E.  Stechert,  2,  Star  Yard,  Carey  Street,  W.C,  Agent). 

New  York  Public  Library. 

New  Hampshire  State  Library,  U.S.A. 

Nottingham  Free  Public  Library. 

Oldham  Free  Public  Library. 

Pennsylvania,  State  Library  of,  Harrisburg,  U.S.A. 

Preston  Free  Public  Library. 

d 


XXVI  LIBRARIES   AND   PUBLIC   INSTITUTIONS. 

Record  Office,  The  Public  (Eyre  &  Spottiswoode,  5,  Middle  New  Street,  E.C.) 

Reform  Club,  Pall  Mall,  London,  S.W. 

Rochdale  Free  Public  Library. 

Sheffield  Public  Library. 

Strasburg,  Kais.  Universitats  &  Landesbibliothek. 

Syracuse  Central  Library,  Syracuse,  N.Y.,  U.S.A. 

Victoria,  Public  Library,  Museums,  and  National  Gallery  of,  Melbourne  (Melville 

and  Mullen,  12,  Ludgate  Square,  London,  Agents). 
Vienna.     The  Imperial  Library  (Agents,  Messrs.  Ceroid   &   Co.,  Booksellers,   I, 

StefansplatE  8,  Vienna). 
Watkinson  Library,  Hartford,  U.S.A.  (Edwd.  G.  Allen,  28,  Henrietta  Street,  Covent 

Garden,  W.C,  Agent). 
Wigan  Free  Public  Library. 
Worcester  Public  Library. 

Yale  University  Library,  New  Haven,  U.S.A.  (Edwd.  G.  Allen,  Agent). 
York  Subscription  Library. 
Yorkshire  Philosophical  Society,  York. 


SOCIETIES  WITH  WHOM    PUBLICATIONS   ARE  EXCHANGED.         XXVU 


LIST  OF  SOCIETIES  WITH  WHOM   PUBLICATIONS 
ARE    EXCHANGED. 

The  Society  of  Antiquaries    Burlington  House,  London,  W. 

Ro3ral  Archaeological  Institute  ...  20,  Hanover  Square,  London,  W. 

Mill  Stephenson,  Hon,  Sec, 
Cambridge  Antiquarian  Society         ...  T.  D.  Atkinson,  Hon, Sec,,  St.  Mary's  Passage, 

Cambridge. 
Cumberland  and  Westmorland 

Archaeolc^cal  Society Chancellor  Ferguson,  i5'fl?'«/^r,  Lowther  Street, 

Carlisle. 
Derbyshire  Archaolt^cal  Society      ...  Percy  N.  Currey,  3,  Market  Place,  Derby. 

East  Riding  Antiquarian  Society       ...  Rev.  A.  Hippisley  Smith,  Langton  Rectory, 

Malton. 
Essex  Archaeological  Society  ..  ...  G.  T.  Beaumont,  F.S.A.,  Hon,  Sec, 

The  Lawn,  Coggleshall,  Kelvedon. 
Lancashire     and     Cheshire     Historic 

Society        R.  D.  Radcliffe,  Old  Swan,  Liverpool. 

Leicester  Archaeological  Society         ...  W.  J.   Freer,  Hon,  Sec.y  10,   New    Street, 

Leicester. 
Sf.  Albans  Architectural 

and  Archaeological  Society  ...  Rev.  Henry  Fowler,  Hon,  Sec,,  Heath  Bank, 

St.  Albans. 
Shropshire  Archaeological  Society      ...  Francis  Goyne,  Sec,  Dogpole,  Shrewsbury. 

Somersetshire  Archaeological  Society...  The  Castle,  Taunton. 

Stockholm.      Academy  of  Antiquities, 

National  Museum,  Dr  Anton  Blomberg,  Librarian. 

Surrey  Archaeological  Society Castle  Arch,  Guildford. 

Sussex  Archaeological  Society Chas.T.  Phillips,  Zr^«.Zf^rarw«,  The  Castle, 

Lewes 
Upsala  (Sweden),  Royal  University  of.  Chief  Librarian, 

Yorkshire  Archaeological  Society        ..  E.  K.  Clark,  Hon,  Librarian,  10,  Park  Street, 

Leeds. 


Ihe  Publications  are  also  sent  to  the  following  :- 
The  Chief  Librarian,  British  Museum,  London,  W. 
The  Chief  Librarian,  Bodleian  Library,  Oxford. 
The  Chief  Librarian,  University  Library,  Cambridge. 
The  Minster  Library,  York. 


The  Society  was  formed  to  promote  the  study  of  the  archaeology 
and  antiquities  of  the  County,  and  issues  to  its  members  a  Journal 
containing  articles  of  antiquarian  and  genealogical  interest. 

Subscription,  los,  td,  per  annum.  Life  Fee,  £-]  ys,  Hon, 
Treasurer:  M.  H.  Peacock,  M.A.,  The  Grammar  School,  Wake- 
field; Hon,  Secretary:  William  Brown,  F.S.A.,  White  House, 
Northallerton. 


The  Record  Series  of  the  Society  was  commenced  in  1885  for 
the  purpose  of  publishing  Yorkshire  records.  It  has  printed  Feet 
of  Fines,  Index  of  Wills.  Inquisitions,  Subsidy  Rolls,  Chartularies, 
Monastic  Notes,  &c.  Subscription,  One  Guinea  per  annum.  Hon, 
Secretaries:  S.  J.  Chadwick,  F.S.A.,  Lyndhurst,  Dewsbury ; 
J.  W.  Clay,  F.S.A.,  Rastrick   House,  Brighouse. 


Cbt  2otksbir(  Jlarislj  legistet  Societg. 

The  Society  was  formed  in  1899  ^^^  *^^  purpose  of  printing  the 
older  Registers  of  the  County.  The  following  have  been  either  issued 
or  are  in  the  press : — York — St.  Michael-le-Belfrey,  Burton  Fleming, 
Horbury,  Winestead,  Linton -in -Craven,  Stokesley,  Patrington, 
Scorborough,  Blacktoft,  Bingley,  Kippax,  Wath-on-Deame,  and 
Hampsthwaite. 

Subscription,  One  Guinea  per  annum.  President',  Sir  George 
Armytage,  Bart;  Hon.  Treasurer:  C.  Letch  Mason,  12,  East 
Parade,  Leeds;  Hon,  Secretaries:  Francis  Collins,  M.D.,  Pateley 
Bridge;  G.  Denison  Lumb,  65,  Albion  Street,  Leeds,  to  whom 
applications  for  membership  should  be  sent. 


<l!^ast  libittg  ^tttiquatian  Societg. 

The  Society  was  formed  in  1892  to  study  and  preserve  the 
antiquities  of  the  East  Riding  of  the  County  of  York.  It  has 
already  done  important  work,  making  extensive  excavations  at 
Watton  Priory,  a  Gilbertine  house,  near  Driffield ;  and  has  also 
taken  part  in  excavaftons  at  Warter  Priory,  near  Pocklington. 
Valuable  papers  on  these,  by  Mr.  St.  John  Hope,  with  plan  and 
illustrations,  appear  in  the  Transactions  for  1900. 

Subscription,  lOJ.  bd,  per  annum.  President:  The  Lord 
Hawkesbury,  F.S.A.;  Hon,  Secret($$ :  Ke\.  A.  N.  Cooper,  Filey 
Vicarage. 


^^^mmmmB. 


1902.  Vol  XI.   part II. 
publicaiions.of  the 


<5.fc-j 


JJiscellanea. 


Wtft  Ci)0mb9  Societg. 

The  Society  was  formed  in  1889  for  antiquarian  objects  in 
connection  with  Leeds  and  District.  Its  publications  include 
the  Leeds  Parish  Church  Register,  Adel  Register,  Methley 
Register,  Kirkstall  Abbey  Coucher  Book,  Calverley  Charters,  local 
Wills  and  Subsidies,  and  Miscellanea. 

Subscription,  10^.  6d.  per  annum.     Life  Fee,  j^S  5^- 
President  and  Hon,  Treasurer :  Edmund  Wilson,  P'.S.A.,  Red 
Hall,  Ivceds;   Hon,  Secretaries:   G.  D.  Lumb,  65,  Albion   Street, 
Leeds ;  B.  R  Scattergood,  M.A.,  7,  Cookridge  Street,  Leeds. 


The     following    is    a    list    of    publications    which     may    be 
purchased  by  members. 

Applications — ^accompanied  by  remittance — to  be  addressed  to 
the  Treasurer,  Mr.  Edmund  Wilson,  Red  Hall,  Leeds. 
Of  some  of  these  the  stock  is  very  small. 
Plan  of  Leeds,  date  1806,  i/- 

Atkinsori's   "Ralph    Thoresby,   his   Town    and   Times," 

2  vols.,  containing  886  pages,  bound  in  buckram,  10/6 

(by    post    11/-).      Published     at    25/-  net.      A    most 

interesting  and  valuable  work. 

Warden's   "Antiquities    of   the    Borough    of   Leeds," 

coloured  plates,  3/-      Published  at  7/6. 
Pettingell's  Lithographed  Bird's-eye  View  of  Leeds,  40  inches 

by  £5,  and  margin,  2/- 
Stooks   Smith's  "Parliaments  of  England,"  3  vols,  in  i, 
containing  765  pages,  2/6.    London,  1844-50.    Published 
at  10/6. 
Stooks  Smith's  "Parliaments  of  Yorkshire  from  the 

Earliest  Times,"  60  pages,  i/-      London,  1854. 
Margerison's  "  Calverley  Parish  Registers,"  Vol.  II, 

1 650-1 680,  4/- 
„  „  „      Vol.  Ill,  1681-1720, 4- 

The  Society's  Publications,  Bound,  viz.:— 

Vol.  I. — Leeds  Register,  157 2-16 12,  15/9. 

„  II. — Miscellanea,  15/9. 

„  III. — Leeds  Register,  161 2-1639,  10/6. 

„  IV. — Miscellanea,  15/9. 

„  V. — Adel  Register,  1606-18 12,  5/3  net. 

„  VI. — Calverley  Charters  (in  progress). 

„  VII.  -Leeds  Register,  1639-1667,  15/9. 

„  VIII. — Kirkstall  Abbey  Coucher  Book  (in  progress). 

„  IX. — Miscellanea,  15/9. 

„  X. — Leeds  Register,  1667-1695,  15/9. 

„  XI. — Miscellanea  (in  progress). 

„  XII. — Methley  Register,  1560-1812,  76  net. 

„  XIII. — Leeds  Register,  1695-1722  (in  progress). 

The  above  prices  are  subject  to  discount — 15  per  cent,  for  any  volume  except 
V  and  XII ;   25  per  cent,  for  a  complete  set. 


S0m«  Ci&il  Wat  ^ccoutits,  164^-1650. 


TTHE  document  which  is  printed  below  was  included  in  Ralph 
Thoresby's  collection,  and  is  now  in  the  possession  of  the 
Thoresby  Society,  and  the  Council  have  decided  to  print  it  in  full 
as  a  record  of  genuine  historical  interest,  although  it  cannot  be 
iscribed  particularly  to  the  locality.  Further  than  this,  it  is  difficult 
0  assign  the  correct  value  to  the  apparently  unconnected  items  of 
?xp)enditure  until  such  time  as  other  accounts  of  a  like  character 
and  there  are  many)  have  been  printed  and  annotated. 

So  far  for  the  demerits  of  the  document,  but  the  demerits  of 
he  system  therein  disclosed  entitle  it  to  interest  and  consideration, 
^rmy  reform  is  a  burning  question  in  1901,  and  it  was  seriously 
alcen  up  when  in  February,  1645,  ^^^  ^^^  Model  was  brought  into 
>eing,  and  this  country  came  to  possess  a  regular  army.  Many 
hapters  have  been  lost  from  the  history  of  this  all-important 
ubject,  and  many  paragraphs  are  needed  to  fill  up  the  gaps, 
taragraphs  such  as  the  following,  which  may  readily  provide  from  out 
>f  their  unclassified,  irreconcileable  elements  the  materials  of  an 
ittractive  and  instructive  story. 

When  it  is  remembered  that  one  of  the  greatest  sources  of 
rouble  among  the  victorious  Parliamentary  forces,  early  in  the  war, 
lad  been  the  irregularity  of  payment,  it  seems  extraordinary  that  so 
ate  as  1647  the  expenditure  should  be  still  dealt  with  in  the 
laphazard  fashion  here  set  forth. 

It  is  true  that  there  is  an  audit,  that  each  page  is  signed  by  the 
'  Quartermaster  general  of  foot,"  E.  Grosvenor,  and  that  at  the  end 
»f  the  accounts  of  each  year  there  appears  the  signature  of  Mr.  John 
^ushworth,  Secretary  to  the  Council  of  War  and  to  His  Excellency, 
;ir  Thomas  Fairfax,  the  Lord  General.  But  a  cursory  inspection 
vill  lead  the  reader  to  wonder  what  the  system  could  be,  when  such 
lisproportionate  items  as  ;^i,6i7  25.6^.  "to  Col.  Butler  and  Col. 
Fincher  for  disbanding  their  troopes,"  and  j£i  los.  ^^d,  "to  W°* 
Turner  for  coales  and  candles  at  the  Mewes,"  appear  close  together. 
^Vhat   were   the   regular  arrangements   for   payment  of  the   army   in 

; 


138  SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

general,  what  was  the  scale  adopted  for  the  various  services,  and 
what  the  authorization  for  the  several  classes  of  expenditure,  are 
questions  which  at  once  present  themselves.  The  direct  answers  are 
not  to  be  found  in  these  Accounts,  but  they  may  upon  fuller  con- 
sideration and  by  careful  collation,  furnish  indications  of  what  is 
desired. 

The  period  covered  is  from  January,  1647,  to  July,  1650,  from 
the  close  of  the  first  Civil  War  to  the  resignation  by  Fairfax  of  his 
post  as  Lord  General.  The  last  entry  is  on  June  26th,  1650,  the 
day  on  which  Cromwell  succeeded  Fairfax  in  the  chief  command. 
The  composition  of  the  army  at  this  time  is  admirably  given  by  the 
Hon.* J-  W.  Fortescue  in  his  History  of  the  British  Army^YoX,  I, 
p.  220,  while  further  details  as  to  pay  and  equipment  are  to  be  found 
in  Grose's  Military  Antiquities,  The  notes  in  the  text  illustrate 
and  explain  much  that  is  of  interest.  Some  of  the  most  interesting 
references  to  important  historical  incidents  are  to  be  found  on 
page  141,  where  there  is  a  payment  of  ^^loo  "to  Cornett  Joyce  for 
extra  charges,"  on  July  loth,  1647,  just  after  his  removal  of  the  King 
from  Holmby  House ;  on  page  143,  where  there  is  an  entry,  August 
24th,  1647,  of  ;^4o  "for  the  seamen  who  overtooke  the  6  members 
neere  Calice;"  and  on  page  169,  where  ;^2oo  was  paid  on  May  3rd, 
1648,  "for  Contingencies  for  L'  Generall  Cromwell  at  his  goeing 
into  Wales."  It  is  indeed  a  veritable  "Account  of  Contingencies." 
Here  are  recorded  all  manner  of  payments,  2s,  6d,  for  a  lost  husband  ; 
55.  "to  a  man  that  lost  his  hogge;"  10s.  for  "a  female  scout  taken 
at  Sherborne;"  "^^798  9^.  4^.  for  a  moneths  pay  for  the  Companies 
in  the  Tower;"  and  there  is  not  even  a  standard  in  the  value  of 
husbands,  hogs  or  garrisons.  The  conscientious  reader  will  be  still 
more  disturbed  by  erasures  and  additions  that  the  final  signatory 
has  made  apparently  at  the  time  of  his  audit. 

It  is  interesting  to  note  the  numerous  entries  of  compensation 
for  damages  caused  by  the  army,  and  the  still  more  numerous 
payments  to  maimed  soldiers — "it  is  supposed  that  many  salve  up 
the  ruins  of  their  estates  out  of  their  wounds,"  wrote  Dr.  Wilson,  in 
the  Fairfax  Correspondence,  June,  1643. 

The  accounts  are  written  on  paper,  and  are  in  the  main  fairly 
legible :  where  the  rendering  is  doubtful  a  query  is  inserted.  Letters 
missed  by  abbreviation  in  the  original  have  been  added  in  italics, 
ahd  words  struck  out  have  been  printed  in  brackets. 

Ethel  Kitson. 
E.  K.  Clark. 


SOME  CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS.  1 39 


E  LIBRIS    RADI   THORESBY  LEODIENSIS. 


AN    ACCOMPT   OF   CONTINGENTIES    DISBURSED    SINCE 

DECEMBER  1646  BY   WARR^iVTS   FROM   HIS 

"EXCELLENCY  THE   LORD   GENERALL    FAIRFAX. 


*  January  1646.  £       s.      d. 

I.     To    M'    Louejoy    for    548     dales    pay    as    an 
Addition  to  his  ^Waggon max/ers   pay  to   his 

Exce/lency  att  25.  per  diem ...       54     16.    00 

8.     To  'Manteau  Van  Delen  for  3  moneths   pay  for 

himself  &  men  147     00     00 

February  1646. 
To  Brian  Elton  an   Ensigne  in  '*Coll :  Lilburnes 

Regt.  who  was  maymed  before  ^Bristoll      ...       05     00     00 
17.     To   the   Clarkes   for   writing   the    Longe   orders 

etc.  att  Northampton  ..      ®io     00     00 

March  1646. 
15.     To   Quaxtermaster   Generall   Grosvenor   for    171 

daies  pay  for  himself  &  one  Clarke  etc.    ...       78     07     06 
25.     To   M"^  Lawrence  Collins   for  the  use  of  M'^is 
Hooper  wife  to  'Capt"  Hooper  for  120  daies 
pay  for  himself  from  the  22'*^  of  May  to  the 

i9**»  of  Sept.  1646      120     00    00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

1  January,  1647,  according  to  the  new  style,  adopted  in  England  in  1752: 
hitherto  the  year  had  begun  on  March  25th. 

a  A  Wa^on -master's  ordinary  pay  was  in  1639,  6s.  Sd.  a  day.     Grose,  I,  p.  278. 

'  Engineer-general.  The  English  were  behindhand  in  the  use  of  Field 
Artillery.  Eortescue  (History  of  the  British  Army,  I,  p.  219)  points  out  the 
significance  of  the  fact  that  the  officers  in  the  Engineers  have  foreign  names. 

*  Robert  Lilbume,  colonel  of  a  foot  regiment  in  the  New  Model.  One  of  the 
leaders  in  the  opposition  of  the  army  to  the  Parliament,  on  the  attempt  of  the 
House  of  Commons  to  disband  the  army  in  March,  1647,  he  promoted  the  petition 
of  the  officers  al)out  the  terms  of  service  in  Ireland,  and  indemnity  for  past 
service.  Lilbume  did  his  best  to  prevent  his  regiment  from  volunteering  for 
Ireland,  and  was  summoned  before  the  House  of  Commons  to  answer  for  his 
conduct.     Fairfax,  in  1647,  made  him  Governor  of  Newcastle. 

*  Bristol  was  invested  by  Fairfax  on  Aug.  23rd,  1645,  and  surrendered  on 
Sept.  nth,  1645. 

*  The  £\o  is,  unlike  all  the  other  sums  on  the  page,  not  ticked,  and  the  sum 
total  on  the  first  page  is  j^"!©  more  than  the  sum  put  down  on  the  outside  page  of 
the  accounts. 

^  Engineer- extraordinary. 


I40  SOME  CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

Aprill  1647.  j£      s.      d, 

[To  M""  Mosse  for  extra  service  ...         ...         ...       12     00     00] 

May  1647. 
8.     To  M"^  Standish  towards  his  Arreares  in  the  life 

Guard 50    00    00 

5.     To    M*"   Woolsey   Assiss*  to    the    Quarterni<i5/er 

Generall  for  service  before  the  ^Establishem^wt       11     15     00 
[To  M'^  Rush  worth  Secretary  wA/ch  hee  disbursed 

upon  severall  occasions         99     06     00] 

To  M'  Partridge  for  the  losses  hee  sustayn'd  by 

'Anglia  Rediviva         150     00     00 

June  1647. 
2.     To  'M'^  Rushworth   for  M*"  Deeble  of  Plymouth 
for  Mony  hee  laid  out  to  prisoners 
To  Cornett  Bunting  for  Recruite  Horses  &c 

14.  To  Coll.  Overton  for  Contingenties  for  *Hull  ... 

15.  To    Capt"    Ireton    &    Capt"    Berry    for   special 

seruice 100    00     00 

21.  To  M""  Cowley  of  S.  Albans  to  bee  disposed  of 
to  those  that  had  damage  by  the  Horse- 
guards  30    00     00 

26.  To  Capt"  Creede  for  41  soldiers  out  of  Warwick- 
shire      

29.     To 'Coll:  Robert  Lilburne  for  special  seruice  .. 
To  M*-  Butler  Chap/a;«   to  Sir   Kairdms  Waller 

for  speaa/  seruice      

To  M*"  Smallwood  for  special  seruice   ... 
25.     To  M'  Brett  for  extra  service    ... 

Ex  E.  Grosvener. 


18 

18 

00 

63 

n 

00 

300 

00 

00 

41 

00 

00 

60 

00 

00 

20 

00 

00 

20 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

1  Establishment  of  the  *'New  Model,"  Feb.  15th,  1645  (?). 

^  Anglia  Rediviva^  a  history  of  the  army  under  Sir  T.  Fairfax,  during  1645  and 
1646,  published  1647.  "Compiled  for  the  public  good"  by  Joshua  Sprigg, 
Fairfax  s  Chaplain.  Walker  {History  of  Independency)  says  not  Sprigg,  but  Col. 
Fiennes  was  the  author. 

'  Appointed  Secretary  to  the  General,  Fairfax  and  to  the  Council  of  War,  on 
the  establishment  of  the  New  Model,  and  was  with  Fairfax  on  his  campaigns. 
He  owes  his  fame  to  his  eight  volumes  of  Historical  Collection  of  private  passages 
in  State^  weighty  matters  in  LaWy  and  remarkable  proceedings  in  Parliament^ 
covering  the  period  from  1608  to  1680. 

*  Hull  was  in  the  hands  of  the  Parliamentary  troops  from  the  outbreak  of  the 
war,  and  in  1643  and  1644  successfully  resisted  long  Royalist  sieges. 

^  Colonel  of  a  Foot  Regiment. 


£ 

S, 

d. 

20 

OO 

oo] 

OO 

OO 

OO 

SOME   CIVIL  WAR  ACCOUNTS.  I4I 

July  1647. 
9.   [To  Mr.  ?  for  Mr.  Moss 

10.  To  'Cornett  Joyce  for  extra  charges 

11.  To   John    Smyth   &    W«»   Smyth    Troopers   for 

themselves    and    14    more    for    charges    in 
seizing    powder    going     to     London    from 

Northampton 010     00    00 

To  three  Waggoners  for  carriage  of  the  powder    020     16     00 

12.  To  Mr  Sillesby  for  144  Barrelles  of  powder  in 

part      100     00    00 

To  *Leiuet'  Coll.  Henry   Lilburne   for   posthire 

&  other  extra  Charges  into  the  North       ...       40    00    00 

13.  To    Francis   Allen    for    mony  of   his    seizd   at 

Newbery  &   ordered  by  the   House   to   be 
restored  unto  him       

14.  Allowed  to  myself  by  warrant 

To  Mr.  Mabbott  for  extra  service  

To  Mr.  Eyton  for  postage  into  Wales 

To  Mr.  Stocall  for  himself  &  2  other  Jerseymen 

19.     To   Comett    Heathcott   for   the   Troopers   that 

brought  upp  Maj.  Gen.  Groine         30    00     00 

To   Mr.  Robt  Wilkinson   for  Charges   into   the 

North 

21.     To  Capt"  Rolfe  for  extra  Charges  upon  Account 
2$.     To  Capt"  Lawrence  for  Horses  for  10  men    ... 

To  Mr.  Margetts  for  extra  service         

27.     To  ^ColL  Lambert  for  Charges  into  the  North  .. 
To  Mr.  Cooke  the  Lawyer  for  extra  service    ... 

*  The  ;£'ioo  paid  to  Cornet  Joyce  for  extra  charges  was  possibly  connected 
with  his  mission  to  Holmby  House,  Oxfordshire,  and  his  removal  of  the  King 
thence  on  June  4th,  1647.  Joyce  went  to  Holmby  House  at  the  head  of  a  large 
body  of  horse  (about  500),  under  Cromwell's  command,  but  it  is  doubtful  whether 
his  orders  were  only  **  to  secure  the  King,  or  also  to  carry  him  off  if  necessary." 
Fairfax  was  displeased  at  the  seizure  of  the  King  and  demanded  who  gave  the 
orders.  Gardin^r^  IH,  p.  86.  If  this  payment  has  any  connection  with  the  mission, 
it  b  strange  that  it  should  have  been  made  through  Fairfax's  Quartermaster-general. 

'Henry  Lilburne  was  Lt.-Col.  in  his  brother  Robert  Lilbume*s  regiment. 

'  Colonel  of  a  foot  r^ment  in  the  New  Model,  and  a  leader  in  the  dispute 
t^tween  the  army  and  Parliament  in  1647.  The  entry  in  the  accounts  evidently 
refers  to  the  despatch  of  Lambert  to  the  north,  in  July,  1647,  to  take  over  the 
conunand  of  the  northern  forces  as  major-general. 


21 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

20 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

13 

00 

00 

100 

00 

00 

070 

00 

00 

010 

00 

00 

150 

00 

00 

015 

00 

00 

142  SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

£     s.     d. 
28.     To  Capt°  Neale   for   provisions  for   the  fort  att 

^Tilbury     ...  ..  ...     100     00     00 

19.     To  Mr.  Norbery  the  I>awyer  for  extr^  service...     030     00     00 

Ex  E.  Grosvener. 

August  1647. 
2.     To  '^Scoutmaster  Generall  Watson  to  buy  Horses     060     00     00 
To   the   Governor   of  Windsor   to   be   disposed 

amongst  his  officers  &  Soldeyers     ...         ...     255     00     00 

To  Joseph    Allen    for  the  loss   of  an    Horse  & 

other  expenses  ...         ...         ...         ...       10     00     00 

7.     To  ^Mr.  Heath  for  ^L' Col.  Jo"  Lilburne  ...       10     00     00 

12.  To  "Adjutant  Generall  Evelin  for  the  use  of  the 

Garrison  of  Wallingford         150     00     00 

To  Lt.  Coll.  Henry   Lilburne   for  extra   charges 

into  the  North  056     00     00 

13.  To    Major   Abbot   for   charge   in   removing   the 

Magazeene  from  Leicester    ...         ...         ...       20     00     00 

18.  To  Capt.  John  Clarke  &  Capt"  Eyton  for  sevrall 

Messengers  into  the  West  &  North  Wales        050     00     00 

19.  To  Capt"  Gardiner  for  a  gratuity  to  his  soldiers       71     15     00 
23.     To  L'  Chillenden  for  extra  charges  and  loss  by 

Horses...         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       60     00     00 

To    Mr.   Cambell    who    lost    his    horses    neare 

Depiford  10     00     00 

26.     To  Mr.  Harris  the  printer  for  pr^clamac/ons  & 

declarac/bns     ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       12     00     00 

30.  To  L*  Chillenden    for  M"^  Coes   printing    press     078     17     00 

31.  To  Capt"  Young  for  his   charges   severall   times 

into  Cornewall  ...         ...         ...         ...       20     00     00 


1  On  July  30,  1647,  during  the  struggle  between  the  Presbyterians  and  the 
army,  some  of  Fairfax's  regiments  seized  on  Tilbury  fort. 

2  Major  Watson,  Scoutmaster-general  to  the  army. 

3  Official  Messenger  to  the  army. 

^  An  important  political  agitator  and  champion  of  individual  liberty.  In  1644 
he  was  made  Lt  -Colonel  in  the  army  of  the  Eastern  Association,  but  left  the 
army  in  1645,  as  he  could  not  join  the  New  Model  without  taking  the  Covenant. 
Lilburne  henceforth  devoted  himself  to  the  redress  of  grievances,  public  and 
private,  and  became  the  leader  of  the  Levellers,  a  lx>dy  of  zealous  reformers.  He 
was  the  author  of  numerous  revolutionary  pamphlets  and  of  many  attacks  upon 
Parliament  and  leaders  of  the  army.  In  August,  1647,  Lilburne  was  in  prison  for 
his  refusal  to  acknowledge  the  jurisdiction  of  the  Lords.  The  receipt  of  ;f  10  from 
Fairfax's  Quartermaster-general  is  strange,  for  although  Lilburne  had  pctitioDcd 
the  Commons  for  the  payment  of  his  arrears,  he  failed  to  get  them. 

^  Captain  Evelyn,  Adjuiant-general  of  Horse. 


SOME  CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS.  1 43 

£     s.     d. 
24.     To  Mr.  Whittington  for  books  sent  to  the  Army       12     04     00 
To  Capt"  Laming  for  the  seamen  who  overt ooke 

the  ^6  members  neere  Calice  ...         ...       40     00     00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 
September  1647. 
18.     To  VV*"  Spence  yeoman  of  the  guard  for  fire  & 

Candles  for  the  Tower         ...         ...         ...       30     00     00 

3.     To  Mr.  Kingdome  Mr.  Hodgeson  &  Mr.  Diggles 

for  postage  into  the  North  ...         ...         ...       30     00     00 

17.     To 'W™  Burlton   for    Mr.  Goldsmith    which   was 
charged    by    Bill    of    Exchange    fro    Coll. 
Lambert  which  he  laid  out  for  contingenties 
in  the  North    ..         ...         ...         ...         ...     100     00    00 

To   L*  Chillenden   for   pro/<7salls  &  declaracons 

printed  att  Cambridge  19     16     00 

17.     To   Lt.  Coll.  Beecher  for   extra   charges   out  of 

Ireltf«d  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       20     00    00 

To  Mr.  Paxton  for  pay  etc.        ...         ...         ...       40     07     07 

To  'L'  Chillenden  &  Mr.  Sexby  for  extr^  service 

into  Kent         16     00    00 

October  1647. 
I.     To  Capt"  Vernon   for  journeys  &  extra  charges 

into  the  West 60     00    00 

*  Six  of  the  famous  eleven  members  accused  by  the  army  on  June  i6th,  1647, 
of  trying  to  overthrow  the  liberties  of  the  subjects,  eic.  The  Commons  refused  to 
suspend  them,  but  they  withdrew,  June  26th.  On  Aug.  14th  the  Agitators 
demanded  their  expulsion  from  the  House,  and  two  days  later  six  of  them  fled 
the  country,  five  of  whom  were  overtaken  by  a  frigate  near  Calais.  Gardiner^  III, 
p.  181.  Rush  worth  (Collections  y  VHI,  p.  785),  writing  on  Aug.  21st,  1647,  gives  the 
foUowing  account  of  the  episode: — **This  day  we  had  certain  intelligence  of  the 
apprehending  Six  of  the  Eleven  Members,  as  they  were  going  beyond  Sea,  being 
taken  within  Six  Miles  of  Callis."  They  set  sail  at  *  Margarets'  in  Kent,  the 
pursuers  inquired  **of  the  Fishermen  what  their  Carriage  was,  they  replied,  the 
Gentlemen  that  went  aboard  were  in  very  great  haste.  One  Fisherman  saying  to 
them,  I  do  not  think  but  these  are  some  Parliament -men  flying.  Whereupon  one 
Captain  Hennet  drew  his  Sword  at  him,  but  the  Fisherman  being  nimble  of  his 
Heels  escaped.  The  Town  understanding  by  the  Messenger  what  they  were,  very 
readily,  at  the  beat  of  a  drum,  repaired  to  their  Colours,  and  Forty  of  them,  under 
the  Command  of  Captain  Lamming,  a  Valiant  Seaman,  put  to  Sea  in  a  Small 
Vessel,  and  within  Six  Miles  of  Callis  overtook  them,  who  seeing  themselves 
pursued,  made  hard  to  Windward  to  escape,  but  could  not."  They  were  brought 
before  Vice-Admiral  Batten  at  Deal,  and  by  him  set  at  liberty.  Rushworth  con- 
tinues that  "the  Seamen  who  apprehended  them"  were  "found  threatned  and 
sufficiently  reviled  against  by  Parson  Major  Kera." 

^  See  note,  page  141. 

*  Added  later ;  very  cramped ;  and  total  on  first  page  is  ;f  16  too  little. 


£ 

s. 

d. 

132 

oo 

oo 

ISO 

oo 

oo 

oos 

00 

00 

20 

00 

00 

200 

00 

00 

005 

00 

00 

100 

00 

00 

020 

00 

00 

040 

00 

00 

144  SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS 

3.  To  Mr.  Richardson  for  the  Garrison  of  Hull  . 

4.  To  Mr.  Spavan  for  extra  service  by  comand   . 

6.  To  L*  Coll.  Rede  for  the  sold/'ers  in  the  Garrison 

of  Poole  040    00    00 

4.     To  Mr.  Vamey  Bourchier  of  the  life  Guard  for 

extra  service 

13.     To  Mr.  Wragg  &  myself  for  extra  services 

16.     To   L^   Larke  for   the   use  of  the  Garrisons  of 

Exetter  &  Exmouth 

9.     To  Mr.  W«»  Hobson  for  a  gratuity        

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

October  1647. 
To    Mr.   Richardson    for    the    sold/ers    of   the 

Garrison  of  Hull        

To  Mr.  Pitson  for  extra  service  in  the  North... 

To  Coll.  Lilbume  for  Conting^«/;>j  att  Newcastle 

15.     To   Mr.  Broad   the   printer   for   printing   sevrall 

declaraabns  of  the  Army  att  York 10     13     00 

To  Mr.  Moss  for  extra  service  &  charges  in  the 

North 20    00    00 

II.     To   Capt"    Roper   for    the    use    of    the   Annie 

^[Agitators]       50     00     00 

22.     To  Capt"  Blethen  w>^/ch  hee  laid  out  to  severall 

officers  that  went  into  Wales  ...         ...       20     00     00 

7.  To  L'  Coll.  Kelsay  for  discharging   the  sold/ers 

Quarters  in  Oxford 50     00     00 

26.     To  ^Mr.  Cadwell   &   Mr.  Heath   for  a   Moneths 

gratuity  as  Messengers  08     08     00 

8.  To  Anthony  West   D  Coll:  Gee  &  W'"  Mason       05     10     00 
30.     To  Mr.  Gillott  for  62  daies  attending  the  officers 

att  6^  8**  per  diem      20     13     04 

*  Agitators  or  Agents  was  the  name  given  to  representatives  of  the  army, 
appointed  first  in  April,  1647,  by  eight  cavalry  regiments,  to  secure  the  redress  of 
their  grievances,  and  prevent  the  disbanding  of  the  army  by  Parliament.  It  is 
curious  to  notice  that  whenever  the  word  ** Agitator"  occurs  in  the  text,  it  has 
been  crossed  out,  and  often  some  other  word  substituted.  Earlier  in  the  year  1647 
this  might  have  been  explained  by  the  fact  that  both  Cromwell  and  Fairfax 
hesitated  between  their  sympathy  with  the  grievances  of  the  soldiers  and  their 
reverence  for  Parliamentary  authority.  But  their  objection  to  military  resistance 
to  Parliament  disappeared  when  in  Tune,  1647,  they  found  that  the  Commons 
meant  to  use  force  to  obtain  their  ends.     Gardiner^  III,  p.  59,  seq. 

2  Official  Messengers  to  the  Army. 


1 


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3 


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Size  of  original,  7 J  in.  by  ii|  in. 
Thoresby  Society's  Miscellama^  Vol.  xi,  Part  ii,  p.  161. 

For  erasure  of  "Agitator,"  September  16,  see  note  p.  144. 


03 

00 

00 

4o 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

46 

00 

00 

TO 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

296 

00 

00 

SOME  CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS.  I45 

November  1647.  £     ^'      ^' 

11.  To   Mr.  Hatter   for  pay   fro   July  10  att  5*  per 

diem 14    00    00 

4.     To  Margarett   Roberts  &  Jane   Smith   for  extra 

service  in  the  Army 

9.     To  Cornett  Joyce  for  extra  service       

To  Mr.  Yerburgh  for  postage  to  Boston  &  backe 
8.     To  Mr.  Kingdome  &  the  Northern  Agents 
10.     To    Mr.   Brett    for    Mr.    Beale    &    Mr.   Creme 

Trumpetters  for  their  extra  Service 

To  W*"  Johnson  for  extra  service  

To  severall  Agents  [Agitators]  for  extra  expences 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

November  1647. 

6.     To  Mr.  Hatter  for  extra  service  ..         

19.     To  Capt°  Wilkinson  for  postage  to  Yorke 

12.  To    Capt"   Sam:    Jervice    for    extra   service   in 

Ireland  

23.     To  L'  Scotten  for  severall  expences  &  journeys 

To  Mr.  W™  Harrison  for  the  like         

To  Lt.  Chillenden  for  a  journey  into  Kent 

26.  To  ^Major  Tulidah  for  his  arreares         

To  Mr.  Alexander   Richardson    Mr.  Rich.  Lloyd 

&  Ann   Edwards  each   of  them  10  pounds 

for  extra  service        30    00    00 

27.  To  Mr.  Lovejoy  for   pay  from   the  30***  of  Sep- 

tember 1646  to  the  27'*»  of  November  1647 
at  2*  per  diem  

26.  To  L*  Coll :  Shanbrooke  for  a  monethes  pay  for 

the  Companies  in  the  Tower  

To  Capt**  Jones  for  service        

27.  To  Coll:  Whitchcott  for  the  soldiers  in  Windsor 

upon  Acco««t 150     00    00 

29.     To  Major  Henery  Markham  for  monies  laid  out 

for  the  garrison  of  Belvoyer 100     00    00 

*  Major  Tulidah  was  sent   to   prison   by   the   House  in   March,  1647,  for  his 
sympathy  with  a  petition  presented  by  the  followers  of  John  Lilburne. 

"  Sum  not  ticked. 


10 

00 

00 

10 

03 

00 

10 

00 

00 

20 

00 

00 

02 

16 

00 

10 

00 

00 

19 

12 

00 

'42 

02 

00 

798 

09 

04 

006 

00 

00 

146  SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

£     5.    d. 

30.     To  Mr.  Mabbott  for  the  Clarke  of  both  Houses     010    00     00 
To  Mr.  Smythes  for  hay  eaten  by  the  Troopers 

horses  att  the  Guards  att  ^Hampton  Cort  ...       25     00     00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

December  1647. 

2.  To  Lt.  Chillenden  for  ^\\xa  expences 

3.  To  Mr.  Walford  for  extr^z  service  

To  Mr.  Benhill  for  the  like         

To  Mr.  Pennyfather  for  Charges  to  Coll.  Horton's 

Regimt.  

2.  To  Mr.  Knight  for  exlr^  service 
To  L'  Wilkinson   for  a  monethes   pay   hee   lost 

3.  To  Mr.  Sharp  for  extr^  service 

To  Mr.  Jo"  Brett  for  the  like 

To  Mr.  Tho:  Wragg  for  the  like  

To  Mr.  Hatter  for  the  like         

To  myself  for  the  like 

20.     To    Capt"    Blackwell    w^/ch     he    laid    out    for 

Horses  at  the  Devizes  

To  Mr.  Allen  to  buy  him  an  Horse     ... 

To  L'  Fox  for  extra   service       

To  Capt"  Blackwell  for  the  like  

To  Mr.  Spavan  which  hee  disbursed     

16.     To  Mr.  Partridge  w/4/ch  hee  laid  out  for  Books 

for  the   Generall         010     19     00 

18.     To  Capt"  Tomlins  for  provisions  for  ^arisbrooke 

Castle 300     00     00 

4.  To  Mr.  Hatter  for  life  Guard  pay         007     00     00 

28.     To  5  Sold/ers  of  Coll :  Lilburnes  regt.  2  Troops 

&    Mr.   Staresmore    who    carried    l^/Zres    to 

Coll:  Horton ^04     05     00 

To    Quartermaster    Generall    Grosvenor    for   his 

daily  pay  210    00     00 

Ex.  Grosvener. 


10 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

12 

00 

50 

00 

00 

20 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

36 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

200 

00 

00 

GIG 

00 

00 

^  Charles   was   a   prisoner   at    Hampton   Court   from   Aug.   24th,   1647,  till   he 
escaped  on  Nov.  nth  in  the  same  year. 

^  Charles  fled  from   Hampton  Court   to  the  Isle   of  Wight  in  Nov.,  1647,  and 
was  detained  there  as  more  or  less  a  prisoner  till  Dec.  1st,  1648. 

3  Sum  not  ticked. 


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Size  of  original,  ^\  in.  by  li|  in. 
Thoresby  Society's  Miscellanea,  Vol.  xi,  Part  ii,  p.  147. 


SOME   CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS.  1 47 

Dec.  1647.  jQ     s.      d, 

24.     To  Capt"  Bland  for  extra  service  05     00     00 

28.     To  Major  Abbott  for  Charges  in  going  post   to 

the  Isle  of  Wight       lo     oo     oo 

17.  To  Mr.  Henry  Collingwood  30"  to  Mr.  W"» 
Hobson  20^  to  English  Tirrell  26^  6^  ob.  & 
to  Mr.  Rushworth   for  sevrall   disbursements 

;^8       ... 

31.     To    Major  Generall    Lambert   for  Contingencies 

in  the  North 

To  Mr.  Cad  well  for  severall  disbursements 
To  Mr.  Rushworth  for  severall  disbursements  ... 
To  Mr.  Wealey  etc.  for  spetiall  service... 
To  Lt.  Coll.  Shambrooke  for  the  Tower 
[To  the  Agitators  towards  their  charges  at  Putney     096     00 
Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

According  to  your  Exce/Zencies  order  of  the  24*^*  of  June  wee 
have  paused  this  Account,  and  Mr.  Clarke  hath  produced  before  us 
the  severall  warrants  under  your  Exce/Zencies  hand  for  the  Respective 
somes  heerin  specified  and  the  Receipts  theruppon  wA/ch  wee 
submitt  unto  your  Excellency  for  ap[)robacon  &  Allowance  therof. 

E.  Grosvener. 

*Jo.  Barkstead. 

Jo.  Rushworth. 


II 

16  060b. 

400 

00  00 

45 

10  00 

100 

00  00 

005 

00  00 

200 

00  00 

096 

00  00] 

An  Account  for  monyes  laid  out  for  Contingencyes  from 
Dec.  28  to  Feb.  i,  1646. 

24.     To  Richard   Hare    for  the   use  of  the  prisoners 

in  Northampton  (loale  ...         ...         ...       00     10     00 

To    Mr.   Brett    the    Trumpeter    for    summoning 

Ragland  &  severall  other  Messages  ...       05     13     00 

29.  To  *Capt.  Wykes   for   severall   particulars   as   by 

his  Bill  07     14     06 

30.  To  Beniamin  Ridley  for  severall  journeys  as  by 

his  bill...         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       01     10     00 

To    Mr.  Tarrant   for   severall    Messages    by    his 

man  as  by  bill  ...         ...         ...         ...       02     01     00 

^  Governor  of  the  Tower. 
^  Marshall -general  of  fool. 


148  SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

January  1646.  £^      s.      d. 

2.     To  Jacob  Hanaky  for  goeing  severall  Joumyes      03     04     00 
More  to  him  for  the  6  waggon  horses  at  4*^  ye 

night  for  14  nights  from  Dec.  28 01     08     00 

7.  To  *Capt :  Lawrence  Marshall  Generall  for 
charges  in  apprhending  ''Col.  Graves  men  in 
Lincolnshire  &  severall  Journeys  about  it . . .  11  06  06 
12.  To  Mr.  Tarrant  for  Journeys  of  his  man  as  by  bill  03  15  00 
16.  To  Beniamin  Ridley  for  the  6  waggon  horses  at 
4*^  a  night — 14  nights  from  Jan.  2  and  2" 
&  6«^  for  a  bushell  &  a  peck  of  oates       ...       01     10    06 

Jo.  Barkstead. 
E.  Grosvener. 

Given  by  his  Exc^//i?«cies  Command  to  one  for 

shewing  the  workes  at  North^w/ton         ...       00     02     00 

Jan.  20.     To    a    Messenger    that    roade    post    from 

Stamford  to  North^fl/«^ton  with  an  extra 

packett  from  Yorke  to  his  Exc^//<f«cie...       00     10    00 

Jan.  21.     For  writing   of  14  of  the   large  orders   for 

paym^wt   of    Quarters   sent    to   severall 

reg"  and  Co»»»»/ttees  [?]  01     08     00 

23.     To    Mary    Dunham  a  poore   woman   whoe   had 

her  grounds  overflowed  in   Lincolnshire     ...       00     02     06 
To  Mr.  John    Rushworth   for   his  extra   charges 

in  goeing  to  Yorke  Newcastle  etc 30     00     00 

To    W"*    Milles   a   souldyer    in  'Maior    Genrall 

Skippons  regt  to  carry  him  to  his  colors  ...       00     10     00 

26.  To  a  Messenger  that  went  to  Stamford   for  the 

Yorke  l<f//res  by  the  post 00     09     00 

27.  To  Andrew   Allen  a  souldyer  in   Col  Herbert's 

reg'  left  sick  behind  his  colors        00     05     00 

To  Mary  Popeley  whoe  was  plundred  in  Ireland 

and  her  children  slaine   by  the  Rebells     ...       01     00    00 

1  Marshall-general  of  Horse. 

^  An  adherent  of  the  Presbyterians,  and  in  command  at  Holmby  House,  where 
in  Dec,  1646,  the  Commons  voted  that  Charles  should  be  sent. 

3  Major-general  of  the  New  Model  and  chief  adviser  of  Fairfax.  In  Dec,  1646, 
Skippon  was  made  Governor  of  Newcastle,  and  in  April,  1647,  he  was  appointed 
to  command  the  intended  expedition  to  Ireland.  He  tried  to  mediate  in  the 
struggle  between  Parliament  and  the  army. 


oo 

17 

00 

oo 

02 

06 

oo 

02 

06 

SOME  CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS.  1 49 

£        S.        d, 

30.     To  John  Wolstone  Constable  for  buriall  of  one 

of  Col.  Herbert's  [reg*]  souldyers oo     07     06 

20.     To  Mr.  Mosse  for  extra  service 28     00    00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

Feb.  1646. 

Feb.    3.     To  severall  guides  for  his  Ex^e/Iende  from 
North//a/«/ton  three  severall  daies  march 

for  ^Pyoneers  

II.     for  Anne  Wallis  a  poore  widdow  of  Nottingham 

TO.     To  Mr.  Millard  for   charges   for  ^Maior   Genrall 

Masseyes   horse   that   were    bought   at    the 

Devizes  as  by  his  Bill  01     02     04 

To  Beniamin  Barnes  one  of  Marsha//  Genrall 
Lawrence  his  men  for  extra  charges  in 
Sussex  Essex  Kent  etc 01     00    00 

16.  To  Blisse  a  Troop  in   Maior  Genrall   Shippon's 

troope  whoe  had  his  horse  taken  from   him 
by    Mr.  Norton   a   Receiver  of  the   King's 

Revenue  in  Nottinghamshire  

18.     To    Mr.  Bret   the   Trumpeter   for   goeing   from 

Northampton  to  Yeelding  in  Bedfordshire...       00     13     00 
To    Anne   Strange  a  poore   woman    in    Sutton 
Bonnyngton  whoe  had  her  horse  taken  from 
her  by  one  Spence  in  Capt  Bethells  troope      00     10    00 

17.  To     the     widdow    Alsupp     by    the     Generalls 

commaifd        00     02     06 

To  2  souldyers   maimed  in   the  'Earle  of  Man- 

chesters  army 00     05     00 

*  The  Pioneers  marched  before  or  with  the  army  with  spades,  etc. ,  to  clear  the 
way  or  dig  entrenchments.  Fortescue  {History  of  the  British  Army^  I,  p.  219)  says 
they  were  in  the  seventeenth  century  the  scum  of  the  army,  and  degradation  to  be 
an  abject  pioneer  was  the  regular  punishment  for  hardened  offenders. 

*  In  the  early  part  of  the  Civil  War,  Massey  played  an  important  part  in  the 
campaign  in  the  West.  In  Oct.,  1646,  his  troops  were  disbanded  by  order  of  the 
House.  He  was  a  staunch  Presbyterian  and  one  of  the  leaders  of  the  city  against 
the  army.  In  June,  1647,  he  was  impeached  for  designing  to  raise  a  new  civil 
war,  and  fled  to  Holland.     In  1649  he  took  service  under  the  king. 

*  Given  the  command  of  the  army  of  the  Eastern  Association  by  Parliament  in 
1643.  He  did  useful  service  early  in  the  war,  but  soon  became  fatally  lethargic 
and  half-hearted  in  its  prosecution.  Cromwell  accused  him  before  the  House  of 
neglect  and  incompetence,  and  in  April,  1645,  ^1^^  ^^y  hefore  the  passing  of  the 
Self  Denying  Ordinance  (forbidding  members  of  either  House  to  serve  in  the 
army),  he  resigned  his  commission. 


150  SOME  CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS. 


£ 


To  Mr.  Sharpe   for   t\Xra   service  in   the   Army 

by  the  Generalls  spec/a/  Comniand  ...       50     00     00 

To  Mr.  Richardson  for  goeing  from  Leicester  to 
Yorke  with  leUres  to  the  lord  Fairfax  after 
'Xaseby   &  soe  to    London   and   thence   to 

Bridgewater  370  miles  ...         13     06     00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

20.     To    Mary    Tullye    Maior     Tullyes    wife    whose 

husband  was  slaine  in  Ireland         00     10     00 

25.     To    Mr.  Margaretts   wAtch    he   disburst   in    pen 

Inke  &  paper  for  the  Counsell  of  Warre  ...       01     00     00 
To    the    Postm^j/er    of   Stamford    for    the    lost 
packet  of  W/res  to  Northaw/ton     ... 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

March  1646. 
8.     To  a  guide  from  Huntington  to  Cambridge    ...       00     05     00 
For  Paper  upon  the  march         ...         ...         ...       00     01     00 

II.     To    Mr.   Curteis     the    Messenger    for     severall 

Messages  as  by  his  hill         ...  ..  ...       37     17     00 

To  Edward    Wattes   the    Messenger    for  severall 

Journeys  as  by  bill 23     17     06 

To    Mr.   Tarrant     the     Messenger    for    severall 

Journeys  [Messages]  as  by  bill        29     08     00 

15.     To  Anne  Roberts  a  woman  whose  husband  was 

slaine  in  Ireland        

17.     To  Capt.  Evans    by    his    Exce//enc\es   Command 

Given  at  Cambridge  by  his  Exce/Zencies  Command 

19.     To  David  Arther  one  of  the  Marshall  Generalls 

men  for  his  extra  charges  in   goeing  downe 

to  Newcastle  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       02     00     00 

5.  To  a  guide    for   the  General  I  from    Nottingham 

to  Melton  Mowbray  ... 
To  one  from  Malton  to  Stamfort 

6.  To  one  from  Stamfort  to  Huntington    ... 
To  one  from  Cambridge  to  Walden 

19.  To  Mr.  Cadwell  the  Messenger  for  severall 
Journeys  and  his  daily  pay  from  the  first  of 
Jan.  to  the  25  March  as  by  bill     64     13     06 


00 

2  [?]  60 

02 

10   00 

20 

00   00 

00 

06 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

07 

06 

00 

07 

06 

1  Battle  of  Na>cl)y,  June  I4ih,  1645. 


151 

£ 

S, 

d. 

02 

00 

00 

02 

ID 

00 

SOME  CIVIL  WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

12.     To  Sir  Thom.  Wythringtons  2  Clarices  for  extr^ 

service 

1.     To    a   Messenger   with    an    extra    packett    from 
London  to  Nottingham  100  miles  ... 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

March  1646. 
9.     To    a    Messenger    from     London     to     Walden 

36  miles  00     18     00 

22.     To   Capt.  Lawrence    Marshall   General  for   fire 
and  other  things   for  the  Court  Marshall  at 

Grantham        00     12     00 

To  Rich.  Joanes  one  of  the  Marshalls  men  that 

went  to  ^Newcastle 02     00     00 

To  Mr.  Heath  the  Messenger  for  journeys  and 

dayly  pay  as  by  bill 40     ^^     06 

To  John   Horseman  one  of  the   Marshalls  men 

that  went  to  Newcastle         02     00    00 

To  W"»  Gunner  one  of  the  Marshalls  men  that 

went  to  Newcastle     ...         ...         ...         ...       02     00     00 

1647. 

27.  To   Jeremy  Weston    one   of   the  Marshalls  men 

that  went  to  Newcastle  for  his  extr«  charges       02     00     00 

28.  To  a  Souldyer  that  came  out  of  Holland  to  seek 

employm^«t  for  Ireland         ...         ...         ...       00     10     00 

29.  To  John    Este  one  of  the  Marshalls  men  whoe 

went  to   Newcastle     ...         ...         ...         ...       02     00     00 

To   Capt.  Scroope   Engineere   to   carry   him    to 

London  00     05     00 

To  Mr.  Sharpe  the  Steward   for  severall    contin- 
gencies as  by  bill       31     00     00 

31.     To     Cornet     Tyringham     by     his     Exc^//^//cies 

Command        ...  ...       05     00     00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

Aprill  1647. 

5.     To  M"  Audley  Capt.  Audleys  wid^7^/ 02     00     00 

7.     To  W°»  Bell  a  Troop  in  Col.  Butlers  reg^  whose 

horse  fell  lame  to  carry  him  to  the  reg'   ...       00     10     00 

*  Newcastle  was  then  in  the  possession  of  the  Scotch. 


OS 

15 

00 

03 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

02 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

152  SOME  CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

£     s.      d. 

12.  To  2  poore  souldy**^  wifes  00    05     00 

To  a  Messenger  that  was  sent  with  W/res  from 

the  Speaker 01     17     00 

13.  To  Capt  Wykes  for  severall  disbursem^/its  as  by 

bill       

15.     To  Capt.  West  by  the  Generalls  orders 

To  'Lt.  Col.  Pryde    for   carriage   of    monie   to 
Reading  and  other  things  laid  out  by  him 
17.     To  Mr.  Foxcroft  for  extra  service   by  order     ... 

To  Jeremiah  Bower  by  the  same  

To  Capt  Gladman  w^/ch  he  laid  out  for  Capt. 

Pattyson  slaine  by  the  *Clubmen     05     00    00 

To  Mr.  Somervile  CoL  Hamonds  Chyrurg^^w  for 

medicaments  for  wounded  souldyers  ...       02     16     03 

21.     To  Mr.  Tarrant   for  severall   journeys   made   by 

his  man  

To  a  poore  scholler         

26.  [To  Mr.  Jenkin  for  extra  service 

27.  To  Mr.  Sam :  Jones  for  spec/a/  service 
To  a  poore  souldyers  wido7<'  by  command 
Paper  severall  tymes  before  the  waggon  came 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

To  a  guide  from  Walsden  to  Hoddesden        ...       00     10     00 
To  'Ensigne  NichoUs   whoe  was  imprisoned   by 

Capt  Dormer 02     00    00 


16 

05 

00 

00 

10 

00 

05 

00 

00] 

03 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

00 

02 

00 

1  Lieut -Col.  of  a  foot  regiment  in  the  New  Model.  A  champion  of  the  right 
of  the  soldiers  to  petition  for  the  redress  of  their  grievances.  In  Dec,  1648, 
Pryde,  under  Fairfax  s  orders,  arrested  over  forty  members  of  the  House  and  forcibly 
prevented  the  entry  of  ninety  others,  to  frustrate  the  intended  agreement  with  the 
King.     This  episode  became  known  as  "Pryde's  Purge.*' 

*  The  Clubmen  were  an  organized  body  of  the  countrymen  of  Wiltshire, 
Dorsetshire  and  Someisetshire,  whose  object  was  the  protection  of  life  and  property. 
The  movement  was  set  on  foot  early  in  1645,  and  the  name  was  derived  from  the 
ai)pearance  of  the  countrymen  without  pikes  or  urearms  at  the  county  musters. 
The  Clubmen,  though  at  first  only  desirous  of  peace  and  security,  were  soon  won 
over  to  the  Royalist  cause,  "not  sparing  to  declare  themselves  absolute  neuters 
(or  rather  friends  to  the  enemy) "  says  Sprigg.  They  were  easily  dispersed  by  the 
Parliamenlary  forces.  **  Many  of  them,"  wrote  Cromwell  to  Fairfax,  "are  f>oor  silly 
creatures,  whom  if  you  please  10  let  me  send  home,  they  promise  to  be  very  dutiful 
for  time  to  come,  and  will  be  hanged  before  they  come  out  again."  Fairfax 
Correspotidence^  I,  p.  245.     Gardiner^  II,  c.  xxxii. 

*  Ensign  NichoUs  was  imprisoned  by  the  Parliamentary  Commissioners  sent  in 
April,  1647,  to  Saffron  Walden,  to  persuade  the  soldiers  to  volunteer  for  Ireland. 
On  April  2ist,  NichoUs  was  caught  circulating  the  soldiers'  petition  for  indemnity, 
payment  of  arrears,  etc.,  he  was  taken  prisoner  and  brought  by  the  Commissioners 
on  April  27th  before  the  Commons,  who  committed  him  to  prison. 


o6 

03 

II 

00 

05 

00 

03 

00 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

06 

00 

SOME   CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS.  1 53 

29.  To    Mary     Rawlins    a    poore     woman     whose 

husband  was   hangd  for  a  spye  at  Lamport      02     00    00 

30.  To  Mr.  Atkinson  Col :  Lamberts  Chyrurg^^//  for 

medicaments  bought  in  Cornewall  ...       02     05     00 

To   Hen:   Baynard  whoe  was  wounded   in   the 

service ...         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       02     00    00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

May  1647. 
T.     To  Capt.  Thomas  for  monyes  laid  out  for  the 
workes     before    BristoU     the    ^Devizes    & 

Crediton  

To  a  Clarke  for  helping  to  write  extra 
3.     To  Mr.  Bret  for  3  Trumpeters  and  3  Marshalls 
men   publishing   the  Generalls  Frodaman'on 

5.     To  a  poore  souldyer        

25.     To  a  guide  from  Walden  to  Bury         

28.  To    Mr.  Tarrant     for    severall     Journeys    from 

March  12  as  by  bill  23     06     00 

To    Edw.   Watts    for    severall     Journyes     from 

March  the  12  as  by  bill      27     10    00 

29.  To  Mr.  Rushworth   for   severall   things  laid   out 

by  him  as  by  noate 

30.  To  «Capt  L^  Hughes  

To  Mr.  Foxcroft  for  extra  service         

To  one   of  Col.  Lamberts   souldyers  a  prisoner 

that  put  out  the^^C"  eie        

[To  Mr.  Gerard  of  the  life  guard  

To  Capt  Scot  of  the  life  guard 

To  L'  Balthazer  or  Ballarde       

To  a  poore  woman  

To  the  *K«  Trumpeters 

1  Devizes  surrendered  to  Cromwell  in  September,  1645,  after  a  very  slight 
resistance. 

^  Formerly  in  Great  Britain  an  officer  with  the  rank  of  a  captain,  and  the  ^pay 
of  a  lieutenant,  in  command  of  a  troop.  The  commander  of  the  first  company  of 
a  regiment  of  infantry  was  a  captain-heutenant.     Century  Dictionary, 

■'«Coloners(?). 

*  King's  (?). 


06 

01 

00 

01 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

00 

lO 

00 

01 

00 

00] 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

£ 

s. 

//. 

OO 

10 

00 

oo 

10 

00 

OO 

02 

06 

03 

00 

00 

154  SOME   CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

To  Thorn.  Beeston  

To  a  man  that  came  out  of  Turky       

To  Ben:  for  the  Waggon  horses  

15.     To  Mr.  Richard  Bourchier  

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead 

May  1647. 

15.     To  a  poore  Argeere  prisoner      ...         ...         ...  01  10  00 

To  one  Jay  a  maymed  souldyer 00  05  00 

To  Mr.  Hobson  by  comand       ...          05  00  00 

To  Cromwell  west            02  00  00 

June  1647. 
3.     To  Mr.  Curteis  for   severall   Joumyes   from   the 

12  of  March  as  by  bill         32     13     00 

To  a  sick  souldyer  00    02     00 

6.  To  one   Roger  Sadler  a  countryman   whoe  had 

his  horst  prest  away  by  a  troop      00    02     06 

7.  To  a  poore  woman  that  lost  her  poultry  by  the 

souldyers  at  a  Randevouz     00    05     00 

8.  To  Mary  Smith  whoe  lost  her  estate  in  Ireland 

her  husband  &  children       01     00    00 

To  W™  Grooves  towards  3  hogsheads  of  beare 
and  other  goods  brought  to  a  Randevouz 
and  taken   by  the  souldyers 01     10    00 

10.  To  Rob.  Wilkinson  [an  Agitator]  whoe  went  into 

the  North       ...         03     00    00 

To  Corp^rall   W™  Young  [Agitator]  whoe  went 

to  London       01     10    00 

To    Mr.   Cadwell    the    Messenger    for    severall 

Journyes  &  daily  pay  as  by  bill      65     10    00 

11.  To  Mr.  Allen  [Agitator]  for  charges      09     00    00 

To  Lancelot  Burt  for  service  about  the  Generalls 

house   ...         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       00    05     00 

To  George  Brooke  &  John  Warren  2  Dragoones 
in  Capt.  Woogans  Troope  who  broughet  the 

peticon  01     00    00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 


SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS.  155 

13.     To    Mr.  Pitson   w^/ch    he   had    laid   out  about 

the  powder  Milles      05     00    00 

For    extra     charges    about    writing    the    large 

Declaracon      00     18     00 

To  a  messenger  with  k//res  from  Royston       ...       03    00    00 
To  2  Troops  whoe  tooke  the  [?]  the 

scotch  lettres 

17.     To  L'  Chillingden  for  printing  the  Engagements 

at  Cambridge 

To  Mr.  Sexby  for  a  Message  to  Hereford 
To  the  Canoneers  &  guardes  at  the  ^Trayne    ... 
To  2  souldyers  by  the  Generalls  command     ... 
To  Richard  Rudd  that  lost  his  eyes  at  ^Maston 

Moore 

for  4  skins  of  parchment 

To  4  poore  women  

19.     To  Mr.  Curteis  for  journeys  as  by  his  bill 

21.     More  for  parchm^/it        ...         

To  Mr.  Potter   whoe   brought  a  k//re   from    the 

house   ...         .  ...         01     00    00 

To   Capt.  Cobbett   for  post   horses   to   London 

[for  the  2  lawyers]     

For  extra   charges  in   writing   the   remonstrance 

To  a  poore  woman  

25.     To  3  Troops  who  came  with  le//res  from  Royston 

To  a  guide  from  Barkham  Roads         

To  Weston  a  messenger  from  •Col.  Whaiey 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 


*  The  Artillery  with  transport  was  called  the  Train.  It  consisted  of  2  foments 
of  infiantry  and  2  companies  of  firelocks.  Ordinary  waggons,  driven  often  by 
London  hackney  coachmen,  were  hired  to  haul  the  guns. 

'  Battle  of  Marston  Moor,  July  2nd,  1644. 

^  L4eut. -Colonel  in  the  New  Model.  A  leader  in  the  opposition  to  the 
attempted  disbandment  in  April,  1647.  After  the  removal  of  Charles  from 
Holml^  House,  Whalley  was  sent  to  guard  the  King,  and  on  June  20th,  1647, 
was  sent  to  attend  him  to  Richmond.  When  the  King  fled  from  Hampton  Court, 
Nov.  nth,  1647,  he  left  behind  him  a  letter  thanking  Whalley  for  his  civility. 
Ruskworthy  VII,  p.  795. 


05 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

00 

04 

06 

01 

00 

00 

00 

04 

00 

00 

02 

00 

05 

05 

00 

00 

02 

00 

01 

II 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

01 

01 

00 

00 

06 

00 

00 

10 

00 

02 

01 

00 

03 

00 

00 

oo 

05 

00 

oo 

02 

00 

lO 

00 

00 

oo 

02 

00 

24 

13 

06 

24 

14 

00 

10 

00 

00 

156  SOME   CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

June  1647. 

To   Col.  Lambert   and  'Col  Hamond  for  post 

charges  to  New  Market         

27.     To  Mr.  Selby  for  spec/a/  service  

To  one  from  Mr.  Norton  w/th  intelligence 

To   one  Spencer  a   maymed   souldyer   of  Col. 

Stroudes  reg'  ...         ..  

To  Mr.  Richardson  towards  postage      

For  parchment  more         

29.     To  Mr.  Tarrant  for  sevrall  joumyes  as  by  bill 
To  Mr.  Richard  Kingdome  [Agitator]  for  monyes 

laid  out  by  him         

To  Capt  Waterhouse  by  spec/a/  Command     ... 
To  the  hoste  of  the  Crowne  Inne  in   Uxbridge 

for  the  use  of  his  house 05     00     00 

To  3  poore  Country  people  whoe  were  opprest 

by  souldyers 00     15     00 

To    Ben :    Wynch    of   Colebrooke    towards    the 

losse  of  his  grasse  by  the  horseguards       ...       01     00    00 
To  a  poore  man ...       00     05     00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

July  1647. 

3.  To  Mr.  Heath  for  divers  Joumyes  and  dayly 
pay  as  by  bill 

To  Edw.  Alley  for  his  grounds  etc       

To  a  guide  from  Wickam  to  Reading 

To  L'  Chillingden  for  divers  bookes  printing  at 

Cambridge  &  charges  about  the  same       ...       28     12     06 

To  Mr.  Allen  [the  Agitator]  for  extra  [service] 

charges  for  Messengers         ...       looooo 

*  Colonel  of  a  foot  regiment  in  the  New  Model.  Hammond  upheld  the 
claims  of  the  army  against  the  House  in  the  strife  of  the  spring  of  1647,  but 
seems  to  have  soon  doubted  the  right  of  the  army  to  withstand  Parliament  by 
force,  and  resigned  his  commission.  In  Sept.,  1647,  Fairfax  made  him  Governor  of 
the  Isle  of  Wight.  In  Nov.,  1647,  Charles  fled  from  Hampton  Court,  and  threw 
himself  on  the  protection  of  Hammond,  as  one  who  had  fought  against  him 
"without  any  animosity  to  his  person."  Charles  found  the  distracted  Hammond 
not  a  protector  but  a  gaoler,  and  while  in  Nov.,  1647,  he  wrote  **  I  am  daily  more 
and  more  satisfied  with  this  governor,"  in  the  summer  of  1648  he  changed  to 
**  the  devil  cannot  outgo  him  neither  in  malice  nor  cunning."  In  Nov.,  1648,  Fairfax 
sent  for  Hammond,  and  in  his  absence  Charles  was  seized  and  taken  to  Hurst 
Castle. 


54 

09 

06 

02 

10 

00 

00 

08 

06 

SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS.  1 57 

£  s.  d. 
To  a  messenger  Irom  Henley  with  W/res  about 

Chester  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       oo    02     oo 

For  goeing   by   water  &   other  expenses   about 

fetching  [Mr.  Nobury]  etc 00    05     00 

To  Mr.  Hodgson  the  Chinirg^^w  that  came  with 

the  Declaracon  of  the  Northeme  forces     ...       10     00     00 

12.  To  a   Messenger  from   Barkam   Road  to   Col. 

Whaley  at  Royston 01     06    00 

[Disbursed  upon  severall  warr^^ts  of  his  "Excellen- 
cies to  be  p^/d  out  of  BristoU  monyes  when 

that  fell  shorte]  

To  W°»  Ingram  a  poore  souldyer  00     10    00 

13.  To  Capt.  Cadwell  for  postage  to  BristoU  ...       05     00    00 
To  Capt.  Eyton  for  postage  from  St.  Albans  to 

London  01     10    00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

To  a  Messenger  from  BristoU 00     10    00 

To  one  [of  the   Agitators]  for   goeing   post  to 

Bristol! 03     03     00 

14.  for  mending  the  brasse  scrue[?]  00    02     06 

To  Mr.  Edw :  Watts  for  severall  Journyes  as  by 

bill       ...         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       26     06     06 

19.  To   Capt  Lawrence   for   handcuffes   and   other 

Irons  prisoners  

To  ^Col.  Harrison  for  extra  charges        

20.  To  a  poore  Yorkshire  man         

21.  To  a  poore  woman  &  one  Mathew  Dyer 

22.  To  a  guide  from  Reading  to  Alesberry 

23.  To  Mr.  Spaven  for  contingent  charges  as  by  bill 
To  a  spec/a/  Messenger  from  Alesberry  to  Oxford 

24.  To  another   Messenger 

To     Mr.   Symonds    for    4    Meddalls    [for     Mr. 

Margarets     Mr.   Wragg    Capt.   Bradford    & 

myselfe]  02     05     00 

To  Mr.  Hardward  for  printing  the  Fvoclamalt'on 

about  impressing  horses  etc.  02     06    00 

*  Fairfax  gave  Harrison  the  command  of  a  re^ment  of  horse  in  June,  1647. 
He  held  extreme  political  views,  and  already  in  1647  denounced  Charles  as  a  man 
of  blood,  and  was  later  very  zealous  in  bringing  him  to  trial. 


01 

08 

00 

10 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

09 

II 

00 

00 

15 

00 

00 

18 

00 

158  SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

£    X.    d. 

To  Mr.  Powell  for  monyes  given  by  the  Generalls 

Command  to  the  souldyers  at  Wallingford  02  00  00 
27.     To  one  Moore  of  Bedford  whoe  had  9  wounds 

by  2  Troops ..       01     00     00 

To  a  poore  vn^dow  whoe   lost   her  husband   in 

the  service       00     10     00 

To  Mr.  Watts  [whoe  translate  Ba ?s  history]       01     00     00 

To    Mr.  Faulkland   the    Messenger  for    coming 

from  London  to  Bedford  about  extr^  business      02     06     00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

July  30. 

30.     To  Phillips  the  Messenger   upon   his   goeing  to 

London 

To  4  Capt:  that  came  out  of  Ireland 

To  a  poore  woman  of  Durham 

To  a  poore  man   for  hay  at   the  Hart   Inne  at 

Layton 

To  a  man  that  lost  his  hogge     

To  a  poore  woman  

To  a  Messenger  out  of  Essex  from  the  ^Earle  of 

Warwicke 
To  one  from  the  Governor  ofH'ilbury 

August  1647. 

To  Mr.  Richardson  Waggoner  for  horses  etc  ...  06  00  00 
To  Richard  Nimli  [?]  Robert  Woodhand  Paul 
Freeman  Alice  Freeman  Margaret  Fletcher 
5  poore  people  that  came  from  Ireland  ... 
To  a  guide  from  Wickham  to  Colebrooke 
For  charges  in  writing  the  declaracon  &  Proposalls 
To  Capt.  Clarke   for  riding  post   from   Reading 

to  London  about  the  charge  ..  ...       02     00    00 

^  The  Earl  of  Warwick  took  a  prominent  part  in  the  colonization  of  America, 
and  in  1643  was  made  governor  of  all  the  islands  and  plantations  subject  to  the 
Crown.  He  was  a  leader  of  the  opposition  to  Charles  I,  and  a  friend  of  the 
Puritans.  In  1642  he  was  made  admiral  of  the  fleet,  but  his  command  ended  with 
the  Self  Denying  Ordinance.  On  the  revolt  of  part  of  the  fleet  in  1648,  Warwick 
was  made  lord  high  admiral. 

^  On  July  30th,  1647,  some  of  Fairfax's  regiments  seized  on  Tilbury  Fort,  on 
their  advance  to  Ixjndon  to  protect  the  true  Parliament  expelled  by  the  violence 
of  the  mob. 


00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

05 

00 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

12 

00 

£ 

s. 

159 

d. 

o6 

00 

00 

00 

10 

00 

05 

00 

00 

06 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

SOME  CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

To    Mr.  Allen   &    Lt.  Chillingden    for   severall 

charges 

To  a  poore  man 

To  Capt  Wilkinson   upon  his  goeing  into  the 

North  ... 
To  Thom.  Trap  Chyrurg^«  to  the  Trayne  for 

his  cheste        

More  to 'Col.  Fleetwood's  Chyrurgeon 

To    Thom.   Symonds    Chyrurgeon    to    Colonell 

Harrisons  reg* 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

To  W«>  Cromwell  Surgeon  to  the  Generalls  reg^ 
of  foot 

To  Edw :  Atkinson   Chyrug^^/i  to   Col.  Lambert 

To  Sam  :  Browne  Chyrurg^^w  to  K)ol.  Rainsborow 

To  Thomas  Jones  Chyrurg^^w  to  'Lt.  Generall 
Cromwell         

Pap^r  and  Inke  at  severall  tymes  

To  a  guide  from  Bedford  to  Wickham 

To  Mr.  Mathews  whoe  went  Poste  to  Yorke  ... 

To  Col.  Herberts  Chyrurg^^«      

To  Mr.  Cleare  Chyrurg^^^  to  Col.  Hortons  regt. 

To   Zachary   Standard   which   should   have   bin 

given  him  at  Exeter 02     00    00 

To  M'  [Bedford]  Payne  for  a  journey  from 
Bedford  to  Newcastle  and  backe  to  Hamer- 
smith 

To  Eliz.  Askeene  for  severall  services 

To  M'  John    Dawbron    Col.  Okeys  Chyrurge^w 

To  M'  Johnston  one  of  the  K's  servants 

To  Capt.  Bulmer 

*  Colonel  of  a  regiment  of  horse,  a  "cluster  of  preaching  officers  and  troopers." 
In  the  quarrel  between  Parliament  and  the  army  in  the  spring  of  1647,  Fleetwood 
was  one  of  the  officers  appointed  by  the  army  to  treat  with  the  Parliamentary 
Commissioners.  Fleetwood  was  in  complete  agreement  with  Cromwell  both  in 
opinions  and  policy,  and  was  later  raised  by  him  to  high  office. 

*  A  leader  of  the  Republican  fraction  of  the  Independents,  and  an  advocate  of 
manhood  suffice.  Rainsborow  was  active  in  i)romoting  the  Agreement  of  the 
People  in  Nov.,  1647.  In  Jan.,  1648,  he  was,  in  spite  of  great  opposition,  made 
vice-admiral,  but  was  superseded  in  a  few  months  by  the  ^u^l  of  Warwick.  He 
was  murdered  in  Oct.,  1648. 

^Cromwell  was  made  lieutenant-general  of  the  New  Model  Army,  in  June, 
1645. 


03 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

01 

01 

09 

00 

07 

00 

02 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

00 

10 

00 

03 

00 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

l6o  SOME  CIVIL   WAR  ACCOUNTS. 

£  s.  d. 
To    M*"   John    Robbinson    Chyrurgeon   to  ^Col. 

Overtons  regiment  for  medacam^wts  ...  03  00  00 

For  bringing  the  box  of  pap^r  etc.  from  London 

to  Kingstone 00  03  00 

To  M*"  Curteis  for  M*"  Allen  [the  Agitator]     ...  01  05  00 

To  M*"  Harris  the  Printer  for  severall  things  ...  04  01  08 

To  M"*  Tarrant  for  Journeys  as  by  his  bill  ...  44  10  06 
To    one    Redworth    a    poore    Lancashire    man 

wounded  in  service    ...         ...         ...         ...  00  10  00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

To  M""  Richardson   more   towards   postage  into 

the  North        12  02  06 

To  M*"  Blacklock  Chyrurgeon     03  00  00 

To  a  poore  man  that  came  out  of  Ireland      ...  00  05  00 

To  a  poore  woman  that  came  out  of  Ireland..  00  02  06 

To  one  Davis,  a  poore  Almesman  of  Worcester  00  05  00 

To  M"*  Payne  for  goeing  to  London  and  backe  00  10  00 

To  M""  Grove  Col.  Prydes  Chyrurg^^« 03  00  00 

17.  To    M*"   Fothergill   and   M*^  Crosse   Chyrurg^^w 

of    the     Generalls     and    *Col.    Tomlinsons 

regiment  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...  06  00  00 

18.  To  [Paul  Best]  a  prisoner  in  the  Gatehouse  ...  02  00  00 

19.  To  W°»  Mason      00  05  00 

To  M^  Cooke       00  10  00 

To  M"  Bucknell  ...         00  10  00 

To  Capt  Scot        00  10  00 

Charges  about  the  large  remonstrance 00  05  00 

To  a  poore  man  in  hide  Parke  ..         00  10  00 

21.     To  M*^  Payne  for  a  Journey  to  London  and  backe  00  10  00 

To  Anne  Garre  a  poore  woman 00  10  00 

To  another  poore  woman  00  05  00 

To  Mary  Browne  a  poore  widd^w         00  10  00 

To  M'^  Morley  Chyrurg^^«  to  Col.  Hewson  ...  03  00  00 
To  M*"  Blackmoore  whoe  suffered  much  by  the 

enimy 01  00  00 

To  M*"  Childe  that  he  laid  out  for  Contingencies  04  13  06 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 


*  Colonel  of  Dragoons,  and  one  of  the  extreme  parly  in  the  army. 

^  Colonel  of  a  regiment  of  horse.     Custodian  of  the  King  during  his  trial. 


i6i 

£ 

s. 

d. 

OO 

10 

00 

00 

lO 

00 

00 

04 

00 

00 

00 

06 

SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  M^  Pinckney  a  poore  woman  of  Colchester 
To  Anne    Peaseley   whoe   had   4  or  5  children 

killed  in  Ireland        00     10     00 

To  one  Clarke  whoe  came  with  a  peticon  from 

the  souldyers  in  Bristoll       

26.     To  2  poore  women 

For  bringing  parchm^;it  by  water 

To    M'    Broad    Chyrurg^^w    to    Col.  Ingoldsby 

regiment  03     00    00 

To  M*^  Rowland   Chyrurg^^w  to   Col.  Barksteads 

regiment  03    00    00 

To  M""  Richardson  for  severall  things  as  by  his 

bill       02     08     00 

To  a  Messenger  to  goe  to  Turnam  greene  and 

backe  

To  a  poore  woman  at  Kingston  

21.     To  the  watermen   for  goeing  severall   tymes  to 

Tumeham  Greene  with  papers         

To  a  Messenger  w/th  papers  thence     

20.     To  M"  Martin  a  poore  widdow 

30.     To  a  Messenger  to  and  from  Turnam  Greene 

To  John  Craven  a  Yorkshire  man        

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

Sept.  1647. 
I.     To  the   Marshall   of  Col.  Barkstead's  regiment 

for  a  paire  of  handchuffes 

To  a  Yorkeshire  woman   that  went  to   Beverley 

To  M'  Tateham 

To  Lannc.  Burt  for  attendance  at  the  Generalls 

quarters  00     10     00 

To  a  poore  souldyer  in  the  way  from  Kingston 

to  Ware  00     02     06 

16.     To  Richard   Pitt   and   John   Fawke  [Agitators] 

from  Poole      ...         01     00    00 

To  Mary  Holloway  by  Command         02     00     00 

To    John     Balsour    and    Elizabeth    Alkene    by 

Command        ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       03    00    00 

To    M'   Richardson    for   severall    Contingencies 

laid  out  as  by  Bill 04     14     00 

To  W™  Mason  the  North  Countryman  ..         ...       00     04     00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 


00 

03 

06 

00 

10 

00 

00 

09 

00 

00 

01 

06 

00 

05 

00 

00 

01 

06 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

01 

00 

00 

1 62  SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 


£    s.    d. 


33 

OI 

06 

oo 

ID 

00 

OI 

OO 

00 

oo 

05 

00 

oo 

02 

06 

86 

14 

06 

oo 

05 

00 

oo 

02 

06 

oo 

02 

06 

oo 

10 

00 

39 

09 

06 

Oct.  1647. 

4.     To  Edw.  Watts  for  Journyes      

To  M*"  Tateham  by  Command 

To  Monsieur  Huray  the   Frenchman  whoe   pre- 
sented the  Art  of  the  goeing  of  of  a  peece 
To  M'  Waive  whoe  lost  his  estate  in  Ireland  ... 
To  the  widd^TO/  Humerston  and  another  widdow 
13.     To  M""  Cad  well  for  severall  Journyes  and  dayly 

pay       

To  a  poore  souldyer  for  his  releefe      

To  Welthian  Joanes  by  order 

15.     To  Eliz.  Wynne 

To  Mary  Crossely 

To  M*^  Heath  for  dayly  pay  and  Journyes 
For    goeing    by    water    and     sending     severall 

Messengers      00     16    06 

To   M'  Butterfeild  a  sick   troop   whoe  lost  the 

Muster  etc. 
7.     To  M'  Heath  which  he  laid  out  for  pap^r     .. 
To  M""  Hatter  for  goeing   by  water  and   other 

things 
23.     To  L^  Col.  Meysey  a  poore   knight  of  Windsor 
To  Thorn.  Booth  a  maimed  souldyer 
To   Welthian   Jones  a  widdow   whose   husband 

was  slaine  at  ^Exeter 
To  Eliz.  Hepe  of  Devon  whoe  lost  her  husband 
To  M'  Bret  for  3  Trumpeters  and  3  Marshalls 

men  proclayming  the  Generalls  proclamacon      02     05     00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

October  1647. 

25.     To   the   widdow    Parsons   whose    husband    was 

slaine  at  Taunton      00    02     06 

30.     To  M"  Allen  L'  Aliens  wife  whoe  was  slaine  at 

Terrington       01     00     00 

[To     M^    Gillet    for    62    daies    attending     the 

Coww/Vtee  for  dispatches     26     13     06] 


01 

00 

00 

00 

05 

00 

01 

03 

06 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

01 

00 

00 

00 

10 

00 

1  Exeter  surrendered  to  Fairfax  in  April,  1646. 

^  Taunton  was   besieged   three   times   during   the   first   Civil   War.    The   third 
siege  was  raised  in  June,  1645. 


^63 

£ 

s. 

d. 

OI 

00 

00 

41 

12 

06 

02 

00 

00 

00 

10 

00 

01 

06 

02 

14 

00 

00] 

[30 

10 

00 

SOME   CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

November  1647. 

3.     To  5  souldyers  of  Col.  Lilburnes  regiment 

10.  To  Mr.  Tarrant  for  Journyes  as  by  bill 
To  John  Staythe  for  extra  service  in  the  Army 
For  goeing  by  water  and  sending  to  the  Generall 

at  Turneham  Greene 

To  Capt  Lawrence  for  prisoners  dyet 

11.  [To  M*^  Hatter  for  life  guard  pay  

12.  To  Lancelet  Burt  being  sick      

To  a  Messenger  to  London   from    Putney  with 

l^//res  in  the  night 00     06     00 

14.     To  a  Messenger  to  Turneham  Greene  and  Elyng 

with  k/^res      00     05     00 

15-16.     For  charges  in  writing  the  Generalls  remon- 
strance.-* 

For  pap^ 

For  a  Clarke  for  helping  at  Hartford 

17.     To  M'  Williams  for  severall  Journyes,  as  by  bill 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

17.     To  a  guide  for   the  Generall   from   Rislippe  to 

Kingston         00    05     00 

For  the  Northeme  W/res  to  ^Putney  and  sending 

them  away  to  Ware 00    03     00 

To  a  poore  woman  at  Kingston 00    05     00 

To  2  poore  women  at  Windsor...  ...       00     10    00 

To  a  Messenger  with   k//res   from    London   to 

Windsor  01     00    00 

To  M'  Bevhill  for  writing  severall  orders  of  the 

house  concerning  the  Army 02     00     00 

To    M*^    Powell    which    he    laid    out    to    Capt. 

Bedman  00    05     00 

To  a  L*  that  came  out  of  Ireland        00    05     00 

Paid  at    Kingstone   for  one  of  the   life  Guards 

quarters  00    06     00 

Given  to  the  guard  there  00     05     00 

»  The  headquarters  of  the  army  were  removed  to  Putney  in  August,  1647. 


00 

12 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

05 

00 

05 

12 

00 

£ 

i. 

d. 

02 

OO 

00 

OO 

02 

06 

OO 

05 

00 

OI 

00 

00 

OO 

12 

00 

OO 

05 

00 

OO 

02 

06 

164  SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  the  Trumpeters  of  the  life  guard    

To  Walter   Plitt  a  souldyer  in   Capt.  Ingoldsby 

company  ...         

To  Capt  Scroope  the  Engineere 

25.  To  the  Canoneers  at  Windsor 

26.  To   3    widdowes    wid^>w   (^onaway    Wynne   and 

Hickson    whoe   lost    their   husbands  in   the 
service  ... 

27.  To  the  prisoners  of  Col.  Lilburnes  regt. 
To  a  poore  woman 
To  a  poore  souldyer  whoe  came  with  a  peticon 

from  Bristoll   ...         00     10     00 

To    25   souldyers   of  CoL  Lamberts   regt.  8   of 

Col.  Barksteads  and   one  of  Col.  Overtons 

whoe    petitoned    the    Generall    for   pay   for 

their  quarters 01     14     00 

To   A.  Jackson   and   Thorn.  Tomlinson  2  York- 

shiremen  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       00     10     00 

To  M"*  Richardson  which  he  laid  out  for  severall 

Contingencies 02     08     00 

To    M*"    Powell    w^/ch    he    disburst    for    extr^ 

charges...         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       03     01     00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

Dec.  1647. 

3.  To  M*^  Tirwhitt  by  Command 05     00     00 

4.  To    Mary    Roberts    a    female    scout 

Sherborne        

5.  To  Capt.  Eyton  for  postage  into  the  west 
To  John  Waus  a  poore  souldyer 

7.  To  the  poore  Gunner  at  Durham  that  was  shot 

blinde  and  lame  00    05     00 

8.  To  a  Post-boy  from  Hounsloe  to  Windsor  with 

k//res 00     06     00 

9.  To  Hester  Wilmot  a  poore  souldyers  wife       ...       00    05     00 

10.  To  Beniamin  Ridley  for  severall  Journyes  as  by 

bill       05     05     06 

11.  To  John  Horton  Rowland  Steward  W"»  Scrivener 

John  Targrett  Patricke  Holston,  5  souldyers 

of  Col.  Lilburnes  regt.  01     05     00 

To  a  souldyer  at  Windsor  castle  00     05     00 


taken 

at 

... 

... 

00 

10 

00 

rest 

... 

02 

00 

00 

• .. 

... 

02 

00 

06 

i6c 

£ 

S, 

d. 

OO 

lO 

OO 

12 

OI 

OO 

00 

lO 

OO 

OI 

00 

00 

00 

05 

00 

OO 

05 

00 

OO 

02 

00 

SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  Edw.  Suckly   whoe  had   his  sonne  slaine  in 

the  warre         

13.     To  M*"  Spavan  which  he  disburst  as  by  bill    ... 
14-     To  Capt.  Scot  formerly  of  the  life  guards 

To  M*^  Austin  the   Printer  of  the   orders  about 

Provender        00     15     00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

Dec.  1647. 

To  M*"  Tarrant  for  several!  Journyes     11     15     00 

To    Capt.   Eyton   for  carryeing   of  k/Zres   from 

Windsor  to  London 01     00    00 

17.     To  Tarrants  brother  for  goeing  to  Denham     ...       00     10     00 
To  Mr.  Tarrants  brother  before  his  goeing  into 

the  Isle  of  Wight       ...  00     15     00 

10.     To  M*"  Williams  the  Farrier  for  a  Journey  from 
Windsor  to  London  and  backe       

24.  To  a  poore  sick  souldyer  

25.  To  one  Rachell 

To  another  souldyer         

To    M*"    Spavan     for    charges    in     finding    out 

L*  White  whoe  kild  the  man  00     10     00 

31.     To   the    wi^ow    Langley    towards   her   losse  by 
souldyers    at    the    Armyes    coming    up    to 

London  

To  the  widd^?a;  Hunt      

To  one  Smalwood  

To  Edw.  Taylor  Chyrurgeon       

To  M'  Tarrant  for  severall  Journyes     

27.     To  M'  James  Wynter  for  a  recruit  chest  for  the 

Generalls  regt.  ...         ...         03    00    00 

Jo.  Barkstead. 
E.  Grosvener. 

According  to  your  Excellencies  Order  of  the  24th  of  June  wee 
have  Examined  this  Account  and  doe  finde  there  are  Receipts  as 
to  the  greatest  somes  therin  mentioned,  and  for  the  lesser  somes 
many  of  them  being  very  inconsiderable,  and  paid  out  uppon 
suddaine  occasions  when  an  Acquittance  could  nott  conveniently  bee 
had  wee  doe  humbly  recommend  them  to  your  Excellency  for  your 
approbation  and  Allowahce. 

Jo.  Barkstead.  Jo.  Rushworth. 


02 

00 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

II 

06 

00 

1 66  SOME  CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

An  Account  of  monyes  disbursed  for  Contingencyes  from 
Jan.  1647  to  Jan.  1648. 


£ 

s. 

d. 

05 

00 

00 

20 

00 

00 

8.     To  Capt  W"  Jones  for  losses  in  the  service  . 
12.     To  M*"  Mosse  for  service  in  the  North 

To   L*  Col.  Salmon  for  his  and   Sir  W«»  Con- 
stables charges  into  the  Isle  of  Wight       ...       40     00     00 
To   M*^   Glapthom   5^  and   to   M""  Roberts   for 

extra  service  10*         15    00    00 

5.     To  10  Dragoones  that  came  of  from  Capt.  Farmer     01     10    00 

19.  To  Nath.  Duncan  for  Nich.  Forde  and  5  other 

gent,  that  came  out  of  Ireland        05     00     00 

To  L*  Col.  Kelsay  for  extra   charges   disbursed 

at  Oxford        100    00    00 

To  M"^  Parsons  a  gent  whoe  came  out  of  Ireland 

and  seaven  others  for  releefe  09    00    00 

To  M*"  Roberts  for  severall  persons  and  spec/a/ 

service  in  Windsor  Castle 14    00     00 

21.  To  John  Stevens  and  4  other  souldyers  of  the 

lord  Generalls  regt.  to  carry  them  home    ...       01     15     00 
To  M*^  Roper   for  goeing   twice   from   Windsor 

to  London  and  back 

24.     To  Ben.  Ridley  for  Joumyes 

To  Capt.  Sanders  for  riding  Post  to  GXoMcester 
26.     To  Capt.  Goldsmith  for  Journyes  as  by  warrant 

20.  To  M'  Higgins  a  Messenger  from  Col.  Harrison 

22.  To  M""  Stoddart  for  repairing  the  Waggons     ... 


Feb.  1647. 

5.     To  Capt  Walter  for  Contingenaes  for  Col.  Horton 

9.     To  Sir  Hard.  Waller  for  extra  charges  in  the  West 

To  M"*  Mabbot   for  184  daies  pay  from   the  2^ 

of  Aprill  1647  to   the   2^   of  Oct.  1647   at 

$s,  6d,  per  diem  

4.     To  M'  Humberston  for  severall  Journyes 
II.     To    M""  CoUingwood   155.     To  M*^  Shipwith   2' 
to  M*"  Hill  a  poore  knight  of  Windsor  2  ox. 
and  to  M"*  Booker  los,         04     05     00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 


02 

02 

00 

06 

19 

00 

03 

00 

00 

14 

13 

00 

02 

00 

00 

05 

17 

00 

25 

00 

00 

300 

00 

00 

50 

06 

06 

20 

00 

00 

20 

00 

GO 

o6 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

14 

00 

00 

06 

10 

00 

SOME   CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS.  167 

£      s-      d. 
Feb.  1647. 

II.     To  M*"  Hatter  for  3  weekes  pay  at  5^.  per  diem       05     05     00 
16.     To    M"^    Bourchier     and    19    other     disbanded 
souldyers  of  the  L'  Generalls  regt 

18.  To  M'  Foxcroft  and  M**  Lacock  for  releefe  ... 
To  John  Tarington  Trumpeter  for  extra  service 
To  M*^  Eyton  for  severall  Journyes       

19.  To  M*"  Whittington  for  bookes  for  the  Army... 
To  M'  Sexby  for  severall  Journyes  and  losse  of 

horses 15     00    00 

To  M"^  Broad  for  representacons  printed  at  Yorke 

and  disp[o?]sed  for  the  used  of  the  Army         16     13     04 

II.  To  M"^  Rich.  Cadwell  which  he  disbursed  at 
Maydenhead  35J.  To  Henry  Wilmot  towards 
his  charges  to  CoL  Horton  to  W"*  Mason  for 

releefe  i/.  and  to  M'  Meysey  30X 

To   M'  Hatter  for  2  moneths  pay   of  the   life 
guards  upon  disbanding        

24.     To  L'  Generall  Cromwell  for  Coxi^Angencies 

29.     To  M""  Purvile  for  extra  service 

March  1647. 
3.     To  Quartermaster   Generall   Grovener  for  addi- 

tonall  pay  from  the  21  Dec.  to  this  day   ...       23     15     00 
13.     To    M*"  Hatter  for  a  fortnights   pay  of  the  life 
guard  one  for  quarters  and  the  other  [for] 

disbanding       03     10    00 

9.     To  Capt.  L^  Ellis  for  a  weekes  pay  for  the  life 

guard  at  disbanding 187     17     02 

S.     To  Capt  Hamden  for  severall  charges 70    00    00 

9.     To     Major    Thom.    Jourden    and    Capt.   John 

Aubrey  for  a  weekes  pay  as  of  the  life  guard      03     10    00 
To    M""   Woolsey   which    he   laid    out    for   the 

quarters  of  severall  Troops  at  Windsor      ...       03    07     00 
To   M*^   Powell   and    M'  Richardson    for  extra 

service ...         ...         55     00    00 

To  M'  Powell  wAich   he  disbursed   for   severall 

particulars        17     02     06 

Ex.  E.  (irosvener. 


\sic 

06 

05 

00 

14 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

1 68  SOME   CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

£        S.        d. 

March  9.     To  Anthony  West  Trumpeter  to  carry  him 

into  the  North 01     10     00 

10.     To  M*"  Enington  for  extr^  service         08     00     00 

To  Capt.  Disney  for  mony  lost  by  Maf/Ser  Rogers 

when  he  was  taken  prisoner  at  Farrington  15     16     00 

To  M*"  Wansey  for  a  weekes  pay  in  the  life 
guard  i/.  155.  and   to   M*"   Ryley   for   extra 

service  3/.        ...         04     15     00 

15.  To  Capt  James  Jolly  for  the  use  of  himselfe  and 
8  other  Capta/«j  for  their  their  (sic)  charges 
in  raising  and  disbanding  their  companyes       200     00     00 

To  Col.  Hewsons  Marshall  for  carrieing  ammun- 
ition into  Kent  01     06     06 

To  M*"  W*"  Bumell  a  Messenger  whoe  brought 
the  newes  of  'Pembrooke  castle  5*  and  to 
Capt.  Young  for  4  souldyers  of  Sir  Hard. 
Wallers  regt.  i'  ...         ...         ...         ...       06     00     00 

To  M*"  Horseman  a  German  to  carry  himselfe 
to  carry  himselfe  (sic)  to  Col.  Tomlinsons  regt. 
i/.  \os,  and  to  M*"  Bland  for  releefe  i/.  ioj.       03     00     00 

To  Col.  Eyre  for  paym^«t  of  the  souldyers  before 

the  15^^  Jan.  at  Hurst  castle  28     07     00 

To  L*  Ellis   for  sending  downe  Armes   to  Coll. 

Hortons  regt.  ...  10     15     06 

29.     To  Capt.  Scot  for  releefe ..       05     00    00 

Aprill  1648. 

4.     To  Capt.  Wilkinson  for  scarfes  etc 06     00    00 

To  M*"  Fulford  for  attendance  at  the  headquarters 

and  writing  the  Queenes  \eUres  etc.  ...       06     05     00 

I.     To   M*"  Arthur  Annasley  for   Coniingencies  laid 

out  by  *CoL  Fleming  before  Pembroke  Castle       20    00     00 
To  M*"  Whiting  himselfe  and  M*"  Allen  for  extra 

service  in  the  Army  ...         ...         ...         ...       20     00     00 

3.     To  Comet  Tiringham  for  extra  service  ...       10     00     00 


^  On  March  2nd,  1647,  news  reached  London  that  Col.  Poyer,  Governor  of 
Pembroke  Castle,  had  refused  to  deliver  up  his  charge  to  the  officer  sent  by 
Fairfax  to  take  it  over. 

^  On  March  23rd,  1647,  Col.  Fleming  was  driven  out  of  Pembroke  by  Poyer, 
and  the  town  was  not  regained  by  the  Parliamentary  troops  till  July  nth,  1648. 


SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS.  1 69 

£       S,       ./. 

5.     To  M*"  Gillot  for  dayly  pay  from  the  30  Oct  to 

the  28  Dec 12     00    00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 


Aprill  1648. 

13.  To  M*"  John  Smith  and  other  tropps  for  speaa/ 

service 02     00     00 

15.  To    M*"  Stevenson   for   a    Co[?]t    of  guard   at 

Windsor  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       09     06     04 

14.  To  M'  Woodroffe  whoe  came  with  \ettxts   from 

Col.  Horton 03    00    00 

17.     To  Capt.  Bray  in  parte  of  his  arrears 20     00    00 

To  Capt  Phil.  Watson  for  extra  service  2^  to 
Jeremiah  Bowyer  for  releefe  i*  to  Wentworth 
a  troops  wife  30X.       04     10     00 

4.  To    L^   Col.  Frogmorton    for  forces    raised    for 

Ireland  afterwards  by  order  disbanded       ...       76    00    00 

2.  To  M""  Mabbot  for  halfe  a  yeares  pay  from  the 

2^  Oct  1647  2^  Apr.  1648  at  55.  per  diem         50    00    00 
21.     To  John  Pearse  for  W/res  from  Col.  Horton    ...       01     02     06 

May  1648. 

3.  To   M*^  David   Walter   whoe   came   with   k//res 

from  Col.  Horton       03     10     00 

To  M*^  Spavan  for  Contingencies  for  L*  Generall 

Cromwell  at  his  goeing  into  Wales 200    00    00 

5.  To  M*^  W"»  Allen  to  buy  him  an  horse  ...       10     00    00 
3.     To  Col.  Deane  to  enable  his  regiment  to  march 

into  Wales       100     00     00 

1 1 .  To  L^  Clarke  for   his  release  out  of  Pembrooke 

castle  and  other  charges       12     00    00 

12.  To  M"^  Bourchier  40?.  to  L*  Meysey  30J.  and  to 

Capt  Bulmer  for  releefe  30J.  05     00    00 

13.  To  Comet   Tuke  w>4/ch   he   laid  out  for  horses 

in  the  West 15     03    04 

16.  To  M"^  Cobham  for  charges  in  carrieing  Ammu- 

nition from  Windsor  to  Gloucester  by  land       66     00    00 


^  On  May  ist  news  arrived  that  all  South  Wales  was  in   revolt.     The  Council 
of  War  at  once  sent  Cromwell  there  at  the  head  of  five  regiments. 


170  SOME   CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

£        S,       d. 

17.     To  Mathew   Stoddard   for   bringing  a  Gin  from 

Wallingford  to  Windsor         ...         ...         ...       03     00    00 

To    him     more    for    Carpenters     Smyths    and 

wheelers  worke  07     06     10 

24.  To   M""   Hen.  Marston   for   riding   post   out    of 

Yorkeshire       07     00     00 

To   Mr.  Snow   for  carrieing   8   waggons   of  the 

trayne 08     02     00 

To  Mr.  Snow  for  covering  and  colouring  of  the 

Generall  his  waggons 05     07     02 

19.     To  John  Pemay  for  carrieng  Ammunition   from 

Windsor  to  Wallingford         ...         ...         ...       00     12     00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

25.  To  Capt.  Brayfeild  wA/ch  he  disbursed 02     04     10 

26.  To    L*    White    for    monyes    laid    out    by    Col. 

Fleetwood  to  one  that  roade  Post  to  Bury 
19.     To  Henry  Hamond   for  charges  of  the  Trayne 

into  South  Wales 
23.     To  M""  Mathew  Stoddart  for  reparing  Waggons 
26.     To  M*"  Wynter  for  Medicines      

June  1648. 

To    Rich.    Truman    and    Thom.   Wharton    for 

severall  services  02     00     00 

6.     To  ^M*"  Wynter  for  Medicines 08     13     01 

To  CoL  Fleetwoods   Trumpeter   for  a  horse   he 

bought  of  a  souldyer  tooke  of  a  Countryman       03     00     00 
17.     To   John    Smith    for   a    horse    he    lost    in    the 

storme  of  ^Maidstone 

8.     To  M*"  Richardson  for  monyes  disbursed  by  him 
To  Capt.  Watson  for  Col.  Needham      

July  1648. 

4.  To  Erasmus  Sanders  for  restoring  a  horse 

8.  To  M*"  Thornehill  for  k//res  from  Colchester . . . 
10.  To  Capt.  Disher  for  a  souldyer  in  his  troop   ... 

9.  To  Thom.  Webb  for  a  horse  he  tooke 


07 

00 

00 

20 

00 

00 

01 

09 

10 

08 

I^ 

OT 

06 

00 

00 

04 

10 

00 

20 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

OI 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

1  Chirurgeon-general  to  the  army. 

2  Maidstone  was  storroed  and  taken  by  Fairfax  on  June  ist,  1648. 


171 

£ 

s. 

d. 

o3 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

02 

II 

00 

01 

10 

00 

01 

10 

00 

02 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

08 

00 

00 

SOME  CIVIL  WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

10.     To  Lt.  Thompson  for  repaire   of  his   losse   by 

the  enimy        

12.     To  M*^  Webb  for  the  wounded  souldyers 

18.     To  M'  Joslyn   for   mony  laid   out   by  him  and 

to  M*"  Webb  for  sick  and  maimed  souldyers 

To  George  Wilmore  for  k//res  out  of  Kent    ... 

To     M'    Rushworth    which     he    disbursed    for 

*Granadoes       03     05     00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

22.     To  M*^  Patricke  for  a  moneths  pay       

25.  To  Dan.  Creswell  Smith  at  Lexden  for  Iron   ... 

26.  To   M''  Joslyn   for   the   wounded   souldyers   at 

London  

To  M*"  Rich.  Winsmore  for  l^/Zres  out  of  Wales 
31.     To  M*"  Rowe   Deputy  Scoutmaster  Generall   for 

horses 60    00    00 

August  1648. 

I.  To  M'  Calendrine  for  intelligence         

3.  To  M'  Webb  for  wounded  souldyers 

5.  To  L*  Johnson  w^/ch  Major  Gibbon  laid  out 

6.  To  M"^  Stoddant  for  Carpenters  worke 

7.  [To   Capt  Ca for  a  seaman   that   went  into 

Holland  &  other  charges      08     10     11] 

To    M"^  Webb  for   disbursements   for   wounded 

souldyers         

To  Capt.  Young  for  lead  to  make  bulletts 

8.  To   M"^  Davis   Tentkeep   for  2  moneths   pay  at 

2S.  per  diem    ... 

9.  To  M'  Richardson  laid  out  by  him      

14.     To  W"»  Karis  for  transporting 

16.  To  M'  Snow  for  a  Tent  for  his  ^xoellency     ... 

17.  To  Webb  for  wounded  souldyers  

18.  To  M*^  Hen.  Moulton  for  special  service 

19.  To  M*^  Patrick  for  a  moneths  pay  from  July  20 
24.  To  M'  Mosse  for  service  in  the  North 

To   M'  Fosberry  for  5  weekes   looking  to   sick 

souldyers         ...       03     10    00 

*  Small  explosive  shells.     Modem  grenades. 


10 

00 

00 

04 

00 

00 

05 

10 

00 

14 

19 

06 

10 

00 

00 

12 

10 

00 

06 

00 

00 

05 

II 

06 

05 

00 

00 

35 

04 

00 

05 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

01 

10 

00 

61 

00 

00 

172  SOME  CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS. 


d. 


August  1648. 

To  M"^  Webb  for  sick  souWyers 

05     00     00 

To  M""  Foxcroft  for  extra  service 

05     00     00 

26.     To  M*"  Edw.  Joslin  for  his  attendance  upon  sick 

souldyers  07     07     00 

29.     To  Col.  Barkstead  which  he  laid  out  in  Kent  10     10     00 
To  M*"  John    Rushworths   for  severall   disburse- 
ments         25     00    00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 


29. 


Sept. 
8.     To  John  Warren  a  Troop  for  extra  service     ...       05     00     00 
To  M'  Adey  for  service  in  looking  to  sick  and 

wounded  souldyers 10     00     00 

4.  To  John  Balwin  for  conveniencies  for  sick  and 

wounded  souldyers     ...         

To  M*"  John  Snow  for  covering  4  Waggones  ... 

5.  To  Capt.  Disher  for  conveying  prisoners 
18.     To  Thorn.  Fosberry  for  looking  to  sick  souldyers 

3.  To  M""  John  Wilson  for  spec/a/  service 

To  M*"  Powell  for  service  

To    Eliz.  Alkin    for    looking    to    the    wounded 

souldyers  

4.  To  M"^  Cox  for  charges  of  a  shipp  at  Rotterdam 
7.     To  Hen.  Sharpe   and    Robbert  Cobbett    to  buy 

them  horses    ... 

30.     To  M*"  James  Wynter  for  medicaments 

To  M""  Winter  for  extra  service 

20.     To  M*"  Richardson  for  severall  things  which   he 

disburst  by  order 
30.     To  Capt.  Lawrence  for  Contingencyes 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

Oct.  1648. 
2.     To  M*"  Mabbet  for  184  daies  pay  ending  Oct.  2       50     05     06 
20.     To   M"^  Webb  for   monyes  laid   out  to   maimed 

souldyers  02     05     00 

24.  To  M»"  Ryley  for  Escutcheons  for  the  Generalls 
tent  4^  to  Thom.  Jones  i^  and  Henry 
Baynard  2'  for  releefe  ...         ...         ...       07     00    00 


01 

II 

06 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

01 

16 

00 

80 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

16 

08 

00 

12 

00 

00 

03 

16 

00 

10 

00 

00 

90 

00 

00 

15 

06 

01 

173 

£ 

J. 

d. 

o6 

00 

00 

03 

16 

02 

10 

00 

00 

04 

04 

00 

SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

10.     To    the    Tentkeep    for    60   dales    paie    ending 
Sept.  30  

12.  To     M""     Collins     for     covering     Waggons     at 

Nottingham     

10.     To  M""  Richardson  for  severall  things  laid  out 

13.  To  Jacob  Hanaky  which  he  laid  out 

10.     To    Capt.    Ireton     for     bringing    Cannon     from 

Langepoint  to  ^Colchester 15     13     00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

I.     1647.  Dec.  1648. 

5.     To   Capt.  Eyton    for  postage   from    Windsor   to 

Blandford        

To  2  troops  th^t  came  from  the   Isle  of  Wight 
8.     To  M*"  Davis  Tentkeep  for  pay 

13.  To   Thom.  Erie   for   charges   from   the   Isle   cf 

Wight 

5.     To  L*  Ellis  for  severall   yi^^sengers  from   Wales 

To    L*    Bridges    for    monyes     laid    out    before 

'Pontefract        

16.  To  W"  Turner   for  coales  and   candles   for  the 

guardes  at  the  'Mewes  

To  Capt.  Disher  for  his  guards  at  S'  Albions... 
To  M*"  Bret  Trumpeter  for  dayly  pay  Dec.  i... 
To    M"^   Vaux    for   sending    Armes    to   the    L* 

Generall  ...         02     17     06 

15.     To    Capt.  Joyce   for   charges    betweene    Portes- 

mouth  and  the  Isle  of  Wight  

14.  To  U  Col.  Axtell  for  Straw       

To  him  more  for  coales  and  candles    ... 

17.  To    Capt    Pretty    for     severall     Journyes     and 

expences  to  the  Isle  of  Wight         17     10    00 

23.     To  L*  Mosse  which   he  laid  for  carrieng  mony 

to  \J  Generall  Cromwell       ...       05     00     00 


02 

00 

00 

08 

00 

00 

06 

02 

00 

01 

10 

00 

10 

15 

06 

02 

12 

06 

[ob. 

01 

10 

03 

06 

00 

00 

15 

05 

00 

16 

10 

00 

07 

12 

00 

07 

13 

00 

*  Colchester  was  besieged  by  the  Parliamentary  troops  from  June  14th  to 
Aug.  28th,  1648. 

'  Pontcfract  Castle  was  surprised  and  captured  by  the  Royalists  on  June  1st, 
1648,  and  was  not  regained  by  the  Parliamentary  troops  till  March,  1649. 

•'The  Parliamentary  troops  were  quartered  at  the  Mews  from  Jan.,  1648. 


174  SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 


d. 


I6I7 

02 

06 

60 

00 

00 

40 

00 

00 

191 

18 

07 

03 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

08 

07 

00 

15.    *To  CoL  Butler  and  Col.  Fincher  for  disbanding 

their  troopes 

26.     To  M*"  Spavan  for  service  in  the  North 

19.  To  the  lord  Calfeild  for  speciVz/  service 
15.     To   Capt.  Joyce   for   D   Col.  Cobb^   at   Hurst 

castle 100     00     00 

7.     To  Capt.  Pitson  which  he  laid  out  for  Provisions 
the  first  night  the  Army  came  to  Towne  ... 

20.  To  W"  Turner  for  coales  at  the  Mewes 
To  L^  Budger  for  charges  in  the  publiq  service 
To  Capt.  Ireton  for  carriage  of  Ammunition  .. 

23.     To    M*"    Ady    Chyrurgeon    for    looking    to    the 

wounded  men  before  Colchester     ...         ...       23     15     00 

31.  To  M*"  Fosberry  for  15  daies  pay  at  2s.  per 
diem  for  looking  to  the  wounded  men  8/.  loy. 
and  30X.  to  a  nurse  and  to  Jones  Williams 
for  her  paines  5/.  55 15     05     00 

23.  To  Capt.  Wane  [?]  for  the  charges  of  himselfe 
and  5  more  to  Windsor       ...  

26.  To  Capt  L'  Browne  for  horses  in  Kent 
25.     To   George   Phillisticke  for  severall   things   laid 

out  as  by  bill 

27.  To  M*"  Turner  for  Coa/w  etc 

29.  To  M*"  Turner  for  hay  taken  from  him 
To   Col.  Pryde   w^/ch   he   lent   Capt.  Joyce   for 

publique  service 
To  him  more  for  straw  etc. 
25.     To    M**    Knight    for   67    daies    pay   as    Chaplin 

when  *M*"  Dell  and  M*"  Saltmarsh  were  absent       26     16     00 

30.  To   M*"  Woollsey   w^/ch   he   disburst   for  those 

that  staid  for  orders 05     04     06 

To  Mr.  Payne  for  attending  the  Councell         ...       92     00     00 

31.  To  M*"  Stapleton   for  pay  as  Chaplin   to  the  L' 

Generall  in  the  North  72     03     04 


30 

00 

00 

16 

00 

00 

22 

06 

01 

04 

06 

04 

03 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

13 

10 

00 

*  Rushworth,  on  Dec.  i6th,  1648,  writes:— **  Yesterday  Col.  Butler  and  Col. 
Fincher*s  troops  were  disbanded ;  they  received  1,600  and  odd  pounds  at  disband- 
ing."    Rushworth,  II,  p.  1365. 

*  Two  well-known  divines,  "spiritual  writers  rather  than  eminent  theologians." 
Dell  became  an  antinomian.  In  the  campaign  of  1645-6  he  was  made  chaplain 
to  the  Parliamentary  Army,  and  in  1649  Master  of  Caius  College,  Cambridge. 
Saltmarsh  was  a  champion  of  complete  religious  liberty,  and  the  author  of 
innumerable  tracts.  In  1646  he  became  an  army  chaplain,  and  in  December  of 
the  next  year  he  died. 


SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

30.  To  Capt.  Norris  for  speda/  service        

31.  To  M*^  Bret  for  a  moneths  pay  to  this  day    ... 
30.     To   W°>  Manistee   whoe  was   wounded   at   Col- 
chester  

27.     To  M*"  Lovejoy  for  dayly  pay  from  Nov.  26  1647 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 


17! 

£ 

s. 

d. 

10 

00 

00 

03 

17 

06 

01 

00 

00 

36 

10 

00 

Sans  warrant 

An  Accompt  of  Monies  disburced  for  Contingencies  from 
January  x   1647  to  Jan.  i   1648. 

6.     To  John  Hellyer  a  Maimed  Souldyer  ...         ...       00     10     00 

To  2  Cripples       00     05     00 

8.     To    Edw.  Finch    and    John    Keysbrooke   poore 

Souldyers  to  carry  them  home        00     10     00 

10.     To  John  Eviner  to  carry  him  to  Coll.  Lilburnes 

Regiment         

To  L*  Heydon  for  releife  

To    Stephen    Young   and    John    Highin    poore 

sold/ers  

To  a  poore  woeman         

20.     To  3  of  ColL  Whalleys   Troupe   to  carry   them 

home    ...         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       00     15     00 

[To  Sam.  Mott  one  of  the  Marshall  Generalls 
men  for  going  with  Orders  to  Coll.  Hewson 

6  daies...         

To  a  poore  Sold/er 

To  John  Staithe  for  going  to  Carisbrook  Castle 
in  the  Isle  of  Wight  and  passage  by  Sea  . 

[To  M"^  Hobson  for  releife  

22.     To  Constance  Heme  and  Eliz.  Richerd 

To  M*"  Fawkard  Messenger  to  the  ^Committee 
of  both  Kingdomes  for  going  from  Putney 
to  Hartford 01     05     00 


00 

05 

00 

01 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

12 

00] 

00 

05 

00 

03 

10 

00 

01 

00 

00] 

00 

05 

00 

*  The  Committee  of  Both  Kingdoms  arose  in  1644  out  of  a  proposal  to  form 
a  committee  to  treat  with  the  Scots.  A  permanent  committee  of  seven  Peers  and 
fourteen  Commoners  was  appointed  to  join  with  the  Scotch  Commissioners  for  the 
l)etter  managing  the  affairs  of  both  nations  in  the  common  cause.  It  was  entrusted 
with  the  carrying  on  of  the  war,  and  with  foreign  policy,  and  was  responsible  to 


176  SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  M'  Perleur  and  another  of  the  Generalls 
troops  att   Disbr         

To  Abra  Tiell  and  others  of  Col.  Hewsons 
Regiment  who  were  left  behind  in  Sussex  to 
carry  them  into  Kent  

To  another  Sold/er  

To  one  of  Col.  Thomeys  Regt 

To  Jo.  Atkins  disbanded  fro  Col.  Hortons  Regt. 

To  M"-  Tatam        ,. 

To  M*"  Mason 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 


s. 


00     10     00 


00 

08 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

01 

00 

00 

I. 

To 

2. 

To 

3- 

To 

To 

To 

To 

8. 

For 

To 

To 

To 

To 

R.To 

To 

R.To 

[I. 

.  To 

R.To 

R.To 


Febr.  1647 

Welthian  Jones  

the  Widdow  King      

the  \Viddo2v  Dunfeild  

the  w'lddow  Foxcroft 

the  widdow  Redyer 

a  poore  Sold/er  

bringing  Monyes  from  Guildhall     

the  mddow  Townesend  and  another  widdow 
Phil.  Corbett  of  Coll.  Lilburnes  Regt. 

Chr.  Baynbridge  

Fra.  Jones        

M""  Eyton   for  a   Journey   to   London   and 

backe... 

Rich.  Colson  and  10  other  Sold/ers  dis- 
handed  out  of  S*"  W"*  Constables  regt.  each  35. 
a   poore  woeman   whose    Unshand  was   in 

prison  in  Lanca^/^rp]  ...  

W"  Prim  and  2  others  each  2s,  6d, 

the  widdow   Langly  in   consideration  of  her 

losses  by  soldiers 

M'  Brett  for  severall  Journeys         


00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

02 

06 

00 

10 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

0.^ 

00 

01  00  00 

01  16  00 

01  00  00 

00  07  06 

03  00  00 

07  05  00 


Parliament.  Gardiner  sees  in  it  the  germ  of  political  union  between  England 
and  Scotland,  and  also  of  the  modern  Cabinet  system.  The  Committee  drew  up  the 
scheme  for  the  New  Model  army,  and  planned  the  campaigns.  In  Jan.,  1647,  to 
end  the  connection  of  the  Scots  with  the  government  of  England,  it  was  dissolved, 
and  the  supervision  of  public  affairs  was  given  to  the  English  members  only. 
Gardiner,  I,  p.  357,  and  III,  p.  288. 


177 

£ 

s. 

d. 

OI 

04 

00 

oo 

02 

06 

SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To    Hugh    Partridge    and    6    other    disbanded 

Sold/'ers  each  35 

To  John  Stacy  [?]  of  Coll.  Hewsons  Regt. 
16.     To  Math.  How  and  3  other  Sold/ers  of  S*^  W"" 

Constables  Regt 00     10     00 

To    Mary   Rothery   who    left    her   husband    in 

Irela/id 00     02     06 

To  Merrian  Coe  another  poore  widdow  ...       01     00    00 

To  Eliz.  Clough   and   W\A.^ow   Bannister  whose 

Husbands  were  killd  in  Irelar/id      00     10     00 

To  Tho.  Maney  and  4  other  disbanded  Sould/ ers 

of  Coll.  Ewers  Regt.  each  31.  00     15     00 

To  a  Sold/'er  that  lost  his  eyes  in  Irek/id       ...       00     02     06 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 


19.     To  James  Gibson  a  disbanded  sold/'er 

To  Isabell  Barker 

To  a  poore  Sold/'er  

To  Marshall  and  Gaunt  2  disbanded  sold/ers... 

To  John  Bridger  ... 

To  Warren  Morris  ...         

To  W™  Simpson 

To  Hopkin  Jones  ..         ..  

2 1  R.  To   M'  I^nile  [?]  Chirurg   to  Col.  Riches    Regt. 

for  supply  of  his  Chest         

23R.  To  M'  Richard  Bourchier  for  releife     

25.     To  Faithfull  Chapman  L^  to  Coll.  Needham   ... 

To  John  Sharp  [?]  

To  Tho.  Wingod  a  poore  Sold/er  

To  a  Mess^/if^  from  the  Governor  of  South- 
a»i/ton 

To  the  Postmtf5/er  for  k//res  from  Coll.  Overton 

To  a  poore  Sold/er         

To  the  Lady  Mordant 

To  Bridgett  Bowell  

To  John   Bond  a  poore  Sold/er  

To  3  poore  Sold/ers        


00 

03 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

06 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

02 

06 

00 

02 

06 

00 

02 

06 

03 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

10 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

01 

06 

00 

03 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

02 

06 

00 

10 

(iO 

1 78  SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

March  1647. 
4  R.  To   the   Chirurgions   of  ^Com.  Generall   Iretons 
and    Col.  Whalleys    Regiments   for    Medica- 
ments     

8  R.  To  L*  Browne  for  Journeys  as  per  bill 

To  the  Lady  Beamont 

To  a  post  from  the  North 

To  John   Scaithe  a  disbanded   Sold/er  of  Coll. 

Overtons  Regt.  

To  a  poore  woeman         

To  Matthias  Baker  

To  Harman  Sword  and  other  disbanded  sold/ers 
To  the  Lady  Essex  for  Releife 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 
4.     1647. 

March  10.     To  Eliz.  Hunt  whose  Husband  was  slaine 
before  Bristoll     

To  2  sold/ers  of  Coll.  Ewers   Regt 

To  Penelope  Thorp  widdow       ...         

To  Jane  Durham 

For  charge  for  fetching  mony  fro  Guildhall     ... 
14.     To  Jane  Harvy  and   Mary  Clarke         

To  Capt°  Scott  for  releife  

To  Elinor  Sadler  a  poore  widdow 

To  Jo.  Mason        

To  Tho.  Ingram  a  poore  Sold/'er  

To  2  other  Sould/ers       ...         

To  M""  Adam  a  blind   person 

21.  To  2  poore  Sold/ers        ...  

To  Rich.  Bridgewater 

To  a  postboy  for  Le/Zres  ...         

20.     To  Jane  Cliflfe       

To  Bridgett  Leigh  

22.  To  M«^  Fra.  Fairboard  [Fairfax  wife  to  L'  Coll. 

Fairboard]       

To  the  widdow  Buckingham       ...         


06 

00 

00 

31 

01 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

02 

06 

01 

10 

00 

01 

00 

00 

00 

02 

06 

00 

02 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

02 

06 

00 

04 

00 

00 

06 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

02 

06 

00 

02 

06 

00 

05 

00 

00 

06 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

04 

00 

00 

06 

00 

00 

01 

06 

00 

15 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

^  Commissary-general  of  horse.  In  1646  he  married  Cromwell's  daughter 
Bridget.  "No  man,**  says  Whitelocke,  "could  prevail  so  much,  nor  order 
Cromwell  so  far,  as  Ireton  could."  He  was  the  mouthpiece  and  defender  of  the 
army,  but  wished  to  maintain  the  constitution  as  far  as  possible,  and  hated  the 
theories  of  the  Levellers. 


SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To   one   W"»  Clarke   formerly   under   the   E.  of 

Essex 

24.     To  the  vfiddow  Aiscough  

To  the  widd^?z«^  Fitzwilliams        

To  Edw.  Pourtier  a  sold/er  of  C.  G.  Iretons  Regt. 
28.     To  M"^  Perry        ...         

To  the  widdow  Meath  of  Col.  Rainsbrowes 
Regt 

To  Ann  Osborne  a  poore  mddow        

To  Ann  Gane       ...         

To  Jane  Bannister  

To  Mabell  Osborne  

To  Mary  Hill        

To  Jone  Mas  Eliz.  Askeene       

To  3  poore  Sould/ers      

To  Robert  Bayly 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 
5.     1647. 

30*^.  To  Rich.  Wentworth  trooper  in  Coll.  Whalleyes 
Reg 

To  Leiu*  Mathewes  his  wife  in  Coll.  Ingoldesbyes 
Reg.      

To  Jane  Sprately  wife  to  a  troop  in  Coll. 
Graves  Reg 

To  Mary  Rothery 

To  Anne  Parsons  whose  husband  was  slaine  at 
Taunton  

To  M"  Carey  whose  husband  was  kild  in  Ireland 

25***.  To  M*"  Cad  well   for  severall  Joumies  and  daily 

pay  from   the  13^**  of  October  1647  to  the 

25^  of  March  following        

To  Jane  Priest  a  poore  woman 

For  bringing  money  from  Guildhall       

Aprill  1648 

3">.  To  M"^  Bastard  a  Yorkshire  Gent 

To  Bridget  Bowell  

4^.  To    4    Exeter    Women    whose    husbands    were 
slaine  before  Exeter  ... 
To  W"»  Hick  a  Souldier  disbanded  out  of  S**  W"" 
Constables  Regiment 


179 

£ 

s. 

d. 

00 

05 

00 

02 

00 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

15 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

05 

00 

137 

00 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00     10     00 


00     05     00 


oo 

02 

06 

oo 

05 

00 

oo 

02 

06 

oo 

03 

00 

oo 

02 

06 

oo 

05 

00 

oo 

12 

00 

oo 

05 

00 

oo 

10 

00 

oo 

10 

00 

oo 

07 

06 

oo 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

180  SOME   CIVIL    WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

To    Mary    Jefferies    whose    husband    is    in    the 

same  Reg. 

To  Alice  Clarke  a  poore   Widdow         

To  Mary  Mathewes 

To  John    Bridge   a    Sould/Vr  disbanded  out   of 

S'  W*"  Constafi/es  Reg 

To  a  Porter  for  severall  L^//res 

To  John  Coren  of  Bradford       

To  4  disbanded  Souldiers 

6*^  To  Anne  Osburne  

To  M'*  Gurney  for  Releife         

12*^.  To  Christopher  Cox  and  other  Souldiers 

To  the  Widdow  Brookes  and  2  other  widdowes 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 
7.     1648.     000     [?]  V.R. 
4^*^.  To  Humphri^^  Jefferies  a  poore  wound^</  Soldier 

To  the  Guard  at  Windsor  Castle  

5^^.  To    the    widow    Mug  well    whose    husband    was 

slaine  at  ^Newbury     ...         ...         ...         ...       00     02     06 

To   M**  A^relius    Chirurg^^«   to   Coll.  Lilburnes 

Regt.  for  his  Chest 03     00     00 

To  W°>  Ripley  for  a  Journey  to    London   from 

Windsor  and  back 01     00     00 

10'**.  To  M*"  Griffith  Inkeep^r  of  Gloucest^/*  for  releif      01     00     00 
To     Tho.   Blaikestone    and     Hen.  Wakman    2 
Souldiers    of    Coll.    Deanes     Regim^w/    left 

behind 00     10     00 

I2'^  To  M""  Roper   for  a   Journey   to    London   with 

L^/Zres  to  the  Speaker  and  back 

To  a  poore  Souldier         

To  a  Post  from  S*  Albans  

13*^**.  To  Cap'  Baldwin  late  of  the  life  guard 

To  a  post  boy       

17'**.  To    M*"    Fulford    for    transcribing    the    Princes 
L^/Zres  etc.  and  attendance  from  the  29*^  of 

March  to  the  17***  of  May  1648     

20***.  To  L.  Browne  for  severall  journies  as  per  bill 
To  M^   Hutchins   post   boy   for   2    l^//res   from 
hondon  


01 

00 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

04 

10 

01 

00 

00 

00 

02 

00 

05 

05 

00 

33 

01 

00 

00 

10 

00 

^  The  first  battle  of  Newbury  was  in  Sept.,  1643,  the  second   in  Oct.,  1644. 


181 

£ 

s. 

d. 

o8 

19 

00 

oo 

05 

00 

oo 

02 

00 

oo 

02 

00 

oo 

05 

00 

SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

2  2***.  To  Ben.  Ridley  for  severall  iourneies  as  by  2  bills 

To  the  VViddow  James 

To  2  poore  Souldiers       

To  a  post  from   Lond^«  with  an   expresse  from 

the  North        

To  Capt.  Smith  who  was  lamd  in  the  service  .. 
To  a   footman   with    L^//res   from    Maj<?r  Gen. 

Skippon  00     04    00 

25^.  To     M*"     Fulford     for     bringing     I>//res     from 

LondoB  to  the  General!       00     10    00 

To  M*"  Paine  for  severall  iournies  as  by  bill  ...       13     00    00 
26'**.  To  M*"   Paxton   for  pap^r  inke   parchment  and 
other   necessan>5  for   the  Army   from   Sept. 

1647 46     14     II 

29***.  To  a  poore  woman  at  Greenewich  whoe  suffered 

losse  by  the  Souldiers  '        ...       00     02     00 

More  to  2  others...         00     10     00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

Aprill  15*^.    To  M*^  Smith  a  poore  widow  for  releife      00     10    00 

17.  To  the  horse  and  foot  guards  at  the  Gen.  Reg.       00     15     00 

18.  To  the  di^handed  Sould/Vr^  of  Col.  Prides  Reg. 

each  2S  6d. 

To  Tho.  Reynardson  who  lost  his  eye  in  Ireland 

19.  To  2  Souldiers  and  a  poore  Woman 

To  severall   poore   Souldiers   and  others   at   his 

Exc^//<?«cies  goeing  from  London 

To  a  poore  Waggoner  and  others         

To  one  for  writing  upon  extra  occasion 

To  Henry  Porter  for  Releife      

For  \nit\X\gence  at  London  on  the  'rebellions  day 
For  Bulletts  for  defence  of  the  Generals  Quarters 
To  M"^  Smith  more  for  releife 


01 

02 

06 

00 

10 

00 

00 

03 

06 

00 

10 

00 

00 

03 

06 

00 

03 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

09 

00 

00 

10 

00 

*  A  reference  to  the  riot  in  the  city  on  April  9th,  1648.  Rushworth,  on 
April  loth,  writes: — That  which  first  offers  itself  this  week  is  the  great  tumult 
which  broke  forth  in  London  by  a  company  of  rude  and  disorderly  persons  on  the 
Lord^s  Day  about  their  Sporting,  Tipling,  and  other  Disorders  on  that  Day,  in 
Contempt  of  the  Ordinance  of  Parliament.  **The  trained  bands  sent  by  the  Lord 
Mayor  to  interfere  with  a  company  of  rud*^  persons  playing  and  sporting  in 
Moore  Fields  in  Sermon  lime,'*  were  disarmed.  The  mob  was  later  in  the  day 
dispersed  by  Cromwell  in  the  Strand,  but  next  morning  the  whole  of  the  City  was 
in  the  hands  of  the  rioters.  The  riot  was  finally  suppressed  by  Barstead  on  the 
same  day. 


£ 

s. 

d. 

oo 

05 

00 

oo 

01 

06 

182  SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  the  horse  Guard  in  Qeene  streete 

To  a  Souldier  in  Coll.  Barksteads  Regiment    .. 

Laid  out  for  Charges  and  disbursements  to 
Messengers  Troops  and  others  in  Suffolk 
about  the  x^oeipt  of  8oo**  by  order  from  the 
Comw/Vtee  of  the  Army  and  bringing  it  to 
London    "        ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       15     00     00 

More  for  a  Mare   bought   there  to   bring   parte 

of  the  Money 10    00    00 

To  my  Selfe  allowed  for  goeing  from  Windsor 
to  Ipswich  and  other  partes  in  Suffolk  and 
back  to   Windsor  240  miles 06     00     00 

May  1648. 

2^**.  To  M*"  Heath  for  Journes  as  by  Bill 103  04  00 

To   M'   Brett   Trumpeter   for  68   daies   pay  at 

2S,  6d.  per  diem  08  10  00 

To  a  Souldier  in  Coll.  Barksteads  Reg.  ...  00  01  06 

To     Edw.    Treije    a     sick     Souldier    in     Coll. 

Hammonds  Regim*  ..  00  05  00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 
000     [?]V.R. 
June  i*^.  To  John  Carter  of  Coll.  Barksteads  Regimen/ 

for  a  white  colour  taken  at  Maidstone        00     10  '00 
2*K  To  the  Trumpeters  of  Coll.  Whalleyes  and  Coll. 

Riches  Regim*  02     00     00 

3**».  To  John  Whiting  a  poore  Kentish  Souldier    ...       00     05     00 
To    James    Sprunt    whoe   tooke    another   white 

colours  at  Maidstone 01     00     00 

4^.  To  the  Marshalls  man  for  the  fees  and  charges 

of  one  West  a  prisoner         00     15     00 

To  one  of  Coll.  Whaleyes  men   who  brought  in 

prisoners  ...       00     10     00 

To   3   Troopers   that   came   from   Coll.  Whaley 

with  W//res      ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       00     07     06 

6*^.  To  M*^  Goodale  for  a  Journey  from    London  to 

Rochester        ...         ..  ...         ...         ...       01     07     00 

To  a  poore  Souldier        ...       00    05     00 

10^.  To  2  of  Coll.  Riches  men  who  lost  their  horses 

in  Essex  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       01     00     00 


SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS.  1 83 

£       S,       d. 

To  myselfe  for  2  Journeyes  the  one  from  Windsor 
to  London  the  other  from  Rochester  to 
Ivond^w  02     07     00 

To   Richard   Trueman    for   taking  a  horse   and 

some  prisoners  ...       01     00    00 

To   Tho.  Wharton    for  vaXx^igence   from  ^  Dover 

cac&tle    ...         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       01     00     00 

i7*\  To  M'  Beale   the   Trumpeter  whoe  came   from 
the  ^revolted  Shipps 

To  a  Messinger  from  Coll.  Whalley       

To  myselfe  for  goeing  with  heftres  from  Graves- 
end  to  London  and  back  to  Londe?«  66  miles 

To  severall  poore  wounded  Souldiers 

To  Cap^  Goldsmith  upon  his  bill  for  iournies... 

To  one  for  helping  to  write  upon  extra  occasion 
18***.  To  a  Messinger  for  intelligence 

To  John   Haward  a  wounded  Souldier  in  Coll. 

Needhams  Regim^«/ 00     05     00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

9.     1648.  June  1648. 

June  18.     To  3  Sold/Vrs  who  went  under  the  walls  of 

'Colchester  and  brought  3  prisoners    ...       00     15     00 
21.     To   Adj*   Gen.  Bury    which    hee    disbursed  for 

inteiUgence       

To  Rich.  Armstrong  for  Journeys  

24.     To  M*"  Winter  for  severall  wounded  Soldiers  ... 
To  a  Messenger  with  l>//res  from  Oxford 

26.  To  Edm.  Young  a  wounded  Sold/'er      

27.  To  Coll.  Barksted  for  them  that  brought  off  the 

Ordnance  att  Colchester       


01 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

01 

13 

00 

00 

15 

00 

33 

07 

06 

00 

12 

00 

00 

OS 

00 

00 

10 

00 

01 

10 

00 

00 

12 

06 

00 

10 

00 

00 

03 

00 

02 

00 

00 

^  A  mutiny  broke  out  in  the  fleet  on  May  27th,  1648,  and  Dover  Castle  was 
besieged.     It  was  relieved  by  the  Parliamentary  troops  on  June  6th. 

*  There  had  been  for  some  time  no  good  understanding  between  ihe  army  and 
the  fleet,  and  in  the  end  of  May,  1648,  emboldened  l»y  the  successful  Royalist 
rising  in  Kent,  six  ships  in  the  Downs  declared  for  the  King.  The  mutiny, 
however,  only  spread  to  three  more  ships,  and  though  at  first  the  rising  appeared 
formidable,  Fairfax  successfully  routed  the  Kentish  army.  The  nine  revolted  ships 
went  to  Holland,  and  invited  the  Duke  of  York  to  come  on  board  as  their 
admiral.     Gardiner^  III,  Ixii  and  Ixiv. 

'  After  successfully  reducing  Kent,  Fairfisuc  turned  to  Essex,  and  arrived  before 
Colchester  on  Tune  12th,  1648;  the  town  surrendered  after  a  stubborn  defence  on 
Aug.  28th. 


184  SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 


d. 


GO 

10 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

15 

00 

07 

00 

00 

00 

05 

00 

08 

13 

00] 

17 

19 

00 

00 

05 

00 

01 

10 

00 

04 

06 

06 

To   Fra.  Owen    whose   Husband   was   slaine   in 

the  service       

To  Tobias  Maning  for  burying  an  Horse 
To  L*  Gifford  for  a  Mess^/i^^r  to  Oxford 

o     19.    To  M'  Roper  for  several  I  Journeys 

To   a   poore    woeman    whose   husba«^  was   an 

Ens/]fw  in  the  Generalls  Regt 00     05     00 

To  one   of  Coll.  Needhams   Souldiers   who   was 

taken  prisoner 

o      9.   [To  Ben.  Ridley  for  Journeys  

To  M""  Paine  for  Journeys  

For  a  Portmantua  to  carry  the  mony  etc. 
To  M"^  Brett  for  the  prisoners  in  Colchester  .. 
28.     To  Zachary  Standard  for  Journeys        

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

10.     1648.  July  1648. 

July  I.     To  Jos.  Parker  for  burying  a  dead  Horse...       00     09     00 
To     Coll.    Fox    and     another   ^Reformade    for 

xviXjt^igence       05     00     00 

6.     To  W*"  Tarrant  to  beare  his  Charges  to  Oxford      00     06     00 
9.     To   Lane.  Burt  for  enterteinem^«t  of  drummers 

from  Co\chester  00     09     05 

To    myself   for   a    Journey    to    London    about 

Contingencies  92  miles  ...  02     06     00 

12.     To   Hen.  Seagner   for   boating   Ammunition   att 

Mannitree  out  of  the  ^Hoy  to  the  Shore  ...       00     18     06 
o       To  M*"  Brett   for  daily   pay  92  daies  ac  2s.  6d, 

per  diem  

o     13.     To  Edw.  Watts  for  Journeys  as  by  Bill 

To  a  Messenger  from  Southampton       

17.  To  a  Messenger  w/Vh  InitWigence  from  London 
To  Zach.  Standard  for  a  Journey  

18.  To  Coll.  Ewers  Man  for  a  Mess^i^^       

To  Capt"  Scott  for  Releif  

1  Reformadoes  were  disbanded  soldiers.  GardituKy  III,  p.  106.  They  were  a 
constant  menace  to  Parliament,  because  of  ihe  non-payment  of  their  arrears. 

^  "  A  small  vessel,  usually  rigged  as  a  sloop,  and  employed  in  carrying 
passengers  and  goods  for  short  distances,  especially  on  the  sea  coast."  Smyth, 
Sailors'   Word  Book. 


II 

10 

00 

29 

04 

06 

00 

10 

00 

00 

10 

00 

01 

00 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

10 

00 

I«5 

£ 

S. 

d. 

OI 

00 

00 

oo 

05 

00 

06 

15 

00 

21 

16 

00 

22 

10 

06 

01 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS 

To  Capt"  Wheeler  for  ^InioiXigefue  from  Holland 

To  a  Troop  that  tooke  L*  Coll.  Weston 
o     20.     To  Benj.  Ridley  for  Journeys  as  per  bill  ... 
o     22.     To  M*"  Payne  for  Journeys  as  per  bill 

24.  To  Capt"  Goldsmith  for  Journeys  as  per  bill . . . 
To  Edw.  Ireland  who  tooke  a  Major  att  Maid- 
stone   ... 

To  Commissary  General   Ireton   to  buy  Horses 

25.  To  Capt"  Wheeler  for  ^InieWigence  out  of  Holk«d 
To  M"^  Everard  for  going  with  orders  to  Harwich 

29.     For  discharging  Quarters  for  some  Soldiers  that 

went  to  fetch  in  straglers 00     11     00 

To  Geo.  Haddon   for  buriall   and  other  charges 

of  one  of  the  L*  Generalls  troopers  ...       00     11     00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

August  1648. 

4.  To  John  Gelder  a  Messenger  from  the  (jovernor 

of  Boston        

5.  To  a  Messenger  from  Coll.  Scroope       

To  a  Messenger  from  ColL  Rich  

o       6.     To  M*^  Edw.  Watts  for  Journeys      

7.  To  M""  Greene  for  a  Journey  to  Harwich 
12.     To  M*"  Jones  for  Journeys  

8.  To  M'  Hatter  which  hee  laid  out  as  by  Bill... 
II.     To  Zachary  Standard  for  Journeys        

To  M'  Heath  for  Journeys        

15.     To  Jo.  Yates  Trumpeter  for  Charges  in  Kent... 
20  R.  To  M*"  Fulford   for  writing  and   attendance  as 

per  bill  

22R.  To  a  Messenger  from  Gloucester  

23R.  To  Jacob  Hannockey  for  going   to  Messinghall 

24.  To  M*"  Wms  for  Journeys  

To  M'  Catton  for  Journeys        

25.  To  M*"  Lovejoy  for  a  Joumy  to   London 

1  Possibly  about  the  arrival  of  the  Prince  of  Wales  in  Holland  about  July  9th, 
1648,  and  his  welcome  by  the  revolted  ships. 

«  On  July  i6lh  the  Prince  sailed  for  England  with  the  fleet. 


00 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

15 

07 

00 

00 

10 

00 

18 

07 

00 

16 

07 

02 

02 

13 

00 

63 

12 

06 

01 

00 

00 

06 

05 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

06 

00 

05 

12 

00 

03 

II 

06 

01 

03 

00 

i86 


SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 


26.  [To  Quartermaster  General  Ireton  for  an  Hoy 
from  Maningtree  to  Langerpoint  with 
Ammunition    ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       00     18     00] 

29.     To  M""  Wragg   which   he   disbursed  to  Seamen 

and  others       ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       01     10     00 


September. 

I.     To  M*^  Fosbery  for  a  weeks  looking  to  Maimed 

Soldiers  

o       2.     To  John   Matthewes  for  looking  to  Maimed 

Soldiers        

4.     To  a  wounded  Soldier     ...         

To  one  of  the  Scouts  men  upon  a  Message   ... 

For  bringing  a  Box  with  pap^r  etc.  from  London 

to  the  Heeth 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 
12.     1648. 
Sept.  5.    To  M*"  Lloyd  for  mony  laid  out  to  Gunners  [?] 

For  Candles  att  the  Heath         

To  Tho.  Smyth  for  Capt"  Graves  Waggon 
To  John  Berisford  for  IniQWigence  out  of  Kent 
29.     To  Tho.  Ripley  for  a  Journey  to  Norwich 

To  M""  Binning  a  Messenger  for  InteWigence     .. 
16.     To   Serj*  Hughes   for   looking   to  the   wounded 

Souldiers  att  Maiden...         

To    John     Edwards     Soldier    wounded     before 

Colchester 

27.     To  Capt"  Thomlins  for  Charges  in  Carrying  the 

Guns  to  Langer  point  

29.     To  M'  Crab  for  fetching  shott  from  Harwich.. 
For  a  portmantu   to  bring   Orders   and  Articles 

of  warr  to  the  Hith 

To  2  poore  men  there     ... 

To  M**  Woolsey  for  Journeys     

For  Arrowes  to  shoote  into  Colchester... 
23.     To  M^  Davis  Tentkeeper  for  covering  Waggons 
etc. 


00  14  00 

06  00  00 

00  02  06 

01  10  00 

00  18  00 


01  00  00 

00  06  05 

01  12  00 

01  00  00 

02  10  00 
01  00  00 

03  00  00 

00  05  00 

10  00  00 

01  00  04 

00  05  00 

00  10  00 

01  12  00 

00  06  08 

01  02  09 


02 

00 

00 

OO 

02 

06 

OO 

02 

06 

OO 

02 

00 

03 

00 

00 

21 

03 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

02 

06 

SOME  CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS.  1 87 

£       S.       d. 

October. 

7.  To  the  Frenchman  who  discovered  the  ^plott  att 

Sandwich         

To  the  Widdow  Davis 

To  the  Widdow  WalHs 

To  W"  Kirke  a  poore  Soldier 

o       To  Capt"  Joyce  before  his  going  into  the  North 

9.     To  Edw.  Watts  for  Journeys       

To  L'  Aliens  widdow       

II.     To  Eliz.  Alkeene  to  carry  her  to  London 

To   widdow  White   whose  Husband   was   slaine 

before  Colchester       ...         oo    05     00 

8.  To  M""  Cadwell  for  Journeys  and  daily  pay  from 

May  26  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     194     17     00 

II.     To  L'  Browne  for  Journeys  from  May  16       ...     074     00     00 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

13.  1648.  November. 

8r.To  Tho.  Reading  for  Guards  att  S*  Albans    ...       01     17     06 
6.     To    a    Messtf«^^r    who     brought    L^//res    from 

Stayning  01     00    00 

To   my   self  for  going   to   London   and    backe 

about  QonXxngencies  

To  W™  Shortly  disbanded  as  a  Supernumerary 

To  a  poore  Ministers  wife  

To     myself    for    going     to    London    with    the 

Remonstra;ir(^ 

For  bringing  pap^r  etc.  from  London 

To  severall  poore  Men 

27.     To  a  Messenger  from  the  Isle  of  Wight 

To  W™  Aldridge  whose  Horse  was  prest 
29.     To  W"  Maxwell  who  came  out  of  Ireland 

14.  To  a  poore  woeman        

To  a  poore  Lincolneshire  Souldier        

To  another  poore  Souldier         

To  2  More  

If.     To  my  self  for  going  to  Windsor  and  backe  ... 


01 

00 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

02 

06 

01 

00 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

04 

00 

01 

00 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

02 

06 

00 

01 

00 

00 

02 

00 

01 

00 

00 

'  Possibly  a  reference  to  the  landing  at  Harwich  in   May,  1648,  of  an  impostor, 
who  declared  himself  to  be  the  Prince  of  Wales. 


oo 

16 

09 

05 

16 

00 

24 

06 

06 

188  SOME   CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

£        S.       d. 

For  Charges  there  and  a  Clarke  to  write  severall 

nights 02     00    00 

Charges  for  severall  Clarks  att  S.  Albons         ...       01     00     00 

December. 

5R.  To  M""  Payne  for  Journeys         76     19     00 

8R.T0    M'    Thomson     the    Smith     for    worke    att 

Whitehall         

13R.  To  Capt"  Goldsmith  for  Journeys         

To  him  more         

I  R,  To  M'  Lluellin  for  Candles  for  the  Council   of 

Warr     ...         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       00     09     06 

Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 
14.     1648. 

Dec.  16.     To  M**  Brett  Trumpetter  for  Journeys     ... 
R.  To  him   more  for  procla/w/Vi^  the  proclamacon 
R. To  M""  Bishopp  for  worke  about  the  traine     ... 
R.  To  M""  Heath  for  Journeys  and  daily  pay 
To  the  Glazier  for  mending  windowes  att  Windsor 

For  Candlesticks  for  the  Councell        

To  a  poore  Troops  wife  of  Coll.  Riches  Regt. 
To   the   widd^TO/   Curtis   whose  husbfl«^/  was   in 

S^  R.  Prests  Regt      00     10    00 

19.  To   the   smith    for    Locks   about   the   Chamber 

where  the  Councell  sate       

20R.  To  John  Roberts  for  Journeys 

21  R.  To  M'  English  Tirrell  one  of  the  Marshalls  men 

for  2  Journeys  to  Windsor 

20.  To  Ben.  Ridley  for  Journeys      

21  R.  To  M""  Edw.  Watts  for  Journeys  

23.     To  Geo.  Philliskirke  for  Inkehornes  and  pap^r 

17.     To  M'  Jo"  Robinson  in  Newgate  

20.     To  Susann  Adams  

To  Ann  Hobson  ...         

22.     To  the  Lady  Beamont 

27.  To  M""  James  Winter  for  his  Chirurgeons  Chest 
27.  To  John  Vickeridge  who  was  wounded  att 
Colchester       ...         

To  a  post  boy       

To  Lament  Scott  a  poore  Soldiers  wife 


09 

06 

00 

01 

16 

10 

03 

18 

06 

85 

05 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

OS 

00 

00 

03 

06 

03 

14 

06 

00 

12 

00 

03 

14 

00 

24 

13 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

02 

06 

00 

01 

00 

00 

10 

00 

03 

00 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

02 

06 

00 

05 

00 

189 

£ 

s. 

d. 

oo 

lO 

00 

oo 

lO 

00 

OI 

00 

00 

SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  Eliz.  Bently  whose  husband  was  an  Ensigne 

and  lay  sicke 

For  Locks  and  keys  to  several!  doores  in  Whitehall 

28.     To  Margerett  Hawley  a  Troops  wife    

R.  To  M'  Rabisha  for  a  Journey  from   London  to 

Colchester       01     01     00 

R.  To  M*"  Paine  for  Candlesticks  and  other  things 

for  the  Generalls  Councell 

To  him  for  Candles         

To  a  poore  woeman  whose  Husband  was  slaine 
31  R.  To  M"^  Williams  for  a  Journey  from  Windsor  to 

London  

To  Rich.  Marshall  Collermaker  upon   his  Bill... 
Ex.  E.  Grosvener. 

According  to  your  Excellencies  Order  of  the  24"^  of  June  wee 
have  examined  this  Account,  and  doe  finde  there  are  Receipts  as  to 
the  greatest  somes  therin  mencioned,  and  for  the  lesser  somes, 
many  of  them  being  very  inconsiderable  and  paid  out  uppon 
suddaine  occasions  when  noe  acquittance  could  conveniently  bee 
had  we  doe  humbly  recomend  them  to  your  Excellency  for  your 
approbacion  and  Allowance. 

Jo.  Barkstead.  Jo.  Rushworth.  E.  Grosvener. 


00 

12 

04 

00 

16 

06 

00 

03 

00 

01 

00 

00 

03 

04 

02 

An  Accott«t  of  Monyes  disbursed  for  Contingencyes  from 
Jan.  the  first  1648  to  the  Jan.  i   1649. 

Jan.  2.     To  Col.  Harrison  and  S'  Hardresse  Waller 

to  be  disposed  of  to  poore  Irish  officers      50    00    00 

3.  To    M'    W"*    Turner    for    coales    candles    and 

Faggots  for  the  horse  guards  at  the  Mewes 

4.  To  Cap' Lawrence  for  severall  disbursements    ... 
8.     To  M'  Snow  tentmaker  for  worke  done 

To  Abr.  Newbold  for  attending  the  Councell  ... 
3.     To  M'  Boys  for  disbanding  the  Pyoners 

5.  To  Thom.  Nash   wheelewright   for  worke  before 

Colches/^r       03     01     00 

6.  To    Cap*    Harding    for    sending    Armes    and 

Ammunition  to  Weymouth 12     00    00 

To   John    Buckingham    for   an    hor$e    he    lost 

before  Colchester       04     10    00 


04 

08 

00 

00 

19 

08 

04 

19 

05 

02 

18 

04 

25 

04 

00 

£ 

s. 

d. 

05 

07 

10 

04 

04 

07 

03 

02 

00 

04 

06 

06 

10 

00 

00 

24 

10 

00 

43 

10 

02 

01 

18 

06 

02 

02 

02 

190  SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

II.     To  Major  Cobbet  for  charges  about  the  Waggons 
To  M'  Turner  for  coales  etc.  at  the  Mewes    ... 

15.  To  M**  Fishe   which  he   laid   out   for   souldyers 

before  Colchester       

17.  To  M""  Turner  for  coales  etc.  at  the  Mewes    ... 

16.  To  Abr.  Newbold  for  Maior  Evelyn  and  others 

whoe  went  to  the  Isle  of  Wight     

18.  To  Capt.  Roger  West  for  service  in  the  life  guard 
To  Capt  Lawrence   Marshall  Generall   for  Con- 

\Sxi%encits  16     13     00 

To  him  more  for  Bedsteads  etc.  for  the 

at  Whitehall 

To  Nath.  Bamock  for  himselfe  and  18  watermen 
To  ^M**  B/V^^p  Farrier  for  Iron  about  the  trayne 
To    M"^   Sam.  Strong   for    an   horse   he    lost   at 

Colchester        09     00    00 

To  M'"  Spavan   for   monyes  laid    out    by  the  L' 

Generall  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       56     00     00 

19.  To    Capt.  Weare    for   pay    as    Quarter    Master 

Generall  in  the  North           113  10  00 

23.     To  Col.  Harrison  for  charges  in  his  Journey  to 

'^Hurst  castle 07  12  06 

To  M'"  Bret  for  extra  service  before  Colchester  10  00  00 
16.     To  Capt.  Snipe  to  bury  Cap^  Scot  255.  to  widdow 

Balston  20s,  to  a  boateman  33 j.      03  18  00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 

1648. 

Jan.  25.     To  M""  Turner  for  coales  etc.  for  the  Mewes       08     05     06 
To  the  clarke   of  the   house   of  Commons   for 

extra  service 

26.     To  Capt.  Morgan  for  charges  the  first  night   .. 
To  Dorothy  Bretch  for  repaire  of  her  shop     .. 

Feb.  1648. 

To  M*^  Fruen  for  QonKmgencies  in  the  North  ...       22     18     02 
To   M'  Cadwell   for  charges   in   bringing  mony 

out  of  Kent 04    03     06 


04 

00 

00 

16 

03 

01 

02 

00 

00 

1  Vide  page  188,  Bishopp. 

2  On  Dec.  ist,  1648,  Charles  was  removed  from  Carisbrook  to  Hurst  Castle, 
and  on  Dec.  i6th,  Col.  Harrison,  at  the  head  of  a  large  body  of  horse  and 
dragoons,  went  to  Hurst  Castle  to  order  his  removal  thence. 


191 

£ 

S. 

d. 

i8 

13 

10 

12 

04 

00 

07 

15 

02 

14 

04 

00 

06 

04 

00 

20 

17 

10 

10 

13 

00 

06 

08 

04 

15 

02 

04 

06 

12 

05 

03 

06 

08 

10 

00 

00 

02 

02 

04 

06 

II 

09 

09 

00 

00 

04 

05 

08 

SOME  CIVIL  WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

To  M*"  Turner  for  coales  etc.  at  the  Mewes    ... 
To  Com.  Phipps  for  carrieing  Ammunicon  etc. 
To  M'  Turner  for  a  weekes  coales  for  the  Mewes 

To  Capt.  Joyce  for  severall  charges       

To  M*"  Davis  for  Attendance      

To  M""  Powell  which  he  disburst  for  Qox\i\n%encies 
To  M""  John  Winter  for  medicines  for  Hull  ... 
To  M"*  Winter  for  medicines  for  the  trayne  ... 
To     Marshall     Bannock     for     Linkes    etc.    for 

Whitehall         01     15     06 

To   Col.  Bridges    for   carrieing   Ammunition   to 

Coventry  from  Warwicke 
To  M'  Turner  for  coales  at  the  Mewes 
To  M"*  Bret  for  proclayming  proclamations 
To  M"^  Sexby  for  QonXm^etuus  which  he  laid  out 
To  M''  John  Hill  for  riding  post  from  Hurst  castle 
To  M**  Turner  for  coales  etc.  at  the  Mewes    ... 
To  M*^  Hills  printer  for  5000  of  the  Agreement 
To  Rich.  Marshall  Collermaker  for  worke 
To  Major  Scarth  for  charges  [for]  at  Helmesley 

castle  and  charges  at  55.  per  diem 27     00    00 

To  Eliz.  Bevey  and   Anne   Lumley   for  present 

support  03     00    00 

E.  Grosvener.  J.  B. 

1648.  March. 

To  James  Barnard  for  severall  disbursements  ... 
To  M*^  Turner  for  coales  etc.  at  the  Mewes    . . . 

To  M'  Bret  for  2  moneths  pay 

To  M^  Pancefoote  for  Capt.  Packer  for  Contin- 

gencies  for  the  Qommiiite  of  discoveryes    ... 

To  Capt.  Breretons  mddaw  for  releefe 

To  M""  Turner  for  coales  

To   L*  Herbert   for   his   losses   by  the  Armyes 

falling  into  his  quarters         20    00    00 

To    Capt.  Gates    for   conveying    prisoners   from 

Newcastle  to  London  ...  50    00    00 

To  Mary  George  for  repamton  of  losses  2/.  and 

to   Dorothy  Bright   for  her   losse   in   West- 

minsier  hall  2/.  04     00     00 


03 

09 

01 

06 

03 

02 

07 

07 

06 

50 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

06 

02 

03 

£ 

S. 

d. 

OI 

00 

GO 

07 

00 

08 

50 

00 

GO 

05 

09 

08 

01 

03 

06 

12 

12 

GO 

05 

09 

08 

192  SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  James  Farmenton  a  souldier  wounded  in  Kent 

To  M""  Turner  for  coales  etc 

To  M"*  Standish  for  extra  service  and  expenses 

To  M""  Turner  for  coales  etc 

To  M'  Wheeler  for  pay  etc.  for  the  Committee 

of  Exactions 

To  M"^  Shambrooke  which  her  husband  disburst 

To  M'  Turner  for  coales  etc 

To  Major   Rolphe   for  monyes   disburst   in   the 

Isle  of  Wight 02     10    00 

To  M^*  Boyce   in  parte  of  her  husband   Capt. 

Boyces  Arreares         ...  10    00    00 

To  Sarah  Jenings  for  releefe      02     00    00 

To  Col.  Deanes  Waggoner  which  he  laid  out  in 

Wales 00     17     02 

J.  B.  E.  Grosvener. 

1649.  Aprill  1649. 

2.     To   M""   Mabbot   for  6  moneths   paie   from   the 


5.  To  M""  Charleton  waggoner  which  he  laid  out 
in  Wales  

To  M""  Turner  for  Coales  at  the  Mewes 

To  M'  Davis  Tentkeep^r  for  2  monethes  pay... 

To  M""  Bret  for  a  moneths  pay  ending  March  31 

To  M"^  Paxton  for  pap^r  etc.  from  May  12  1648 

9.     To  L*  Browne  for  extra  service 

10.  To  Marshall  Generall  Lawrence  for  Q,on\\Ti%encies 
12.  To  Col.  Barkstead  for  Qon\xn%encies  for  Yarmouth 
14.     To  M'  Turner  for  coales  etc 

To  2  Chesterfeild  men  for  releefe         

To  M'  Margaretts  for  extra  service       

18.     To  M^  Turner  for  Coales  

23.  To  M""  Mathew  Stoddart  Carpenter  for  worke 
about  the  Trayne      

To  M"*  Bishop  Blacksmith  for  worke 

More  to  him  upon  another  bill 

To  M*"  Snow  for  covering  of  waggons 

To  M'"  Thom.  Nash  wheel[er]  for  worke 

To  John  Fishe  for  medicines  before  Pontefract 


50     05     06 


14 

05 

07 

03 

07 

08 

06 

00 

00 

03 

17 

06 

69 

00 

10 

OS 

00 

00 

38 

17 

06 

100 

00 

00 

01 

08 

10 

02 

00 

00 

36 

00 

00 

01 

15 

10 

32 

15 

09 

07 

02 

02 

09 

15 

00 

25 

02 

00 

17 

04 

08 

04 

05 

04 

193 

£ 

s. 

d. 

32 

08 

00 

OI 

09 

04 

OI 

17 

06 

03 

17 

06 

02 

10 

00 

03 

II 

00 

10 

00 

00 

SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNl'S. 

24.  To  M*"  Streeter  engineere   for  81  daies  pay  for 

service  at  the  Leaguer  before  Pontefract  at 
%s.  per  diem 

25.  To  M"*  Turner  for  coales  etc 

26.  To  Edw.  Smith  for  charges  about  the  Ordinance 

at  Pontefract 

30.    To  M""  Bret  for  a  moneths  pay 

To  Seria«*  Dendy  for  deale  boardes     

To  Col.  Hewsons  waggoner  for  disbursement  ... 
To  M""  George  Franck  for  extra  service 

J.  B.  E.  Grosvener. 


May. 

To  Anne  Ayworth  whose  husband  was  wounded 

by  souldyers 

To  Rich.  Marshall  CoUermaker  for  worke 

To  him  for  Branches  bill  

To  M""  Walford  for  extra  service 

To  Adiutant  Genera//  Bury  for  the  horse  guards 

To  M'  Fulford  for  extra  service  

To  L*  Col.  Rosewarme  for  his  releefe 

To   M'  Turner  for  cleansing  the  pond  at  the 

Mewes 04     11     00 

To  M'  Mottershed  for  printing  3  rheames  of  the 

Generalls  declaraton 

To  the  mdAow  Shallaken  for  

To  M'  Blunt  for  his  wounds  and  losses 

To  Col.  Harrison  which  he  laid  out  to  Mr  Sexby 

To  M""  Mabbot  for  46  daies  pay  in  arreare  to 

the  18***  instant  

To  him  for  the  Clarkes  in  the  office 

To  W"  Wentworth  whose  daughter  was  shot  by 

the  souldyers 

To  M'  Stapleton  for  extra  service        

To  Hen.  Boyse  for  extra  service  

To   M'  Wragg  which   he   disburst   for  severall 

things 

To  M*"  Yarwell  which  he  disburst  in  7**' 


05 

00 

00 

05 

05 

02 

02 

03 

04 

05 

00 

00 

04 

14 

08 

10 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

25 

08 

03 

10 

00 

00 

33 

00 

00 

12 

13 

00 

05 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

40 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

01 

00 

II 

02 

15 

06 

194  SOME  CIVIL  WAR    ACCOUNTS. 


£ 


58 

13 

00 

14 

06 

00 

05 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

13 

00 

00 

04 

00 

00 

1649.  June. 

I.  To  AdiuUw/  Genera//  Sodasme  for  extr^  service  25  10  00 
To  M""  Bret  for  a  moneths  pay  ending  May  31  03  17  06 
To  M*^  Davis  for  2  moneths  pay  ending  May  31       06     04    00 

J.  B.  E.  Grosvener. 

June. 

8.  To  M"^  Hatter  upon  Acco««t  for  Burford  march  [?]  550  00  00 
To  Col.  Twisseldon   for  pay  and   extra   service 

of  the  souldyers  in  Belvoir  castle 

1  o  John  Shepeard  for  Payles  etc.  for  the  trayne 
To  Capt.  Val.  Hill  for  extra  service       

9.  To  L'  Cotterill  for  the  like        

11.  To  L*  Col.  Goflfe   for  charges   into   the   Isle  of 

Wight 

12.  To  M*^  Norris  for  a  shop  at  S'  James 

15.     To  M""  Banister  Apothecary  in  Oxford  for  phisicke 

for  the  souldyers        ...         ...         ...         ...       11     02     06 

To  M""  Vivers  for  conveying  orders  from  North- 

ampton  to  Warwicke...         ...         ...         ...       50     00     00 

24.     To  John  Olive  knd  2  other   frenchmen   of  Col. 

Scroope  regiment        ..       03     00     00 

21.     To   Capt  Sanchy   for   soe   much   disbursed    by 

him   for    Major    Coleman    Capt.  White   for 

their    troopes    when    the    Army  came    into 

London  last 113     13     00 

9.     To  Capt.  Walker  of  Col.  Cookes   regt.  for  extra 

expences  

26.     To  M"  Hill  by  warrant 

28.  To  M""  Winter  for  medicaments 

To  the  Marshall  upon  his  bill    ... 

To  Hen.  Coop  whbe  discovered  the  ^Oxford  plot 

May. 
9.     To  the  widdow  Ad  wick  for  releefe        02     00     00 

29.  To  L*  Gale   for   the  guard   that   went  with   the 

Waggons  from  Portesmouth  to  Guilford    ...       03    00    00 

J.  B.  E.  Grosvener. 

1  In  Aug.,  1648,  there  was  a  plot  among  the  soldieis  at  Oxford,  to  seize  the 
place.     It  was  soon  suppressed. 


07 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

06 

II 

05 

12 

18 

09 

02 

00 

00 

19! 

£ 

s. 

d. 

o3 

15 

00 

02 

15 

00 

20 

00 

00 

SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

1649.  July. 

2.  To  M*^  Bret  for  30  dales  pay  ending  July  i   .. 

3.  To  M"*  Wragg  for  severall  expences       

To  Capt.  Roger  West  in  parte  of  his  arreares  .. 

5.  To  Quartermay/er  Eborne  and   W"*  Laicock  for 

releefe 02     00    00 

7.     To  Quartermoj/er  Millard  for  workes  about  the 

Trayne...         ...         ...         ...  ..         ...       01     14     08 

12.  To   W'"   dead    for   disbursements    for    the    L' 

Generalls  regt.  waggons         01  08  04 

To  Thorn.  Chapman  for  worke  about  the  Trayne  00  11  08 

10.     To  George  Philliskicke  for  severall  disburseme/rts  17  00  00 

13.  To  M*^  Pauncefoot  for  extra  service      30  00  00 

14.  To  M'  Stapleton  for  extra  service         60  00  00 

To  Capt  Boyce  in  par/e  of  his  arreares  ...  10  00  00 

21.     To  the  Master  Wheelewright  upon  his  bill      ...  07  02  05 

24.     To  the  Blacksmith  upon  his  bill  06  09  08 

To  the  Farrier  upon  his  bill       06  05  00 

29.     To  M""  Titan  for  bookes  dispersed  in  the  Army  03  16  00 

August. 

6.  To   M*^   Crewes   which    he   laid   out   about   the 

Waggons  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       02     02     02 

To  M^  Bret  for  a  moneths  pay 03     17     06 

To    M'    Spittlehouse    for    the    charges    of   the 

Marshall  Generall      04     14    06 

To  M'  Davis  for  2  moneths  pay  06     02     00 

To  M""  Fulford  for  writing  orders  etc. 08     09     00 

13.     To  Ellen   Dan   Eliz.  Reynolds   and    M"^  English 

for  disbursements  etc.  02     16    06 

18.     To  L*  Col.  Kelsay  for  one  Trooper  wounded  at 

Burford  

23.     To  Joseph  Brookes  Waggoner  for  disbursements 
To  Hen.  Cox  for  his  release  out  of  prison 

E.  Grosvener.  J.  B. 

1649.  Sept. 

I.     To  M'  Bilton  for  extra  service 10     00    00 

To  M"  Bushell  for  her  husbands  releefe         ...       05     00     00 


03 

00 

00 

01 

01 

04 

05 

00 

00 

14. 


13- 

24. 

25- 

26. 


196  SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  severall  persons  upon  warr^«t  

To   M'  Smyth   and   the   rest   of  the   Marshalls 

men  for  extra  service  

To  M"*  Payne  for  apprehending  M*"  Sommers... 
To  M""  Ashley  for  cleansing  the  Greene  Mewes 
To  Peter  Brookes  which  he  disburst  for  guardes 

at  Putney        

To  L'  Herbert  for  horses  he  lost  

To    M*"   Hatter   which    he   disburst    to    severall 

persons  

To  the  mddows  Dan  Alkyn  and  Colt  for  service 

each  40s 

October. 

Thorn.  Totney  for  dammage  susteyned 

M'  Turner  for  coales  etc.  for  the  Mewes  ... 

M^  Bret  for  2  moneths  pay 

Rich.  Marshall  Collermaker  for  worke  etc. 

John  Robertes  for  extra  service      

M"  Boyce  in  parte  of  her  husbands  Arreares 

M'  Pinches  for  extra  service  

M"*  Turner  for  Coales  etc.  at  the  Mewes  ... 

W"  Arrowsmyth  for  fetters  etc 

M*"  Davis  for  2  moneths  pay  ending  Oct.  i 

M*"  Turner  for  Coales  etc 

the  lady  Cooch  for  releefe 

M"  Garforth 

M"^  Turner  for  coales  etc     


2. 

To 

8. 

To 

To 

9- 

To 

3- 

To 

To 

To 

16. 

To 

20. 

To 

22. 

To 

24. 

To 

31- 

To 

To 

3°- 

To 

£ 

s. 

d. 

06 

06 

06 

05 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

08 

05 

00 

02 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

05 

10 

00 

06 

00 

00 

02 

00 

00 

01 

19 

09 

07 

12 

06 

05 

01 

06 

10 

00 

00 

15 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

02 

13 

05 

01 

08 

10 

06 

04 

00 

01 

13 

02 

05 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

01 

13 

02 

J.  B. 


E.  Grosvener. 


1649. 


Nov. 


I.     To  M""  Fulford  upon  his  bill  and  warrant 
3.     To   Maior  Scarthe  for   2    moneths    pay  at   dis 
banding  

6.  To  Major  Elton  for  extra  service 
To  M^  Turner  for  coales  

7.  To  Major  Scarthe  for  fire  and  candle  at  Helmsley 
To  M""  Hall  for  Waggons  eta 

9.     To  M'  Paxton  for  pap^r  etc 

To  L*  GifTord  and  31  troops  by  warrant 
To  M""  Wynter  for   medicines     


09  10  06 

33  12  00 

03  00  00 

01  13  02 

12  12  00 

00  17  06 

55  04  10 

14  00 

15 


74 
07 


02 


15 

00 

00 

OI 

13 

02 

04 

00 

00 

01 

13 

02 

05 

00 

00 

20 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

01 

13 

02 

SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS.  I97 

£       S.       d. 

To  the   Marshall  General!   for  severall  disburse- 
ments         10     10     06 

To  M"^  Payne   for   dayly  pay   from   June  12  to 

Nov.  9  at  2s,  per  diem  150  daies 

12.     To  M"*  Turner  for  codes  etc 

To  U  CoL  Burrell  and  W  A.  Johnson 

20.     To  M"*  Turner  for  coales  etc 

27.     To  M*^  Lovet  in  Col.  VVhaleys  regt.  for  reparatons 
14.     To  Col.  Sheffeild  by  order  

27.  To  M"  Messervey  and  other  gent  of  Jersey   ... 
To  M*^  Turner  for  coales  etc     

28.  To  M""  Partridge  and  M'  Whittington  for  remon- 

strances etc.  delivered  to  the  Army  ...  43  04  06 

22.     To    M'   Fr.  Rush  worth    for   keeping   Armes   at 

Northaw/ton 30  00  00 

27.     To  M'  Loveioy  for  dayly  pay  from  Nov.  26,  1648  36  10  00 

J.  B.  E.  Grosvener. 

1649.                                              Dec. 
I.     To  M'  Partridge  for  bookes  etc.  

3.  To  M""  Davis  for  a  moneths  pay  ending  Nov.  30 

4.  To  M"*  Turner  for  Coales  etc 

6.     To  Comet  Tyringham  for  extra  service 

II.     To  M'  Turner  for  coales  etc 

14.     To  Maior  Barber  which  he  disburst  for  Waggons 

etc 

8.    To  John  Robertes  for  extra  service      

20.     To  George  Philliskicke  for  the  lady  Cooch  etc. 

24.     To  M""  Turner  for  coales  etc     

To  M"  Boyce  in  parte  of  her  husbands  arreares 
8.     To  Rich.  Clarke  Porter  for  a  badge     

29.  To  George  Philliskicke  for  L^  Col.  Skipwith  etc. 

J.  B.  E.  Grosvener. 

According  to  your  Exc^//<?«cies  Order  of  the  24'**  of  June  wee 
have  p^msed  this  Account,  and  M""  Clarke  hath  produced  before  us 
the  severall  Warrants  under  your  Exc^iZf/fcies  hand  for  the  respective 
sommes  heerin  specified  and  the  Receipts  theruppon  w^ch  wee 
submitt  unto  your  Excellency  for   Approbation  and  allowance  therof. 

E.  Grosvener. 

Jo.  Barkstead. 

Jo.  Rush  worth. 


42 

17 

II 

06 

02 

00 

01 

13 

02 

05 

00 

00 

01 

13 

10 

II 

II 

10 

02 

00 

00 

08 

00 

00 

03 

03 

08 

10 

00 

00 

03 

00 

00 

12 

00 

00 

igS  SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 


An  Acco««t  of  moneys  disbursed  for  Contingencies  from 
Jan.  I  1648  to  Jan.  i  1649. 

B  3.     1648.  January.  j£      s,      d, 

6,  To  severall  poore  souldyers  at  Whitehall         ...       00     07     00 
II.     To  M"^  Cadwell  for  charges  in  receiving  monyes 

upon  the  Armyes  march  into  London  01  10  06 
To   Thom.  Honyburne   whoe   was   wounded   in 

the  service       ...         ...         ...         ...         ...  00  10  00 

To  one  Bayly  a  poore  souldyer ..  00  02  06 

Feb. 

3.     To  M"^  Payne  for  Candles  for  the  Councell     ...  00  16  06 

To  him  more  for  journyes  ...         ...         ...  09  05  00 

5.     To  Eliz.  Parnell  a  L*''  wife  whose  husband  died 

in   the  service...         ...         ...         ...         ...  00  05  00 

9.     To    M'  Yarwell   which    he   disburst   to   severall 

souldyers         00  08  00 

21.     To  Capt.  Eyton  for  Journyes      ...         ...         ...  02  00  00 

March. 

To  the  lady  Beamont  and   others  whoe  rec^V'^d 

losses  by  souldyers 

31.     To  M'  Patrick  and  others  for  releefe 

For  charges  for  500'  received  in  London 

To  M*^  Cadwell  for  Journyes  and  dayly  pay    .. 

E.  Grosvener. 

Aprill. 

7.  To  M'  Heath  for  Journyes  and  dayly  pay      ...       18     02     00 
To  the  Post  for  leUrts  severall  tymes  ...         ...       00     05     00 

14.     To  Anne  Meacock  whoe  cured  the  souldyers  at 

Banbury  and  other  poore  women 00     10     00 

18.     To   Ralph   Ash  ton   a   souldyer  in    Holland   for 

releefe 00     10    00 

To  one   for  the   debt  of  Capt.  Craford   lately  a 

member  of  the  Army  00     12     00 

To  another  poore  souldyer  ,,       00    02     00 


01 

15 

00 

OT 

05 

00 

00 

12 

00 

80 

16 

00 

199 

£ 

s. 

d. 

lO 

09 

06 

OI 

04 

06 

oo 

05 

00 

23 

09 

06 

04 

06 

00 

56 

17 

06 

26 

06 

06 

00 

II 

00 

23 

00 

00 

01 

00 

00 

SOME   CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

May. 

12.     To  M""  Watts  for  Joumyes         

To  Bryon  Griffith   Bridget  Bowell   Lament  Scot 
and  other  poore  women  whose  husbands  were 

in  the  service 

To  Jacob  Angalo  a  poore  souldycr  his  wife    ... 
22.     To  L'  Browne  for  Joumyes       

June. 
5.     To  M*^  Robertes  for  Joumyes 

July. 
To  M*"  Cadwell  for  Journyes  and  dayly  pay    ... 
To  M'  Heath  for  Joumyes  and  dayly  pay 

To  the  Smith  for  Irons  for  prisoners 

To  M"*  Payne  for  Joumyes 
To  M"^  Lloyde  for  severall  disbursements 
E.  Grosvener. 


Aug. 

I.     To  U  Browne  upon  his  bill       09     03     00 

To   George   Robertes   for    10   Quire   of  orders 

against  Free  quarters 00     10    00 

September. 
To    M"*    Chapman    for    the    orders    conceming 

Parkes 00     12     00 

November. 

23.     To  L*  Browne  for  Journyes        02     10    00 

26.     To  M'  Cadwell  for  Journyes  and  dayly  pay    ...       64    06    06 
To  M'  Heath  for  Joumyes  and  dayly  pay      ...       47     13    06 
E.  Grosvener. 

According  to  your  ^xoellencxes  Order  of  the  24***  of  June  wee 
have  Examined  this  Account  and  doe  finde  there  are  Receipts  as  to 
the  greatest  sommes  therin  menconed,  and  for  the  lesser  sommes 
many  of  them  being  very  inconsiderable  and  paid  out  uppon  severall 
occasions  when  acquittances  could  nott  conveniently  bee  had,  wee 
doe  humbly  recommend  them  to  your  'Excellency  for  your  Appro- 
bation and  Allowance. 

E.  Grosvener. 

Jo.  Barkstead. 

Jo.  Rush  worth. 


200 


SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 


An  Account  of  monyes  disbursed  for  Contingencyes  from 
Jan.  1  1649  to  July  1650. 


1649-50.     4A.  January. 

3.     To  M*^  Asheley  for  keeping  the  Greene  Mewes 


9- 
10. 

3- 


14. 


21. 


30. 


To  M*"  Playford  for  printing  severall  orders     ... 

To  M*^  Turner  for  Coales  etc 

To  George   Philliskicke  which   he  disbursed  for 

severall  

Disbursed   to  severall  persons   from  Sept.  6  and 

allowed  ...         

To  M'  Crewes  for  horse  meat  at  Hampton  Corte 
To  M'  Mosse.  for   monyes  disbursed  and   extra 

service 

To  M""  Turner  for  Coales  etc 

To  M"^  Bret  for  123  dales  pay  to  Feb.  i 

To  M*"  Jefferies  for  releefe  of  Capt.  Rudgeley  .. 

To    M'^  Allington   which    he   disbursed   to    M"" 

Mosse  when  he  was  in  the  North 


03  00  00 

02  05  00 

03  01  08 

03  00  00 

12  II  06 

00  19  10 

19  10  00 

03  07  08 

15  07  06 

02  00  00 

30  00  00 


Feb. 

1.  To  the  Marshall  Generall  etc.  for  the  prisoners  etc.  20  04  09 
To  M""  Davis  for  dayly  pay  from  the  i  of  Dec. 

to  the  12  of  Feb 06  04  00 

2.  To  M*"  Charleton  for  Col.  Prydes  waggons     ...  01  04  06 

4.     To  M"^  Turner  for  Coales  etc 03  07  08 

6.     To  M^  Fulford  for  writing  and  attendance      ...  07  17  06 

18.     To  M"^  Turner  for  Coales           03  07  08 

To  M"  Mary  Hambleton  in  great  distresse     ...  01  00  00 

25.     To  M*^  Susan  Bowen  for  special  service          ...  10  00  00 

21.     To  Capt.  Baldwin  for  an  horse  he  lost 05  00  00 

E.  Grosvener.  Jo.  Barkstead. 


1649.  March. 

4.    To  M*"  Turner  for  Coales  etc 

To  M'  Meade  for  L'  Streater      

To  M"*  Bushell  2\  to  M"^  Raymond  for  extra 
service  4',  and  to  M'"  Powell  for  severall 
disbursements  3^         


03  07  08 
03  00  00 


09  00  00 


20T 

£ 

S. 

d. 

02 

05 

00 

03 

07 

08 

46 

12 

00 

14 

05 

00 

03 

07 

08 

07 

07 

06 

01 

16 

00 

00 

12 

00 

07 

II 

00 

05 

01 

09 

SOME   CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

14.     To  M'  Crewe  for  the  Trayne  horses     

18.  To  M'  Turner  for  Coales  

25.     To  the  widdow  Lacock  in  parte  of  her  husbands 

Arreares  5*  and  to  M"  Lumley  5* 10     00    00 

To  Capt  Hobson  for  pay  and  disbursements  at 

Mackstock  castle        

Disburst  to  severall  persons  by  warr/7«t 

AprilL 

1.  To  M*^  Turner  for  Coales  etc 

2.  To  M*"  Bret  for  59  daies  pay  at  2s,  6d,  per  diem 

4.  To  M'  Crewes  for  the  draught  horses 

5.  To  M*"  Turner  for  Coales  etc 

6.  To  M""  Davis  for  dayly  pay  etc.  

16.  To  M'  Wynter  for  Medicines  etc 

19.  To  Col.  Heane   for  charges  about  Gardner  etc. 

2*  and  to  John  Robertes  for  Joumyes  2^  ...  04     00    00 
30.     To   M'   Loveioy   which   he   disburst  about   the 

Waggons  02 

To  M'  Ashley  for  cleansing  the  Mewes  ...  03 

To   the  ^Judge   Advocate  for  pap^r  and   other 

charges 60 

To  M'  Heart  the  Marshalls  man  for  prisoners  etc.  10 

E.  Grosvener.  J.  B. 

May. 

2.     To  M""  Turner  for  Coales  etc 

To  M'  Fulford  for  writing  orders  etc 

5.     To  M*"  Bret  for  a  moneths  pay  ending  Aprill  30 

13.  To  M'  Crewes  for  43  daies  pay  as  Tentkeep^  etc. 
To  Capt.   Lloid    for  an    horse  he  lost  in    the 

service 

14.  To  M'  Tompson  for  Chaines  etc.         

15.  To    M""   Griffing    for    printing    the   oathes    and 

bonds  etc.       08     12     00 

29.     To  Major  Wilkes  which  he  disburst  for  carriage 

of  Ammunition  etc 01     04    00 


19 

04 

15 

00 

00 

00 

07 

06 

06 

10 

08 

06 

19 

08 

03 

15 

00 

04 

06 

00 

20 

00 

00 

06 

16 

00 

*The  Judge  Advocate  to  the  army  was  an  officer  "skilled  in  the  civil, 
municipal  and  martial  laws:  his  office  was  to  assist  the  marshall  or  general  in 
doubtful  cases,'*  and  his  pay  was  15^.  a  day.     Grose ^  I. 

N 


202  SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 


/ 


29 

10 

08 

03 

17 

06 

20 

00 

00 

June. 

4.     To  M*"  Breedon  which  M^  Lloide  high  Constable 

of  Westminster  disbursed  for  fire  Candle  etc. 

To  M'^  Bret  for  a  moneths  pay  ending  May  31 

6.     To  M"^  Fulford  for  extra  service 

10.     To  Adiutant  Generall   Sydenham  which   he  dis- 

burst  for  [d/ank]  of  Garrisons  ...         ...       03     00     00 

To  Quartermaster  Generall   Grovcner  w'n/ch    he 

disburst  in  the  publique  service      12     00     00 

15.     To  M"^  Smyth  who  was  wounded  in  the  service      03     00    00 
18.     To  Ant.  Newen  for  postage  from   Maryborough 

and  backe       03     00     03 

Disbursed  to  severall  persons  from  March  25  to 

June  24  ...  .         ...         ...         ...       29     09     06 

24.  To    M*"   Thompson    of   Colchester    2\     To    M*" 

Rossiter         to         whoe   was    maimed    by  a 
souldyer  of  the  Army  and  to 
10.     To  M"^  Crewes  for  Attendance  etc.        ...         ...       03     00     00 

To  M'^  Paxton  for  paper  etc.  from  Nov.  5       ...       88     08     02 
23.     To  S**  John    Hippesley  for  hay  of  the  Troopers 

at  Hampton  Court     ...         ...         ...         ...       12     00     00 

E.  Grosvener.  J.  B. 

1650.  June. 

25.  To  M**  Ashley  for  keeping  the  Mewes...         ...       03     05     00 

To   M""   Gerard    for    losses    of  severall    of   the 

Commissary  of  Musters 
To  M**  Fulford  for  severall  services 
To  W*"  King  for  attendance  5^  M""  Rop  for  dis- 
bursements 2^  13"  4*^  to  W*"  Dugdale  6' 

26.  To  M*"  Loveioy  for  213  daies  pay  at  2s.  per  diem 

E.  Grosvener.  J.  B. 

According  to  your  Exc^/Z^wcies  Order  of  the  24^  of  June  wee 
have  perused  this  Account,  and  M""  Clarke  hath  produced  before  us 
the  severall  Warrants  under  your  Exc^//f«cies  hand  for  the  respective 
sommes  heerin  specified  and  the  Receipts  theruppon,  which  wee 
submitt  to  your  Exce//ency  for  Approbation  and  Allowance. 

E.  Grosvener. 

Jo.  Barkstead. 

Jo.  Rushworth. 


140 

00 

00 

II 

08 

03 

13 

13 

04 

21 

06 

00 

SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS.  203 

ACCOUNTS  OF  THE  WORKS  BEFORE  COLCHESTER, 
June  i8,  1648,  to  Aug.  27,  1648. 

These  accounts,  unlike  the  others,  are  for  a  definite  object,  and 
though  in  the  majority  of  cases  a  name  is  the  only  entry,  presumably 
the  payment  is  for  digging  or  other  work  in  the  entrenchments. 
The  total  sum  paid  is  about  £1,6^^,  and  that  would  be  only  a  very 
small  part  of  the  cost  of  the  siege. 

The  siege  of  Colchester  was  one  of  the  most  severe  of  the  whole 
war,  and  lasted  from  June  14th  to  Aug.  28th,  1648.  It  was  a  develop- 
ment of  the  formidable  Royalist  rising  in  Kent  and  Essex  in  the 
spring  of  1648.  The  Royalists  on  their  way  into  Norfolk  and  Suffolk 
turned  aside  into  Colchester,  hoping  to  get  recruits  there.  They  had 
not  counted  on  Fairfax's  rapid  pursuit  from  his  headquarters  in 
London,  and  when  on  June  12th  he  appeared  with  5,000  men  they 
were  obliged  to  make  hasty  preparations  for  defence.  The  town  was 
ill-fitted  to  stand  a  siege,  and  the  4,000  Royalist  troops  were  most  of 
them  newly  levied  and  ill-armed,  but  after  a  repulse  on  June  14th, 
Fairfax  realized  that  a  long  siege  was  inevitable,  and  busied  himself 
with  raising  forts  to  completely  isolate  the  town.  On  July  2nd  the 
work  of  circumvallation  was  finished,  and  though  meeting  with  fierce 
resistance,  Fairfax  gained  post  after  post.  Early  in  August  famine 
added  to  the  misery  of  the  besieged,  and  never  more  than  half-hearted 
in  their  reception  of  the  Royalists,  the  citizens  began  to  clamour  for 
surrender. 

On  Aug.  19th,  Norwich,  the  Royalist  leader,  asked  for  terms; 
negotiations  went  on  for  some  days,  and  finally  on  Aug.  28th,  Fairfax 
occupied  the  town.  Three  of  the  Royalist  leaders  were  shot,  and  the 
soldiers  were  sent  to  labour  in  the  West  Indies,  or  to  enforced 
military  service  under  the  Venetian  Republic.  The  townsmen  were 
made  to  pay  a  heavy  fine.  For  an  account,  and  a  very  interesting 
map  of  the  siege  of  Colchester,  see  Gardiner,  III,  400. 


An  Accompt  of  Monies  Disbursed  out  of  Contingencies  for 
THE  Carrying  on  the  THE(x/r)  workes  before  Colchester 
in  the  veare  1648. 

June.                                 £      X.  d. 

18.     To  Ensign   Nutt   of  Col.  Engoldbies   Regiment 

for  worke  done          01     00  00 

More  to  him         00     12  00 


oo 

lO 

00 

OI 

OS 

00 

oo 

17 

00 

oo 

12 

06 

oo 

15 

00 

oo 

00 

08 

204  SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  Edw.  More   Serg^   for  work  done   by  Maior 

Mills  Company  

To  Consolation  Fox  for  work  done      

To  Jo.  Smith         

To  Rich.  Honywood         

To  Charles  Massie  

More  to  him  for  digging 

To    John     Davis     for    worke     done     by    Cap* 

Scrimptons  Company 01     01     00 

To  L'  W™  Ducket  for  6  files  of  Col.  Ingoldesbys 

men      ...         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       00     09     00 

To  Jo.  Davis  for  worke  of  Cap*  Grimes  ...       00     10    00 

To  Cha.  Massey  for  more  worke  done  by  C.  Gs 

men      00    05     00 

To  Tho.  Andrews  for  worke  done  by  Col.  Evers 

Regiment         

To  him  more         

19.  To  Ensign  Fogg  for  work  done  by  Cap'  Foggs 

Company         

More  to  him         

More  to  John  Underbill 

To  Tho.  Allen  for  worke  done  by  ^Matrosses... 
More  to  him         

20.  To  T.  Turner  for  work  done  by  CoL  Ewers  men 

21.  To  Thom.  Clarke 

More  to  him         

To  John  Sheppard  

E.  Grosvener. 

21.  To  W"  Howes 

More  to  Jo.  Sheppard 

To    Jo.   Stone    for    worke    done    by    Cap'    Grimes 

Company    ...         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...       080 

22.  To   Cap'  Overstreet    for   worke    done    by   Colonell 

Necdhams  Regim^wt        i  17     o 

23.  To  Jo.  Sheppard  for  worke  done      040 

To  Tho.  Allen 3     5     o 

^  One  of  the  soldiers  in  a  train  of  artillery.  A  gun's  crew  consisted  of  a 
gunner,  a  mate  or  matross,  and  an  odd  man.  The  matross  helped  to  clean,  fire 
and  sponge  the  gun. 


00 

18 

00 

01 

00 

00 

00 

10 

00 

00 

07 

06 

00 

08 

00 

00 

08 

00 

01 

00 

00 

01 

01 

00 

00 

07 

00 

00 

05 

00 

00 

01 

06 

£  s 

d. 

0  12  0 

, , 

0  « 

;  0 

SOME  CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

25.  To  Henry  Wilson   for  worke  done   by  Cap*  Grimes 

Soldiers       

To  John  Gilford  for  worke  done 
To  John  Paremaine  for  worke  done 

26.  To  Joseph  Dickison  for  worke  done 

To  George  Frost  

To  Cha.  Massey  

To  Cap'  Humphryes 

To  Rich.  Bourne  

27.  To  Robert  Blower  for  worke  done 
To  Nath.  Shed  for  Brome      ... 
To  John  Borroughes  for  worke  done 

28.  To   Tho.  Forrester  one   of  the   Conducters   of  the 

Trenches  for  work  done  ... 
To  Enstgn  Harridge  for  worke  done 
To  Jo.  Paremayne 
To  John  Terry... 
To  Jo.  Dickson  .. 
To  Tho.  Rivers 
To  Jo.  Curtis    ... 

To  Col.  Barkestead  for  worke  done  by  his  men 
To  Lieuten'  Scudamore 
To  John  Linett 
To  Roger  Diers 
To  Mich.  Wright 
To  Rich.  Guildford      .. 
To  John  Terry  and  his  Company  for  worke 

To  Rich.  Mills 

E.  Grosvener. 


205 
£    s.    d. 


I  10 

o  IS 
o 


o  10 


o  18 
o  10 


10 

7 


o  18 

O    12 

o  18 

0  6 

1  7 
o  19 


28. 


19. 


27. 


To  Michaell  Adams 

To  Edw.  Markham 

To  Steph.  Rogers 

To  John  Spencer 

To  Cap*  Domey 

To  L'  Duckett  for  worke  done — in  severall  Bills 

To  Cap'  Humphryes  for  worke  done 

More      

To  Cap*  Domey  

To  Cap'  Ducket  for  2  severall  times  worke  done 
To  Tho.  Allison  


o  4 
o  6 
o  8 
o  12 
4     7 


9 
9 

o 

5 
I 


1   15 


2o6  SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  Nich.  Dollyn  for  bringing  L^//res  from  London 

To  Cap'  Dorney  for  worke  done  by  Colonell  Barke 
steads  Regimer//t  (severall  Bills) 

To  Thomas  Home  for  worke  done  ...         

To  Tho.  Allen  for  cutting  broome 

30.     To  Maior  Wilkes  for  worke  done 

To  Gasper  Clarke  for  worke  done    ... 

To  Cap^  Miller  for  worke  done  (3  Bills)     ... 
July  I.     To  W™  Demonstable  and  his  Company 

To  Giles  Spicer  and  his  Company    ... 

To  Randall  Kettle  and  his  Company  

To  Tho.  Dent  and  his  Company  for  work  done   .. 

To  Rich.  Wright  and  his  Company  for  worke  done 

To  Tho.  Smith  and  his  Company  for  work  done  .. 

To  Col.  Fothergill  upon  Account  for  worke  done  by 
his  Company  

To  Tho.  Allen  for  worke  done 

To  Cap'  Humphryes  for  worke  done 

To  him  more 

To  Ensigne  Tew   for  worke  done     ... 

To  John  Baynes  for  worke  done 

To  Cap*  Miller  for  worke  done  upon  4  notes 

To  Cap'  Miller  for  severall  Bills       

E.  Grosvener. 


£    5.    d. 
I   10     o 


4  4 
o  10 
o  10 
o  10 


16 

7 


I 

5 

4  o 
3  10 
I      o 


5 

10 
10 


20     o 
2     o 

1  18 

O    12 

2  5 
o  12 

4  15 
9  18 


6 
o 
o 
6 
o 
6 
6 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 

o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 


July  3.     To  Tho.  Flower  for  worke  done 

To  John  Styles  and  his  Company  for  worke  done 

To  Jo.  Emett  and  his  Company       

To  Hen.  Wilson  and  his  Company  ... 
To  John  Stone  and  his  Company     ... 

To  Rob*  More  and  his  Company     

To  Th.  Taylor  for  making  shot  etc 

To  Col.  Whalley   upon   Account  for   the  workes   on 

Suffolke  side  

To  Cap*  Humphryes  upon  severall  Bills 

4.     To  Serg'  Clarke  for  2  Rodde  

To  him  more  for  3  Rodde 

To  Thorn.  Harding  for  removing  a  dead  horse 
To  him  more  for  3  Roddes  of  worke 

To  Cap'  Miller  for  8  Bills     

To  him  more  for  10  Rodde  ... 


o 
o 
o 
o 

I 
o 
2 

3 
o 
o 
o 
o 

5 
2 


18 

12 

6 

12 

4 
12 

15 

o 
18 
12 
18 

9 
12 

17 

I 


o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 

o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 

4 
o 


July 


SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

207 

£ 

X. 

d. 

To  him  more  for  one  Rodde            

0 

4 

0 

To  Jo.  Goodall  for  2  Rodde  and   halfe       ... 

I 

2 

0 

To  W™  Judge  for  one  Rodde  3  Foot 

0 

8 

0 

To  Rob*^  Coleman  one  Rodde           

0 

4 

0 

To  Patrick  Camfield  one  Rodd         

0 

7 

0 

To  W"^  Rowles  one  Rodde 

0 

6 

0 

To  the  Controller  for  moneys  expended  by  hhn    . 

2 

16 

6 

To  Tho.  Fosbury  for  worke  done 

I 

5 

0 

To  Theophilus  Gipson  2  Roddes 

0 

14 

0 

To  Rowl.  Harwich        

I 

10 

0 

To  John  Miles  2  Rodde  and  a  half 

I 

2 

6 

To  Cha.  Massey  3  Rodde      

0 

18 

0 

To  Tho.  Rigley  one  Rodde 

0 

6 

0 

To  Jeremy  Blackwell  for  powder      

6 

0 

0 

To  Ensigne  Andrews  for  a  pan:ell  of  work 

0 

13 

0 

More  to  him 

0 

16 

0 

More  to  him 

0 

4 

0 

E.  Grosvener. 

6.     To  W*"  Osburne  for  worke  done 

0 

4 

0 

To  W™  Rolles  for  4  Rooddes            

0 

16 

0 

To  him  more 

I 

4 

0 

To  Tho.  Taylor            

0 

7 

6 

To  Tho.  Allen 

I 

8 

0 

To  Tho.  Overbury        

0 

14 

0 

To  Rich.  Wilson          

0 

8 

0 

To  Theo.  Gibson          

0 

6 

0 

To  John  Goodall 

0 

12 

0 

To  Geo.  Fleming         

0 

8 

0 

To  Tho.  Home            

0 

14 

0 

To  S/q)hen  Pickhaver 

0 

15 

0 

To  Cap*  Jo.  Miller  for  9  Bills           

4 

14 

6 

To  Ciprian  Windle      

0 

6 

0 

To  Jo.  Sterne 

0 

8 

0 

To  Rich.  Taylor           

0 

9 

0 

To  Maior  Westhorp  for  Col.  Fothergils  Regt. 

20 

0 

0 

To  Rob'  How  for  private  intelligence 

0 

5 

0 

To  James  Sadler         

0 

16 

0 

To  Sam  Spareman       

0 

15 

9 

To  W"  Warren 

I 

0 

0 

To  Tho.  Burton            

I 

0 

0 

to  beare  their  charge 


208  SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  Humphrey  Johnson  

To  a  Spy  out  of  Colchester  for  InteWigence... 
To  Thomas  Tent 

To  Rich.  Grey 

To  Edwin  Harris 
To  Nich.  Humphreys  ... 
To  2  seamen  taken   prisoners 
to  the  Frigett 

To  John  Ford 

To  Jasper  Clarke 
To  Tho.  Bithell 
To  John  Wilsmore 
To  Rob'  Blower 
To  Henry  Frye 

E.  Grosvener. 


July 


7.     To  Anth.  Turner    ... 

To  Jo.  Warde 

To  Nich.  Trovall          

To  Jo.  Warde 

To  W"»Trescot 

To  Hen.  Offley 

To  W«»  Stallage 

To  Rob*  Walker 

To  Anth.  Tucker 

To  Thomas  Simpson   ... 

To  Cap' Jo.  Miller 

To  him  more 

To  W"»  KeisaU 

To  Edw.  Finch 

To  Geo.  Springet 

To  Nich.  Trovell 

To  Jo.  Kirby 

To  W"  Jakes 

To  W"»  Beare 

To  Rob' Wills 

To  Alben   Hanchen     ... 

To  W^Cranford 

To  him  more 

To  Joseph  Hughes 

To  George  Scorer 

£ 

s. 

d. 

I 

4 

0 

0 

10 

0 

0 

6 

0 

I 

8 

0 

0 

4 

0 

0 

9 

0 

0 

2 

0 

0 

9 

0 

0 

10 

0 

0 

3 

0 

0 

12 

0 

0 

10 

0 

0 

5 

0 

0 

10 

0 

0 

12 

0 

0 

18 

0 

4 

14 

0 

0 

18 

0 

0 

10 

0 

0 

18 

0 

0 

17 

0 

0 

18 

0 

0 

5 

0 

6 

19 

0 

I 

0 

0 

0 

14 

0 

0 

15 

0 

0 

12 

0 

0 

12 

0 

I 

6 

0 

0 

13 

0 

0 

12 

0 

0 

5 

0 

0 

8 

0 

0 

10 

0 

0 

4 

0 

0 

10 

0 

0 

12 

0 

SOME  CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

209 

£    s,   d. 

To  Joseph  Bennet       

0  19    0 

To  Thomas  Allen 

2  15     0 

To  him  more 

0  10    0 

To  John  Parker 

I  12     0 

To  Giles  Hughes 

080 

To  Sylvester  Heather  ... 

080 

To  Hen.  Pryer 

140 

To  Anth.  Turner 

080 

To  Rich.  Morgan 

080 

To  Jo.  Holdsworth 

0  10    0 

To  John  Miller 

0  10    0 

To  Rob*  Smith 

0  12     0 

To  Nich.  Humphryes  ... 

0  12     0 

To  Tho.  Burrows 

0  II     0 

To  Rob^  Guard 

050 

E.  Grosvener. 

July  9.     To  John  Newham              

0  IS     0 

To  Stephen  Pickhaver... 

040 

To  Hen.  Hall 

I  10    0 

To  Theoph.  Gipson     ... 

026 

To  John  Person 

0  i8[?]6 

To  Jeremy  Hunt 

0  12     0 

To  W™Rowles 

0  16    0 

To  Rob^Tredder 

0  10     0 

To  Rob*  Barnes 

080 

To  John  Haslewood    ... 

080 

To  Thomas  Levit 

0  10     0 

To  Henry  Slade 

0  16     0 

To  him  more 

0  14     0 

To  Rich.  Payne 

080 

To  W»  Churches 

080 

To  Rich.  Judge 

080 

To  John  Smith 

080 

To  John  Beckham 

0  10     0 

To  W»  Sherwood 

080 

To  Tho.  Fosbury 

140 

To  Tho.  Dudley 

080 

To  W»  Harris 

080 

To  John  Crabb 

2     5     0 

2IO  SOME  CIVIL  WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

9.     To  Jonathan   Newell   to  be  disposed  of  by  him  for 

the  worke  on  Suffolke  side  

To  Tho.  Fosbury  for  worke  done     

To  Tho.  Mathew  for  viewing   worke  done   ... 

To  Cap*  Groome   for  worke  done   by  divers  of  Col 

Barkesteads  Regimt.  

E.  Grosvener. 


d. 


20 

0 

0 

6 

•       3 

1. 

19 

20 

2 

To  Roger  Fins  for  worke  done 

0 

4 

To  Rob*^  Walker           

I 

16 

To  M^John  Streeter  for  Outservices             

5 

0 

II. 

To  Jonathan  Newill  for  ConU'nqenaes  for  Col.  Whalle> 

'     10 

0 

To  M^  Thomas  Allen  for  worke  done          

2 

18 

More  to  him 

5 

18 

To  Tho.  Overbury  for  worke  done  about  the  Traint 

J       1 

4 

To  Nich.  Burbitch        ...         

0 

12 

To  John  Hill 

0 

18 

To  Rob'  Huit 

0 

5 

* 

To  Cap*  Groome  upon  severall  bills.. 

13 

5 

To  Tho.  Swift  for  worke  done 

0 

10 

To  Edward  Gilford      

0 

6 

To  John  Goodale         

I 

3 

10. 

To  Ralph  Plott  for  worke  done 

0 

4 

12. 

To  Robert  Kirkby       

0 

14 

To  Math.  Bush 

0 

12 

To  Thomas  Hosebury             

I 

12 

July 

1 0.     To  M*-  Jonath.  Newell      

20 

0 

To  Edw.  Barrow           

I 

3 

To  Nich.  Trownell       

0 

16 

To  Tho.  Davis  upon  2  Notes 

0 

9 

To  W°>  Jonson 

0 

6 

To  Eward  Hart            

0 

6 

To  Tho.  Wisedome      

0 

6 

To  Jo.  Reeve 

0 

12 

12. 

To  Nich.  Umphrey       

0 

12 

To  John  Owens            

0 

9 

To  Geo.  Darnell           

0 

4 

SOME   CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS. 


To  Tho.  Valentine 
To  Lawrence  Wood 
To  Rich.  Curtis 
To  Stephen  Pickaker 
To  John  Wisedome 


E.  Grosvener. 


12.     To  Patrick  Calfield 

To  W"  Deverell 

To  John  Russell 

To  Tho.  Burse  . . . 

More  to  him     ... 
12.     To  Thomas  Hitchcocke 

To  Rich.  Wilson 

To  John  Lucas 

To  Edward  Gilbert 

To  Rich.  Brodyer 

More  to  him     ... 

To  Francis  K' ... 

12.  To  Jo"  Newham 
To  Jo.  Davis     ... 
To  Tho.  Hitchcocke 
I'o  W™  W°»  Osbume 
To  Tho.  Russell 

13.  To  John  Brown  for  worke  done 
To  John  Kelsay 
To  Tho.  Warde 
To  Philip  Dyer 
To  Jo"  Martin  ... 
To  Jo"  Dud       ... 
To  Hen.  Bonds 
To  Sam.  RoUes 
To  W"*  Bright  ... 
To  Joseph  Bennet 
To  Roger  Sutton 
To  John  Brown 
To  Tho.  Levit 
To  John  Davis... 
To  Abr.  Barber 
To  Geo.  Scorer... 


211 

£ 

J. 

d. 

0 

6 

0 

0 

6 

0 

0 

12 

0 

I 

4 

0 

0 

18 

0 

0 

15 

0 

0 

6 

0 

0 

14 

0 

0 

18 

0 

0 

18 

0 

0 

12 

0 

0 

6 

0 

0 

12 

0 

0 

6 

0 

0 

6 

6 

0 

6 

0 

I 

4 

0 

0 

12 

0 

I 

4 

0 

0 

10 

6 

0 

6 

0 

0 

7 

0 

0 

7 

0 

0 

14 

0 

0 

16 

0 

0 

12 

0 

0 

14 

0 

0 

18 

0 

0 

4 

0 

0 

8 

0 

0 

9 

0 

0 

S 

0 

0 

2 

6 

0 

9 

0 

0 

7 

0 

0 

14 

0 

0 

16 

0 

0 

16 

0 

E.  Grosvener. 


212 


SOME   CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 


July  13.     To  Henry  Prayer  for  worke  done 

To  John  Downton 

... 

To  Alban  Hanshaw     ... 

To  Rich.  Hacks 

To  Edw.  Singleton 

... 

To  W«»  Densell 

... 

To  W"»  Walter 

To  John  Holdsworth  ... 

... 

To  Rob'Sybbott 

To  Abr.  Lucas 

... 

To  Allen  Farrison 

... 

To  Edward  Jordan 

To  Thomas  Berry 

... 

To  Nich.  Trownell 

... 

To  John  Kelsey 

To  John  Goslin 

... 

To  Rob*  Bemt 

... 

To  Nath.  Richelson     ... 

... 

To  W"  Ingram 

... 

To  W"  Shearing 

To  John  Huet 

... 

To  Rob^  Kates 

... 

To  James  Miller 

To  Hen.  Poyer 

To  Mich.  Williams 

... 

To  Thomas  Cattaway  ... 

... 

To  Dennis  Allen 

... 

To  Dallison  Greenham 

... 

To  Rob^  White 

... 

For  Bowes  and  Arrowes 

at  London 

To  Thomas  Fosbury   ... 

... 

To  Cap^  Groome  upon  Severall  Bills 

To  Andrew  Grey 

To  Jo"  Mayne 

To  Tho.  Allen 

To  Ambrose  Ever 

To  Edw.  Jude 

To  Edw.  Billert 

E. 

Grosvener. 

£ 

s. 

0 

16 

0 

16 

I 

10 

0 

8 

0 

8 

0 

8 

0 

16 

0 

16 

0 

8 

0 

16 

0 

16 

0 

10 

0 

16 

I 

4 

I 

0 

0 

8 

0 

8 

0 

8 

0 

8 

0 

8 

0 

4 

I 

10 

0 

12 

0 

16 

0 

10 

0 

8 

0 

18 

I 

0 

0 

13 

I 

0 

I 

19 

7 

5 

I 

4 

0 

8 

2 

5 

0 

12 

0 

15 

SOME   CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

July  17^.  To  Antho.  Pigeon  for  worke  done 
To  Ben.  Stephen 
To  Rob*  Strange 
To  W™  Watlington 
To  Jo.  Enny 
To   M'  Newell   to   be   disposd   to   the  soldiers   on 

SufFolke  side 
To  Hamlet  Taylor  for  throwing   Granadoes  against 

the  Gate  howse     ... 
To  2  Soldiers  for  burying  a  horse 
To  Thom.  Bates   for  2  Granadoes  at  the  Gatehouse 
To  Roger  Sutton 
To  John  Smith 
To  Cap*  Thomas  Mathews  for  overseeing  206  Rodds 

at  3**  a  Rodde 
To  him  more  for  worke  done   ... 
To  John  Beckham 
To  Christopher  Holmes 
To  Rob*  Green 
18.     To  Anth.  Forrix 
To  Wn>Harren 
To  Hen.  Frayeren 
To  John  Webb 

To  Math.  Stoddart  for  Carpenders  worke 
To  Rob'  Hayes 

ToW^Sellard  

To  John  Fotheigill      ... 

To  Sam.  Wilkes 

More 

To  Allin  Harrison 

To  Jo°  Home 

To  Tho.  Wyatt 

To  Jo.  Pritchet 

More 

To  David  Pritchet 

E.  Grosvener. 


£ 
o 
o 
o 
I 
I 


213 

J.  d, 

4     o 


6 

4 
o 

5 


2 
o 
o 
o  18 

O    12 


II 

5 
6 


0  12 

1  O 

8  17 
I     5 


o  10 
o  16 


30     o     o 

050 
030 
050 
040 
o  10     o 


6 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
6 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 


July  18.    To  Thomas  Scott... 
To  John  Goslin 
To  Lieuten'  Tho.  Jones 
More  to  him... 


0  16    o 
120 

1  5    o 
o  15     o 


214  SOME   CIVIL    WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

To  Math.  Heard 

To  Anth.  Keeping 

To  John  Barker 

To  Edw.  Jude 

To  Adi.  Gen.  Bury  for  moneys  disburse//  for  cutting 

hedges  etc. 
To  John  Rolph 
To  Jo"  Bullock 
19.     To  M'- Hatter  for  Charles  Scott 
To  John  Holdsworth  ... 
To  John  Bettes 
To  W*"  Badue 
To  Edw.  Gootch   and   his  Company  for   barricading 

the  wall  at  the  Gatehouse   ... 
To  the  worke  men  on  Sufifolke  side  at  the  Generalls 

being  there 


To  George  Riggs  for  worke  done 

To  John  Smith 

To  John  Lowe 

To  Leo.  Leale 

To  James  Stonson 

To  John  Todd 

To  Anth.  Rippon 

To  Anth.  Wallis 

To  John  Hall 

] 

E.  Grosvener. 

July  20.     To  George  Rigges 

for  worke  done 

To  Jo.  Lake  ... 

To  Rich.  Gostlih 

To  Jo.  Kirby 

To  Tho.  Burton 

To  Walter  Hater 

To  W"*  Croten 

To  John  Todd 

To  John  Honniton 

To  Abraham   Lucas 

To  John  Symmons 

To  Tho.  Forrester 

To  Peter  Morey 

To  W»"  Symons 

£ 

s. 

d. 

0 

10 

0 

0 

6 

0 

I 

16 

0 

0 

2 

0 

I 

12 

6 

2 

5 

0 

I 

0 

0 

I 

4 

0 

0 

12 

0 

0 

6 

0 

I 

0 

0 

0  15 

2     10 

1  3 

2  6 

0  6 
2   17 

1  3 
I     o 


I   10 
I     o 

O  12 

O  12 

0  4 

1  o 

0  10 

1  4 

0  12 

1  O 

0  4 

1  2 
I       O 

o     6 


SOME   CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS, 

To  M""  Payne  for  fireworkes  at  Ipswich 

To  Sam  Hartley  for  worke  done 

To  Tho.  Day 

To  Tho.  Barton 

To  Hen.  Bolton 

To  Christopher  Baldwin 

To  Jo.  Wilmore 

To  Christopher  Maule... 

To  Nich.  Triveale 

To  Jo.  Higgs 

To  Thomas  Lison 

To  Rob'  Norris 

To  Rich.  Nealer 

To  Leo.  Wilson 

To  John  Sympson 

To  Rich.  Hutchison  for  worke  done 

To  W"  Wilson 

To  George  Holland 

To  W"  Fitch 

To  Hen.  Wright 

To  James  Pigget 

To  John  Webb 

To  Geo.  Riggs 

To  Andrew  Squibb 

E.  Grosvener. 

July  22.     To  Col.  Barkstead  w^/ch  he  laid  out 

To  Rich.  Gill  etc.  for  Lead 

To  Abr.  Barber 

To  Tho.  Bale 

To  Tho.  Twidall 
23.     To    Maior    Biscoe    for   33    men    who    stormd    the 
Gatehouse 

To  Zachary  Flood  for  worke  done 

To  Hen.  Haukes 

To  Geo.  Frost 

To  Anth.  Olive 

To  Peter  Penton 

To  Thomas  Asaph 

To  Humphrye  Mannings 

To  w™  Williams 


215 

£   s^ 

d. 

4  7 

1 1 

0  6 

0 

.   0  7 

0 

0  12 

6 

I  3 

0 

0  6 

0 

I  15 

0 

0  4 

0 

0  10 

0 

0  12 

0 

0  10 

0 

I  0 

0 

0  18 

0 

0  12 

0 

I  0 

0 

I  10 

0 

I  I 

0 

0  16 

0 

0  10 

0 

0  16 

0 

0  12 

0 

I  0 

0 

2  10 

0 

I  10 

0 

.   6  15 

0 

1  0 

0 

2  10 

0 

I  0 

0 

0  4 

0 

4  2 

6 

I  4 

0 

0  10 

0 

0  16 

0 

I  10 

0 

0  2 

6 

0  18 

0 

0  4 

0 

0  18 

9 

2l6  SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  W«  Clarke 
To  John  Smyth 
To  W°>  Mathews 
To  Tho.  Griffin 
To  John  Street 
24.     To  W™  Ingram 
To  Francis  Rogers 
To  Tho.  Ramsbury      ... 
To  W«  Whitehead 
To  Jo.  Williams 
To  John  Andrews 
To  John  Wilkinson 
To  Thomas  Kelby 
To  Hen.  Haines 
To  W*"  Sowert 
To  Thomas  Bedge 
To  Thomas  Holden    ... 
To  John  Newham 
To  John  Constable 
More  to  him... 
To  Christopher  Maiden 
To  M'^  Jo.  Newell  for  worke  on  SufFolke  side 
To  M'  Yarwell  which   he  laid  out   by  the  Generalls 
Comand 

E.  Grosvener. 


£ 

s. 

I 

16 

I 

5 

0 

16 

I 

5 

I 

15 

I 

10 

I 

12 

0 

5 

0 

16 

I 

10 

I 

5 

0 

17 

0 

17 

I 

2 

I 

0 

0 

II 

0 

14 

0 

18 

0 

S 

0 

6 

0 

16 

^0 

0 

24. 


25- 


To  Rob^  Hearing 

To  W°»  Watlington 

To  W"  Williams 

To  Col.  Ewers  w^ch   he   laid  out  for  a  Gunner  by 

the  Generalls  Comand 
To  Edward  Cox  for  worke  done 
To  W"  King... 

To  Lane.  Burt  for  entertaining  Drummers 
To  Abr.  Barber 

To  Jo.  Hardwell  and  Rich.  Clark  for  Granadoes 
To  Rob*Blore 

To  John  Blake  for  work  done  ... 
To  Tho.  Halfpeny 
To  Nich.  Bradley 
To  Nich.  Rawlen 


0 

18 

9 

3 

13 

9 

I 

5 

0 

01 

0 

0 

I 

2 

0 

I 

0 

0 

0 

II 

0 

0 

16 

0 

0 

5 

0 

0 

15 

0 

I 

4 

0 

I 

0 

0 

0 

10 

0 

I 

I 

0 

SOME  CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

217 

£ 

s. 

^. 

To  John  Smith 

0 

16 

0 

To  Rob*  Tredwell        

I 

6 

0 

To  Geo.  Holland 

0 

15 

0 

To  W"  Bush 

0 

15 

0 

To  John  Higgs 

0 

2 

6 

To  Sam  Beere 

6 

3 

6 

To  Hen.  Haines 

I 

5 

0 

To  Jo.  Mathelman  for  burying  a  Cavaleer 

0 

8 

0 

To  Jo.  Forrester  for  viewing  the  workes  ... 

I 

2 

8 

More  to  him  for  work  done  by  Jo.  Gasse  etc. 

0 

17 

0 

To  W"  Ingram  for  worke  done... 

I 

4 

0 

To  Tho.  Bursea  for  worke  done 

0 

16 

0 

To   Rich.  Coe   Trumpeter  for  going   w/th   severall 

Messagges  in  to  Colchester... 

•       3 

0 

0 

To  M'  Brett  for  severall  messages  into  the  towne 

•       5 

0 

0 

E.  Grosvener. 

July  26.    To  John  Andrews  for  work  done     ... 

0 

18 

0 

To  Rob'Klegg 

I 

10 

0 

To  John  Newam 

I 

10 

0 

To  John  Gosly 

I 

5 

6 

To  Tho.  Allen 

2 

14 

6 

To  Tho.  Burton 

I 

10 

0 

To  Tho.  Foster 

I 

0 

0 

27.     To  Tho.  Taylor  etc  for  200**^  weight  of  Musket  Bull 

et      2 

0 

0 

To  Christopher  Alderman   for  700"^  weight  of  Lej 

Id      3 

17 

0 

To  W™  Jakes  for  worke  done    ... 

0 

17 

0 

To  one  for  shotting  the  Arrows 

0 

2 

6 

To  Tho  Wyatt  for  worke  done... 

0 

18 

0 

To  Rich.  Brookes 

0 

8 

0 

To  John  Hamton 

I 

4 

0 

ToW^Lide 

0 

18 

0 

To  M"^  Newell  for  the  work  on  Suffo/k  side 

..     40 

0 

0 

To  James  Pasewell  for  worke  done 

I 

13 

0 

To  Percy  Cooper  [for  worke  done] 

0 

7 

0 

To  M'  Stoddart  for  monies  laid  out  by  him 

6 

19 

7 

To  Abraham  Hilliard  for   Lead... 

0 

12 

0 

28.     To  Tho.  Ally  for  worke  done    ... 

0 

8 

0 

To  Robert  Blore 

0 

6 

0 

To  Tho.  Treharne 

0 

15 

0 

To  Tho.  Church 

I 

0 

0 

2l8 


SOME   CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS, 


To  Hen.  Hughes 
To  Abr.  Barber 
To  Tho.  Burra 
To  Jo.  Smyth 
To  John  Winter 
To  John  Newam 
To  Thomas  Kelly 
To  W"  Addams 
To  John  Lissen 


E.  Grosvener. 


To  Geo.  Hill... 
To  Rich.  Neeler 
To  Tho.  Burton 
To  Francis  Palus 
To  Zachary  Wood 
To  Anth.  Tucker 
To  Andrew  Squibb 
To  John  Pritchet 
To  Humphry  David 
To  George  Bradon 
To  W™  Church 
To  Rich.  Chaplin 
To  Barth.  Mersh 
To  W»  Parker 
To  Josias  White 
To  Rich.  PuUin 
To  W«»  Watlington 
To  Edw.  Coate 
To  W"  Lord... 
To  Hen.  Bauden 
July  29.     To  W"  Mill  for  worke  done 
To  Hen.  Bonney 
To  W""  Whitehead  for 
To  John  Andrews 
To  AUin  Farrison 
To  W"  Farrington 
To  Daniel  1  Knocker 
To  Philip  Dyer 
To  John  Bucknell 
To  John  Coret 


raismg  a 


Battery 


£ 

s. 

f/. 

0 

8 

0 

0 

16 

0 

2 

4 

0 

0 

16 

0 

0 

12 

0 

0 

6 

0 

0 

8 

0 

3 

0 

0 

0 

8 

0 

0 

4 

0 

3 

6 

0 

2 

4 

0 

r 

4 

0 

2 

0 

0 

0 

15 

0 

19 

40b. 

2 

9 

0 

I 

2 

0 

I 

7 

6 

I 

4 

0 

I 

4 

0 

I 

14 

0 

0 

4 

0 

0 

12 

0 

I 

0 

0 

I 

0 

0 

0 

8 

0 

I 

15 

0 

0 

4 

0 

I 

18 

3 

I 

4 

0 

I 

4 

0 

I 

2 

0 

0 

8 

0 

0 

16 

0 

I 

0 

0 

0 

18 

0 

I 

10 

0 

0 

12 

0 

SOME   CIVIL  WAR    ACCOUNTS. 


To  John  Coks 
To  Abr.  Lucas 
To  Thomas  Chace 
To  John  Tarry 
To  Rob*  Green 


E.  Grosvener. 


29.  To  a  Drummer  for  coming   to   the  Head   Quar/ers 

upon  a  message     ... 
To  John  Stone 
To  Peter  Crawley 

To  Tho.  Allen  upon  3  Bills  viz*  For  Tho.  Allison... 
To  Henry  Bauden 
To  John  Davis 

To  Nich.  Will  

To  a  Smith  for  Hinges  etc.  for  an  horse  in  the  Field 
To    6    Soldiers    of    Col.   Barksteads    Regim^«t    for 

building  the   Hutt... 
To  4  men  for  fetching  Rushes  for  that  and  the  Tent 

30.  To  John  Brown  for  worke  done 
To  W°»  Johnson 

More  to  him... 

To  John  Smith 

To  Tho.  Woodward     ... 

To  AUin  Farrison 

To  John  Street 

To  Tho.  Wyatt 

To  John  Goslin 

To  Sam.  Paremayne     ... 

To  John  Kerby 

To  Henry  Bauden 

To  Tho.  Isle... 

To  Francis  Ferby 

To  John   Burly 

To  John  Davis 

To  Tho.  Hasunney 

To  Lodewike  Lysen     ... 

To  W™  Judge 

To  W«»Rawlen 

To  Col.  Fothergill  for  his  Brigade 

E.  Grosvener. 


219 

£ 

s.   d. 

0 

8  0 

2 

16  0 

0 

4  0 

4 

10  0 

0 

16  0 

0 

0 

6 

2 

5 

0 

I 

10 

0 

I 

10 

0 

0 

12 

0 

0 

12 

0 

0 

7 

0 

0 

2 

6 

0 

II 

0 

0 

4 

0 

I 

10 

0 

0 

13 

6 

0 

6 

0 

10 

0 

0 

0 

5 

0 

10 

0 

7 

6 

19 

6 

5 

0 

12 

0 

4 

0 

0 

15 

0 

I 

3 

10 

0 

0 

8 

0 

0 

0 

14 

0 

0 

15 

0 

I 

0 

0 

20 

0 

0 

220 

July  30. 
To 
To 

31.  To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 

July  31. 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 
To 


SOME  CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 


To  Rob*  Winscombe 
John  Stone 
Rich.  Poole 
John  Fosser 
Rich.  Neale 
Jo.  Newam 
Andrew  Squibb 
W°»  Person 
Charles  Belden 
Anth.  Chapman 
Hen.  Poger 
W°»  Clarke 
Tho.  Edmond 
John  White 
John  Hampton 
Rich.  Crosse 
W"  Atkison 
Christopher  Maiden 
To  Allin  Harrison  for  worke  done 
Thomas  Drake 
Jenkin  Owen 
W™  Farrington 
Humphry  Johnson 
Rob*  Home 
Rob*  Pindar 
W°»  Derrant 
W°»  Rogers 
John  Webb 
Walter  Fisher 
W°»  England 
Willm  Wicks 
Walter  Fisher 

E.  Grosvener. 


£  s. 

d. 

0  15 

0 

0  18 

0 

0  16 

0 

0  15 

0 

0  16 

0 

2  5 

0 

I  19  50b. 

0  6 

0 

0  8 

0 

0  12 

0 

0  14 

0 

0  08 

0 

01  12 

0 

0  8 

0 

0  12 

0 

0  8 

0 

0  6 

0 

I  10 

0 

2  2 

6 

0  16 

0 

I  5 

0 

0  8 

0 

0  12 

0 

0  18 

0 

0  18 

0 

I  10 

0 

0  8 

0 

0  12 

0 

I  10 

0 

0  IS 

0 

0  8 

0 

July  31.     To  Francis  Smith 
To  W°»  England 
To  Peter  Graves 

August  I.     To  John  Hull    .. 
To  Rob*  Coleman 
To  Lawrence  Ambrose 
To  Tho.  Burra 


0  15 

1  10 
I  10 
I  10 
o  16 
o  18 
o  16 


SOME  CIVIL  WAR 

ACCOUNTS. 

221 

£  s. 

d. 

More  to  him... 

0  17 

6 

To  Zachary  Sanfort      ... 

I     8 

0 

To  Nich.  TrewneU       

..12 

6 

To  Humphry  Jonson  ... 

0  10 

0 

To  Christopher  Maiden 

0  16 

0 

To  Jonath.  Newell   for  worke  on   Col.  Whallys  si( 

de     50     0 

0 

To  Rob'  Ward  for  worke  done  ... 

0  15 

0 

To  W"  Judge 

I     3 

6 

More  to  him... 

..08 

0 

2.     Laid  out  by  Col.  Barkstead  for  digging  a  gapp 

•        04 

0 

To  Rich.  Wildgoose  for  work  done 

...       2     5 

0 

To  Hen.  Frieren 

0  12 

0 

To  Edw.  Sowdert 

2     2 

0 

To  Gilb' Brian 

...       I     8 

0 

To  John  Brown 

I   10 

0 

To  John  Stone 

0  16 

0 

To  Rich.  Gerard 

I   12 

0 

To  Tobias  Hold 

0  12 

0 

To  Allen  Farrison 

...       2     5 

0 

To  Tho.  Wyatt 

...       I   18 

0 

To  Edw.  Peace 

I   II 

0 

To  Thomas  Martyr      ... 

...       0  15 

0 

To  Hen.  Bouden 

0  16 

0 

To  Fra.  Mailer  for  digging  up  a  block  in  a  way 

..01 

6 

To  John   Winter  for  stopping   up   holes   neere  t 

be 

Sallyport... 

0     5 

0 

To  Will"*  Bunny  for  worke  done 

0    5 

0 

E.  Grosvener. 

August  3.     To  Tho.  Harris  for  worke  done 

..10 

0 

To  Rob' Walker 

•05 

0 

To  Maior  Wilkes 

..06 

0 

To  Allin  Farrison 

I   10 

0 

To  John  Foster 

2     5 

0 

To  John  Pate 

I   12 

0 

To  John  Andrews 

I   12 

0 

To  Rich.  Bent 

..03 

0 

To  Thomas  Greenwood 

..06 

0 

To  Rob*  Feby  for  Reparacons  . 

0  14 

0 

To  W°>  Ingram  for  worke  done. 

I  13 

0 

To  Lane.  Burt  for  entertaining  c 

►f  Drumw 

^rs 

0  II 

6 

222  SOME   CIVIL  WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

To  severall   poore  men   out  of  Colchester  and   the 
Subburbes 
2.     To  David  Pritchet 
To  Andrew  Squibb 
To  John  Parker 

To  John  Hall  

To  Thomas  AUenson  ... 
More  to  Th.  Allenson... 
More  to  him... 
To  John  Brown 
To  Tho.  Allenson 
To  John  Kelsay 
To  Moyses  Smith 

E.  Grosvener. 

5.     To  John  Tam  for  worke  done  ... 
To  W"*Kayes 
To  Tho.  Duglas 
To  Anth.  Coulam 
To  Hen.  Haynes 
To  Nich.  Williams 
To  W«n  Winter 
To  John  Holoch 
To  Franc.  Ouldham     ... 
To  Arth.  Aylett 
To  Tho.  Allen 
To  Rich.  Hilliard 

To  2  poore  men  that  came  out  of  Colchester 
To  John  Ward  for  worke  done... 
To  W™Trallop 

To  2  Troopers  for  fetching  spades 
To  Tho.  Forrester   for  worke  done   by  severall   men 

viz'  for  Sam.  Beare 
For  Roger  Parker 
For  Hele  Spitting 
For  John  Loe 
To  Vincent  Bird 
To  Tho.  Bale 
To  John  Street 
To  Francis  Lane 
To  Nich.  Humphrey    ... 


£    s.    d. 


0 

10 

0 

0 

18 

9 

2 

0 

0 

1 

10 

0 

0 

6 

0 

0 

5 

0 

0 

8 

0 

0 

18 

0 

I 

10 

0 

I 

15 

0 

I 

II 

0 

0 

15 

0 

I 

12 

I 

I 

4 

6 

0 

10 

6 

0 

14 

0 

2 

4 

0 

I 

2 

0 

I 

2 

0 

I 

2 

0 

I 

I 

0 

0 

14 

0 

0 

7 

0 

0 

7 

0 

0 

2 

6 

I 

10 

0 

I 

2 

9 

0 

6 

0 

I 

10 

0 

I 

5 

0 

I 

5 

0 

2 

15 

0 

0 

14 

0 

I 

13 

0 

0 

16 

0 

0 

7 

0 

I 

2 

0 

SOME  CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS.  223 

£     S.    d. 

To  John  Goslin            ...             ...             ...  ...  450 

To  Mathew  Horner     ...             ...             ...  ...  120 

To  Tho.  Martyr            ...             ...             ...  ...  240 

To  Tho.  Clarke            ...             ...             ...  ...  300 

To  W°»  Wilkins             ...             ...             ...  ...  o  14    o 

To  Rich.  Gosted          ...             ...             ...  ...  450 

To  John  Davis             ...             ...             ...  ...  120 

To  John  Rawkins        ...             ...             ...  ...  180 

To  John  Gage             ...             ...             ...  ...  070 

To  Tho.  Taylor            ...             ...             ...  ...  100 

To  Andrew  Frieren      ...             ...             ...  ...  2  15     o 

To  Maior  Desbrow  wAich  he  laid  out  to  a  Trooper 

who  lost  his  horse                ...            ...  ...  026 

E.  Grosvener. 


.     To    CoL   Whalley    w^/ch    he   laid    out   to    another 

wAich  came  out  of  town  w/th  a  horse 

0    5 

0 

To   Rob'  Brown  a  Butcher   who   came   out   with   a 

horse 

0    5 

0 

To  John  Cox  for  worke  done    ... 

0    7 

0 

To  John  Morrill 

2  10 

0 

To  John  Newam 

I  10 

0 

To  Tho.  Waters 

0     8 

9 

To  Geo.  Ballard 

01   16 

0 

To  Edw.  Cox 

I   13 

0 

To  W™  Clement 

0  17 

6 

To  Hen.  Hale 

I   10 

0 

To  Hen.  Hawkins 

I   ^3 

0 

To  Hen.  Speere 

2  16 

0 

To  Philip  Dyer 

2  01 

0 

To  Rich.  Nayler 

2  14 

0 

To  W"»  Herrit 

I   10 

0 

To  John  Parker 

I   16 

0 

To  M'  Bishop  for  iron  workes  about  the  trainc 

3     7 

0 

To  Thorn.  Jones  for  worke  done 

I     2 

0 

To  Tho.  Balaam 

I     2 

0 

To  John  Honywort 

2     8 

0 

.     To  M"^  Allenson 

3  10 

0 

To  M-^  Newell  for  worl 

ke  on  Colonell   Whalleys  s'u 

dc 

50     0 

0 

E.  (irosvener. 


224  SOME  CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

8.  To  Mathew  Hewis  for  worke  done 
To  Edw.  Burlacy 
To  Tho.  Forrester  for  viewing  50  Rodds  of  worke 
More  to  him  for  Dan.  Price  for  worke 
More  for  James  Clarke 
More  for  Peter  Crawley 
More  to  Anth.  Turner... 
More  to  Robert  Newell 
To  Fran.  Fowle 
To  W*"  Hooper 
To  W»  Herod 
To  Sam  Fascott 
To  John  Francis 
To  Joseph  Symonds 

9.  To  Rob*  Zibbott 
To  John   Spencer 
To  W°»  Langham 
To  John  Newam 
To  Edward  Piper 
To  Rowland  Herbert 
To  W"  Jakes 
To  John  Kelsay 
To  Hen.  Poger 
To  Thomas  Burra 
To  Rob*  Guard 
To  James  Eve 
To  Rob'  Stint 
To  W»  Hooper 
To  John  Hull 
To  John  Hampton 
To  Tho.  Balaam 
To  W"  Watlington 
To  John  Loe 
To  Tho.  Tennet 
To  Rich.  Sharpe 
To  John  Andrews 
To  John  Rimer  for  entertaining  a  Drumw^r  one  night 

E.  Grosvener. 


£  s,  d, 
060 
070 

0  16     8 

1  5     o 

0  12 

1  5 
I   10 

I  5 
o  18 

O    12 

0  16 

1  O 

1  16 

2  2 

o     9 

0  16 

1  I 

0  9 

1  I 

O    II 

0  7 

1  16 
I  6 
o  18 

O    12 

o     6 

o  5 

0  7 

1  o 
o  16 

0  12 

1  II 

o  14 

0  7 

1  4 
o     9 

O       2 


SOME  CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

225 

£  s,  d. 

August  9.     To  Thomas  Martyr  for  worke  done 

0  16    0 

To  Lod.  Lison 

0  12    0 

To  John  Battee 

0  12    0 

To  Thomas  Roper 

0  12    0 

To  John  Rice 

060 

To  John  Pritchet 

0  12    0 

To  W"  Mathew           

0  12    0 

10.     To  John  Thompson     ... 

100 

To  Benj.  Rogers 

080 

To  W°>  Griffin 

0  16    0 

To  W°>  Clarke 

0  16    0 

To  W°»Cranford 

0  16    0 

To  Rich.  Mills 

I  10    0 

More  to  him  for  cutting  hedges 

0  10    0 

To  James  Carent 

JIG 

To  Geo.  Symonds 

070 

To  Tho.  Sipping 

0    14       0 

To  T^anc.  Burt  for  entertaining  Drum»«ers 

0    5     7 

To  Joseph  Crawley      ... 

0  10    0 

To  John  Newam 

I     2     6 

To  John  Burley 

I  10     0 

To  John  Goslin 

230 

To  W»  Clarke              

090 

To  Jo.  Pritchet 

0  15     0 

To  Tho.  Foster 

100 

To  John  Wight 

0  18     0 

To  Rowland  Robertes  .. 

090 

To  John  Helser 

0  14     0 

To  Rob'  Blore 

0  12     0 

To  Rob*  Ball 

I   17     6 

To  Rich.  Blackwell      ... 

0  18     0 

To  Fran.  Fowles 

0  12     0 

To  John  Bakeham 

0  12     0 

To  Nich.  Billet 

050 

To  Edw.  Powell 

0  16     0 

To  Rob'  Lidall 

020 

To  Allin  Farrison 

0  10     0 

To  Ralph  Ashly 

I   IS     0 

To  Tho.  Perse 

0  15     0 

To  Humphry  Goffe     ... 

I   12     0 

To  W*"  Jakes 

I   10     0 

E.  Grosvener. 


226  SOME  CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  The.  Burra  for  himself  and  Jo.  Turner 
To  John  Goodwin 
To  Fran.  Smyth 
To  James  Smyth 
To  Moritur  Hewes 
To  Dallison  Greenham 
To  a  poor  soldier  by  Command 
To  Rob*  Lidall  for  worke  done.. 
To  W™  Herod 
To  Andrew  Squibb 
To  Tho.  Gilbert 
To  W°>  Bush... 
To  Hen.  Bouden 
To  Ralph  Wortley 
To  Anth.  Pearse 
To  Fran.  Bland 

To  John  Loe  for  John  Holgate 
To  John  Loe  for  him  more 
To  W»"  Watlington 
To  James  Canith 
To  Geo.  Symonds 
To  Dan.  Brooke 
To  John  Graves 
To  Oliver  Hughes 
1 2.     To  M*"  Cadwell   for  charges   in    bringing  5oo*»*>  from 
Cambridge 
To  John  Norham  for  worke  done 
To  John  Gay 
To  Philip  Betts 
To  Tho.  Webb 
To  Hen.  Marshall 
To  W"*  Rogers 
To  Joseph  Symonds 
To  Edw.  Swann 
To  Ezek.  Adams 
To  John  Packer 
To  Rich.  Collins 

E.  Grosvener. 


€ 

s. 

•   3 

12 

o 

12 

2 
I 

6 

o 

I 

2 

O 

i6 

O 

4 

O 

9 

O 

i6 

2 

o 

I 

lO 

I 

ID 

I 

O 

O 

lO 

I 

5 

I 

lO 

o 

II 

o 

14 

I 

8 

o 

14 

o 

14 

o 

14 

o 

9 

3n 

•   7 

8 

•   3 

10 

I 

8 

I 

14 

o 

14 

o 

14 

I 

8 

o 

I 

o 

12 

I 

ID 

I 

lO 

o 

14 

I 

lO 

'3- 


SOME  cn 

^L  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

227 

£  s.  d. 

To  Christopher  Stephens 

070 

To  Rich.  Bates 

I     I     0 

To  Tho.  Saunders 

...                     ...                     ... 

040 

To  John  Cranford 

0  14    0 

To  Thomas  Pearse 

I     4    0 

To  w™  Carter 

0  12     0 

To  John   Spencer 

080 

To  Thomas  Smith 

080 

To  Tho.  Kede 

040 

To  Julian  Clarke 

0  16    0 

To  John  Street 

0  15     0 

To  Philip  Dyer 

0  15     0 

To  John  Andrews 

0  18    0 

More  to  him... 

0  10     6 

To  Allin  Farrison 

0  18     0 

To  Humphry  Manning 

0  12     0 

To  John   Selby 

0  10     0 

To  Nich.  Middleton     .. 

0  10     0 

To  Christ6pher  Maiden 

060 

To  John  Hall              

I   15     0 

To  John  Gerard  for  mending  4  peeces  of  ordnance 

4  10     0 

To  W°»  Million  for  worke  done... 

060 

To  Edw.  Peach 

080 

To  Geo.  Gilby 

090 

To  James  Percivall 

080 

To  Thomas  Nash  for  making  1300  ^Bavings 

6  10     0 

To  W*"  Hooper 

040 

To  Rich.  Judge 

I     4     0 

To  William  Atkinson  ... 

080 

To  William  Griffin 

I     4     0 

To  Andr.  Squibb 

0  15     0 

To  Roger  Sutton 

0  13     6 

To  a  poor  wounded  soldier 

050 

To  Nich.  Parish 

0  14     0 

To  John  Moren 

0  12     0 

To  James  Haine 

0  12     0 

14. 


*  Bundles  of  brushwood,  differing  from  faggots,  in   being  bound   by  one  instead 
of  two  withes. 


228 


SOME  CIVIL  WAR  ACCOUNTS. 


14. 


IS- 


IS- 


£    s. 

flf. 

To  Hen.  Bouden 

...             ...             ... 

0    7 

0 

To  John  Hix 

0  12 

0 

To  John  Kilsay 

E.  Grosvener. 

I  12 

6 

To  Rob*  Zibbet 

0  12 

0 

To  John  White 

...             ...             ... 

I     0 

0 

More  to  him... 

... 

10 

0 

To  Tho.  Martyr  for  worke  done 

0     5 

0 

To  John  Pritchet 

20 

0 

To  Joseph  Croft 

... 

■       04 

0 

To  Hen.  Frieren 

I     4 

0 

To  Hen.  Prier 

... 

I     7 

0 

To  2  inhabitants  of 

Colchester... 

•OS 

0 

To  Wn»  Swinston  for 

making  buUe/ 

..       3     7 

6 

To  Col.  Whalley  for  worke  on  Suffolke  side 

10     0 

0 

To  John  Talcott  for  Lead 

..40 

0 

To  John  Burly  for  worke  done... 

0  18 

0 

To  Paul  Clasick 

... 

I     S 

6 

To  Charles  Hwdell 

... 

..12 

0 

To  Rich.  Marshall  for  work  done  in  the  Traine 

••       3     I 

8 

To  W°>  Hawock  for  worke  done 

..II 

0 

To  Rich.  Bales 

...             ...             ... 

0  14 

0 

To  Tho.  Burra 

... 

10 

0 

To  Tho.  Allen 

...             ...             ... 

0  18 

0 

To  W°>  Parker 

... 

0  12 

0 

To  Allin  Farrison  for  worke  done 

..II 

0 

To  John  Crosby 

..04 

0 

To  Sam  Juscott 

0  14 

0 

To  John  Hill 

0  16 

0 

To  Thomas  Griffin 

..II 

0 

To  John  Burly 

..22 

0 

To  Rob*  Citteridge 

0  14 

0 

To  Rob'  Coleman 

..07 

0 

To  John  Webster 

0     7 

0 

To  Rob*  Newell 

0  14 

0 

To  Anth.  Wallis 

I   17 

0 

To  James  Balaam 

...      I     s 

0 

To  Tho.  Allen 

...      I    s 

0 

To  Philip  Alett 

I    s 

0 

To  John  Pritchet 

E.  Grosvener. 

..20 

0 

SOME  CIVIL  WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

August  15.     To  Thomas  Balaam 

To  Henry  Clarke 

To  John  Selby 

To  Edw.  Sowert 

More  to  Th.  Allen  of  his  Bill 

To  Sam  Bull 

To  Thomas  Asage 

To  Nich.  Cromewell 

To  Rich.  Blackwell 
16.     To  John  Haslewood 

To  John  Mills 

To  W™  Engld 

To  Philip  Jones 

To  Anth.  Pearse 

To  Thomas  Balaam 

To  Rob'  Kistarigg 

To  Rich.  Nelson 

To  John  Swetnam 

To  Hen.  Kayes 

To  Allin  Farrison 

More  to  him.,. 

To  John  Pritchet 

To  Tho.  Buna 

More  to  him... 

To  Hen.  Haynes 

To  Fran.  Foulis 

To  Francis  Spencer 

To  Morten    ... 
10.     To  John  Hull 

16.  To  Leo.  Sell... 

17.  To  Francis  Smyth 
To  W"»  Hart... 
To  Rich.  CasseU 
To  Charles  Beldon 
To  M'Wragge  laid  out  by  command 
To  Rowland  Rob. 
To  W"  Herod 
To   Cap*  Lloyde   for  cutting  grasse    for   Col.  Fleet 

woods  Regimt. 
To  John  Compton  for  worke  don 
To  Tho.  Martyr 

E.  Grosvener. 


2 

29 

£ 

s. 

d. 

I 

17 

0 

4 

6 

0 

I 

5 

0 

I 

2 

6 

0 

3 

0 

I 

0 

0 

0 

16 

0 

I 

12 

6 

2 

0 

0 

I 

16 

0 

T 

7 

0 

0 

18 

0 

0 

18 

0 

0 

18 

0 

I 

14 

0 

0 

12 

0 

I 

0 

0 

I 

10 

0 

I 

0 

0 

I 

5 

0 

I 

0 

0 

I 

5 

0 

I 

0 

0 

0 

8 

0 

0 

12 

0 

I 

5 

0 

I 

0 

0 

I 

0 

0 

0 

7 

0 

3 

0 

0 

I 

0 

0 

I 

5 

0 

I 

0 

0 

I 

10 

0 

3 

2 

6 

I 

0 

0 

I 

0 

0 

3 

8 

0 

I 

I 

0 

2 

0 

0 

230  SOME   CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

August  17.     To  W"»  Woodworth  for  work  done 

To  Leo.  Every 

To  Tho.  Hapenny 

To  John   Pritchet 

To  Thomas  Allison  for  viewing  the  works 

To  John  Newham  for  worke  done 

To  Henry  Hall 

To  Griffith  Jones 

To  Thomas  Griffin 

To  2  poor  Soldiers 
18.     To  W"  Horrocks  for  worke  done 

To  Dallison  Greenham 

To  John  Andrews 

To  Allin  Farrison 

To  Tobias  Hold 

To  Rob*  Guard 

To  Peter  Cawley  for  cutting  hedges  viewing  etc. 

To  W"»  Farrington  for  worke  done 

To  W"»  Jakes 

To  John  Hampton 

To  Nich.  Trownell 

To  John  White 

To  John  Parker 

To  John  Compton 

To  John  Burly 

To  Jo.  Newman 

To  W"  Farrington 

To  Andr.  Squibb 

To  John  Michaells 

To  Rich.  Bull 

To  Thomas  Burra 

To  Henry  Hall 

To  Tho.  Hapenny 

E.  Grosvener. 


£ 

s. 

I 

0 

I 

0 

I 

0 

0 

15 

I 

15 

I 

10 

0 

15 

0 

15 

I 

2 

0 

5 

2 

0 

0 

17 

I 

4 

I 

7 

2 

5 

I 

2 

2 

II 

0 

9 

0 

16 

I 

0 

I 

16 

0 

10 

0 

10 

0 

10 

I 

3 

I 

10 

0 

10 

I 

0 

0 

6 

I 

0 

0 

15 

I 

8 

o  15 


August  18.     To  W™  Jennyngs  for  worke  done... 
To  Lane.  Burt  for  tnUrtaintng  Drumwers 
To  Humphry  Mannings  for  worke  done  ... 
To  John  Davis 
To  Hen.  Clarke 
To   Hen.  Spicer 


2  o 

0  II 

1  10 
I      o 

3  o 


SOME  cn 

^IL   WAR    ACCOUNTS. 

231 

£   s,  d. 

To  John  Pritchet 

I   16     0 

To  Roger  Sutton 

040 

To  Rich.  Williams 

0    12       0 

To  Humphry  Goffe 

140 

To  Hen.  Hutchison 

140 

To  John  Hall 

230 

More  to  him... 

0    10       0 

More 

0    16       0 

To  Thomas  Webb 

300 

More  to  him... 

I     10       0 

More  to  him... 

I     16       0 

To  Benj.Ed[?] 

300 

To  Hen.  Heckford 

100 

19.     To  John  Baseby 

2    16       0 

To  Anth.  Burchmore   .. 

I       5       0 

To  John  Bonny 

0    16       0 

To  John   Selby 

100 

To  Tho.  AUand 

100 

To  Dennis  Allen 

I       5       0 

To  John  Granes 

I     8     0 

To  Tho.  Tozell 

0  12     0 

To  W"  Wilson 

0  18     0 

To  Hen.  Heckford' 

300 

To  John  Baanam 

0  10     0 

To  Hen.  Haines 

2   10     0 

To  Francis  Spencer 

I   10     0 

To  John  Hampton 

I   10     0 

For  Candles  at  the  Tent 

050 

To  W»  Herod              

.       I     5     0 

E.  Grosvener. 

August  19.    To  M'  Stoddart  for  Carpenders  worke 

960 

To  Fran.  Fowles  for  worke  done 

0  18    0 

20.     To  Rob'  Baker  for  worke  done... 

100 

To  Rich.  Sharpe 

I   10    0 

To  Tho.  Hewes 

0  14     0 

To  Rich.  Williams 

I  10    0 

To  John  Blunt 

0  12     0 

To  Sam  Enfcott 

060 

More  to  him... 

0  15     0 

To  Gregory  Right 

0  10    0 

232  SOME   CIVIL   WAR   ACCOUNTS. 

To  Thomas  Rogers 

To  Julian  Clarke 

To  John  Clarke 

To  Rich.  Wilkinson 

To  Thomas  Younge 

To  Thomas  Griffin 

To   Hen.  Whiting 

To  Nath.  Cooke 

To  John  Parker 

To  Allin  Farrison 

To  a  poor  Widdow  who  lost  by  soldiers. 

To  Hen.  Bouden  for  work  done 

To  Rob' Wheeler 

To  John  Hull  

To  Hen.  Haines 
To  Thomas  Andrews  ... 
To  James  Braston  for  carrying  Faggottes 
To  John  Swetnam  for  worke  done 
To  M*^  Swinston  for  making  Musket  bullets 
21.     To  Fran.  Fowles  for  worke  done 
To  Rich.  Nelson 
To  Rob'  Baker 
To  Peter  Panton 
To  John  Winter 
To  Geo.  Rob^rtes 
To  Cap'  Younge  for  Lead 

E.  Grosvener. 

August  21.     To  Rich.  Booker  for  worke  done... 
To  Lane.  Burt  for  Entertainm^  Drummers 
To  Anth.  Burchmore  for  carrying  Faggottes 
To  M""  Bishopp  for  Iron  about  the  Line 
To  him  more  for  Iron  about  the  Traine 
To  Tho.  Carrier  for  worke  done 
To  W">Cranford 
To  John  Okes 

21.     To  John  Pritchet  for  worke  done 

To  Cap'  Tomlins  for  ^Cannon  Baskets 
To  Tho.  Webb  for  worke  done... 


£  s^ 

d. 

I     3 

6 

O    ID 

0 

O    ID 

0 

I     ID 

0 

o  19 

0 

2     5 

0 

0     6 

0 

I     ID 

0 

I     10 

0 

I     4 

0 

0     3 

6 

I     7 

0 

I     0 

0 

5     5 

0 

I     4 

0 

3  10 

0 

0  10 

0 

0    5 

0 

I     7 

6 

4  15 

0 

0  10 

0 

I     0 

0 

0     9 

0 

3  16 

6 

0    4 

0 

20  15 

0 

2  15 

0 

0     6 

0 

0     5 

0 

3     9 

4 

3     8 

4 

2     2 

0 

[diank] 

[d/ank] 

4  15 

0 

5     0 

0 

0  14 

0 

*  Cylindrical  wicker  baskets,  to  be  filled  with  earth  and  iised  in  fortification. 


SOME  cr 

VIL  WAR 

ACCOUNT 

s. 

2 

*33 

£   s^ 

d. 

To  Hen.  Heckford 

I     15 

0 

To  W»  Flenney 

I     8 

0 

To  Sam.  Juscott 

I   15 

0 

To  Geo.  Symonds 

0  14 

0 

To  Joseph  Symonds    .. 

I     8 

0 

To  Roger  Sutton 

•30 

0 

To  him  more 

..       0  18 

0 

22.     To  John  Smyth 

..10 

0 

To  Rich.  Collyns 

2  16 

0 

To  Tho.  Green 

1  . 

I   12 

6 

To  John  Brown 

..08 

0 

To  Leo.  Sell 

I   15 

0 

To  Tho.  Philips 

0     6 

0 

To  Thomas  Watkins    .. 

0  10 

0 

To  Thomas  Younge    .. 

•       I   15 

0 

To  Art.  Myers 

0  12 

0 

To   Rich.  Dickins 

0  12 

0 

E.  Grosvener. 

August  22.     To  John  Bonny 

0  16 

0 

To  Roger  Bude 

0     8 

3 

To  Hen.  Spier 

I   12 

0 

To  Denis  Allen 

I     2 

0 

To  Rich.  Guard 

I  02 

0 

To  Thomas  Asage 

0  12 

0 

To  Thom  Ball 

2  04 

0 

To  John  Pardy 

0  12 

0 

To  James  Charleton    .. 

.       0  15 

9 

To  Aaron  Powell 

0  15 

0 

To  W">  Shephard 

.       I  04 

0 

To  John  Parker 

I   12 

0 

To  Ephr.  Bennett 

0  12 

0 

To  Philip  Dyer 

I   16 

0 

To  Jeffry  Smyth 

•       3     5 

0 

To  Thomas  True 

0     9 

0 

23.     To  Thomas  Allison  for  Tho.  Davis 

.       0     4 

0 

To  him  for  Rich.  Marshall 

0  14 

6 

To  him  more  for  John  Swallow 

0     6 

0 

To  him  more  for  Philip  Dyer    ... 

I    17 

0 

To  him  more  for  John 

Marsh  . 

.       0     8 

0 

234 


SOME   CIVIL   WAR    ACCOUNTS 


To  John  Haslewood 
To  him  more 
To  Thomas  Bartlett 
To  Hen.  Stamford 
To  John  Newam 
To  Hen.  Bouden 
To  John  Selve 
To  Rich.  Rea 
To  Rob'  Hering 
To  Tho.  Webb 
To  John  Holdsworth 
To  John  Andrews 
To  John  Hull 


E.  Grosvener. 


Barksteads 


workes   on 


August  24.     To  Ralph  Dunston  for  worke  done 

1  o  M*^  Taylor  for  1 700^  vieighi  (?)  of  Bullet  making 
To  M'-Crabb  for  Lead 
To  M'  Chapman   which   he   laid   out   for    Waggons 

with  Amuniton  from  Windsor 
To  John  Brown  for  worke  done 
To   Edw.  Abraham   and    others   of  Col. 

Regimt.  for  3  horses 
To  Sam.  Wood 
To  Allin  Farrison 
24.    To  M' Stoddart  for  Boards 

To   M*-  Lloyd   Col.  Whalleys   Clark   for 

SufTolke  side 
To  Humphry  Heckford  for  worke  done 

E.  Grosvener. 


August  25.     To  Philip  Hooper  for  carrying  Faggots 
To  Ro(?)  Sley  for  throwing  stones 
To  Roland  Kelsay  for  making  a  port  hole 
To  Dennis  Allen  for  worke  done 
To  Allin  Farrison  for  the  same... 
To  Ro.  Risley  for  carrying  Faggotes 
To  John  Selby 
To  John  Andrews 
To  W"™  Farrington  for  work  done 
To  John  Goslin 


£ 
I 
o 

I 
o 
I 

I 
o 

3 
o 
I 

I 
I 


o 
6 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
6 
o 
10 

3 
o 


o  10 

2       2 

8  II 


I 
I 

I 
2 

I 
12 

20 
I 


o 

17 
16 

7 
7 
o 

o 
4 


o  10 
o  9 
o 

I 
I 
o 


5 
5 

2 

7 

0  12 

1  15 


10 
I 


o 
6 
o 

10 
o 

o 
o 
6 
o 

o 
o 


27. 


SOME 

CIVIL   WA 

R   ACCOUNTS. 

235 

£    s.    d. 

To  Rob^  Hall 

...             ... 

313 

To  W°>  Jenninks 

200 

More  to  him... 

I    15     0 

To  Thomas  Morley 

I   10     0 

To  John    Burges 

239 

To  Francis  Fowles 

I   10     0 

To  Randle  Kettle 

200 

To  M"-  Lloyd  for  work  on  Col. 

Whalleys  side 

...     10     0     0 

To  John  Winter  for  worke  done 

I   15     0 

To  Tho.  Asage 

... 

...                        ••. 

I     I     0 

To  John  Pritchet 

... 

... 

200 

To  Hen.  Hewes 

... 

... 

150 

To  Rob'  Klegg 

...                        ... 

220 

To  Jeffery  Smyth 

... 

... 

100 

To  Wn>  Jakes 

... 

... 

080 

To  Thomas  Allenson 

••• 

... 

140 

To  him  more  for  Jo. 

Curtis 

...                       ... 

090 

To  him  more 

. .. 

0  10     0 

To  Rob*  Henwing 

... 

...       239 

To  Rowland  Harridge 

i... 

026 

To  Tho.  Church 

... 

... 

100 

To  Joseph  Symonds 

... 

*.. 

140 

To  Allin  Farrison 

•  •• 

070 

To  John  Kelsey 

••• 

... 

..       250 

E.  Grosvener. 

Since  sending  the  above  to  the  press,  a  most  valuable  and  interest- 
ing work,  by  Mr.  C.  H.  Firth,  on  Cromweirs  Army — A  History  of 
the  English  Soldiers  from  1642  to  1649,"  has  appeared.  Publisher, 
Methuen  &  Co.  Price,  75.  6^.  The  *New  Model'  is  described  in 
detail,  and  much  interesting  information  bearing  on  the  *  Civil  War 
Accounts '  is  given. 


Cjmtcijfeatlretts'  Accounts -JBUtfjleg. 


By    E.   KITSON     CLARK. 


INTRODUCTION. 

The  Methley  parish  churchwardens'  accounts,  of  which  unfortunately 
but  little  survive,  are  the  first  records  of  the  kind  which  the 
Thoresby  Society  has  undertaken,  and  it  seems  natural  not  only  to 
annotate  them  as  far  as  possible,  but  to  preface  them  with  a  general 
introduction  to  the  subject.  So  much  have  churchwardens  suffered 
from  the  careless  appreciation  of  their  unremunerated  work,  that  most 
people  are  content  to  accept  their  existence  as  a  matter  of  course,  to 
remember  their  failings,  and  to  take  note  of  their  philistine  actions,  and 
so  to  forget  the  value  of  that  lay  executive  which  has  carried  out  such 
important  duties  for  many  centuries. 

Any  analysis,  however  slight,  of  the  items  of  such  accounts 
presents  to  the  enquirer  at  the  outset  many  and  complicated 
problems.  He  feels  warned  at  once  that  the  task  of  dealing  with 
the  origin,  growth,  and  work  of  the  warden's  office  is  one  which 
should  claim  the  full  attention  of  a  devoted  historian,  and  that  it  is 
too  ambitious  for  an  isolated  article  in  a  miscellaneous  publication  of 
a  local  archaeological  society.  At  the  same  time  there  are  to  be  found 
in  reprints  of  constitutional  documents,  etc.,  allusions  to  the  duties  of 
churchwardens  sufficient  to  provide  an  intelligible  commentar>'  upon 
the  questions  which  arise  in  connection  with  the  accounts  here 
printed.  Some  such  passages  have  been  extracted  for  this  purpose, 
and  it  is  hoped  that  they  may  suggest  explanations  or  provide 
illustrations  in  connection  with  this  important  subject.  But  in  the 
extracts  to  be  quoted  below  there  appears  no  solution  to  the  first 
problem  which  naturally  suggests  itself,  namely:  When  and  how  did 
the  office  of  churchwarden  originate?  And  when  we  turn  to  the 
History  of  English  Law^  by  Pollock  &  Maitland,  we  find  no  more 
definite  statement  than  opinions  begun  with  such  careful  words  as, 
"  We  are  not  persuaded,"  and  "  We  suspect." 

^  History  of  English  Law  (1895),  i*  ^2-3. 


CHURCHWARDENS   ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY.  237 

Not  SO  diffident  are  the  dictionary  makers.     In  the  Dictionary  of 

Christian  Antiquities  the   reader  is  referred  back   to   an   officiaP   of 

Fifth   the   fifth    century,  who   received   from   the   Bishop  certain  keys  and 

century.  ^^  guardianship  of  certain  goods  : — to  the  *  seniores '  addressed  by 

S.  Augustine,  Bishop  of  Hippo,*  at  the  beginning  of  that  century ;  and 

to  the  seniores  ecclesiastici  of  a  later  time.     In  another  work  a  reference 

1127.        is  made  to  the  Canon  of  1127  (Synod  of  Westminster),  in  recording 

which     Johnson'    makes    a    suggestion,    a    suggestion    merely,    that 

"other  ministers"  there  mentioned  may    mean    the   "reeves    of  the 

church,  such  laymen  as,  by  the  bishop's  appointment,  took  care  of  the 

secular  affairs  of  the  diocese."     All,  it  is  explained,  were  officials  who 

would  now  be  described  as  churchwardens.*    They  may  have  been  \ 

but,  unfortunately,  there  is  such  a  gap  in  ecclesiastical  records  on  this 

subject  that   it  appears  profitless   to  consider  even  the  probabilities. 

The  earlier  sacred  writers  were  more  concerned  with  the  picturesque 

details  of  a  saint's  life,  and  the  miracles  associated  with   his   bones, 

than   with   the  ordinary  business    details  of   church    expenses;    and 

when    official  documents  appear,  in  which  we  can  read  to  a  certain 

extent   the    history   of  the    times,  the  dramatic  struggles   for  power 

and    jurisdiction    between    church    and   king,   and    king   and    pope, 

are  written  therein  so   large  as   to  obscure   the   descriptions   of  the 

humbler  machinery. 

Nineteenth         If  we,  on  the  other  hand,  begin  at  the  end  of  the  story,  we  find 

that  in  the  nineteenth  century  churchwardens  form  an  executive  council 

of  laymen   popularly  elected  in  each  parish,  with  certain   duties  in 

connection  with  the   repair  of  the  church  and  the   property  of   the 

Seventeenth  church.      And    in   the   seventeenth   century  at    Methley  the   state   of 

^xoxyxTj.       affairs  appear  to  have  been  much  the  same;    only  then   the  duties 

1606.        embraced  a  still  wider  field,  approximating  to  those  so  fully  described 

in  Lambard's  Duties  of  Constables^ Churchwardens^  etc,  (see 

page  255  below) ;  in  fact,  almost  to  those  of  a  modern  parish  or  even 
county  council,  with  ecclesiastical  functions  added. 

Is  this,  we  ask,  an  indication  of  the  history  of  this  office?  Did 
the  wardens  represent  the  people,  and  act  as  the  unit  of  local  self- 
government,  with  powers  still  wider  at  earlier  periods?    Should  the 


*  Perhaps  the  Suftf^t. 

^Aug,  Ep,,  137  (Paris  edition,  1679). 

'  Im7vs  and  Camms  of  the  Church  of  England  (Oxford,  185 1),  vol.  ii,  p.  40. 

*  Probably  misreading  Bingham,  Antiquities  of  the  Christian  Churchy  Book  III, 
13,  2,  and  Book  II,  19,  9.  The  writer  there  says  that  the  functions  were  in  some 
respects  similar  to  those  of  churchwardens. 


238  CHURCHWARDENS*  ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY. 

enquirer  incline  to  answer  in  the  affirmative,  he  will  find  that  he  has 
arrived  at  the  position  taken  up  by  Mr.  Toulmin  Smith  in  his  book 
on  The  Parish  (1857).  In  that  thoughtful  and  most  interesting 
work,  the  author  states  his  opinion  that  in  the  beginning  the 
parish  was  a  lay  unit,  that  the  wardens  were  officials  of  the  people 
popularly  elected  to  carry  out  lay  work,  and  he  treats  with  some 
vehemence  the  unwarrantable  encroachments  of  ecclesiastical  authority. 
But  Dr.  Stubbs,*  on  the  other  hand,  in  no  uncertain  voice  states 
that  the  parish  is  the  township  treated  ecclesiastically^  and  describes 
it  as  "a  fact  that  the  two  systems,  the  parish  and  township,  have 
existed  for  more  than  a  thousand  years  side  by  side,  identical  in  area 
and  administered  by  the  same  persons,  and  yet  separate  in  character 
and  machinery."*  And  the  deduction  from  his  view  is  that  the 
wardens  are  officials  in  an  ecclesiastical  sphere. 

^  ConstittUwncd  History  of  England^  vol.  i,  p.  247. 

*  The  position  of  the  laity  in  the  Church  forms  the  subject  of  a  report  delivered 
at  the  Convocation  of  Canterbury  in  1902  (sold  at  the  National  Society's  Depository, 
Sanctuary,  Westminster,  No.  367,  1902) ;  and  it  might  have  been  expected  that  the 
description  of  the  development  of  the  lay  position  would  have  included  a  notice  of 
the  lay  officials,  such  as  wardens,  &c.  This  is  not  the  case,  however.  These  officials 
are  only  mentioned  when  the  writers  turn  in  the  last  chapters  to  record  the 
assumption  by  the  State  of  functions  carried  out  up  to  a  certain  date  under 
ecclesiastical  supervision.  But  in  the  course  of  this  pamphlet  there  are  sentences 
which  would  seem  10  be  worth  a  reference,  and  in  all  of  them  the  evidence  tends 
to  make  us  look  for  an  ecclesiastical  system  in  parish  work. 

Pages  7-17.     As  long  as  the  Church  was  small  enough,  and  a  corporate  self- 
government  was  possible,  the  traditions  of  the  first  period  were  adhered  to  as  in 
the   time   when   the   apostles   and   elders  were   gathered   in   council.     This   lasted 
325.  approximately  up  to  the  date  of  the  Council  of  Nicaea  (325). 

3 '2.  Pages  18-31.     But  when  Constantine  the  Great  was  converted   in   312  A.  D., 

the  powers  previously  enjoyed  by  Christian  laymen  were  transferred  to  the  Emperor, 
Christianity  became  official,  and  the  State  interfered  with  the  ecclesiastical  exeaitive. 
As  instances  of  this  the  authors  quote  a  numberof  councils  in  which  laymen  participated 
g  as  persons  of  authority,  and  present  a  fairly  continuous  series  in  the  western  Christian 

•^'  countries  up  to  the  ninth  century  (Synod  of  Aries). 

Pages  31-38.     Further,  in  the  Anjilo-Saxon  Church  the  relations  of  State  and 

Church  were  peculiarly  close,  for  when  Christianity  came  into  England  the  faith  was 

adopted  at  the  first  by  the  kings  and  leaders,  and  the  Church  element  being  thus 

at  the  outset  in  a  position  of  power,  had  a  share  in  all  State  business.    This  held  until 

1066.  1066. 

Pages  39-43.     Shortly  after  his  accession  in  that  year,  William  the  Conqueror 

separated  ecclesiastical  from  secular  councils.  Church  courts  from  civil  courts ;   and 

1066-87.      this   led   to  the  introduction  of  Roman  canon  law  and  to  a  system  of  appeals   to 

1073-85.       Rome.     To  quote  the  exact  words:  "The  reign  of  William  the  Conqueror,  1066- 

1087,  and  the  pontificate  of  Pope  Gregory  VII,  1073-1085,  constitute  a  marked  epoch 

in  the  history  of  the  separation  of  the  clergy  from  the  laity."    The  king,  however, 

retained   certain  extensive  though  ill-defined  powers.     In  order,  therefore,  to  mark 

1 164.  the  boundary  lines,  the  mutual  relations  of  Church  and  State  were  reduced  to  writing 

1382.  under  Henry  II,  in  the  Constitutions  of  Clarendon  (1164).    From  this  time  onward  the 

1414.         Crown  and  State  exercised  authority  in  varying  degrees,  until  it  came  about  that  the 

civil  courts  interfered  against  the  Lollards  (1382),  that  the  statute  of  1414  empowered 

Justices  to  enquire  after  heretics,  and  that  the  same  statute  was  that  under  which 


CHURCHWARDENS'  ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY.  239 

So  there  is  here  a  grave  divergence  of  opinion  upon  a  question 
which  must  be  solved  before  the  history  of  wardens  can  be  rendered 
complete.  Unfortunately,  as  far  as  these  officials  are  concemed,"there 
are  no  records  of  a  sufficiently  early  date  to  prove  the  existence  of  an 
ecclesiastical  parish  machinery  in  the  time  to  which  Dr.  Stubbs  alludes, 
while  the  earliest  records*  which  are  in  our  hands  undoubtedly  point  to 
inferences  entirely  opposed  to  the  arguments  of  Mr.  Toulmin  Smith. 
Krom  1349.  A  far  less  positive  solution  than  either  of  these  has  been  arrived 
at  in  the  History  of  English  Law,  There  the  sub-division  of  England, 
through  Counties,  Hundreds,  and  Wapentakes,  is  brought  down 
to  the  Township  or  Vill  as  the  smallest  unit;  and  at  this  point, 
where  it  would  seem  that  the  earliest  indications  of  popular 
parish  work  should  appear,  it  has  to  be  confessed  that  the  authors 


Fifteenth   the  executions  of  the   fifteen'h   and  sixteenth   centuries  took   place.     And   so  the 
and  clergy  secured  assistance  in  spiritual   matters,  and  a  certain  extension  of  freedom ; 

sixteenth    but    by   invoking    the   civil    power   against    heresy  they  revived   a   parliamentary 
centuries,  interference  which  bore  full  effect  after  the  Reformation  in  the  Revolution. 

Pages  44-48.  And  as  in  the  events  which  then  took  place  the  churchwardens 
are  called  upon  to  play  their  part  in  the  relations  of  laity  and  Church  we  reach  at 
last  a  recognition  of  these  officials,  alwut  whom  we  have  been  seeking  information. 
We  therefore  have  no  cause  in  this  place  to  proceed  further,  but  rather  to  note  that 
as  in  all  these  movements  the  Church  was  strong  enou^  to  dispute  with  the  king 
and  the  State  for  the  supremacy  in  highest  affairs,  it  is  wellnigh  certain  that  the 
Church  worked  its  subsidiary  organizations  such  as  the  parish  under  its  own  con- 
stitution. It  may  be  even  srat^  positively  that  in  that  period  the  Church  must 
have  managed  its  own  business  without  reference  to  a  popular  vote. 

The  pages  also  from  which  the  following  sentences  are  taken  seem  to  refer  to  a 
system  which  was  ecclesiastical.  {Cf,  Phillimorc,  Ecclesiastical  Law  of  the  Church 
of  England^  p.  264 : — 

**  Tithes  and  oblations  were  brought  into  the  common  fund,  and  administered 
for  the  bishop  as  the  unit  of  the  British  Church,  and  afterwards  of  the  Saxon. 
**The  parishes  were  largely  made  because  the  great  lords  built  for  their  tenants, 
V     rth       ^^^  ^^^  ^^  reason  the  parish  and  the  manor  were  often  coterminous." 
eleventh  ^  perusal  of  an  interesting  book  by  Imbart  de  la  Tour,  entitled  Les  Paroisses 

century.  RuraUs  du  IVe  au  Xle  Siicle  (Paris:  A.  Picard  et  Fils,  1 900),  tends  to  confirm 
the  impression  that  in  these  centuries  itfdeed  the  popular  element  had  some  repre- 
sentation in  church  management.  This  is  the  view  underlying  the  whole  book,  as 
the  passages  quoted  below  would  indicate  : — 

Pa^e  137.     **Velectio   (du   clerc)   se    faisait   sans  doute    dans   une   assemble 

composee  des  villageois  et  du  cler^e  de  la  paroisse " 

Page  164.     **  Toute  la  vie  civile  venait  y  (sc.  4  Teglise)  affluer,  car  il  n'y  avait 
Tenth  and    P^s  d'autre  organization  rurale  un  peu  complete  que  celle  de  la  paroisse.'* 
eleventh  ^**t  a  change  came  later.     Under  the  heading,    "Les  eglises  priv^  au  X**  et 

centuries.       au   XI«  Siccle." 

Page  255.  **Ce  que  nous  devons  retenir,  cest  qu*a  cote  d'une  investiture 
eccl^iastique  faite  par  I'eveque,  nous  remarquons  une  investiture  seculi^re  faite  par 
le  seigneur." 

Page  299.     **I1  ne  reste  plus  au  pretre  qu'i  devenir  M'homme'  du  seigneur." 
And   the  last  sentence  of  the   book  destroys  our  hopes  that  we  may  find  in 
P'rancc  an  instance  of  local  church  government  continuous  from  early  times. 

Page  351.  **C*est  par  le  patronage  des  Eglises  que  la  societe  religieuse  a  perdu 
son  caractere  des  premiers  siecles  et  est  entree  peu  i  peu  dans  la  feodalite." 

«549-  ^^'S*  ^t,  Michaetsy  Bath^  a.d.  1349-1575,  etc. 


240  CHURCHWARDENS*  ACCOUNTS. — METH1.EY. 

have  searched  in  vain  for  such  an  organisation^  as  might  by  any 
stretch  be  called  the  counterpart  of  the  modern  vestry.  All 
organisation  is  manorial,  is  feudal,  and  though  the  township  has  to 
make  payments,  to  send  four  good  men  to  Court,  and  the  rest, 
it  can  only  be  suggested  that  the  Executive  is  not  appointed  by 
periodical  election,  but  that  the  work  is  done  by  permanent 
arrangement,  and  has  become,  in  fact,  a  charge  upon  definite 
portions .  of  the  land.  And  yet,  when  the  reader  has  accepted  an 
apparently  definite  denial  that  any  connection  can  be  traced 
between  the  earlier  and  later  systems,  to  his  dismay  he  finds  that  in 
apparent  contradiction  our  authors  say  that  "in  general  the  vill  of  the 
thirteenth  century*  has  become  the  civil  parish  of  the  nineteenth."  If 
this  is  not  contradictory,  what  is  the  process  by  which  the  burdens  of 
the  manorially  managed  vill  came  to  be  undertaken  by  the  popularly 
elected  vestry? 

It  is  possible  that  Churchwardens'  accounts  supply  the  answer.  For 
upon  examination  they  appear  to  indicate  that  the  'vehicle*  of  this 
great  change  was  the  office  of  warden,  and  the  quotation  which  follows, 
taken  from  the  last  mentioned  work,  gives  the  explanation: — 

"*The  parish'  has  in  modern  law  supplanted  the  vill  or 
township,  owing  to  causes  which  did  not  come  into  play  until  the 
Tudor  time,  when  the  rate  for  the  relief  of  the  poor  was  imposed. 
The  law  then  began  to  enforce  a  duty  which  had  hitherto  been 
enforced  by  religion,  and  very  naturally  it  adopted  for  this  purpose 
the  geography  of  the  Church.  In  course  of  time  other  rates  were 
imposed  by  Parliament,  and  the  poor's  rate  was  taken  as  their  model. 
Thus  the  parish  became  the  important  district  for  most  purposes  of 
local  government  and  taxation."^ 

The  transformation  from  vill  to  parish  may  have  begun  indeed 
before  the  Tudor  time,  but  certainly  it  was  Tudor  legislation  which 
threw  secular  duties  on  an  ecclesiastical  organization. 

A  more  lengthy  passage  a  few  pages  further  on  gives  additional 
insight   into  this  difficult  subject,  and  by  the  great  kindness  of  the 


^  History  of  English  Law^  Pollock  &  Maitland,  vol.  i,  p.  599. 
2  Ibid,^  vol.  i,  p.  548. 
^ Ibid,,  vol.i,  p.  548. 


CHURCHWARDENS*  ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY.  24 1 

authors  we  are  permitted  to  repeat  the  important  words  below: — * 
"The  Manor  and  the  Township. 


"  Whether*  or  no  the  church-rate  has  a  remote  origin,  whether  it 
is  connected  with  ancient  churchscots  or  light-scots,  whether,  on  the 
other  hand,  the  clergy  have  shuffled  off  a  burden  which  once  fell  on 
them,  we  do  not  inquire.  We  think  it,  however,  quite  plain  that  in 
rhirtecDth  the  thirteenth  century  the  general  custom  of  the  Churc!>  of  England, 
century,  swerving  in  this  form  from  the  tus  commune  of  the  CathoHc  Church,  cast 
the  burden  of  repairing  the  nave  of  the  parish  church  and  providing 
the  main  part  of  the  ecclesiastical  apparatus,  not  upon  the  parson, 
but  upon  the  parishioners,  and  that  the  lay  powers  left  the  spiritual 
tribunals  free  to  enforce  this  custom  by  spiritual  censures.  But  we 
are  by  no  means  satisfied  that  this  custom  demanded  any  permanent 
organisation  of  the  parishioners,  any  *  vestry*  that  would  meet  and 
grant  a  rate.  So  far  as  we  can  see  the  burden  is  a  *real  burden,* 
incumbent  on  land.  The  ecclesiastical  power  can,  we  take  it,  deal 
directly  with  each  individual  landowner,  can  excommunicate  him  and 
procure  his  imprisonment  if  he  will  not  contribute  his  proper  share 
to  whatever  expenditure  has  become  necessary  for  the  due  repair 
of  the  fabric,  and  the  question  of  necessity  is  decided  by  the 
ecclesiastical  court. 

"The  duty  of  repairing  the  parish  church  is  analogous  to  the 
duty  of  repairing  the  county  bridges ;  it  is  planted  in  the  soil,  and 
to  the  soil  it  has  ceded;  it  is  apportioned  according  to  hidage  or 
acreage.'  No  doubt  the  occasional  nature  of  the  charge  almost 
compels  the  rector  or  the  archdeacon  to  deal  with  the  parishioners 
as  a  body,  to  call  them  together  and  endeavour  to  persuade  them 
that  a  wall  is  crumbling  or  that  a  new  Missal  is  wanted.  The 
parishioners  will  make  terms  with  him;  they  may  vote  him  a  rate 
to  be  assessed  in  this  way  or  in  that;  and  very  likely,  as  they  will 
have  to  pay,  they  will  hire  the  workmen  and  buy  the  materials. 

"  The  splendour  and  costliness  of  the  churches  and  their  furniture 
increase  very  rapidly;  the  parson's  demands  grow  heavier  and  more 


1  Ibid.^  vol.  i,  p.  602-3. 

^  Among  the  best  of  many  pamphlets  on  this  subject  are  W.  H.  Hale, 
Tfu  Antiquity  of  the  Church  Rate  System  (1837);  W.  Goode,  A  Brief  History  of 
Church  Rates  (1838);   Robert  Swan,   The  Principle  of  Church  Rates  (1837). 

*  In  Cambridgeshire  the  pontage  was  certainly  taken  as  a  tax  on  land. 
R.  H.,  i,  50;  the  sheriff  has  taken  from  every  hide  in  the  county  two  shillings  for 
pontage,  whereas  he  used  to  take  but  sixpence.     We  see  here  no  vote  of  the  tax. 


242 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY. 


Thirteenth 
century. 


frequent.  What  goes  on  in  the  kingdom  at  large  is  going  on  in  each 
parish.  Money-voting  vestries  became  as  indispensable  to  the 
rector  as  money-voting  Parliaments  are  to  the  King.  Movable 
wealth  must  be  brought  under  the  sphere  of  taxation.  To  our 
minds  it  would  be  as  rash  to  argue  from  the  'vestries'  or 
'parishioners'  meetings  of  the  fourteenth  and  fifteenth  centuries  to 
similar  assemblies  of  an  earlier  time,  as  it  would  be  to  argue  that 
the  Commons  of  the  realm  were  represented  in  the  Councils  of 
Henry  II  because  they  were  represented  in  the  Parliaments  of 
Edward  I. 

"And  so  with  the  churchwardens.  We  are  not  persuaded  that 
as  a  general  rule  there  were  churchwardens  in  the  thirteenth 
century.  They  and  their  legal  powers  are,  to  our  thinking,  the 
outcome  of  two  movements,  one  in  the  world  of  fact,  the  other  in 
the  world  of  legal  thought.  If  the  parishioners  are  compelled  to 
provide  precious  books,  robes,  vessels,  they  will  naturally  desire  to 
have  their  say  about  the  custody  of  these  articles;  parsons  have  been 
known  to  sell  the  church  plate. 

"Secondly,  as  we  have  seen,  in  the  later  Middle  Ages,  a  dead 
saint  or  a  personified  ecclesia  would  no  longer  serve  as  a  persona 
capable  of  proprietary  and  possessory  rights.  The  lawyers  are 
beginning  to  hold  that  the  parson  is  in  some  sort  the  owner  or  the 
tenant  of  the  church-yard  and  the  glebe;  they  have  to  find  an 
owner,  at  all  events  a  possessor,  for  what  in  the  past  had  been  the 
chattels  owned  and  possessed  by  a  saint  or  a  personified  ecclesia; 
the  churchwardens  present  themselves  as  claimants  for  property  and 
possession, ^'^ 


1287. 


1275. 


»37o. 


Fifteenth 
century. 

1287. 


*  The  first  clear  tiJings  that  we  get  as  to  the  incidence  of  the  duty  that  is 
cast  upon  the  parishioners  tell  us  that  they  contribute  **  Secundum  portionem  tcme 
quam  possident  in  eadeni  parochia";  Synod  of  Exeter  (1287),  Wilkins,  Cofuilia,  ii, 
138.  John  de  Athona,  Const.  Othoboni,  can.  improbam,  gloss,  ad  V.  peragendam, 
doubts  whether  the  burden  be  "real"  or  "personal,"  decides  in  favour  of  reality, 
but  on  either  side  alleges  nothing  beyond  ineptitudes  out  of  Code  and  Digest.  In 
1275  the  township  of  Graveley  contracts  with  a  mason  for  the  repair  of  a  wall  of 
the  church ;  he  is  to  have  31.  2d.  for  the  work,  and  a  garb  of  wheat  from  every 
house;  "the  Attorney  of  the  township"  sued  him  in  the  fair  of  St.  Ives;  SfUct 
PUas  in  Manorial  Courts ^  p.  150.  In  1370  we  see  parishioners  assembled, 
making  a  regular  rate  and  distraining  for  it;  but  it  seems  exceedingly  doubtful 
whether  their  resolution  binds  one  who  has  not  assented  to  it;  Y.B.  44  Edw.  Ill, 
f.  18  (Trin.  pi.  13).  This  case  does  not  look  as  if  a  ** vestry"  had  an  old  and 
well-established  power  of  granting,  assessing,  and  enforcing  a  rate.  As  to  the 
churchwardens,  they  l)ecome  jrominent  enough  in  the  Year  Books  of  the  fifteenth 
century;  but  even  then  some  elementary  pnnciples  seem  to  be  in  dispute.  See 
€.g.  Y\B.  II,  Henry  IV,  f.  12  (Mich.  pi.  23);  8  Henry  V,  f .  4  (Ilil.  pi.  15): 
37  Henry  VI,  ff  30  (Trin.  pi.  11).  The  Synod  of  Exeter  in  1287  had  said 
"  Ornamenta    ecclesisc    securuc    custodide    committantur,    tton    tamen    sub    custodia 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  243 

Having  concluded  a  general  statement  concerning  the  origin  and 
development  of  the  functions  of  wardens,  we  turn  to  certain  extracts 
from  constitutional  documents  and  other  records,  which  afford  definite 
evidence  upon  the  many  difficult  points  involved  in  the  subject ;  but 
first  it  would  appear  desirable  to  describe  in  the  same  general  manner 
the  action  and  condition  of  the  parish.  For  this  purpose  no  better 
authority  can  be  drawn  upon  than  the  admirable  preface  of  Bishop 
Hobhouse  in  his  Chtirchivarden^  Accounts  of  Certain  Parishes  in 
Somerset}  The  learned  writer  is  dealing  with  six  parishes  between 
the  years  of  1349  and  1560.  He  does  not  give  a  time  for  the 
initiation  of  the  parish  system  which  he  describes,  and  his  deductions 
are  made  from  transactions  which  are  recorded  at  all  dates  during  this 
time.  For  this  reason,  it  is  true,  the  constitution  of  the  parish  as 
described  by  him  cannot  be  assigned  to  one  particular  period,  but  it 
seems  probable  that  the  system  was  in  operation  on  similar  lines  during 
the  whole  time,  for  it  is  noted  that  at  Bath  in  1349,  his  earliest  date, 
the  organisation  is  found  to  be  already  complete.  And  further,  until 
earlier  wardens'  accounts  have  been  brought  forward  and  studied,  we 
are  led  to  think  that  this  time  may  not  be  far  from  that  of  the 
institution  of  the  warden  system.  The  few  references  to  Canon  I^w'' 
which  it  has  been  in  our  power  to  make  would  point  to  the 
conclusion  that  the  finances  of  the  parish  were  managed  in  all 
matters  by  ecclesiastics  in  early  times.  Pollock  &  Maitland  hold  that 
in  the  century  before  this  time  churchwardens  did  not  generally  exist ; 
and  in  proposing  1349  as  our  starting  point  we  are  enabled  to  build 
from  an  epoch  which  was  deeply  scored  in  the  history  of  parish  life 
in  England.     That  date  when  the  Black  Death  carried  off  priest  and 


laicorum^  nisi  id  nccessitas  maior  expostulaverit."  The  churchwardens'  accounts 
edited  \tj  Bishop  Hobhouse  in  1890  for  the  Somerset  Record  Society,  point  to 
the  conclusion  that  in  the  fourteenth  and  fifteenth  centuries  the  making  and 
enforcement  of  a  compulsory  church  rate  was  a  rare  event;  indeed,  the  editor 
(p.  231)  says  that  he  knows  of  but  one  case  before  the  reign  of  Elizabeth.  The 
churchwardens  seem  to  have  got  the  money  that  they  needed  by  means  of  voluntary 
gifts  and  legacies,  and  of  church  ales,  which  opened  the  purses  of  the  parishioners. 
*  Somerset  Record  Society,  vol.  iv,  1890. 

2  To  take  instances  at  various  dates  which  point  in  ihis  direction : — 

Collection  of  Laws  ami  Canons  of  the  Church  of  England, — S.  Johnson, 

MDCCCL. 

Vol.  i,  p.  188.     Canon  a.d.  740,  28.     "Let  every  bishop  take  care  that  the 

churches  within  his  parish  1^  well  built,  repaired,  and  adorned.'* 
Vol.  i,  p.  367.     Canon  5.     **That  every  bishop  repair  God's  house  in  his 

own   see,   and    remind   the    King   that   all    God's   churches   be   well 

provided." 
Also  cf.  Brcutoity  f.  226A,  thitteenth  century.     **  Et  cum  ecclesia  fungatur 

vice   minoris,  acquirilur   per  RECTOR f.m  el    relinet   per  cundem   sicui 

minor  *per  tutorem." 


238  CHURCHWARDENS*  ACCOUNTS. — METHLEV. 

enquirer  incline  to  answer  in  the  affirmative,  he  will  find  that  he  has 
arrived  at  the  position  taken  up  by  Mr.  Toulmin  Smith  in  his  book 
on  The  Parish  (1857).  In  that  thoughtful  and  most  interesting 
work,  the  author  states  his  opinion  that  in  the  beginning  the 
parish  was  a  lay  unit,  that  the  wardens  were  officials  of  the  people 
popularly  elected  to  carry  out  lay  work,  and  he  treats  with  some 
vehemence  the  unwarrantable  encroachments  of  ecclesiastical  authority. 
But  Dr.  Stubbs,*  on  the  other  hand,  in  no  uncertain  voice  states 
that  the  parish  is  the  township  treated  ecclesiastically^  and  describes 
it  as  "a  fact  that  the  two  systems,  the  parish  and  township,  have 
existed  for  more  than  a  thousand  years  side  by  side,  identical  in  area 
and  administered  by  the  same  persons,  and  yet  separate  in  character 
and  machinery.'*^  And  the  deduction  from  his  view  is  that  the 
wardens  are  officials  in  an  ecclesiastical  sphere. 

'  Constitutional  History  of  England y  vol.  i,  p.  247. 

*  The  position  of  the  laity  in  the  Church  forms  the  subject  of  a  report  delivered 
at  the  Convocation  of  Canterbury  in  1902  (sold  at  the  National  Society's  Depository, 
Sanctuary,  Westminster,  No.  367,  1902) ;  and  it  might  have  been  expected  that  the 
description  of  the  development  of  the  lay  position  would  have  included  a  notice  of 
the  lay  officials,  such  as  wardens,  &c.  This  is  not  the  case,  however.  These  officials 
are  only  mentioned  when  the  writers  turn  in  the  last  chapters  to  record  the 
assumption  by  the  State  of  functions  carried  out  up  to  a  certain  date  under 
ecclesiastical  supervision.  But  in  the  course  of  this  pamphlet  there  are  sentences 
which  would  seem  to  be  worth  a  reference,  and  in  all  of  them  the  evidence  tends 
to  make  us  look  for  an  ecclesiastical  system  in  pari.sh  work. 

Pages  7-17.     As  long  as  the  Church  was  small  enough,  and  a  corporate  self- 
government  was  possible,  the  traditions  of  the  first  period  were  adhered  to  as  in 
the   time   when   the   apostles  and   elders  were   gathered   in   council.     This   lasted 
325.  approximately  up  to  the  date  of  the  Council  of  Nicaea  (325). 

3' 2.  Pages  18-31.     But  when  Constantine  the  Great  was  converted   in   312  A.D., 

the  powers  previously  enjoyed  by  Christian  laymen  were  transferred  to  the  Emperoi, 
Christianity  became  official,  and  the  State  interfered  with  the  ecclesiastical  executive. 
As  instances  of  this  the  authors  quote  a  number  of  councils  in  which  laymen  participated 
g  as  persons  of  authority,  and  present  a  fairly  continuous  series  in  the  western  Christian 

•^*  countries  up  to  the  ninth  century  (Synod  of  Aries). 

Pages  31-38.     Further,  in  the  An^lo-Saxon  Church  the  relations  of  State  and 

Church  were  peculiarly  close,  for  when  Christianity  came  into  England  the  faith  was 

adopted  at  the  first  by  the  kings  and  leaders,  and  the  Church  element  being  thus 

at  the  outset  in  a  position  of  power,  had  a  share  in  all  State  business.    This  held  until 

1066.  1066. 

Pages  39-43.     Shortly  after  his  accession  in  that  year,  William  the  Conqueror 

separated  ecclesiastical  from  secular  councils.  Church  courts  from  civil  courts ;   and 

1066-87.       fills  led   to  the  introduction  of  Roman  canon  law  and  to  a  system  of  appeals   to 

1073-85.       Rome.     To  quote  the  exact  words:  "The  reign  of  William  the  Conqueror,  1066- 

1087,  and  the  pontificate  of  Pope  Gregory  VII,  1073-1085,  constitute  a  marked  epoch 

in  the  history  of  the  separation  of  the  clergy  from  the  laity."     The  king,  however, 

retained  certain  extensive  though  ill-defined  powers.     In  order,  therefore,  to  mark 

1 164.         the  boundary  lines,  the  mutual  relations  of  Church  and  State  were  reduced  to  writing 

1382.  under  Henry  II,  in  the  Constitutions  of  Clarendon  (1164).    From  this  lime  onward  the 

1 4 14.         Crown  and  State  exercised  authority  in  varying  degrees,  until  it  came  about  that  the 

civil  courts  interfered  against  the  Lollards  (1382),  that  the  statute  of  1414  empowered 

Justices  to  enquire  after  heretics,  and  thai  the  same  statute  was  that   under  which 


CHURCHWARDENS'  ACCOUNTS.— METHLEY.  239 

So  there  is  here  a  grave  divergence  of  opinion  upon  a  question 
which  must  be  solved  before  the  history  of  wardens  can  be  rendered 
complete.  Unfortunately,  as  far  as  these  officials  are  concerned,"there 
are  no  records  of  a  sufficiently  early  date  to  prove  the  existence  of  an 
ecclesiastical  parish  machinery  in  the  time  to  which  Dr.  Stubbs  alludes, 
while  the  earliest  records^  which  are  in  our  hands  undoubtedly  point  to 
inferences  entirely  opposed  to  the  arguments  of  Mr.  Toulmin  Smith. 
Krom  1349.  A  far  less  positive  solution  than  either  of  these  has  been  arrived 
at  in  the  History  of  English  Law,  There  the  sub-division  of  England, 
through  Counties,  Hundreds,  and  Wapentakes,  is  brought  down 
to  the  Township  or  Vill  as  the  smallest  unit;  and  at  this  point, 
where  it  would  seem  that  the  earliest  indications  of  popular 
parish  work  should  appear,  it  has  to  be  confessed  that  the  authors 

Fifteenth   the  executions  of  the   fifteen'h   and   sixteenth   centuries  took   place.     And  so  the 
and  clergy  secured  assistance  in  spiritual   matters,  and  a  certain  extension  of  freedom ; 

sixteenth    but    by   invoking    the   civil    power   against    heresy   they  revived    a   parliamentary 
centuries,  interference  which  bore  full  effect  after  the  Reformation  in  the  Revolution. 

Pages  44-48.  And  as  in  the  events  which  then  took  place  the  churchwardens 
are  called  upon  to  play  their  part  in  the  relations  of  laity  and  Church  we  reach  at 
last  a  recognition  of  these  officials,  about  whom  we  have  been  seeking  information. 
We  therefore  have  no  cause  in  this  place  to  proceed  further,  but  rather  to  note  that 
as  in  all  these  movements  the  Church  was  strong  enough  to  dispute  with  the  king 
and  the  State  for  the  supremacy  in  hi|;hest  affairs,  it  is  wellnigh  certain  that  the 
Church  worked  its  subsidiary  organizations  such  as  the  parish  under  its  own  con- 
stitution. It  may  be  even  stated  positively  that  in  that  period  the  Church  must 
have  managed  its  own  business  without  reference  to  a  popular  vote. 

The  pages  also  from  which  the  following  sentences  are  taken  seem  to  refer  to  a 
system  which  was  ecclesiastical.  {Cf.  Phillimore,  Ecclesiastical  Law  0/  the  Church 
of  England,  p.  264 : — 

"Tithes  and  oblations  were  brought  into  the  common  fund,  and  administered 
for  the  bishop  as  the  unit  of  the  British  Church,  and  afterwards  of  the  Saxon. 
**The  parishes  were  larjgely  made  because  the  great  lords  built  for  their  tenants, 

»-     -.u  .    and  for  this  reason  the  parish  and  the  manor  were  often  coterminous." 
Fourth  to 

eleventh  ^  perusal  of  an  interesting  book  by  Imbart  de  la  Tour,  entitled  Les  Paroisses 

century.  l^f^raUs  du  IVe  au  Xle  Sikle  (Paris :  A.  Picard  et  Fils,  1900),  tends  to  confirm 
the  impression  that  in  these  centuries  itfdeed  the  popular  element  had  some  repre- 
sentation in  church  management.  This  is  the  view  underlying  the  whole  book,  as 
the  passages  quoted  below  would  indicate : — 

Page  137.     ^'Velectio   (du    clerc)   se   faisait   sans  doute    dans   une   assemble 

composee  des  villageois  et  du  cler^e  de  la  paroisse '* 

Page  164.     **Toute  la  vie  civile  venait  y  (sc.  4  Teglise)  affluer,  car  il  n'y  avait 
Tenth  and    pas  d*autre  organization  rurale  un  peu  complete  que  celle  de  la  paroisse." 
eleventh  ^**t  a  choftge  came  later.     Under  the  heading,    **Les  eglises  privies  au  X«  et 

centuries.       au   XI«=  Siecle." 

Page  255.  **Ce  que  nous  devons  retenir,  c'est  qu*^  cote  d'une  investiture 
eccl^iastique  fidte  par  Tcveque,  nous  remarquons  une  investiture  seculi^re  faite  par 
le  seigneur." 

Page  299.     **I1  ne  reste  plus  au  pretre  qu'i  devenir  M'homme'  du  seigneur." 
And   the   last  sentence  of  the  book  destroys  our  hopes  that  we  may  find  in 
France  an  instance  of  local  church  government  continuous  from  early  times. 

Page  J51.  "C'est  par  le  oatronage  des  ^^lises  que  la  societe  religieuse  a  perdu 
son  caractere  des  premiers  si^cles  el  est  entree  peu  4  peu  dans  la  feodalite." 

«349-  ^'-i'  •*•  ^^lichattsy  Bath^  a.d.  1349-1575,  etc 


240  CHURCHWARDENS    ACCOUNTS. — METHi-EY. 

have  searched  in  vain  for  such  an  organisation*  as  might  by  any 
stretch  be  called  the  counterpart  of  the  modem  vestry.  All 
organisation  is  manorial,  is  feudal,  and  though  the  township  has  to 
make  payments,  to  send  four  good  men  to  Court,  and  the  rest, 
it  can  only  be  suggested  that  the  Executive  is  not  appointed  by 
periodical  election,  but  that  the  work  is  done  by  permanent 
arrangement,  and  has  become,  in  fact,  a  charge  upon  definite 
portions  of  the  land.  And  yet,  when  the  reader  has  accepted  an 
apparently  definite  denial  that  any  connection  can  be  traced 
between  the  earlier  and  later  systems,  to  his  dismay  he  finds  that  in 
apparent  contradiction  our  authors  say  that  "in  general  the  vill  of  the 
thirteenth  century*  has  become  the  civil  parish  of  the  nineteenth."  If 
this  is  not  contradictory,  what  is  the  process  by  which  the  burdens  of 
the  manorially  managed  vill  came  to  be  undertaken  by  the  popularly 
elected  vestry? 

It  is  possible  that  Churchwardens'  accounts  supply  the  answer.  For 
upon  examination  they  appear  tc  indicate  that  the  'vehicle'  of  this 
great  change  was  the  office  of  warden,  and  the  quotation  which  follows, 
taken  from  the  last  mentioned  work,  gives  the  explanation: — 

"*The  parish'  has  in  modern  law  supplanted  the  vill  or 
township,  owing  to  causes  which  did  not  come  into  play  until  the 
Tudor  time,  when  the  rate  for  the  relief  of  the  poor  was  imposed. 
The  law  then  began  to  enforce  a  duty  which  had  hitherto  been 
enforced  by  religion,  and  very  naturally  it  adopted  for  this  purpose 
the  geography  of  the  Church.  In  course  of  time  other  rates  were 
imposed  by  Parliament,  and  the  poor's  rate  was  taken  as  their  model. 
Thus  the  parish  became  the  important  district  for  most  purposes  of 
local  government  and  taxation."* 

The  transformation  from  vill  to  parish  may  have  begun  indeed 
before  the  Tudor  time,  but  certainly  it  was  Tudor  legislation  which 
threw  secular  duties  on  an  ecclesiastical  organization. 

A  more  lengthy  passage  a  few  pages  further  on  gives  additional 
insight  into  this  difficult  subject,  and  by  the  great  kindness  of  the 


*  History  of  English  LaWy  Pollock  &  Maitland,  vol.  i,  p.  599. 
a  Ibid,y  vol.  i,  p.  548. 
^Ibidy  vol.i,  p.  548. 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  24 1 

authors  we  are  permitted  to  repeat  the  important  words  below: — * 
"The  Manor  and  the  Township. 


"  Whether*  or  no  the  church-rate  has  a  remote  origin,  whether  it 
is  connected  with  ancient  church  scots  or  light-scots,  whether,  on  the 
other  hand,  the  clergy  have  shuffled  off  a  burden  which  once  fell  on 
them,  we  do  not  inquire.  We  think  it,  however,  quite  plain  that  in 
rhirtecnth  the  thirteenth  century  the  general  custom  of  the  Churc  )  of  England, 
century,  swerving  in  this  form  from  the  ius  commune  of  the  Catholic  Church,  cast 
the  burden  of  repairing  the  nave  of  the  parish  church  and  providing 
the  main  part  of  the  ecclesiastical  apparatus,  not  upon  the  parson, 
but  upon  the  parishioners,  and  that  the  lay  powers  left  the  spiritual 
tribunals  free  to  enforce  this  custom  by  spiritual  censures.  But  we 
are  by  no  means  satisfied  that  this  custom  demanded  any  permanent 
organisation  of  the  parishioners,  any  *  vestry*  that  would  meet  and 
grant  a  rate.  So  far  as  we  can  see  the  burden  is  a  *real  burden,* 
incumbent  on  land.  The  ecclesiastical  power  can,  we  take  it,  deal 
directly  with  each  individual  landowner,  can  excommunicate  him  and 
procure  his  imprisonment  if  he  will  not  contribute  his  proper  share 
to  whatever  expenditure  has  become  necessary  for  the  due  repair 
of  the  fabric,  and  the  question  of  necessity  is  decided  by  the 
ecclesiastical  court 

"The  duty  of  repairing  the  parish  church  is  analogous  to  the 
duty  of  repairing  the  county  bridges;  it  is  planted  in  the  soil,  and 
to  the  soil  it  has  ceded;  it  is  apportioned  according  to  hidage  or 
acreage.'  No  doubt  the  occasional  nature  of  the  charge  almost 
compels  the  rector  or  the  archdeacon  to  deal  with  the  parishioners 
as  a  body,  to  call  them  together  and  endeavour  to  persuade  them 
that  a  wall  is  crumbling  or  that  a  new  Missal  is  wanted.  The 
parishioners  will  make  terms  with  him ;  they  may  vote  him  a  rate 
to  be  assessed  in  this  way  or  in  that;  and  very  likely,  as  they  will 
have  to  pay,  they  will  hire  the  workmen  and  buy  the  materials. 

"  The  splendour  and  costliness  of  the  churches  and  their  furniture 
increase  very  rapidly;  the  parson's  demands  grow  heavier  and  more 


» Ibid,^  vol.  i,  p.  602-3. 

^  Among  the  best  of  many  pamphlets  on  this  subject  are  W.  H.  Hale, 
Th€  Antiquity  of  the  Church  Rate  System  (1837);  W.  Goode,  A  Brief  History  of 
Church  Rates  (1838);   Robert  Swan,   The  Principle  of  Church  Rates  (1837). 

•  In  Cambridgeshire  the  pontage  was  certainly  taken  as  a  tax  on  land. 
R.  H.,  i,  50;  the  sheriff  has  taken  from  every  hide  in  the  county  two  shillings  for 
pontage,  whereas  he  used  to  take  but  sixpence.     We  see  here  no  vote  of  the  tax. 


242 


churchwardens'  accounts.  — METHLEY. 


frequent  What  goes  on  in  the  kingdom  at  large  is  going  on  in  each 
parish.  Money-voting  vestries  became  as  indispensable  to  the 
rector  as  money-voting  Parliaments  are  to  the  King.  Movable 
wealth  must  be  brought  under  the  sphere  of  taxation.  To  our 
minds  it  would  be  as  rash  to  argue  from  the  *  vestries'  or 
*  parishioners'  meetings  of  the  fourteenth  and  fifteenth  centuries  to 
similar  assemblies  of  an  earlier  time,  as  it  would  be  to  argue  that 
the  Commons  of  the  realm  were  represented  in  the  Councils  of 
Henry  II  because  they  were  represented  in  the  Parliaments  of 
Edward  I. 

"And  so  with  the  churchwardens.  We  are  not  persuaded  that 
Thirteenth  as  a  general  rule  there  were  churchwardens  in  the  thirteenth 
century.  ^gntury.  They  and  their  legal  powers  are,  to  our  thinking,  the 
outcome  of  two  movements,  one  in  the  world  of  fact,  the  other  in 
the  world  of  legal  thought.  If  the  parishioners  are  compelled  to 
provide  precious  books,  robes,  vessels,  they  will  naturally  desire  to 
have  their  say  about  the  custody  of  these  articles;  parsons  have  been 
known  to  sell  the  church   plate. 

"Secondly,  as  we  have  seen,  in  the  later  Middle  Ages,  a  dead 
saint  or  a  personified  ecdesia  would  no  longer  serve  as  a  persona 
capable  of  proprietary  and  possessory  rights.  The  lawyers  are 
beginning  to  hold  that  the  parson  is  in  some  sort  the  owner  or  the 
tenant  of  the  church-yard  and  the  glebe;  they  have  to  find  an 
owner,  at  all  events  a  possessor,  for  what  in  the  past  had  been  the 
chattels  owned  and  possessed  by  a  saint  or  a  personified  ecdesia; 
the  churchwardens  present  themselves  as  claimants  for  property  and 
possessions^ 


1287. 


1275. 


1370. 


Fifteenth 
century. 

1287. 


^  The  first  clear  tidings  that  we  get  as  to  the  incidence  of  the  duty  ihat  is 
cast  upon  the  parishioners  lell  us  that  they  contribute  "  Secundum  portionem  tcrne 
quam  possident  in  eadem  parochia";  Synod  of  Exeter  {1287),  Wilkins,  Concilia^  ii, 
138.  John  de  Athona,  Const.  Othoboni,  can.  improbam,  gloss,  ad  V.  pera^endam, 
doubts  whether  the  burden  be  *'real"  or  **  personal,"  decides  in  favour  of  reality, 
but  on  either  side  alleges  nothing  beyond  ineptitudes  out  of  Code  and  Digest.  In 
1275  the  township  of  Graveley  contracts  with  a  mason  for  the  repair  of  a  wall  i»f 
the  church;  he  is  to  have  y.  2d.  for  the  work,  and  a  garb  of  wheat  from  every 
house;  **the  Attorney  of  the  township"  sued  him  in  the  fair  of  St.  Ives;  SeUci 
Pleas  in  Manorial  Courts ^  p.  150.  In  1370  we  see  parishioners  assembled, 
making  a  regular  rate  and  distraining  for  it;  but  it  seems  exceedingly  doubiful 
whether  their  resolution  binds  one  who  has  not  assented  to  it;  Y.B.  44  Edw.  Ill, 
f.  18  (Trin.  pi.  13).  This  case  does  not  look  as  if  a  '* vestry"  had  an  old  and 
well-established  power  of  granting,  assessing,  and  enforcing  a  rate.  As  to  the 
churchwardens,  they  l^ecome  jrominent  enough  in  the  Year  Books  of  the  fifteenth 
century;  but  even  then  some  elementary  principles  seem  to  be  in  dispute.  Sec 
e,g.  Y.B.  II,  Henry  IV,  f.  12  (Mich.  pi.  23);  8  Henry  V,  f.  4  (Ilil.  pi.  15): 
37  Henry  VI,  C  30  {Trin.  pi.  11).  The  Synod  of  Exeter  in  1287  had  said 
"  Ornamenta    ecclesiae    securae    custodise    committantur,    non    iamen    sub    cusiodia 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  243 

Having  concluded  a  general  statement  concerning  the  origin  and 
development  of  the  functions  of  wardens,  we  turn  to  certain  extracts 
from  constitutional  documents  and  other  records,  which  afford  definite 
evidence  upon  the  many  difficult  points  involved  in  the  subject ;  but 
first  it  would  appear  desirable  to  describe  in  the  same  general  manner 
the  action  and  condition  of  the  parish.  For  this  purpose  no  better 
authority  can  be  drawn  upon  than  the  admirable  preface  of  Bishop 
Hobhouse  in  his  Churchwarden^  Accounts  of  Certain  Parishes  in 
Somerset}    The   learned  writer  is  dealing  with  six  parishes   between 

9-1560.  the  years  of  1349  and  1560.  He  does  not  give  a  time  for  the 
initiation  of  the  parish  system  which  he  describes,  and  his  deductions 
are  made  from  transactions  which  are  recorded  at  all  dates  during  this 
time.  For  this  reason,  it  is  true,  the  constitution  of  the  parish  as 
described  by  him  cannot  be  assigned  to  one  particular  period,  but  it 
seems  probable  that  the  system  was  in  operation  on  similar  lines  during 

1349-  the  whole  time,  for  it  is  noted  that  at  Bath  in  1349,  his  earliest  date, 
the  organisation  is  found  to  be  already  complete.  And  further,  until 
earlier  wardens'  accounts  have  been  brought  forward  and  studied,  we 
are  led  to  think  that  this  time  may  not  be  far  from  that  of  the 
institution  of  the  warden  system.  The  few  references  to  Canon  Law^ 
which  it  has  been  in  our  power  to  make  would  point  to  the 
conclusion  that  the  finances  of  the  parish  were  managed  in  all 
matters  by  ecclesiastics  in  early  times.  Pollock  &  Maitland  hold  that 
in  the  century  before  this  time  churchwardens  did  not  generally  exist  ; 

^349-  and  in  proposing  1349  as  our  starting  point  we  are  enabled  to  build 
from  an  epoch  which  was  deeply  scored  in  the  history  of  parish  life 
in  England.     That  date  when  the  Black  Death  carried  off  priest  and 

laicorum^    nisi   id  nccessitas   maior  expostulaverit."      The  churchwardens'  accounts 

irteenth     edited   by  Bishop   Hobhouse  in    1890   for  the   Somerset    Record   Socirty,  point  to 

fifteenth    ^e    conclusion    that    in    ihe    fourteenth   and   fifteenth    centuries    the    making   and 

ituries.      enforcement   of  a  compulsory  church   rate   was  a   rare   event;   indeed,    the   editor 

(p.  231)  says  that  he  knows  of  but  one  case  before  the  reign  of  Elizabeth.      The 

churchwardens  seem  to  have  got  the  money  that  they  needed  by  means  of  voluntary 

gifts  and  legacies,  and  of  church  ales,  which  opened  the  purses  of  the  parishioners. 

*  Somerset  Record  Society,  vol.  iv,  1890. 

''To  take  instances  at  various  dates  which  point  in  this  direction:  — 

Collection  of  Laws  and  Canons  of  tfu  Church  of  Englattd. — S.  Johnson, 
MDCCCL. 

740.  Vol.  i,  p.  188.     Canon  a.d.  740,  28.     "Let  every  bishop  take  care  that  the 

churches  within  his  parish  1^  well  built,  repaired,  and  adorned." 
CJ44.  Vol.  i,  p.  367.     Canon  5.     "  That  every  bishop  repair  God's  house  in  his 

own   see,   and    remind   the    King   that   all   God's   churches   l>e   well 

provided." 
rtecnlh  Also  cf  Bracton^  f.  226//,  thirteenth  century.     "  Et  cum  ecclesia  fungatur 

ntury.  vice   minoris,  acquiritur   per  rkctorrm  et    retinet   per  eundem   sicut 

minor  »per  tutorem." 


244  churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY. 

people  in  such  disastrous  numbers,  and  by  a  dislocation  of  existing 
systems  may  have  brought  about  a  general  reorganisation  of  parish 
procedure. 

The  parish  was  the  community  dwelling  in  an  area  defined  by 
the  church,  and  organised  for  church  purposes ;  within  this  area  each 
resident  was  a  parishioner,  owing  his  duty  of  worship  and  contribution 
to  his  church,  and  of  confession  and  submission  to  his  pastor,  the 
rector  or  vicar  of  the  rector.  The  officers  of  this  constitution  were 
the  rector  or  his  deputy,  together  with  the  wardens  who  were  the 
chosen  representatives  of  the  parishioners;  and  the  place  of  general 
meeting  was  the  church.* 

It  can  be  deduced  from  the  entries  in  the  accounts  of  proceed- 
ings which  took  place,  coram  parochianis^  that  the  formal  acts  of 
parishioners  in  meeting  were : — 

(i)  The  yearly  election  of  wardens; 

(2)  The  audit  of  the  outgoing  wardens'  accounts ; 

(3)  The  transfer  of  church  goods,  cash,  and  live  stock  to 

the  incoming  wardens; 

(4)  The  consideration  of  the  repairs  of  the  church  fabric, 

etc.,  and  of  ways  and  means. 

Such   were    the    acts    by   which    the    parishioners    arranged    the 

discharge  of   the   obligations    which    were   enjoined   upon   them    by 

the    diocesan    authorities.'     According    to    Archbishop    Winchelsea's 

constitution,  which  was  in  force  from  the  beginning  of  the  fourteenth 

1305.        to  the  middle  of  the  sixteenth  century,  the  parishioners  were  bound 

to  attend   to   the   following   particulars: — They   were    liable    for    the 

maintenance  of  the  nave   of  the   church,  the   books,  the   vestments, 

and    a    portion    of   the  "furniture.*''    The    whole    purpose    of    this 

Ut  parochiani  constitution  is  to  draw  lines  of  demarcation  between 

the  liability  of  the  parishioners  and  that  of  the  clergy,  and  as  such 

Fourieemh  a  demarcation  was  probably  new  in  the  beginning  of  the  fourteenth 

century,     century,  we  have  another  reason  for  feeling  that  here  we  are  near  the 

starting  point  of  the  new  system,  which  is  democratic,  not  feudal. 

The  "books"  were  those  which  contained  the  various  offices. 
The  "  vestments  "  were  worn  by  the  priest  at  mass  and  other  services, 


^  Somerset  Record  Society,  vol.  iv,  Churchwardens^  Accounts  of  Parishes  in 
Sotnerset^  ranging  from  1349- 1560. 

2  Cf.  Injunction  of  Bishop  Stapledon,  Nov.  23,  1321,  of  Exetej-,  to  Sir  Henry 
Champemoun,  the  patron,  and  the  parishioners  of  Ilfracoinbe,  that  the  church  be 
enlarged  within  two  years  under  penalty  of  ;^40. 

»  See  Lyndwood's  Provinciale^  Lib.  iii,  Tit.  27.  Johnson's  Canons  (ed.  1851), 
vol.  ii,  p.  319' 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  245 

such  as  the  chasuble,  the  amice,  the  dalmatic,  etc.  The  "furniture" 
included  vessels,  such  as  the  chalice,  the  paten,  the  altar  cloths,  the 
processional  cross,  the  censer,  the  pyx,  the  images  in  the  nave,  the 
bells,  etc 

In  order  to  provide  funds  for  these  purposes,  rates  (generally  of  a 
voluntary  character)  were  levied,  or  recourse  was  had  to  special 
collections.  It  appears  that  usually  compulsion  was  unnecessary,  as 
contributions  were  elicited  by  means  which  dep)ended  on  exciting  the 
good-will  of  the  people.  For  instance,  on  holy  days  the  employment 
of  labour  was  forbidden ;  and  after  attending  the  church  services  the 
people  were  drawn  together  by  amusements  directed  by  the  church. 
There  were  Christmas  and  other  plays,  church  ales,  guild  feasts,  etc. 
And  on  these  occasions  contributions  were  made  by  the  people,  which 
were  either  devoted  to  the  special  objects  connected  with  a  guild,  or 
came  into  the  hands  of  the  wardens  for  general  purposes. 

Besides  these  sources  through  which  funds  were  provided,  special 
donations  were  made  by  persons  whose  names  were  recorded  as 
benefactors.  Their  names  were  written  in  the  "bede  roll,"  and 
were  read  out  to  the  parishioners  on  great  days,  that  prayers  might  be 
offered  on  their  behalf.  These  contributions  varied  from  articles  of 
small  value,  such  as  a  girdle  or  a  ring,  to  important  gifts  of  live  stock. 
And  hence  the  wardens  might  at  times  have  the  management  of 
sheep  or  cows,  or  even  of  bees  on  their  hands.  It  is  impossible  to 
enumerate  all  the  forms  in  which  the  church  funds  were  assisted. 
The  contributions  appear  in  innumerable  sha|>es  in  the  different 
accounts  which  are  accessible,  and  need  not  be  further  detailed ;  but 
it  is  desirable  to  make  special  mention  of  one  institution,  which  may 
almost  be  considered  as  a  commercial  undertaking,  namely  the 
Church  House. 

In  one  parish*  the  Church   House  began   by  being  a  bakehouse 

for  the   Holy  Wafer,  then   became  a   place  for  its  sale,  and  finally 

iwnth    developed  from  a  brewhouse  of  the  Holy  Ale^  to  a  place  of  sale  for 

""'^'     that  also,  and  so  by  the  sixteenth  century  the  Church  House  was  the 

centre  of  the  social  life  of  the  parish.     There  the  parishioners  enjoyed 


^  i,e.  at  TintinhuU  (Somerset  Record  Society,  Vol.  IV,  p.  195),  where  it  is  called 
Pandoxeterium.  1496-7.  There  is  one  siill  standing  in  the  churchyard  at  East 
Down  in  North  Devon. 

«  For  the  use  of  ecclesiastical  ale  cf.  New  English  Dictionary,  s.v.  Church -ale. 
1 583.     Stubbes,  Anatomy  of  Abuses, 

95.    The  manner  of  Church-ales.     Against  a  Christmas,  an  Easter,  Whit-Sonday, 

or  some  other  time,  the  churchewardens prouide  half  a  score  or  twenty 

quarters  of  mault which  mault,  beeing  made  into  very  strong  ale  or  beere,  it 

b  set  to  sale,  either  in  the  church  or  some  other  place  assigned  to  that  purpose 

they  repaire  their  churches  and  chappels  with  it :  they  buy  bookes  for  seruice. 


246 


churchwardens'  accounts — METHLRY. 


Beginning 

sixteenth 

century. 


1549. 


1539-40. 
1563. 


Beginning 

seventeenth 

century. 


one  another's  hospitality,  and  even  invited  members  of  adjoining 
parishes  to  take  a  part  in  festivities.  And  from  the  proceeds  a  rich 
harvest  was  reap)ed,  which  was  at  the  disposal  of  the  wardens. 

In  such  ways  the  wardens  were  supplied  with  the  means  for 
providing  the  necessaries  connected  with  the  worship  in  their  parish 
church,  and  so  far  they  were  the  officers  of  the  parishioners  described 
as  custodes  bonorum  or  procuratores  ecclesia.  But  beside  the  work  entailed 
upon  them  by  the  management  of  these  matters,  their  duties  included 
the  presentment  of  the  moral  delinquencies  of  the  rector  or  parishioners 
to  the  Archdeacon's  Court,  and  in  this  respect  they  were  Bishop's 
Officers,  with  disciplinary  functions  empowered  in  the  Visitation 
Court.  It  does  not  appear  that  purely  civil  functions  were  laid  upon 
them  until  the  reign  of  Henry  VIII,  when  they  began  to  receive 
orders  to  provide  arms  for  soldiers,  to  relieve  maimed  soldiers,  and 
otherwise  to  meet  the  public  needs  where  there  was  no  provision 
made  by  the  Civil  Government. 

Not  long  after  this  date,  in  the  reign  of  Edward  VI,  a  very 
important  addition  was  made  to  their  duties.  For  in  1549  the 
voluntary  alms  of  the  members  of  the  Church  were  regularly  demanded 
for  the  relief  of  the  poor,  and  the  wardens  were  charged  to  collect  the 
donations  and  distribute  them  amongst  the  poor.  Afterwards,  when 
the  mass  of  poverty,  which  had  begun  to  be  a  serious  trouble 
after  the  suppression  of  the  monasteries  in  1539-40,  became  too 
great .  to  be  relieved  by  voluntary  alms,  a  poor  rate  was  imposed, 
and  the  wardens  were  empowered  to  levy  the  tax.  During  the 
reigns  of  Elizabeth  and  James  I  the  office  which  they  administered 
was  used  for  further  civil  work,  for  the  maintenance  of  army 
hospitals,  the  transmission  of  soldiers,  and  for  the  equipment 
of  volunteers.  And  as  the  manorial  executive  ceased  to  deal  with 
the  civil  interests  of  the  community,  the  vestry  became  the 
chief  local  authority.  By  its  machinery  highways  were  made  and 
repaired,  the  pound  was  maintained,  the  stocks  were  repaired,  vermin 
were  destroyed,  and  other  work  of  the  kind  carried  out 

We  have  little  to  add  to  Bishop  Hobhouse's  description,  except 
to  call  attention  to  the  fact,  brought  out  in  Lambard's  treatise, 
p.  255,  that  the  churchwardens  were  a  corporation,  and  enjoyed  the 
privileges  and  responsibilities  of  a  legal  position. 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  247 

The  necessity  for  such  an  arrangement  is  apparent  since  "a 
church  is  always  under  age,  and  is  to  be  treated  as  an  infant,  and 
it  is  not  according  to  law  that  the  infants  should  be  disinherited  by 
the  negligence  of  their  guardians."^ 

A  very  good  general  picture  of  the  parish  life  is  also  drawn  by 
the  Rev.  W.  W,  Capes,'  who  ends  his  chapter  by  general  references 
to  certain  Chantry  Surveys,  Gild  accounts,  etc. 

Turning  now  to  the  texts  which  form  the  authority  of  much  that 
is  described  above,  the  writer  would  first  express  his  regret  that  he 
is  able  to  bring  forward  only  a  meagre  amount  of  evidence  from  the 
Canon  Law,  and  hopes  that  the  blanks  left  by  his  ignorance  may 
be  supplemented  later  in  a  more  satisfactory  manner. 

There  is  a  vast  quantity  of  information  to  be  gained  on  the 
subject  from  this  direction,*  for  it  is  to  be  remembered  that  the 
ecclesiastical  tribunals  claimed  jurisdiction  in  cases  of  land  given  to  a 
church,  and  also  the  exaction  of  spiritual  dues,  tithes,  mortuaries, 
oblations,  and  pensions ;  that,  as  the  last  testament  was  so  intimately 
connected  with  the  last  confession,  the  Church  claimed  to  pronounce 
on  the  validity  of  wills,  and  also  to  interpret  them*;  and  that  generally 
English  Law,  more  especially  the  English  Law  of  civil  precedent, 
was  rationalised  under  the  influence  of  Common  Law.* 

And  this  influence  has  undoubtedly  to  be  reckoned  with,  in  spite  of 
the  limit  authoritatively  placed  upon  the  scope  of  Canon  Law,  when  in 
1532  Henry  VIII  forced  Convocation  (Canterbury)  to  sign  a  document 
known  as  the  Submission  of  the  Clergy.'  In  this  the  clergy  engaged 
in  the  first  place  neither  to  meet  in  Convocation  nor  to  enact  or 
to  execute  new  canons  without  the  King's  authority,  and  secondly,  to 
submit  all  past  ecclesiastical  legislation  to  examination,  with  a  view 
to  the  removal  of  everything  prejudicial  to  the  Royal  prerogative. 

Having  now  considered  some  general  aspects  of  the  church- 
wardens' system,  we  proceed  to  the  extracts  upon  which  the  above 
sketch  is  largely  based. 


*  Pollock  &  Maiiland,  History  of  English  Imw^  1895,  ^ol-  i»  P-  483,  quoting  a 
judgment  of  1307. 

«  The   English    Church   in    the   Eourtecnth   and   Fifteenth    Centuries  (1900), 
pp.  272-278. 

'  See  the  summary  in  the  index  of  Gibson's  Codex  juris  Ecclesiastici  Anglicani, 

*  Pollock  &  Maitland,  History  of  English  Law^  1895.  ▼ol-  i»  PP-  106-107. 
»  Ibid,^  vol.  i,  p.  113. 

«  Gardiner,  Student's  History  of  England  (1890),  vol.  ii,  p.  386. 


240  churchwardens'  accounts. — METHi-EY. 

have  searched  in  vain  for  such  an  organisation^  as  might  by  any 
stretch  be  called  the  counterpart  of  the  modern  vestry.  All 
organisation  is  manorial,  is  feudal,  and  though  the  township  has  to 
make  payments,  to  send  four  good  men  to  Court,  and  the  rest, 
it  can  only  be  suggested  that  the  Executive  is  not  appointed  by 
p)eriodical  election,  but  that  the  work  is  done  by  permanent 
arrangement,  and  has  become,  in  fact,  a  charge  upon  definite 
portions  of  the  land.  And  yet,  when  the  reader  has  accepted  an 
apparently  definite  denial  that  any  connection  can  be  traced 
between  the  earlier  and  later  systems,  to  his  dismay  he  finds  that  in 
apparent  contradiction  our  authors  say  that  "in  general  the  vill  of  the 
thirteenth  century*  has  become  the  civil  parish  of  the  nineteenth."  If 
this  is  not  contradictory,  what  is  the  process  by  which  the  burdens  of 
the  manorially  managed  vill  came  to  be  undertaken  by  the  popularly 
elected  vestry? 

It  is  possible  that  Churchwardens*  accounts  supply  the  answer.  For 
upon  examination  they  appear  to  indicate  that  the  'vehicle'  of  this 
great  change  was  the  office  of  warden,  and  the  quotation  which  follows, 
taken  from  the  last- mentioned  work,  gives  the  explanation: — 

"*The  parish*  has  in  modern  law  supplanted  the  vill  or 
township,  owing  to  causes  which  did  not  come  into  play  until  the 
Tudor  time,  when  the  rate  for  the  relief  of  the  poor  was  imposed. 
The  law  then  began  to  enforce  a  duty  which  had  hitherto  been 
enforced  by  religion,  and  very  naturally  it  adopted  for  this  purpose 
the  geography  of  the  Church.  In  course  of  time  other  rates  were 
imposed  by  Parliament,  and  the  poor's  rate  was  taken  as  their  model. 
Thus  the  parish  became  the  important  district  for  most  purposes  of 
local  government  and  taxation."' 

The  transformation  from  vill  to  parish  may  have  begun  indeed 
before  the  Tudor  lime,  but  certainly  it  was  Tudor  legislation  which 
threw  secular  duties  on  an  ecclesiastical  organization. 

A  more  lengthy  passage  a  few  pages  further  on  gives  additional 
insight  into  this  difficult  subject,  and  by  the  great  kindness  of  the 


*  History  of  English  Law,  Pollock  &  Maitland,  vol.  i,  p.  599. 
^  Ibid,,  vol.  i,  p.  548. 
^Ibid.,  vol.i,  p.  548. 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  24I 

authors  we  are  permitted  to  repeat  the  important  words  below: — * 
"The  Manor  and  the  Township. 


"  Whether*  or  no  the  church-rate  has  a  remote  origin,  whether  it 
is  connected  with  ancient  church  scots  or  Hght-scots,  whether,  on  the 
other  hand,  the  clergy  have  shuffled  off  a  burden  which  once  fell  on 
them,  we  do  not  inquire.  We  think  it,  however,  quite  plain  that  in 
rhirteenth  the  thirteenth  century  the  general  custom  of  the  Churc'i  of  England, 
century,  swerving  in  this  form  from  the  ius  commune  of  the  Catholic  Church,  cast 
the  burden  of  repairing  the  nave  of  the  parish  church  and  providing 
the  main  part  of  the  ecclesiastical  apparatus,  not  upon  the  parson, 
but  upon  the  parishioners,  and  that  the  lay  powers  left  the  spiritual 
tribunals  free  to  enforce  this  custom  by  spiritual  censures.  But  we 
are  by  no  means  satisfied  that  this  custom  demanded  any  permanent 
organisation  of  the  parishioners,  any  *  vestry'  that  would  meet  and 
grant  a  rate.  So  far  as  we  can  see  the  burden  is  a  *real  burden,' 
incumbent  on  land.  The  ecclesiastical  power  can,  we  take  it,  deal 
directly  with  each  individual  landowner,  can  excommunicate  him  and 
procure  his  imprisonment  if  he  will  not  contribute  his  proper  share 
to  whatever  expenditure  has  become  necessary  for  the  due  repair 
of  the  fabric,  and  the  question  of  necessity  is  decided  by  the 
ecclesiastical  court 

"The  duty  of  repairing  the  parish  church  is  analogous  to  the 
duty  of  repairing  the  county  bridges;  it  is  planted  in  the  soil,  and 
to  the  soil  it  has  ceded;  it  is  apportioned  according  to  hidage  or 
acreage.'  No  doubt  the  occasional  nature  of  the  charge  almost 
compels  the  rector  or  the  archdeacon  to  deal  with  the  parishioners 
as  a  body,  to  call  them  together  and  endeavour  to  persuade  them 
that  a  wall  is  crumbling  or  that  a  new  Missal  is  wanted.  The 
parishioners  will  make  terms  with  him ;  they  may  vote  him  a  rate 
to  be  assessed  in  this  way  or  in  that;  and  very  likely,  as  they  will 
have  to  pay,  they  will  hire  the  workmen  and  buy  the  materials. 

"  The  splendour  and  costliness  of  the  churches  and  their  furniture 
increase  very  rapidly;   the  parson's  demands  grow  heavier  and  more 


1  Ibid.y  vol.  i,  p.  602-3. 

^  Among  the  best  of  many  pamphlets  on  this  subject  are  W.  H.  Hale, 
Th€  Antiquity  of  the  Church  Rate  System  (1837);  W.  Goode,  A  Brief  History  of 
Church  Rates  (1838);   Robert  Swan,   The  Principle  of  Church  Rates  (1837). 

>  In  Cambridgeshire  the  pontage  was  certainly  taken  as  a  tax  on  land. 
R.  H.,  i,  50;  the  sheriff  has  taken  from  every  hide  in  the  county  two  shillings  for 
pontage,  whereas  he  used  to  take  but  sixpence.     We  see  here  no  vote  of  the  tax. 


242 


CHURCHWARDENS    ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY. 


Thirteenth 
century. 


frequent  What  goes  on  in  the  kingdom  at  large  is  going  on  in  each 
parish.  Money-voting  vestries  became  as  indispensable  to  the 
rector  as  money-voting  Parliaments  are  to  the  King.  Movable 
wealth  must  be  brought  under  the  sphere  of  taxation.  To  our 
minds  it  would  be  as  rash  to  argue  from  the  *  vestries'  or 
*  parishioners'  meetings  of  the  fourteenth  and  fifteenth  centuries  to 
similar  assemblies  of  an  earlier  time,  as  it  would  be  to  argue  that 
the  Commons  of  the  realm  were  represented  in  the  Councils  of 
Henry  II  because  they  were  represented  in  the  Parliaments  of 
Edward  I. 

"And  so  with  the  churchwardens.  We  are  not  persuaded  that 
as  a  general  rule  there  were  churchwardens  in  the  thirteenth 
century.  They  and  their  legal  powers  are,  to  our  thinking,  the 
outcome  of  two  movements,  one  in  the  world  of  fact,  the  other  in 
the  world  of  legal  thought.  If  the  parishioners  are  compelled  to 
provide  precious  books,  robes,  vessels,  they  will  naturally  desire  lo 
have  their  say  about  the  custody  of  these  articles;  parsons  have  been 
known  to  sell  the  church   plate. 

"Secondly,  as  we  have  seen,  in  the  later  Middle  Ages,  a  dead 
saint  or  a  personified  eccksia  would  no  longer  serve  as  a  persona 
capable  of  proprietary  and  possessory  rights.  The  lawyers  are 
beginning  to  hold  that  the  parson  is  in  some  sort  the  owner  or  the 
tenant  of  the  church-yard  and  the  glebe;  they  have  to  find  an 
owner,  at  all  events  a  possessor,  for  what  in  the  past  had  been  the 
chattels  owned  and  possessed  by  a  saint  or  a  personified  eccUsia ; 
the  churchwardens  present  themselves  as  claimants  for  property  and 
possession,^^^ 


1287. 


1275. 


1370. 


Fifteenth 
century. 

1287. 


1  The  first  clear  tidings  that  we  get  as  to  the  incidence  of  the  duty  that  is 
cast  upon  the  parishioners  lell  us  that  they  contribute  "Secundum  portionem  tcrrse 
quam  possideni  in  eadem  parochia'*;  Synod  of  Exeter  (1287),  Wilkins,  Concilia^  ii, 
138.  John  de  Athona,  Const.  Othoboni,  can.  improbam,  gloss,  ad  V.  peragendam, 
doubts  whether  the  burden  be  "real"  or  "personal,"  decides  in  favour  of  reality, 
but  on  either  side  alleges  nothing  beyond  ineptitudes  out  of  Code  and  Digest.  In 
1275  the  township  of  Graveley  contracts  with  a  mason  for  the  repair  of  a  wall  of 
the  church;  he  is  to  have  3J.  2d.  for  the  work,  and  a  garb  of  wheat  from  every 
house;  "the  Attorney  of  the  township"  sued  him  in  the  fair  of  St.  Ives;  Seltct 
Pleas  in  Manorial  Courts ^  p.  150.  In  1370  we  see  parishioners  assembled, 
making  a  regular  rate  and  distraining  for  it;  but  it  seems  exceedingly  doubtful 
whether  their  resolution  binds  one  who  has  not  assented  to  it;  Y.B.  44  Edw.  Ill, 
f.  18  (Trin.  pi.  13).  This  case  does  not  look  as  if  a  "vestry"  had  an  old  and 
well-established  power  of  granting,  assessing,  and  enforcing  a  rate.  As  to  the 
churchwardens,  they  l>ecome  1  rominent  enough  in  the  Year  Books  of  the  fifteenth 
century;  but  even  then  some  elementary  principles  seem  to  \yt  in  dispute.  See 
e.g,  Y.B.  II,  Henry  IV,  f.  12  (Mich.  pi.  23);  8  Henry  V,  f.  4  (Ilil.  pi.  15). 
37  Henry  VI,  ff  30  ( !>in.  pi.  11).  The  Synod  of  Exeter  in  1287  had  said 
"  Ornamenta    ecclesiae    securic    custodise    committantur,    fion    tamen    sub    custodia 


CHURCHWARDENS    ACCOUNTS. — METHLKY.  243 

Having  concluded  a  general  statement  concerning  the  origin  and 
development  of  the  functions  of  wardens,  we  turn  to  certain  extracts 
from  constitutional  documents  and  other  records,  which  afford  definite 
evidence  upon  the  many  difficult  points  involved  in  the  subject ;  but 
first  it  would  appear  desirable  to  describe  in  the  same  general  manner 
the  action  and  condition  of  the  parish.  For  this  purpose  no  better 
authority  can  be  drawn  upon  than  the  admirable  preface  of  Bishop 
Hobhouse  in  his  Churchwardens^  Accounts  of  Certain  Parishes  in 
Somerset}     The   learned  writer  is  dealing  with  six  parishes   between 

9-1560.  the  years  of  1349  and  1560.  He  does  not  give  a  time  for  the 
initiation  of  the  parish  system  which  he  describes,  and  his  deductions 
are  made  from  transactions  which  are  recorded  at  all  dates  during  this 
time.  For  this  reason,  it  is  true,  the  constitution  of  the  parish  as 
described  by  him  cannot  be  assigned  to  one  particular  period,  but  it 
seems  probable  that  the  system  was  in  operation  on  similar  lines  during 

1349-  the  whole  time,  for  it  is  noted  that  at  Bath  in  1349,  his  earliest  date, 
the  organisation  is  found  to  be  already  complete.  And  further,  until 
earlier  wardens*  accounts  have  been  brought  forward  and  studied,  we 
are  led  to  think  that  this  time  may  not  be  far  from  that  of  the 
institution  of  the  warden  system.  The  few  references  to  Canon  Law'^ 
which  it  has  been  in  our  power  to  make  would  point  to  the 
conclusion  that  the  finances  of  the  parish  were  managed  in  all 
matters  by  ecclesiastics  in  early  times.  Pollock  &  Maitland  hold  that 
in  the  century  before  this  time  churchwardens  did  not  generally  exist ; 

'349-  and  in  proposing  1349  as  our  starting  point  we  are  enabled  to  build 
from  an  epoch  which  was  deeply  scored  in  the  history  of  parish  life 
in  England.     That  date  when  the  Black  Death  carried  off  priest  and 


laicorum^    nisi   id  necessitas   maior  expostulaverit."      The  churchwardens'  accounts 

Hirteenth     edited   by  Bishop    Hobhouse  in    1890   for  the   Somerset    Record   Socirty,  point  to 

d  fifteenth   ^^    conclusion    that    in    ihe    fourteenth   and   fifteenth    centuries    the    making    and 

enturies.      enforcement  of  a  compulsory  church   rate   was   a   rare   event;   indeed,    the   editor 

(p.  231)  says  that  he  knows  of  but  one  case  before  the  reign  of  Elizabeth.      The 

churchwardens  seem  to  have  got  the  money  that  they  needed  by  means  of  voluntary 

gifts  and  legacies,  and  of  church  ales,  which  opened  the  purses  of  the  parishioners. 

*  Somerset  Record  Society,  vol.  iv,  1890. 

2  To  take  instances  at  various  dates  which  point  in  this  direction: — 

ColUction  of  f^ws  and  Canons  of  the  Church  of  England. — S.  Johnson, 

MDCCCL. 

7^0.  Vol.  i,  p.  188.     Canon  a.d.  740,  28.     "Let  every  bishop  take  care  that  the 

churches  within  his  parish  be  well  built,  repaired,  and  adorned." 
^^.  Vol.  i,  p.  367.     Canon  5.     **That  every  bishop  repair  God's  house  in  his 

own   see,   and   remind   the   King   that   all    God's   churches   be   well 
provided."  ^ 

hirteenth  Also  cf,  Bracton,  f.  226/^,  thirteenth  century.     *'  Et  cum  ecclesia  fungatur 

century.  vice   minoris.  ac(iuiritur   per  rector F.M   et   relinet   per  eundem   sicul 

minor 'per  tutorem." 


244  CHURCHWARDENS    ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY. 

people  in  such  disastrous  numbers,  and  by  a  dislocation  of  existing 
systems  may  have  brought  about  a  general  reorganisation  of  parish 
procedure. 

The  parish  was  the  community  dwelling  in  an  area  defined  by 
the  church,  and  organised  for  church  purposes :  within  this  area  each 
resident  was  a  parishioner,  owing  his  duty  of  worship  and  contribution 
to  his  church,  and  of  confession  and  submission  to  his  pastor,  the 
rector  or  vicar  of  the  rector.  The  officers  of  this  constitution  were 
the  rector  or  his  deputy,  together  with  the  wardens  who  were  the 
chosen  representatives  of  the  parishioners;  and  the  place  of  general 
meeting  was  the  church.' 

It  can  be  deduced  from  the  entries  in  the  accounts  of  proceed- 
ings which  took  place,  coram  parochianis^  that  the  formal  acts  of 
parishioners  in  meeting  were: — 

(i)  The  yearly  election  of  wardens; 

(2)  The  audit  of  the  outgoing  wardens' accounts ; 

(3)  The  transfer  of  church  goods,  cash,  and  live  stock  to 

the  incoming  wardens; 

(4)  The  consideration  of  the  repairs  of  the  church  fabric, 

etc.,  and  of  ways  and  means. 

Such   were    the    acts    by  which    the    parishioners    arranged    the 

discharge  of   the   obligations    which   were   enjoined   upon   them    by 

the    diocesan    authorities.*     According   to    Archbishop    Winchelsea's 

constitution,  which  was  in  force  from  the  beginning  of  the  fourteenth 

1305.        to  the  middle  of  the  sixteenth  century,  the  parishioners  were  bound 

to  attend   to   the   following   particulars : — They   were    liable    for   the 

maintenance  of  the  nave   of  the   church,  the   books,  the   vestments, 

and    a    portion    of   the  "  furniture. ''^     The    whole    purpose    of    this 

Ut  parochiani  constitution  is  to  draw  lines  of  demarcation  between 

the  liability  of  the  parishioners  and  that  of  the  clergy,  and  as  such 

Fourteenih  a  demarcation  was  probably  new  in  the  beginning  of  the  fourteenth 

century,     century,  we  have  another  reason  for  feeling  that  here  we  are  near  the 

starting  point  of  the  new  system,  which  is  democratic,  not  feudal. 

The  "books"  were  those  which  contained  the  various  offices. 
The  "  vestments  "  were  worn  by  the  priest  at  mass  and  other  services, 

1  Somerset  Record  Society,  vol.  iv,  Churchwardens^  Accounts  of  Parishes  in 
Somerset^  ranging  from  1349-1560. 

2  Cf.  Injunction  of  Bishop  Stapledon,  Nov.  23,  1321,  of  Exeter,  to  Sir  Henry 
Champernoun,  the  patron,  and  the  parishioners  of  Ilfracoinbe,  that  the  church  be 
enlarged  within  two  years  under  penalty  of  £^0, 

3  See  Lyndwood's  Provinciale^  Lib.  iii,  Tit.  27.  Johnson's  Canons  (ed.  1851), 
vol.  ii.  p.  319- 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  245 

such  as  the  chasuble,  the  amice,  the  dalmatic,  etc.  The  "furniture" 
included  vessels,  such  as  the  chalice,  the  paten,  the  altar  cloths,  the 
processional  cross,  the  censer,  the  pyx,  the  images  in  the  nave,  the 
bells,  etc 

In  order  to  provide  funds  for  these  purposes,  rates  (generally  of  a 
voluntary  character)  were  levied,  or  recourse  was  had  to  special 
collections.  It  appears  that  usually  compulsion  was  unnecessary,  as 
contributions  were  elicited  by  means  which  depended  on  exciting  the 
good-will  of  the  people.  For  instance,  on  holy  days  the  employment 
of  labour  was  forbidden ;  and  after  attending  the  church  services  the 
people  were  drawn  together  by  amusements  directed  by  the  church. 
There  were  Christmas  and  other  plays,  church  ales,  guild  feasts,  etc. 
And  on  these  occasions  contributions  were  made  by  the  people,  which 
were  either  devoted  to  the  special  objects  connected  with  a  guild,  or 
came  into  the  hands  of  the  wardens  for  general  purposes. 

Besides  these  sources  through  which  funds  were  provided,  special 
donations  were  made  by  persons  whose  names  were  recorded  as 
benefactors.  Their  names  were  written  in  the  "bede  roll,"  and 
were  read  out  to  the  parishioners  on  great  days,  that  prayers  might  be 
offered  on  their  behalf.  These  contributions  varied  from  articles  of 
small  value,  such  as  a  girdle  or  a  ring,  to  important  gifts  of  live  stock. 
And  hence  the  wardens  might  at  times  have  the  management  of 
sheep  or  cows,  or  even  of  bees  on  their  hands.  It  is  impossible  to 
enumerate  all  the  forms  in  which  the  church  funds  were  assisted. 
The  contributions  appear  in  innumerable  shaj)es  in  the  different 
accounts  which  are  accessible,  and  need  not  be  further  detailed ;  but 
it  is  desirable  to  make  special  mention  of  one  institution,  which  may 
almost  be  considered  as  a  commercial  undertaking,  namely  the 
Church  House. 

In  one  parish^  the  Church    House  began  by  being  a  bakehouse 

for  the   Holy  Wafer,  then   became  a   place  for  its  sale,  and   finally 

tecnih    developed  from  a  brewhouse  of  the  Holy  Ale'  to  a  place  of  sale  for 

""'^*     that  also,  and  so  by  the  sixteenth  century  the  Church  House  was  the 

centre  of  the  social  life  of  the  parish.     There  the  parishioners  enjoyed 


^  i,e,  at  Tintinhull  (Somerset  Record  Society,  Vol.  IV,  p.  195),  where  it  is  called 
Pandoxeterium.  1496-7.  There  is  one  siill  standing  in  the  churchyard  at  East 
Down  in  North  Devon. 

«  For  the  use  of  ecclesiastical  ale  cf.  New  English  Dictionary,  s,v.  Church-ale. 
1583.     SixihheSt  j4mUomy  0/ Aduses. 

95.    The  manner  of  Church-ales.     Against  a  Christmas,  an  Easter,  WhitSonday, 

or  some  other  time,  the  churchewardens prouide  half  a  score  or  twenty 

quarters  of  mault which  mault,  beeing  made  into  very  strong  ale  or  beere,  it 

is  set  to  sale,  either  in  the  church  or  some  other  place  assigned  to  that  purpose 

I  hey  rcpaire  their  churches  and  chappels  with  it :  they  buy  bookes  for  seruice. 


246 


CHURCHWARDENS    ACCOUNTS  — METHLEY. 


Beginning 

sixteenth 

century. 


1549. 


1539-40. 
1563. 


Beginning 

seventeenth 

century. 


one  another's  hospitality,  and  even  invited  members  of  adjoining 
parishes  to  take  a  part  in  festivities.  And  from  the  proceeds  a  rich 
harvest  was  reaped,  which  was  at  the  disposal  of  the  wardens. 

In  such  ways  the  wardens  were  supplied  with  the  means  for 
providing  the  necessaries  connected  with  the  worship  in  their  parish 
church,  and  so  far  they  were  the  officers  of  the  parishioners  described 
as  custodes  bonorum  or  procuratores  ecclesice.  But  beside  the  work  entailed 
upon  them  by  the  management  of  these  matters,  their  duties  included 
the  presentment  of  the  moral  delinquencies  of  the  rector  or  parishioners 
to  the  Archdeacon's  Court,  and  in  this  respect  they  were  Bishop's 
Officers,  with  disciplinary  functions  empowered  in  the  Visitation 
Court.  It  does  not  appear  that  purely  civil  functions  were  laid  upon 
them  until  the  reign  of  Henry  VIII,  when  they  began  to  receive 
orders  to  provide  arms  for  soldiers,  to  relieve  maimed  soldiers,  and 
otherwise  to  meet  the  public  needs  where  there  was  no  provision 
made  by  the  Civil  Government. 

Not  long  after  this  date,  in  the  reign  of  Edward  VI,  a  very 
important  addition  was  made  to  their  duties.  For  in  1549  the 
voluntary  alms  of  the  members  of  the  Church  were  regularly  demanded 
for  the  relief  of  the  poor,  and  the  wardens  were  charged  to  collect  the 
donations  and  distribute  them  amongst  the  poor.  Afterwards,  when 
the  mass  of  poverty,  which  had  begun  to  be  a  serious  trouble 
after  the  suppression  of  the  monasteries  in  1539-40,  became  too 
great .  to  be  relieved  by  voluntary  alms,  a  poor  rate  was  imposed, 
and  the  wardens  were  empowered  to  levy  the  tax.  During  the 
reigns  of  Elizabeth  and  James  I  the  office  which  they  administered 
was  used  for  further  civil  work,  for  the  maintenance  of  army 
hospitals,  the  transmission  of  soldiers,  and  for  the  equipment 
of  volunteers.  And  as  the  manorial  executive  ceased  to  deal  with 
the  civil  interests  of  the  community,  the  vestry  became  the 
chief  local  authority.  By  its  machinery  highways  were  made  and 
repaired,  the  pound  was  maintained,  the  stocks  were  repaired,  vermin 
were  destroyed,  and  other  work  of  the  kind  carried  out 

We  have  little  to  add  to  Bishop  Hobhouse's  description,  except 
to  call  attention  to  the  fact,  brought  out  in  Lambard's  treatise, 
p.  255,  that  the  churchwardens  were  a  corporation,  and  enjoyed  the 
privileges  and  responsibilities  of  a  legal  position. 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  247 

The  necessity  for  such  an  arrangement  is  apparent  since  "a 
church  is  always  under  age,  and  is  to  be  treated  as  an  infant,  and 
it  is  not  according  to  law  that  the  infants  should  be  disinherited  by 
the  negligence  of  their  guardians."^ 

A  very  good  general  picture  of  the  parish  life  is  also  drawn  by 
the  Rev.  W.  W.  Capes,'  who  ends  his  chapter  by  general  references 
to  certain  Chantry  Surveys,  Gild  accounts,  etc. 

Turning  now  to  the  texts  which  form  the  authority  of  much  that 
is  described  above,  the  writer  would  first  express  his  regret  that  he 
is  able  to  bring  forward  only  a  meagre  amount  of  evidence  from  the 
Canon  Law,  and  hopes  that  the  blanks  left  by  his  ignorance  may 
be  supplemented  later  in  a  more  satisfactory  manner. 

There  is  a  vast  quantity  of  information  to  be  gained  on  the 
subject  from  this  direction,'  for  it  is  to  be  remembered  that  the 
ecclesiastical  tribunals  claimed  jurisdiction  in  cases  of  land  given  to  a 
church,  and  also  the  exaction  of  spiritual  dues,  tithes,  mortuaries, 
oblations,  and  pensions ;  that,  as  the  last  testament  was  so  intimately 
connected  with  the  last  confession,  the  Church  claimed  to  pronounce 
on  the  validity  of  wills,  and  also  to  interpret  them*;  and  that  generally 
English  Law,  more  especially  the  English  Law  of  civil  precedent, 
was  rationalised  under  the  influence  of  Common  Law.* 

And  this  influence  has  undoubtedly  to  be  reckoned  with,  in  spite  of 
the  limit  authoritatively  placed  upon  the  scope  of  Canon  Law,  when  in 
1532  Henry  VIII  forced  Convocation  (Canterbury)  to  sign  a  document 
known  as  the  Submission  of  the  Clergy.'  In  this  the  clergy  engaged 
in  the  first  •  place  neither  to  meet  in  Convocation  nor  to  enact  or 
to  execute  new  canons  without  the  King's  authority,  and  secondly,  to 
submit  all  past  ecclesiastical  legislation  to  examination,  with  a  view 
to  the  removal  of  everything  prejudicial  to  the  Royal  prerogative. 

Having  now  considered  some  general  aspects  of  the  church- 
wardens' system,  we  proceed  to  the  extracts  upon  which  the  above 
sketch  is  largely  based. 


*  Pollock  &   Maiiland,  History  of  EngHsh  Law,  1895,  ^ol*  i»  P-  483»  quoting  a 
judgment  of  1307. 

«  The   English    Church   in    the   Fourteenth   and   FifUenth    Centuries  (1900), 
pp.  272-278. 

*  See  the  summary  in  the  index  of  Gibson*s  Codex  juris  Ecclesiastici  Anglicani, 

*  Pollock  &  Maitland,  f/istory  of  English  Law,  1895,  vol.  i,  pp.  106-107. 
^  Ibid,,  vol.  i,  p.  113. 

«  Gardiner,  Student's  History  of  England  (1890),  vol.  ii,  p.  386. 


248  churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY. 


EXTRACTS   FROM  J.  JOHNSON 

(A  CcUection  of  Laws  and  Canons  of  the  Church  of  England) 

[Translated  and  annotated  by  J.  Johnson,  1720], 

Which  bear  upon  the  duties  of  Churchwardens  according 
to  Canon  Law. 

[Figures  after  the  letters  "  Jo."  indicate  the  volume  and  page  in 
fohnson  (Oxford,  edition  1850.)] 

1322.  No.  6.  "  We  enjoin  archdeacons  and  their  officials  in  their  visitations  J<>-  "»  33 

Constitutions  q|-  churches  to  cause  the  vessels,  vestments,  books,  and   other  things 
of  Archbishop  .  ^  .j      ^  V  •  j  j    ,  .   , 

Reynolds.       belonging  to  the  said  offices  to  be  wntten  down,  and  have  a  special 

regard  to  the   fabric   of   the   church   and   especially  of  the  chancel'; 

and   that  they  fix  a  certain   time  for  the  supplying  such  defects  as 

they  find  therein  under  some  penalty." 

1440.  On  this  closing  passage  Lyndwood,  in  his  ProinnciaU  {circa  1440), 

raises  the  following  question  : — "  Sed  nunquid  Gardiani  ecclesiae^  ad 
hujusmodi  reparationem  faciendam,  et  alias  ad  bona  ecclesiae  dis- 
ponenda  electi,  possunt  per  poenam  hujusmodi  (sc :  excommunicationis, 
vel  suspensionis  aut  per  poenam  aliam)  compelli  ad  reparationem  de 
qua  hie  dicit"^ 

1416.  *'We  ordain  that*' the  bishops  and  their  officials  " diligently  make  J°- "»  4^ 

Archbishop  enquiry  in  their  several  jurisdictions  in  every  rural  deanery  twice  at 

Chichley's     ^'^  ^  ^  .      c   .  j 

Constitution  least  every  year  after  persons  suspected  of  heresy,  and  cause  3  or 

with  regard  more   men   of  good   report   in   every  deanery  and   parish   in   which 

heretics  are  said  to  dwell,  to  swear  on  God's  holy  gospels  that  if  they 

know  any  heretics,  etc., they  will   inform  against  and  discover 

in  writing those  persons  to  our  said  suffragans,  archdeacons, 

or  their  commissaries." 

(Punishment  described.) 

Johnson's  note  on  the  above  runs  as  follows  : — "  From  the  time  that  Jo-  "»  4S 
the  repairs  of  the  churches  and  the  ornaments  thereof  were  laid  as 
a  charge  on  the  parishioners,  and  this  charge  was  defrayed  in  part 
by  assessments  or  levies,  it  was  absolutely  necessary  that  there  should 
be  settled  officers,  or  certain  men  assigned  to  take  care  of  those 
reparations  and  ornaments,  and  to  receive  such  bequests  and  levy 
such   sums  as   were   necessary  for  those   purposes.     As  we  are  sure 

^  It  is  interesting  to  note  in  Canon  Law  in  the  Church  of  England  (Maitland, 
1898,  page  42)  the  following  sentence  : — **  One  English  custom  diverging  from  the 
ius  commune  is  one  that  imposes  on  the  parishioners,  and  not  on  the  rector,  the  burden 
of  maintaining  the  nave  of  the  parish  church." 

2  Lib.  i,  Tit.  10,  gl.  Sub  pcena  Contemptus  (Oxford,  1679,  page  53). 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  249 

that  church  assessments  were  made  in  the  beginning  of  the  fourteenth 
century  (see  the  preceding),  so  we  may  be  certain  that  from  that  time 
forward  these  officers  were  often  obliged  to  make  presentments  of 
such  as  made  default  in  paying  their  church  rates,  and  were,  by 
other  matters  incident  to  their  office,  more  directly  under  the 
inspection  of  the  ecclesiastical  court  than  other  parishioners.  And 
when  the  zeal  of  the  prelates  against  Lollardy  prompted  them  to 
make  more  frequent  and  strict  enquiry  into  the  behaviour  of  the 
people  than  formerly,  they  thought  it  necessary,  not  only  to  charge  a 
certain  number  of  men  on  oath,  as  they  had  formerly  done  in  their 
synods  and  chapters,  to  discover  such  past  scandals  and  offences  as 
they  knew,  but  to  have  two  or  three  in  each  parish  sworn  to  make 
discoveries  of  this  sort  for  the  time  to  come." 

The  churchwardens  were  not  necessarily,  but  naturally  became, 
these  *  presenters.' 

The  destruction  of  relics  and  images. 

The  completion  of  the  suppression  of  the  monasteries. 

The  first  prayer-book  of  Edward  I. 


EXTRACT  FROM   E.  GIBSON 

{Codex  juris  Eccksiastici  Anglicani^  London,  17 13) 
Concerning  the  duty  of  Churchwardens. 
[A  number  following  the  letters  **Gi."  indicates  the  page  in  GibsonJX 
1 55 1.  "The  Bread  and  Wine  for  the  Communion  shall  be  provided  byGi. 475. 

Mw.  VI.  the  Curate  and  the  Church-wardtfis  at  the  charges  of  the  Parish." 


EXTRACTS    FROM   G.  W.  PROTHERO 

{Statutes  and  Constitutional  Documents^  1559-^625), 

Which   bear  upon  the   Duties  of  Churchwardens  according 
to  Act  of  Parliament. 

[A  number  following  the  letters  "Pr.'*  indicates  the  page  in  Prothero 
(1894  edition)]. 

Sec.  3.     In  the  Act  of  Uniformity  it  became  law  that  "all  persons  Pr.  17. 

residing  in  the  Queen's  Majesty's  dominions should  resort  to  their 

parish   church upon   every  Sunday  and   other   days  ordained 

J*^    .J     as  Holy  Days and  there  abide  orderly  and  soberly  during  the 

time  of  Common    Prayer upon   pain    of  punishment  by   the 

censures  of  the  Church,   and  also   upon  pain  that  every  person  so 


250 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY. 


1559. 

The  Queen's 
Injunctions 
(Sparrow's 
Articles). 


1563. 
5  Eliz., 
Cap.  III. 

Act  for  the 
relief  of 
the  poor. 


offending  shall  forfeit  for  every  such  offence  12  pence,  to  be  levied 
by  the  churchwardens  of  the  parish  where  such  offence  shall  be 
done,  to  the  use  of  the  poor  of  the  same  parish " 

Sec.  5.     "  Further,  that  all   Justices  of  Oyer  and   Determiner  or  Pr- 18. 
Justices  of  Assize  shall  have  power  in  their  open  and  general  sessions 
to  enquu-e,  hear,  and  determine  ...  all  manner  of  (such)  offences." 

Sec.  24.     "The  churchwardens  ....  in  every  church  shall  provide  Pr.  186. 
a  comely  and  honest  pulpit " 

Sec.  25.     "Also,  they  shall  provide a  strong  chest ^-  J^;. 

having  three  keys,  whereof  one  shall  remain  in  the  custody  of  the 
parson  ....  and  the  other  two  in  the  custody  of  the  churchwardens^ 

or  any  other  two  honest  men  to  be  appointed ;  which  chest 

they  shall fasten  in  a  most  convenient  place,  to  the  intent  the 

parishioners  should   put   into   it    their  oblations  and   alms  for  their 

poor  neighbours ,  the  which  alms the  keepers  of  the 

keys  shall distribute  in  the  presence  of  the  whole  parish  or  six 

of  them,  to  be  truly  and  faithfully  delivered  unto,  their  most  needy 
neighbours,  and  if  they  be  provided  for,  then  to  the  reparation  of 
highways  next  adjoining,  or  to  the  poor  people  of  such  parishes 
near,  as  shall  be  thought  best." 

Sec.  2.     "  The  parson  and  churchwardens  shall  have  written  in  a  Pr.  4^- 

register as  well  the  names  of  the  inhabitants as  also 

the  names  of  all   such    impotent,    aged,   and    needy   persons    as  be 

within    their    parish and    shall    openly  in    the    church,    and 

after    divine    service,    call    the    said    householders    and    inhabitants 

together and   shall  appoint  yearly  two  able  persons  or  more, 

to  be gatherers   of  the   charitable    alms   of   all    the   residue 

of  the   people  inhabiting  in  the  parish which  collectors   the 

Sunday    next    after    their    election,    or    the    Sunday    next    following 

when    the  people  are   at   the    church   at    divine   service, 

shall  gently  ask  and  demand  of  every  man  and  woman  what 
they  of  their  charity  will  be  contented  to  give  weekly  towards 
the  relief  of   the   poor,  and  the   same  to    be    written    in  the    said 

register and  the  said  gatherers shall  justly  gather 

and  truly  distribute  the  same  alms  weekly " 

Sec.  7.     "And  be  it  further  enacted,  that  if  any  person  being  able  Pr.  43. 
to    further    this    charitable    work,    do    obstinately    refuse    reasonably 

to    give   towards    the    relief  of   the    poor the    parson 

and  churchwardens shall   then   gently  exhort 

him  towards  the  relief  of  the  poor;  and  if  he  will  not  so  be 
persuaded the  bishop's  ordinary shall  send  for  him  to 


churchwardens'  accounts.  — METHLEY.  2  5 1 

induce  him  by  charitable  means  to  extend  charity  to  the  poor 

and  if  the  person shall  obstinately  refuse the   bishop 

or   ordinary shall    have   full  power to  bind   the  said 

obstinate  person unto  the  Queen  by  recognisance with 

condition that  the  said  obstinate  person shall  personally 

appear  before  the  Justices  of  Peace and  if  any  such  obstinate 

person refuse then  the  said  Bishop shall  have 

authority to  commit  the  said  obstinate  person  to  prison." 

Sec.  8.     "And  further it   shall   be  lawful for   the  P'-43- 

Mayor with  the  churchwardens to  cess,  tax,  and   limit 

upon  every  such  obstinate  person what  sum  the  said  obstinate 

person shall  pay  weekly  towards  the  relief  of  the  poor." 


THE    RISING   OF  THE    NORTH. 

In  1569  the  Rising  of  the  North  took  place,  and  in  documents 
relating  to  this  rebellion,  churchwardens  and  their  duties  are 
occasionally  subjects  of  special  notice.  We  quote  several  instances 
from  one  of  the  publications  of  the  Surtees  Society  with  respect 
to  the  responsibilities  which  lay  in  awkward  times  upon  the 
unfortunate  churchwarden :  as  appears  below.  It  had  been  the 
duty  of  the  curate  and  churchwardens  to  quietly  take  down  and 
destroy  altars,  and  yet  certain  persons  did  in  this  year  1569,  *"  by  the 

instigation   of  the  devell unlawefuUy  erecte  an   alter,  or  holy 

water  fait  ,...."  and  so  on. 

At  a  time  when  "all  churchwardens  ought  to  provide  one  boke 
of  the  whole  Bible  of  the  largest  volume,  one  boke  of  Common 
Prayer,  two  bokes  of  Homelies,  and  all  other  Church  Bokes  to  the 
use  of  the  parish,"  yet  "Robert  Gilson  and  William  Merley  and 
other  churchwardens  and  parishioners  of  St.  Giles,  not  having  the 
feare  of  God  before  their  eies  did  not  only  set  up  certen  alters,  but 
also  burne,  teare,  and  utterly  destroy "  the  said  books. 

William  Wright,  of  Elvett,  tynker,  aged  40  years,  churchwarden 
of  St.  Oswald's,  Durham,  confessed  that  he  did  set  up  an  altar  and 
a  holy  water  stone,  heard  Mass,  and  took  absolution  from  William 
Holmes,  "and  commendyd  the  old  servic  in  dispraise  of  this  service 
sett  furth  by  the  Quene's  Majestic,  and  ys  sory  for  the  same." 
A  fellow  churchwarden^  Robert  Tedcastell,  tailyer,  aged  40,  agrees 
with  W.  Wright  in  every  point  of  his  answer. 


^  Surtees  Society  Publications,  vol.  xxi,  p.  129,  et  seq^ 


252 


CHURCHWARDENS'  ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY. 


Thomas  Richmond,  carpenter,  aged  40 ;  William  Rawling, 
husbandman,  aged  58,  Christopher  Whitfield,  husbandman,  aged 
40,  both  of  Sherborn;  William  Sklaitor,  of  Eldon,  husbandman, 
aged  60;  Roland  Hyxson,  of  Sedgfeilde;  Th.  Collinge,  of  Long- 
newton,  husbandman,  aged  60,  churchwardens^  all  confessed  to 
similar  wrongdoings  Their  names,  ages,  and  employments  have 
been  quoted,  as  it  is  of  no  little  interest  to  note  the  kind  of  men 
who  held  this  position  at  that  time. 


EXTRACTS   FROM   PROTHERO. 


Sec.  38.     "  Provided  always,  that  whereas  by  reason  of  this  Act  Pr.  72. 
the  common  gaols are  like  to  be  greatly  pestered  with  a  more 


1572. 

14  Eliz., 
Cap.  V. 

number  of  prisoners  than  heretofore  hath  been it  shall  be 

Punish'ment  of  ^^^^"^  for  the  Justices  of  the  Peace  of  every  shire,  at  their  General 

Vagabonds      Quarter  Sessions to  rate  and  tax  every  parish  within  the  said 

shires  at  such  reasonable  sums  of  money  for  the  relief  of  the  said 

prisoners  as   they  shall   think   convenient,  so   that  the   said  taxation 

doth  not  exceed  above  6^/.  or  8^.  by  the  week  out  of  every  parish, 

and  that  the  churchwardens  of  every  parish  shall  every  Sunday  levy 

the  same " 

The  Recusancy  Laws. 

"  For  the  preventing of  such  great  inconveniences as  Pr.  89, 

might  happen by  the  wicked practices  of  seditious 

sectaries  ....  be  it  enacted  ....  that  if  any  person  ....  of  16  years 


and  for  the 
relief  of  the 
poor  and 
impotent. 


1581. 

1593. 
35  EUz., 
Cap.  I. 


Act  to  retain    which  shall  obstinately  refuse  to  repair  to  some  church  ....  to  hear 
divine  service  established  by  her  Majesty's  laws  ....  by  the  space  of 


subjects  in 
obedience. 


1598. 

39-40  Eliz. 
Cap.  III. 


a  month or persuade  any  other to  abstain  from 

coming  to  church that  then  every  such  person, being 

thereof  lawfully  convicted,  shall  be  committed  to  prison " 

Sec.  5.     "That  if  any  person  shall relieve,  maintain, Pr-  9'- 

any  person  which   shall  obstinately  refuse   to  come   to  some  church 

,  then  every  person offending  as  aforesaid,  after  notice 

thereof  given  to  him  by  the  ordinary  of  the  diocese  or or 

churchwarden  of  the  parish  where  such  person  shall  be,  shall  forfeit 

to  the  Queen's   Majesty  for  every  person  so  relieved j[,\o  for 

every  month  that  he  shall  so  relieve any  such  person 

offending " 

Sec.  I.     "Be  it  enacted.  That  the  churchwardens  of  every  parish  Pr. 961 
and  four  substantial  householders,  there  being  subsidy  men  ....  shall 
be  called  overseers  of  the  poor  of  the  same  parish ;  and  they  shall  take 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  253 

Act  for  the  order for  setting  to  work  of  the  children whose  parents 

the  poor.     ^^^^^  ^^^ t)e  thought  able  to  keep their  children 

and  also  to  raise by  taxation a  convenient  stock  of  flax, 

hemp,  wool,  thread,  iron,  and  other  thrift,  to  set  the  poor  on  work,  and 
also  competent  sums  of  money  for  the  necessary  relief  of  the  lame, 

impotent,  old,  blind and  also  for  the   putting   out  of  such 

children  to  be  apprentices.     Which  said  churchwardens  and  overseers 

shall   meet   together   at   the   least   once   every   month   in   the  Pr.  97. 

church  of  the  said  parish,  upon  the  Sunday  in  the  afternoon,  after 
divine  service,  there  to  consider  of  some  good  course  to   be  taken 

in  the  premises,  and  shall  within  four  days  after  the  end  of 

the  year make  and  yield  up  to two  Justices  of  Peace 

a  true account  of money received,  or  rated  and 

cessed  and  not  received upon  pain   that   every  one 

absenting  themselves  without  lawful  cause from  such  monthly 

meeting to  forfeit  for  every  such  default  20s. 

Sec  3.     "  And  that  it  shall  be  lawful  for  the  said  churchwardens  Pr.  97. 

by  warrant  from  any  ....  two  Justices  of  Peace  to  levy  .... 

money  of  everyone  that  shall  refuse  to  contribute by  distress 

and  sale  of  the  offender's  goods " 

Sec.  4.     ** It  shall  be  lawful  for  the  said  churchwardens  Pr.  98- 

....  to  bind  any  such  children  ....  to  be  apprentices  ....  till  such 
man-child  shall  come  to  the  age  of  24  years,  and  such  woman-child 
to  the  age  of  21  years  .  .  .  ." 

Sec.  5.     ".  .  .  .  It  shall  be  lawful  for  the  ...  .  churchwardens  .  .  .  .  ,  Pr.  98. 
by  the  leave  of  the  lord  or  lords  of  the  manor  whereof  any  waste  or 

common  within  their  parish  is  parcel ,  to  erect  in  fit  and 

convenient  places  of  habitation  in   such  waste  or  common,  at   the 

general  charges  of  the  parish ,  convenient  houses  of  dwelling 

for  the  said  impotent  poor  .  .  .  ." 

Sec.  II.     "That  all ... .  forfeitures  before  mentioned  in  this  Act  Pr.  99. 
shall  be  employed  to  the  use  of  the  poor  of  the  same  parish." 

Sec.  12.     "And   forasmuch   as   all   begging   is   forbidden    by  this  Pr.  99. 

Act .  .  .  .  ,  the  Justices  of  the  Peace  shall  rate  every  parish so 

as  no  parish  be  rated  above  the  sum  of  6d.,  nor  under  the  sum  of 

i^d.  weekly ,  which  sums  so  taxed  shall  be  yearly  assessed  by 

the  agreement  of  the  parishioners  within  themselves,  or  in  default 
thereof  by  the  churchwardens  and  constables  .  .  .  ." 

Sec.  13.     "That  the  said  Justices  of  the  Peace shall  set  Pr.ioo 

down  what money  shall  be  sent  quarterly  out  of  every  county 

for  the  relief  of  the  poor  prisoners  of  the  King's  Bench  and 


244  CHURCHWARDENS*  ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY. 

people  in  such  disastrous  numbers,  and  by  a  dislocation  of  existing 
systems  may  have  brought  about  a  general  reorganisation  of  parish 
procedure. 

The  parish  was  the  community  dwelling  in  an  area  defined  by 
the  church,  and  organised  for  church  purposes ;  within  this  area  each 
resident  was  a  parishioner,  owing  his  duty  of  worship  and  contribution 
to  his  church,  and  of  confession  and  submission  to  his  pastor,  the 
rector  or  vicar  of  the  rector.  The  officers  of  this  constitution  were 
the  rector  or  his  deputy,  together  with  the  wardens  who  were  the 
chosen  representatives  of  the  parishioners;  and  the  place  of  general 
meeting  was  the  church.* 

It  can  be  deduced  from  the  entries  in  the  accounts  of  proceed- 
ings which  took  place,  coram  parochianiSy  that  the  formal  acts  of 
parishioners  in  meeting  were : — 

(i)  The  yearly  election  of  wardens; 

(2)  The  audit  of  the   outgoing  wardens'  accounts ; 

(3)  The  transfer  of  church  goods,  cash,  and  live  stock  to 

the  incoming  wardens; 

(4)  The  consideration  of  the  repairs  of  the  church  fabric, 

etc.,  and  of  ways  and  means. 

Such   were    the    acts    by  which    the    parishioners    arranged    the 

discharge  of   the   obligations    which   were   enjoined   upon   them    by 

the    diocesan    authorities.*     According   to    Archbishop    Winchelsea's 

constitution,  which  was  in  force  from  the  beginning  of  the  fourteenth 

1305.        to  the  middle  of  the  sixteenth  century,  the  parishioners  were  bound 

to  attend  to  the  following  particulars : — They   were    liable    for   the 

maintenance  of  the  nave  of  the  church,  the   books,  the   vestments, 

and    a    portion    of   the  **  furniture.'*^    The    whole    purpose    of   this 

Ut  parochiani  constitution  is  to  draw  lines  of  demarcation  between 

the  liability  of  the  parishioners  and  that  of  the  clergy,  and  as  such 

Kourieenih  a  demarcation  was  probably  new  in  the  beginning  of  the  fourteenth 

century,     century,  we  have  another  reason  for  feeling  that  here  we  are  near  the 

starting  point  of  the  new  system,  which  is  democratic,  not  feudal. 

The  "books"  were  those  which  contained  the  various  offices. 
The  "  vestments  "  were  worn  by  the  priest  at  mass  and  other  services, 


1  Somerset  Record  Society,  vol.  iv,  Churchwardens^  Accounts  of  Parishes  in 
Somerset^  ranging  from  1349- 1560. 

^  Cf.  Injunction  of  Bishop  Stapledon,  Nov.  23,  132 1,  of  Exeter,  to  Sir  Henry 
Champemoun,  the  patron,  and  the  parishioners  of  IliTacoinl)e,  that  the  church  be 
enlarged  within  two  years  under  penalty  of  £^0. 

»  See  Lyndwood's  ProvinciaUy  Lib.  iii,  Tit.  27.  Johnson's  Canons  (ed.  185 1), 
vol.  ii,  p.  319' 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  245 

such  as  the  chasuble,  the  amice,  the  dalmatic,  etc.  The  "furniture" 
included  vessels,  such  as  the  chalice,  the  paten,  the  altar  cloths,  the 
processional  cross,  the  censer,  the  pyx,  the  images  in  the  nave,  the 
bells,  etc 

In  order  to  provide  funds  for  these  purposes,  rates  (generally  of  a 
voluntary  character)  were  levied,  or  recourse  was  had  to  special 
collections.  It  appears  that  usually  compulsion  was  unnecessary,  as 
contributions  were  elicited  by  means  which  depended  on  exciting  the 
good-will  of  the  people.  For  instance,  on  holy  days  the  employment 
of  labour  was  forbidden ;  and  after  attending  the  church  services  the 
people  were  drawn  together  by  amusements  directed  by  the  church. 
There  were  Christmas  and  other  plays,  church  ales,  guild  feasts,  etc. 
And  on  these  occasions  contributions  were  made  by  the  people,  which 
were  either  devoted  to  the  special  objects  connected  with  a  guild,  or 
came  into  the  hands  of  the  wardens  for  general  purposes. 

Besides  these  sources  through  which  funds  were  provided,  special 
donations  were  made  by  persons  whose  names  were  recorded  as 
benefactors.  Their  names  were  written  in  the  "bede  roll,"  and 
were  read  out  to  the  parishioners  on  great  days,  that  prayers  might  be 
offered  on  their  behalf.  These  contributions  varied  from  articles  of 
small  value,  such  as  a  girdle  or  a  ring,  to  important  gifts  of  live  stock. 
And  hence  the  wardens  might  at  times  have  the  management  of 
sheep  or  cows,  or  even  of  bees  on  their  hands.  It  is  impossible  to 
enumerate  all  the  forms  in  which  the  church  funds  were  assisted. 
The  contributions  appear  in  innumerable  shapes  in  the  different 
accounts  which  are  accessible,  and  need  not  be  further  detailed ;  but 
it  is  desirable  to  make  special  mention  of  one  institution,  which  may 
almost  be  considered  as  a  commercial  undertaking,  namely  the 
Church  House. 

In  one  parish'  the  Church    House  began   by  being  a  bakehouse 

for  the   Holy  Wafer,  then   became  a  place  for  its   sale,  and  finally 

tccnth    developed  from  a  brewhouse  of  the  Holy  Ale^  to  a  place  of  sale  for 

'*"'^*     that  also,  and  so  by  the  sixteenth  century  the  Church  House  was  the 

centre  of  the  social  life  of  the  parish.     There  the  parishioners  enjoyed 


*  i,e.  at  Tintinhull  (Somerset  Record  Society,  Vol.  IV,  p.  195),  where  it  is  called 
Pandoxeterium.  1496-7.  There  is  one  siill  standing  in  the  churchyard  at  E^t 
Down  in  North  Devon. 

*  For  the  use  of  ecclesiastical  ale  cf.  New  English  Dktionary^  s,v.  Church -ale. 
1583.     SiahhcSy  Anatomy  of  Abuses, 

9$.    The  manner  of  Church-ales.     Against  a  Christmas,  an  Easter,  Whit-Sonday, 

or  some  other  time,  the  churchewardens prouide  half  a  score  or  twenty 

quarters  of  mault which  mault,  beeing  made  into  very  strong  ale  or  beere,  it 

is  set  to  sale,  either  in  the  church  or  some  other  place  assigned  to  that  purpose 

they  repaire  their  churches  and  chappels  with  it :  they  buy  bookes  for  semice. 


246 


churchwardens'  accounts — METHLEY. 


Beginning 

sixteenth 

century. 


1549- 


1539-40. 
1563. 


Beginning 

seventeenth 

century. 


one  another's  hospitality,  and  even  invited  members  of  adjoining 
parishes  to  take  a  part  in  festivities.  And  from  the  proceeds  a  rich 
harvest  was  reaped,  which  was  at  the  disposal  of  the  wardens. 

In  such  ways  the  wardens  were  supplied  with  the  means  for 
providing  the  necessaries  connected  with  the  worship  in  their  parish 
church,  and  so  far  they  were  the  officers  of  the  parishioners  described 
as  custodes  bonorum  or  procura tores  ecclesicR,  But  beside  the  work  entailed 
upon  them  by  the  management  of  these  matters,  their  duties  included 
the  presentment  of  the  moral  delinquencies  of  the  rector  or  parishioners 
to  the  Archdeacon's  Court,  and  in  this  respect  they  were  Bishop's 
Officers,  with  disciplinary  functions  empowered  in  the  Visitation 
Court.  It  does  not  appear  that  purely  civil  functions  were  laid  upon 
them  until  the  reign  of  Henry  VIII,  when  they  began  to  receive 
orders  to  provide  arms  for  soldiers,  to  relieve  maimed  soldiers,  and 
otherwise  to  meet  the  public  needs  where  there  was  no  provision 
made  by  the  Civil  Government. 

Not  long  after  this  date,  in  the  reign  of  Edward  VI,  a  very 
important  addition  was  made  to  their  duties.  For  in  1549  the 
voluntary  alms  of  the  members  of  the  Church  were  regularly  demanded 
for  the  relief  of  the  poor,  and  the  wardens  were  charged  to  collect  the 
donations  and  distribute  them  amongst  the  poor.  Afterwards,  when 
the  mass  of  poverty,  which  had  begun  to  be  a  serious  trouble 
after  the  suppression  of  the  monasteries  in  1539-40,  became  too 
great .  to  be  relieved  by  voluntary  alms,  a  poor  rate  was  imposed, 
and  the  wardens  were  empowered  to  levy  the  tax.  During  the 
reigns  of  Elizabeth  and  James  I  the  office  which  they  administered 
was  used  for  further  civil  work,  for  the  maintenance  of  army 
hospitals,  the  transmission  of  soldiers,  and  for  the  equipment 
of  volunteers.  And  as  the  manorial  executive  ceased  to  deal  with 
the  civil  interests  of  the  community,  the  vestry  became  the 
chief  local  authority.  By  its  machinery  highways  were  made  and 
repaired,  the  pound  was  maintained,  the  stocks  were  repaired,  vermin 
were  destroyed,  and  other  work  of  the  kind  carried  out 

We  have  little  to  add  to  Bishop  Hobhouse's  description,  except 
to  call  attention  to  the  fact,  brought  out  in  Lambard's  treatise, 
p.  255,  that  the  churchwardens  were  a  corporation,  and  enjoyed  the 
privileges  and  responsibilities  of  a  legal  position. 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  247 

The  necessity  for  such  an  arrangement  is  apparent  since  "a 
church  is  always  under  age,  and  is  to  be  treated  as  an  infant,  and 
it  is  not  according  to  law  that  the  infants  should  be  disinherited  by 
the  negligence  of  their  guardians."^ 

A  very  good  general  picture  of  the  parish  life  is  also  drawn  by 
the  Rev.  W.  W.  Capes,'^  who  ends  his  chapter  by  general  references 
to  certain  Chantry  Surveys,  Gild  accounts,  etc. 

Turning  now  to  the  texts  which  form  the  authority  of  much  that 
is  described  above,  the  writer  would  first  express  his  regret  that  he 
is  able  to  bring  forward  only  a  meagre  amount  of  evidence  from  the 
Canon  Law,  and  hopes  that  the  blanks  left  by  his  ignorance  may 
be  supplemented  later  in  a  more  satisfactory  manner. 

There  is  a  vast  quantity  of  information  to  be  gained  on  the 
subject  from  this  direction,*  for  it  is  to  be  remembered  that  the 
ecclesiastical  tribunals  claimed  jurisdiction  in  cases  of  land  given  to  a 
church,  and  also  the  exaction  of  spiritual  dues,  tithes,  mortuaries, 
oblations,  and  pensions ;  that,  as  the  last  testament  was  so  intimately 
connected  with  the  last  confession,  the  Church  claimed  to  pronounce 
on  the  validity  of  wills,  and  also  to  interpret  them*;  and  that  generally 
English  Law,  more  especially  the  English  Law  of  civil  precedent, 
was  rationalised  under  the  influence  of  Common  Law.* 

And  this  influence  has  undoubtedly  to  be  reckoned  with,  in  spite  of 
the  limit  authoritatively  placed  upon  the  scope  of  Canon  Law,  when  in 
1532  Henry  VIII  forced  Convocation  (Canterbury)  to  sign  a  document 
known  as  the  Submission  of  the  Clergy.*  In  this  the  clergy  engaged 
in  the  first  •  place  neither  to  meet  in  Convocation  nor  to  enact  or 
to  execute  new  canons  without  the  King's  authority,  and  secondly,  to 
submit  all  past  ecclesiastical  legislation  to  examination,  with  a  view 
to  the  removal  of  everything  prejudicial  to  the  Royal  prerogative. 

Having  now  considered  some  general  aspects  of  the  church- 
wardens' system,  we  proceed  to  the  extracts  up)on  which  the  above 
sketch  is  largely  based. 


1  Pollock  &  Maiiland,  History  of  English  Law^  1895,  vol.  i,  p.  483,  quoting  a 
judgment  of  1307. 

«  The  English  Church  in  the  Fourteenth  and  Fifteenth  Centuries  (1900), 
pp.  272-278. 

*  See  the  summary  in  the  index  of  Gibson's  Codex  juris  Ecclesiastici  Anglicani, 

*  Pollock  &  Maitland,  History  of  English  Law^  1895,  vol.  i,  pp.  106-107. 
fi  fbid.y  vol.  i,  p.  113. 

«  Gardiner,  Student's  History  of  England  (1890),  vol.  ii,  p.  386. 


258  CHURCHWARDENS*  ACCOUNTS. — MBTHLEY. 

After  the  end  of  divine  service  our  good  people  are  not  to  be  Ga.  102. 

disturbed,  letted,  or  discouraged  from dancing,  archery,  leaping, 

May-games,  Whitsun-ales,  Morris-dances,  maypoles.  But  bear  and  bull 
baiting,  interludes,  and  bowling  are  prohibited. 

And  later,  this  Declaration  of  Sports  proceeds  that  "those 
Recusants  are  forbidden  these  recreations,"  who  '*  though  they 
conform  in  religion,  are  not  present  in  the  church  at  the  service  of 
God,  before  their  going  to  the  said  recreation;"  also  "such  persons 
as  shall  use  these  exercises  before  the  end  of  all  divine  services  for 
that  day,  shall  be  presented  and  sharply  punished  by  those  to  whom 
it  belongeth  in  office, ^^ 

1640.  In   the  Root  and   Branch  Petition,  "by   many  of  His  Majesty's  Ga.  137. 
The  Root  and  subjects   against    the   Government   of   Archbishops,    etc.,    with   their 
Petition.          Courts "   we   find   among    "  the   manifold  evils,  pressures,  and 

grievances    caused    by  the  Prelates  and  their  dependents " 

the  two  following  included 

22.  "  The  pressing  of  the  strict  observation  of  the  Saints'  days,  whereby  Ga.  141 . 
great  sums  of  money  are  drawn  out  of  men's  purses  for  working  on 
them;  a  very  high  burthen  on  most  people,  who  getting  their  living 
on  their  daily  employments,  must  either  omit  them  or  part  with  their 
money,  whereby  many  poor  families  are  undone  or  brought  behind- 
hand; yet  many  churchwardens  are  sued,  or  threatened  to  be  sued 
by  theu-  troublesome  ministers,  as  perjured  persons,  for  not  presenting 
their  parishioners  who  failed  in  observing  holy-days." 

also 

27.     The  imposing  of  oaths  of  various  and  trivial  articles  yearly  Ga.  143. 
upon  churchwardens  and   sidesmen,  which  they  cannot  take  without 
perjury,  unless  they  fall  at  jars  continually  with  their  ministers  and 
neighbours,  and  wholly  neglect  their  own  calling. 

1 64 1.  Impeachment  of  the  Bishops  by  the  Commons. 

Resolutions  of       "  Whereas  divers   innovations    in   or  about  the  worship  of    God  Ga.  197. 

Comm^'onson   ^^ve  been  lately  practised it  is ordered 

Ecclesiastical  "That    the    churchwardens   of    every   parish    church    and   chapel 

respectively  do  forthwith  remove  the  communion  table  from  the  east  end 
of  the  church,  chapel  or  chancel,  into  some  other  convenient  place ;  and 
that  they  take  away  the  rails,  and  level  the  chancels  as  heretofore 
they  were  before  the  innovations." 

After  citing  the  things  which  are  to  be  done  away  with,  such  as  Ga.  198. 
crucifixes,  "scandalous  pictures,"  images  of  the  Virgin   Mary,  tapers, 
candlesticks,  and  basins  from  the  communion  table ;  after  enjoining  that 
corporal  bowing  at  the   name   of  Jesus  or  towards  the  east  end  or 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  259 

communion  table  be  forborne,  that  the  Lord's  Day  be  duly  observed 

and  that  dancing  and  other  sports  before  and  after  divine 

service  be  restrained The   Resolution   directs  that  the  Vice- 

Chancellors  of  the  Universities,  heads  and  governors  of  colleges,  all 
parsons,  vicars,  and  churchwardens,  make  certificates  of  the  perform- 
ance of  these  orders.' 

1643.  London   in   the  hands  of  the  Parliament.     Charles  I  at  Oxford 

planning  to  recover  it. 

»645-  The  year  of  the  self-denying  ordinance  and  the  constitution  of  the 

New  Model  in  the  parliamentary  army. 

1647.  No.  12  contains  the  demand  that  there  be  a  repeal  of  all  Acts  or  Ga.  321. 

Aug.  I.      clauses  in  any  Act  enjoining  the  use  of  the  Book  of  Common  Prayer 
Tie  Hemds  and   imposing   any   penalties   for   neglect    thereof,  as   also    all    Acts 

Pro^^als    imposing    any    penalty    for    not    coming    to     church,    etc., 

offered  by  which   eventually   bore   fruit   in    1650.       An   Act    was    then   passed  Ga.  391. 
the  Army. 

^  A  sidelight  upon  the  mode  of  election  of  churchwardens  about  this  period  is 
provided  by  a  tract  printed  for  Thomas   Underbill,  at  the  signe  of  the  Bible,  in 

1643.  Wood  Street,  London,  1643.  This  rare  tract  is  "a  petition  exhibited  with  all  due 
respect  unto  the  right  Honourable  the  Lord  Major  and  Aldermen  of  London,"  by 
Rich.  Dey,  Minbter  of  the  Gospell,  and  b  called  The  Right  and  Legall  Church- 
warden. 

This  petition  ** declares  and  expresses"  the  churchwardens'  ** lawful  admit- 
tance unto  the  said  office  by  the  choice  and  appointment  of  the  Lord  Major  and 
Aldermen  of  London,  the  Majors  and  Bailiffs  of  Cities  and  Corporations,  and  by 
the  Justices  of  peace  in  each  County  through  England,  so  that  they  may  be 
legally  authorised  without  any  future  dependance  on  the  Prelates. 

And  therein  Richard  Dey,  Clerke,  declaims  against  the  long  abuse  of  some  ecclesi- 
astical laws,  and  proceeds  that  **  as  we  find  it  so  exceedingly  difficult  not  only  to  rectifie 
old  bad  laws  degenerated  into  worse  customes,  but  also  to  obtaine  any  better  new,  we 
have  the  more  reason  to  "change  those  who  have  the  management  thereof  "from 
bad  to  better  persons,  who,  like  good  Bees,  may  gather  the  honey  from  those  flowers 
of  Law  now  in  force,  where  formerly  Spiders  have  gathered  poyson,"  and  argues 

1601.      from  the  Act  for  the  relief  of  the  poor  (looi)  in  the  direction  of  the  above  preamble, 

1603.  discounting  the  value  of  the  Canon  in  Convocation  at  London  (1603),  dv  which 
it  was  orcuuned  that  all  churchwardens  in  every  parish  shall  be  chosen  by  tne  joynt 
consent  of  the  minister  and  parishioners,  etc. 

The  validity  of  the  Canons  is,  we  understand,  a  matter  of  controversy  at  the 
present  day.  (See  Maitland*s  Canon  Ijzw  in  the  Church  of  England,)  But  it 
cannot  be  denied  that  the  practices  enjoined  by  this  impugned  Canon  of  1603 
are   in   many   cases   those   in    vogue   with    us    in   the   twentieth   century   (Sir   R. 

'53**  PhiUimore,  pp.  1842-3),  in  spile  of  the  Statute  of  1532,  by  which  no  Canon 
could  be   enacted  *'  without  Royal  license  or  against  the  laws  and  customs  of  the 

'603.      land ;"  the  Canon  of  1603  not  having  been  recognised  in  this  way. 

The  end  of  Richard  Dey*s  tract  is  taken  up  by  **a  short  touch  of  the  nature 
and  office  of  church- wardens.'' 

The  defender  of  the  church  and  church  goods,  he  says,  the  Gucurdianus  ecclesia^ 
the  aediiuus  qui  sacris  aedibus prcesty  is  net  the  Bishop's  proper  officer,  whatever  the 
Arch-Prelate  of  Yorke,  B.  Williams,  may  assert ;  his  office  is  of  more  excellency,  as 
intrusted  by  the  people  Mrith  all  the  Church  and  Church  goods  and  the  ministry 
thereof,  to  stand  for  them  in  the  ministry  against  the  Pope,  Prelates,  false  patrons,  etc. 
Richard  Dey's  position  is  defined  in  vigorous  terms,  but  the  result  of  his  petition 
is  at  present  not  ascertained. 


26o  CHURCHWARDENS*  ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY. 

1650.        repealing   the   clauses   in   previous   Statutes   which  deal  with  persons 
Sept.  27.     vvho    do    not    come    to    church,    yet    ending    with    the     following 

provision : — "And  to  the  end  that  no  profane  or  licentious  persons  Ga.  395. 
may  take  occasion  by  the  repealing  of  the  said   laws  to  neglect  the 

performance  of  religious  duties,  be  it  enacted  that every  person 

shall upon  every  Lord^s  day diligently  resort  to 

some  public  place  where  the  worship  of  God  is  exercised and 

that  every  person that  shall  not  diligently  perform  the 

duties  aforesaid shall  be  deemed  offenders  against  this  law, 

and  shall  be  proceeded  against  accordingly." 

The  Protectorate  instituted. 
1653.  jl^g   Instrument  of  Government,  1653,  in   which  the   constitution  Ga.  405, 

Instrument  of  is  described,  contains  the  clause — 

Government.          j^q  ^^      'Phat   such   as    profess    faith    in    God    by    Jesus    Christ  Ga.  416. 
(though  differing  in  judgment  from  the  doctrine,  worship,  or  discipline 
publicly    held    forth;    shall    not    be    restrained    from,   but    shall    be 
protected    in,   the    profession   of    the    faith    and    exercise    of    their 
religion exclusive  of  Popery,  Prelacy,  or  licentiousness. 

A  description  of  the  duties  of  Wardens  is  given  in  a  systematic 
form  in  R.  Burn,  The  Justice  of  the  Peace  (1825),  vol.  i,  pp.  600-618. 
And  with  the  exemptions  recapitulated  by  him  we  will  close  this 
series  of  extracts.  Peers,  he  tells  us,  clergymen,  Members  of 
Parliament,  counsellors  or  attorneys.  Dissenting  ministers.  Catholic 
ministers,  felons,  persons  serving  in  the  Militia,  non-resident 
partners,  aliens,  and,  curiously  it  seems  (by  Statute  6  and  7  W.  iii, 
c.  4),  apothecaries  who  have  served  seven  years,  shall  be  exempted 
from  the  office  of  churchwarden} 

In  conclusion  we  think  that  although  this  fragment  of  the  Methley 

churchwardens'  accounts  comes  next  in  point  of  time,  dating  as  they 

1681-1705     do  from  1681-1705,  still  it  may  be  that  the  story  would  be  made 

more  complete  by  a  record  of  the  various  Acts  by  which  the  position 

*  A  large  number  of  churchwarden^  accounts,  or  at  least  extracts  from  them, 
have  been  printed  at  various  times,  either  as  part  of  the  history  of  a  parish  or 
separately  in  local  magazines  or  archaeological  journals.  A  list  of  these  appears  in 
1695.  ^^  English  Historical  Review,  vol.  xv,  pp.  335-341,  compiled  by  Miss  Elsbeth 
Philipps.  There  are  146  entries  in  this  list,  which  is  arranged  chronologically. 
The  dates  at  which  these  records  begin,  range  from  1349  to  1767,  and  the  periods 
which  they  deal  with  vary  from  two  years  to  473  years.  Some  remarks  are  added 
in  a  separate  column  by  the  compiler,  which  indicate  the  value  and  the  extent  of 
the  several  transcripts,  and  the  whole  forms  a  most  useful  index  to  those  who 
make  this  subject  their  especial  study. 

Other  lists,  to  some  extent  covering  the  same  ground,  without  commentary, 
are  to  be  found  in  Notes  and  Queries,  9th  Series,  IV  (1899),  pp.  301-2,  414-5, 
452-3;  V  (1900),  pp.  63-4,  etc. 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  26 1 

of  churchwardens  has  been  affected  or  their  functions  reduced  in 
modern  times.  And  the  following  have  been  taken  from  a  list  in  the 
Report  to  the  Convocation  of  Canterbury,  1902,  No.  367  : — 

By  the  Toleration  Act  there  ceased  to  be  any  civil  disqualification 
of  citizens  on  the  ground  of  religious  opinions,  and  so  the  ideas  and 
actions  involved  by  the  Acts  of  Uniformity  (1552,  1558,  1662)  passed 
away. 

By  the  Union  of  Parishes  Act  the  parochial  unit  was  disturbed, 
and  this  particular  function  of  churchwardens  interfered  with.  See 
also  1834. 

By  the  Church  Building  Acts  pew-rents  are  set  up  as  a  source 
of  income  by  which  the  Church  may  be  served  and  the  principle  that 
every  parishioner  had  a  right  to  a  seat  in  his  parish  church  was 
disregarded. 

The  Unions  of  parishes  were  extended  beyond  the  provisions  of 
the  Act  of  1782,  and  now  churchwardens  are  no  longer  ex-officio 
members  of  Boards  of  Guardians. 

The  Civil  Registration  of  births  and  deaths  superseded  for  legal 
purposes  the  Church  Registers,  and  marriage  by  civil  rite  became 
recognised  by  law. 

By  the  Burials  Acts  (1852,  1853,  1880,  1900)  the  use  of  the 
church  burial  office  and  the  consecration  of  the  burial  ground  became 
no  longer  necessary. 

Compulsory  Church  rates  were  abolished,  and  consequently  the 
obligation  of  the  parishioners  to  maintain  public  worship  was  no 
longer  recognised  by  law. 

We  will  not  weary  the  reader  who  has  survived  by  attempting  a 
recapitulation,  but  prefer  to  apologise  for  an  amount  of  undigested 
information,  trusting  humbly  that  in  the  preceding  pages  many  facts 
have  been  borrowed  which  have  been  put  side  by  side  so  as  to 
partially  elucidate  the  position  of  churchwardens  in  the  development 
of  the  parish.  For  the  wholesale  borrowing  we  are  indebted  to  the 
historians  and  scholars  whose  names  appear  in  the  many  references 
above,  and  we  would  acknowledge  with  grateful  thanks  the  very  kind 
guidance  of  Professor  E.  C.  Clark,  Rev.  W.  H.  Frere,  and  Professor 
Maitland,  and  would  at  the  same  time  exempt  them  from  responsi- 
bility of  our  own  errors  and  want  of  system. 


262  churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY. 


THE   CHURCHWARDENS'   ACCOUNTS   OF   METHLEY 
PARISH,  1681-1705. 

Transcribed  and   Annotated  by  Rev.  H.  ARMSTRONG-HALL. 

A  NUMBER  of  leaves  of  a  manuscript  book  were  found  in  a 
lamp  cupboard  in  the  Vestry  of  Methley  Church  about  four  years 
ago.  The  leaves  measured  20 in.  by  Sin.  About  half  the  written 
matter  relates  to  collections  made  in  the  Church  and  the  distribution 
of  the  Easter  and  Christmas  Doles  during  the  latter  part  of  the 
eighteenth  century.  The  earlier  leaves  contain  schedules  of  liabilities 
for  the  repair  of  the  churchyard  fence  (some  undated  and  one  of 
1768),  lists  of  bonds  and  securities  (from  1672  onwards)  due  to  the 
poor,  a  copy  of  a  General  Quarter  Sessions  Order  relative  to  the 
duties  of  Constables  and  to  vagrants;  the  accounts  of  the  Church- 
wardens, the  Constables,  the  Overseers  of  the  Poor,  and  the 
Overseers  of  the  Highways  for  the  period  (roughly)  1680-1707;  and 
a  list  of  the  Churchwardens,  Overseers  of  the  Poor,  and  Overseers 
of  the  Highways  from   1639  onwards. 

Of  the  accounts,  those  of  the  Overseers  of  the  Poor  are  the  most 
complete,  but  are  of  little  interest,  as  they  do  not  record  much 
beyond  the  names  of  the  persons  who  were  in  receipt  of  monthly  relief. 

Occasionally  the  entries  are  varied  with  such  as  the  following : — 

s,   d, 
Pade  to  Mary  VVedderall  for  one  blankitt  for  winding' 

William  Berkitt  in 20 

Pade  to  Sarah   WoUton  for  ale  and    for   the    bell 

towlling  and  grave  making  to  John  Shan  one 

shilling  and  to  Justis  Whyte  Clarke  the  whole  is       3     o 

Or  one  is  given  a  glimpse  of  the  cost  of  fitting  out  parish  orphans 

and  apprentices,  as  (1699): — 

s.   d, 
A  coat  a  wast  coat  and  a  pare  of  breches  for  Tho. 

Burton 4  10 


1  By  18  Charles  II,  c.  4  (1666),  it  was  ordered  that  burials  were 
to  take  place  in  wool. 


CHURCHWARDENS*  ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY. 

Or  in  the  following  more  detailed  statement  (1705): — 

Laid  out  for  Cloathes  for  Jane  Field. 

September   the    15    day    2    yardes  and   a    halfe    of 

wolse 

For  buckram  canuis  whale  bone  and  thred 

For  coat  makeing 

For  cloath  for  2  shifts  and  2  aprons 

For  a  cap  and  a  black  band  . 

For  a  pare  of  shooes       .... 

For  a  pare  of  stockines 

For  thred  and  makinge  shifts  and  aprons 


263 


6 
o 

4 
o 

4 

2 

4 
6 


14 


The  accounts  of  the  Overseers  of  the  Highways  are  few  in 
number,  and  record  simply  the  tons  of  stones,  large  and  small, 
which  were  purchased  for  mending  the  roads,  and  the  prodigious 
quantities  of  ale  consumed  in  laying  the  material. 

The  Constables'  accounts  range  over  the  whole  inner  life  of 
the  township  and  its  relation  to  the  larger  life  of  the  county  and  the 
kingdom.  Thus  we  read  of  county  bridge  money,  of  the  hue  and 
cry,  of  the  arrest  of  vagrants,  of  the  relief  of  seamen  and  travellers, 
cripples  and  persons  on  the  way  to  "the  spawes,"  and  persons 
with  "passes"  and  "letters  of  request,"  of  the  Fourteen  Articles,  of 
mending  the  pinfolds  and  the  field  fences,  the  ducking  stool  and 
the  'stocks,  of  "  holburts "  and  "  watch  bills,"  of  warrants  for 
window  money,  of  the  building  of  "  Yorke  gaill"  and  the  repair  of 
"  Hallifax  beacon,"  of  making  a  list  of  boatmen  and  "  raisinge  3 
Soulgers,"  of  repairing  Leeds  bridge,  of  "returning  a  list  of  Papists 
to  Ledes  Seshons"  and  drawing  up  a  schedule  of  "Popish 
recusants,"  of  raising  the  "Traine  Band,"  and  of  relieving  the 
prisoners  at  York  Castle.  The  pages  of  the  Constables'  accounts 
include  charges  which  in  many  parishes  appear  in  the  Church- 
wardens' accounts.  Indeed,  the  distinction  between  the  work  of  the 
two  classes  of  officials  is  in  some  matters  very  ill  defined.  It  is 
hoped,  therefore,  that  in  a  future  issue  the  Thoresby  Society  may 
publish  the  Constables'  accounts  of  Methley,  with  further  notesj  and 
so  render  a  more  perfect  picture  of  the  Parish  life  of  this  village.^ 

1  In  the  Churchwardens'  Accounts  of  Pittington  (Surtees  Society,  Ixxxiv)  the 
churchwardeas,  the  trustees  for  the  poor  stock,  the  overseers  for  the  poor,  the 
overseers  for  the  high  ways«  were  different  persons  at  this  period. 

An  interesting  comparison  may  also  be  made  by  reference  to  Memorials  of 
Stepney  Parish,     Hill  and  Frcre.     1890-1. 


264  churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY. 

The  list  of  Churchwardens  and  Overseers  is  of  considerable 
interest.  It  is  headed,  "The  names  of  all  the  Churchwardens, 
Overseers  of  the  Poore,  and  Overseers  of  the  Highwayes  in  the 
yeare  of  our  Lord  1639."  In  subsequent  years  the  date  only,  eg. 
1640,  is  given.  The  only  break  in  the  list  is  during  the  Civil  War. 
After  the  names  of  those  elected  for  1643  is  written,  "Thess  was 
till  1648,"  and  then  follow  the  elections  for  the  last-named  year.  The 
Constables  are  not  mentioned  as  being  elected,  though  obviously 
they  had  to  submit  their  accounts  for  the  criticism  of  the  parish. 

It  may  be  noted  here  that  the  word  Churchwarden  does  not 
occur  in  any  Methley  will  till  1584,  in  which  year  Richard  Webster, 
"peinter,"  gave  "unto  the  makinge  of  a  faire  tabernacle  and  couer 
to  be  maid  of  faire  timber  to  couer  the  foote  or  place  of  Baptising 
wthin  the  Parish  Church  of  Methelay  to  be  maid  after  the  best 
manner  at  the  order  and  ouer  sighte  and  appointment  of  Mr.  Wittm 
Lacie  RoBte  Laborne  the  younger  and  of  the  parson  of  Methelay 
the  hole  sum  of  \\)s,  iiij^/.  to  be  paid  by  myne  executors  unto  the 
handes  of  the  Church  Wardens  of  the  Parish  Church  of  Metheley 
aforesaid." 

In  order  to  bring  the  Churchwardens'  expenses  into  some  sort 
of  a  system  we  have  divided  them  out  into  several  sections,  the 
description  of  which  appears  at  the  head  of  the  columns  of  the 
schedule  which  follows. 

A  glance  at  these  columns  will  show  how  little  expense  was 
deemed  necessary  to  maintain  the  fabric  of  the  church,  how  very  little 
was  done  towards  cleansing  and  caretaking,  what  a  large  proportion 
of  the  total  expenditure  was  absorbed  by  the  bells  and  the  clock, 
and  that  the  most  costly  duty  of  the  Churchwardens  was  to  provide 
the  bread  and  wine  for  the  Communion. 

It  might  be  expected  that  other  sections,  such  as  charity  work, 
highways,^  etc.,  would  claim  more  of  the  finances  of  the  village,  but 
as  suggested  above,  although  the  general  introduction  to  these 
accounts,  pages  236-71,  state  that  the  Churchwardens  were  charged 
with  such  work  in  this  case,  much  of  it  in  different  places  was 
undertaken  by  the  Constables. 

There  are  a  few  instances  of  payments  for  apprentices ;  but  no 
mention  of  education^  or  of  sanitary  regulations  occur.  No  notice 
of  village  festivities  or  interesting  local   events  is  to  be  found;  but 


1  Mending  the   "causey*'   was  a  favourite  object  of  bequests  in  the  sixteenth 
and  seventeenth  centuries. 

*  The  schoolmaster   of  1686   was   earning  a  small   sum   outside   of  education 
duties. 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  265 

on  the  anniversaries  of  the  Gunpowder  Plot  and  the  accession 
of  Charles  II  the  bells  were  rung,  and  the  dates  of  the  taking  of 
Monmouth,  the  coronation  of  William  III,  and  the  Battle  of 
Blenheim  were  commemorated  ofl&cially  in  the  same  way. 

The  bell-ringers  appear  to  have  charged  only  for  these  occasions, 
and  to  have  rung  their  bells  for  the  remainder  of  the  year  without 
wages. 

The  personal  names  are  well  known  in  the  district  to  the  present 
day,  though  the  foumardes  and  foxes  have,  we  suppose,  entirely 
disappeared,  and  from  the  small  number  of  payments  for  the 
destruction  of  the  latter,  it  may  be  assumed  that  the  neighbourhood 
was  already  fairly  well  cultivated  and  populated. 

The  reader  will  note  with  sympathy  that  in  most  cases  the  sums 
have  been  added  up  wrongly,  and  perhaps  envy  the  Churchwardens 
their  easy-going  auditors. 

It  will  occur  to  him  also  that  the  total  expenditure  of  the 
village  through  these  officials  was  very  small.  It  will  have  to  be 
remembered  however  that  the  purchasing  power  of  money  has 
changed.  For  this  reason  two  columns  have  been  added  to  the 
scheduled  analysis,  in  which  Thorold  Rogers'  figures  of  the  price  of 
wheat  by  the  quarter  and  of  labour  by  the  week  are  tabulated, 
thus  giving  some  sort  of  a  standard  by  which  the  amount  of  the 
village  budget  may  be  estimated. 

Little  more  remains  to  be  said;  the  column  of  unclassified 
details  contains  sums  of  money  allotted  to  persons  for  services 
which  are  unrecorded.  For  the  rest,  the  commentator  may  leave  the 
Churchwardens'  accounts  to  tell  their  own  simple  story. 

The  system  of  dealing  with  contractions  and  signs  is  as  follows : — 
To  expand  all  contractions,  to  rationalise  the  capitals,  to  avoid  the 
repetitions  of  the  symbols  "y«"  for  "the"  and  "ff"  for  "f,"  but  to  leave  the 
spelling  as  in  each  case  the  writer  made  it,  and  where  these  principles 
are  in  conflict,  to  print  according  to  common  sense. 


I 


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2g    '3 


churchwardens'  accounts. — methley. 


267 


METHLEY,  1681-1705. 

The  accompts  made  by  James  Pattyson  and  Richard  Burton,  Church- 
wardens for  the  parish  of  Methley  for  the  yeare  1681. 

Received  of  the  parish     ...  6    o    o 
^™-                                                     Disbursments. 

Paid  at  the  Visitation  to  the  Clark  of  the  Courtt  and  for 

oure  owne  charges          060 

Paid  to  John  Burton  for  oure  sesmentt      o     i     o 

Pade  to  the  Ringers  the  29^  of  May           o     8     o 

Paid  to  Darbyson  for  glazening  the  Church           o     3     4 

For  Coales  and  Lime  and  seruing  him       o     o     4 

Paid  to  the  head  constable  the  9  day  of  July  for  penson 

money.     Aquittance  for  the  same        o     4     7 

Forgoing  to  Wakefeild  with  itt         006 

Laid  downe  for  A  Communion  for  Bred  and  Wine  the  12 

day  of  September:  our  Charges             o     4     2 

Pade  to  the  Ringers  the  ^5  of  November  ...          o     8     o 

Laide   downe    for  bread  and   wine   for  a   Sacramentt   on 

Crismas  day  and  for  owne  charges       o     4     8 

Pade  the  22  day  of  december  for  a  booke  for  a  fast  day  010 

Payd  to  Genint  Shan  for  washing  of  the  surpleses  050 
Paid  for  bread  and  wine  for  a  sacrament  on  Palme  Sundey, 

good  Fryday  and  Easter  day i     i     8 

For  owne  charges        010 

For  going  to  Pontyfractt  for  Bred  and  wine          o     i     o 

Paid  for  a  pare  of  Indentures  to  Godfray  Shan     o     2     o 

And  for  going  to  Wakefeild  for  the  Confirming  of  them 

by  the  Justices  att  the  sessions o     2     o 

Pade  to  a  pore  man   that  came  with  a  letter  of  Request 

for  a  losse  by  fire          o    o    4 

Pade  to  Abraham  Hutchinson  for  the  Register     ...         ...  o     i     o 

Paid  att  the  visitations  att  Wakefeild  the  28  of  Aprill     ...  o     6     o 

Laide  downe  for  Bell  ropes 030 

1  Charles  IL  entered  London  May  29,  1660. 

2  CHscoverv  of  the  Gunpowder  Plot,  November  5,  1605.    The  belU  are  still  rung 
on  May  29  and  November  5,  and  the  ringers'  wages  are  paid  on  those  days. 


268 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY. 


For  oure  oaths  att  Wakefield  

Pade  to  William   Stanfeild   for  looking  to  the   Clock  and 
for  oyle 


£    s.    d, 
060 

o  17   10 


Received  in  the  sesment    .. 

.     6 

J. 

d. 

Disbursed     

•     5 

viij 

J 

Remaining  in  my  handes   .. 

. 

ii 

ii 

Abraham!     Alowed  by  us 
Hutchinson   ^  u      ol 

John  Shann 

Robert  Nunns 

1682.        An   Accompt   maid    by  Will.    Roberts   and   John   Webster,   Church 
Wardens,  in  the  yeare  1682  for  the  parish  of  Methley. 

At  the  visitations  for  swearing  of  us 

For  our  diners 

Spent  after  diner         

For  the  visitations  book  and  the  King's  declaration^ 

For  repaireing  the  Reuester*  

The  29  of  May  for  ringing 

Paid  to  the  head  Constable  for  the  releife  of  p'^soners 

For  a  Acquittance       

Expences  to  pay  this  money 

For  the  great  bell  string  mending 

September  the  10  for  Bread  and  wine  for  a  Communion 
Expences  to  buy  the  Bread  and  wine  att  pontifractt 

Given  to  a  letter  of  request 

For  ringing  the  5***  of  Nouember     

For  a  booke  binding  belonging  to  the  Church 
For  the  little  bell  talking  up  and  mending 

For  the  sesment  drawing       

For  Bread  and  wine  att  exemas 

For  the  midle  Bell  mending 

For  the  Church  windows  glasening  ... 
For  Bread  and  Wine  att  Easter 


I 

5, 

d. 

0 

2 

4 

0 

3 

6 

0 

2 

6 

0 

I 

6 

I 

I 

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8 

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^  Sc.  the  writer.     See  above. 

^  **Now  that  his"  (the  King's)  "end  was  accomplished,  he  no  sooner  saw  the 
Exclusion  Bill  {i,e.  of  James  from  the  succession)  reintroduced  into  the  Commons 
than  he  suddenly  dissolved  the  Houses  after  but  a  month's  sitting,  and  appealed  in 
a  royal  declaration  to  the  justice  of  the  nation  at  large."  Green's  History  of  the 
English  People  (1894),  vol.  iv,  p.  1427. 

*  =  vestry.     See  Century  Dictionary,  which  quotes  several  instances  of  the  use. 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY.  269 

£      s,     d. 

For  surples  washing oo     5  o 

For  waiting  2  dayes  att  Pontifractt  Sessions          00     2  o 

Given  to  a  letter  of  Request            00  00  6 

For  the  Clock  looking  to      00  13  4 

For  the  Church  sweeping      4  2 

For  the  Clock  mending  and  stringe            ...         ...         ...  00  00  10 

For  the  Great  Bell  wheile  mending 00     2  o 

Expences  att  the  Visitations 00     6  6 

For  a  Hack*  mending             010 


£  £    s.    d. 

Received  in  the  ley'    ...     6  disbursed      -695 

which  is  paid  of  the  Towne 


The  Accompts  of  John  Rollings  and   Richard  Ward,  Churchwardens 
for  the  parish  of  Methley,  A**  1683. 

Disbursed. 

Att  the  Visitations       

To  Robert  Lake  for  iron  worke  aboutt  the  bells 

Given  in  aile  to  those  that  helpt  to  take  up  bels 

Paid  att  VVakefeild  for  prissoners  att  York 

For  our  charges  and  the  acquittance  

Paid  to  the  Ringers  upon  the  29***  of  May  

For  the  Sesmentt  drawing      

Given  to  two  men  with  a  letter  of  request  

For  bred  and  wine  for  a  communion  at  Micaelm : 

For  a  new  bell  rope  for  the  Great  Bell      

Paid  to  the  Clark  att  the  Visitations  att  Micaelmas 

For  our  owne  Charges  

Paid  to  the  Ringers  on  the  5***  of  Nouember        

For  my  Charges  att  Leeds  sessions 

For  Bread  and  wine  for  the  Communion  upon  Crismas  day 
Given  to  a  traveller  with  a  pas  and  a  letter  of  request    ... 
Given  to  M*^  Sauile  boy  for  a  fox  head 
Given  to  a  poore  minister  which  came  about 

Given  to  women  with  a  letter  of  request 

Paid  for  the  surples  washing  

For  bread  and  for  the  Communion  att  Easter 

1  Pickaxe. 

^  New  English  Dictumary.     Lay,  a  rare  word  =  a  bill,  or  score.     The  instance 
giveD  is:  "And  scttc  heore  costes  in  his  lay." 


s. 

d. 

6 

II 

6 

6 

I 

6 

3 

4 

0 

8 

9 

0 

I 

0 

2 

6 

4 

8 

4 

4 

4 

6 

6 

4 

9 

0 

0 

6 

4 

8 

I 

0 

I 

0 

I 

6 

I 

6 

£    5 

0 

I     3 

4 

270 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY. 


Paid  for  entering  Richard  Sharp  surrender 

For  my  charges  att  the  Sessions,  Pontyfractt 

For  the  leads  poynting  and  lime 

Paid  for  the  Register  to  our  Clarke  and  for  parchment 

Disbursed  at  the  Visitations 

Given  to  a  traveler  with  a  pas  and  a  letter  of  request 

Paid  to  the  saxton  for  the  Clock  keeping 

And  his  wages... 

Received  in  the  ses'  6 
Allowed  the  23  of  May  s.    d, 

M'Shan         A°  1683       due  to  him     ...     8     5 

George  Burton  which  is  paid  him 


J. 

d. 

I 

0 

I 

0 

0 

8 

I 

6 

6 

8 

I 

6 

13 

4 

£    4 

0 

6     8 

5 

Accompt  maid  by  the  Churchwardens  by  us  David  Lake  and  Richard 
Ward  as  followeth. 

;f    ^.    d. 

At  the  visitation          Aprill  22  day,  1685^  070 

To  the  Ringers  on  the  29  of  May 090 

For  bread  and  wine  for  a  Communion  at  penticost         ...  o     5     o 

For  our  owne  charges            006 

For  lether  to  Coll  er^  the  bels            010 

For  a  letter  of  request  the  29  of  July        o     o     6 

Paid  to  the  Chiefe  Constable           034 

For  our  charges  for  carrying  the  money     o     o     6 

Paid  to  John  Holling  the  27  of  July          i     7     o 

Paid  for  our  sesment  writing 010 

Paid  to  M"^  Savile  man  for  two  fox  heads o     2     o 

Paid  to  the  Ringers  the  5  of  November o     8     o 

For  a  letter  of  request  the  sixtt  of  November      o     i     o 

Paid  for  bell  ropes  ekeing*  to  Thomas  poole          o     2     6 

Paid  for  the  revester  mending,  slate,  lime  and  mosse*      ...  o     4     8 
Paid  to  Robertt  Lake  for  Ireon  worke  about  the  bells  and 

for  help  to  take  up  the  great  bell        o     4     6 


1  ses=cess,  or  assessment, 
a  The  date  of  the  audit. 

3  Niw  English  Dictionary^  s.v,  collar,  an  encompassing  and  restraining  band  or 
strap. 

1507.     Louth  (Lincolnshire)  Churchwardens'  Accounts.     Paid  Codder  makyng 

bell  colars  x<*. 
1593-     Vestry   Books  (Surtees  Society,  vol.  xxxiv).      Item,  given    for   a   bell 
coller  xij<*. 

*  =  lengthening.     English  Dialect  Dictionary.     Eke = an  additional  piece  to  a 
bell  rope. 

5  The  moss  was  used  to  pack  the  slates,  which  are  sandstone  flags,  and  keep 
the  cold  air  out. 


CHURCHWARDENS*  ACCOUNTS. — METHLEV.  27 1 

£    s.     d. 

Pade  for  a  booke  for  a  fast  day      ...         o     i     o 

For  bread  and  wine  for  a  Communion  at  Xmas o     4     6 

For  our  owne  charges  ...         ...         ...         ...         ...006 

For  bread  and  wine  for  a  Communion  of  Palm  Sunday, 

Good  Friday  and  Easter  day      128 

Our  owne  charges       010 

Paid  to  Genitt  Shan  for  surplases  washing o     4     o 

Paid  to  WiUiam  Stanfeil  for  looking  to  the  Clock  ...     o  17     4 

And  his  wages  and  for  oyle 006 

Paid  to  Abraham  Hutchinson  for  the  register  writing  and 

parchment 016 

Cort  fees  att  the  Visitation  when  we  went  out  and  our 

owne  charges        o  11     8 

Paid  the  22  of  Octob:  at  Wakefeild  at  the  Correction  at 

Wakefeild  for  a  Terrier  of  all  the  gleab  belonging  to 

the  parsonage  of  Methley  050 

Allowed  this  account  the  day   and    year  above  sad   and 

alowed    the    overplush    to    make   up   their  Constable 

account  in  a  rcare 

For  this  account  recording     ...     o     i     o 
John  Shan 
Edmund  Morphy 
William  Roberts 
John  Rollings  

Disbursed  in   the   yeare  1684   by  us  Thomas  Coopers  and  William 
Pickersgill,  Church  Wardens  for  thatt  yeare. 

At  the  first  visitation 070 

For  our  sesment  drawing       010 

For  the  book  of  Artickels' 010 

To  the  ringers  the  29***  of  May        090 

For  two  bell  roopes 070 

Yorke  Castle  money  and  for  the  returne  of  itt      o     4     o 

To  John  Arnell  for  foure  foumards*  heads o     i     o 

For  ringers  on  the  5  of  Nouember 090 

For  a  booke  to  invite  us  to  the  second  visitation  ...  o     i     o 

*  The  Fourteen  Articles.  **The  Fourteen  Articles  were  to  be  'diligently 
enauired  of  and  particularly  answered  in  writipe'*by  High  Constables,  Petty  Con- 
stables, and  Tithing  Men,  and  related  to  (i)  Popish  Recusants,  (2)  Felonies, 
(3)  Vagabond  Persons  and  Rogues,  (4)  Cottages  erected  contrary  to  the  Statute  of 
Queen  Elizabeth,  (5)  Taverns  and  Tipling-houses,  (6)  Unlawful  Weights  and 
Measures,  (7)  Trespassers,  Forestallers,  Regulators  of  Corn  and  Maltsters,  (8)  Petty 
Constables,    (9)  Servants   out   of   Service,  (10)    Bridges   and    Highways   in  decay, 

in)  Stocks,  Apprentices,  and  Bastards,  (12)  Profane  Swearers  and  Cursers, 
13)  Riots,  Routs,  Batteries,  and  Affrays,  and  (14)  Neglectful  Constables.'*  {Cf.  York- 
shire Post^  July  19,  1890.) 

*  Foumard= polecat. 


272  CHURCHWARDENS'  ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY. 

Given  to  a  man  which  had  a  partickuler  Brefe     

For  bred  and  wine  for  a  Communion 

Paid  for  two  folmards  heads 

At  the  second  visetations       

For  sertifficates  for  burialls 

Paid  to  a  man  which  came  from  Kippax 

To  John  Johnson  for  his  worke  at  the  Church      

One  pewther  plaite  for  the  Church 

One  basin  for  the  Church     

Att  the  Corrections     

For  bread  and  wine  for  Palme   Suday,  Good   Friday  and 

Easter  day  

For  going  to  Roth  well  for  wine  3  times      

To  a  ministers  whife  and  her  familie  with  a  breefe 
For  the  second  booke 

For  plaits  festoning  about  the  bels  ...  

For  two  stayes  of  ireon  at  the  pulpitt         

For  the  Church  linen  washings         

To  William  Stanfeild  for  lookeing  to  the  Clock     

It     For  sweepinge  the  Church  and  Tallow  and  bessoms 

For  the  Church  Windows  mending  with  glas  

To  peter  Sarjant  for  a  booke  

For  our  paines  waiting  of  the  glasner  and  providinge  lathers 

The  second  sesment  drawing  

To  our  Clark  for  the  Register  writing  in  parchment 

For  drawing  this  account  up  myselfe  

Received  in  the  ses:  

Disbursed  out  of  the  same  

Due  to  the  Towne  

Allowed  this  account  the  25  of  May,  1685. 
Robertt  Nunns  Spent  at  this  account  taking 

William  Roberts  For  this  account  enteringe 

Anthony  Roberts 


£ 

5. 

d. 

0 

2 

6 

0 

S 

6 

0 

0 

8 

0 

6 

6 

0 

0 

6 

0 

I 

0 

3 

0 

0 

0 

I 

2 

0 

I 

8 

0 

2 

0 

I 

6 

2 

0 

3 

0 

0 

I 

6 

0 

I 

0 

0 

I 

0 

0 

4 

0 

0 

5 

0 

0 

13 

4 

0 

4 

8 

0 

6 

6 

0 

1 

0 

0 

2 

0 

0 

I 

0 

0 

I 

6 

0 

I 

0 

12 

0 

0 

10 

2 

2 

I 

17 

10 

0 

2 

0 

0 

I 

0 

Methley.      These    are    the    accompts   of   Anthony   Roberts    and    Peter   Coats, 
Church  Wardens,  for  the  yeare  A<>  Dom,  1685. 

£    s,    d, 
disbursments  Att  the  visitations        ...         ...         ...         ...         ...         ...     o     8     o 

"P*  Two  breefe  boxes        020 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY. 


A  letter  of  request      

Fade  to  the  Ringers  the  29***  of  May 
A  booke  for  the  29**^  of  May 

Yorke  Castle  money 

For  goeinge  to  Wakefeild  with  it 
For  ringinge  att  munmuth  takinge'  ... 
For  takeinge  the  bels  up 
It.      To  a  poore  minister  ... 

For  three  quarts  of  wine  att  micaelmas 

For  goeinge  to  fetch  itt 

For  a  new  bell  roope 

Fade  to  the  Ringers  the  5'**  of  Nouember 

An  eke  for  the  great  bell 

A  letter  of  request 

For  4  quarts  of  wine  for  a  communion  att  Xmas 

For  three  bell  wheels  makinge  new... 

For  Communion  wine  att  Easter 

For  bread  and  goeinge  for  itt 

Fade  the  Saxton  for  sweeping  the  Church 

For  glasinge     

For  washinge  the  surples 

Att  the  latter  visitation 

For  the  Register  writtinge 

Clock  roopes  mending 

For  two  Sessments  writtinge 

Fade  for  lookeinge  to  the  Clock  a  yeare 

Fade  for  a  new  lock  for  the  Church  doore 

Fade  for  Clock  mendinge  and  dressinge  and  oyle 

For  Ireon  workes  aboutt  the  bells  ... 

Received  in  the  ses: 
Disbursed     

Due  to  the  accomptant 

which  is  paid  to  them. 

This  accountt  allowed  Septemb""  the  30'** 
by  John  Savile,  Esq"" 
Edmund  Morphy,  gen : 
A'>  Don*  William  Roberts 


273 

s.      d. 


0  10 

1  o 


o  13 
o     7 

o     5 
o  10 


900 
10     2     o 


2       O 


*  Scdgmoor,  July  6.     Monmouth  taken,  July  8.     Executed,  July  15, 1685. 


274 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY. 


AoDom  1686.  These  beinge  the  accompts  of  Thomas  Shillito  and  Wittm 
Church  wardens,  for  the  year  1686. 

Inipf     Charges  about  the  Church 
Spent  at  the  visitation 

For  our  oaths 

For  a  proclamation  Book^     ... 

For  a  Book  of  Artickles 

For  the  Sesment  drawinge     ... 

May  the  29^  for  Ringinge    ... 

To  Thomas  Poole  for  a  roape 

For  two  ropes  moore... 

To  the  High  Cunstable  for  poore  p^soners 

At  the  Correction        

For  one  rope  moore 

November  the  5***  for  ringing 
At  X*mas  for  wine  and  bread 

For  a  fox  head  

For  a  Citation 

For  washing  the  Surplice 

Charges  about  Thomas  Brigs 

At  Easter  for  Bread  and  wine 

For  a  fox  head 

To  a  poore  man 

To  Ralph  Burton 

To  Robertt  Tod 

For  a  new  hack  and  spade 

For  dressinge  two  new  locks 

To  Abr.  Hutchinson  for  the  Register 

For  the  Register  enteringe 

For  Corte  fees 

Spent  at  the  visitation 


Crowder, 

s.      d. 


5 

2 

o 
I 

9 
2 

I 

3 

I 
o 
7 

3 

I 
o 

4 
o 

19 

I 
I 

19 
I 

3 
I 
I 
I 

5 
8 


6 
o 
o 
6 
o 
o 
6 
8 

4 
6 
6 

2 
8 
o 
6 
o 
8 

9 
o 
6 
o 
o 
o 
o 
6 
6 
6 
3 


1  1686  was  the  year  of  the  appointment  of  seven  Commissioners  for  the 
government  of  the  Church,  with  Jeffreys  at  their  head.  The  object  was  to  turn 
the  Church  back  from  Protestant  to  Catholic.  We  do  not  know  if  this 
proclamation  had  relation  to  the  above,  but  it  is  to  be  noted  that  the  opposition 
to  the  Commission  was  universal,  and  it  is  significant  that  the  bells  were  still 
rung  on  November  5. 


churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY. 

For  washing  the  Table  linen  and  scouring  pla 
For  drawin  the  acompts  to  schoole  master... 

Received  in  the  ses: 6 

Disbursed  out  of  the  same    ...         5 


In  areare  to  the  Towne  which  is  paid  for  the  use  of  the  same       7     9 

Allowed  this  accompt  May  the  7*** 
by  M'-Shan  A*>D:  1688 

Robertt  Nunns 

John  Hollings 

George  Burton 


2 

ns 

s. 

d. 

0 

6 

0 

6 

12 

3 

^^^^™    These  being  the  accompts  of  Andrew  Tompson  and  John  Hewetson, 
Churchwardens,  in  the  yeare 

{Page  d/ank.] 


The   Accompts   of  Adam    Hargreave  and    Charles    Ashton,    Church 
Wardens,  for  the  year  1688.* 

[Page  blank,] 


These  being  the  accounts  of  Robert  Nalson  and   Henry  Sheppard, 
Church  Wardens,  for  the  year  1689. 

Paid  at  the  Visitation 

Paid  for  Ringing  the  29'^  of  Maie 

For  York  Castle  money         

Paid  for  an  asesment  

Paid  to  Robert  Lake  for  looking  to  the  Clock 
Paid  for  Ringing  the  5'**  of  Nouember 

Given  to  a  Breife       

Paid  for  Communion  Charges  on  Cfex  day 

Paid  for  one  roop  and  splicing  twice 

Paid  for  an  otter's  head         


£ 

s. 

d. 

00 

7 

0 

0 

9 

6 

0 

3 

6 

0 

I 

0 

0 

6 

8 

0 

9 

6 

0 

0 

6 

0 

4 

8 

0 

I 

0 

0 

I 

0 

1  William  III.  landed  in  England  Nov.  5,  1688. 


276 


CHURCHWARDENS   ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY. 


Paid  for  the  leads  mending 

Paid  to  Robert  Lake  for  looking  to  the  Clock     ... 

Paid  for  one  Shufle 

Paid  for  lime 

Paid  for  sane  (sic)  leading 

Paid  for  one  stroak  of  haire 

Paid  for  the  windows  glaising  

Paid  for  the  leads  poynting 

Paid  for  Communion  Charges  att  Easter 

Paid  to  John  Lake  for  his  wages 

Payd  for  oyle  and  beesom 

Paid  att  the  visitation  Charges  on  the  14***  day  of  May 

Paid  for  the  book  of  Artickles^         

Pade  for  the  Register  writing  

Paid  for  Ringinge  upon  Kinge  William  Coronation  Day^ 
For  drawing  the  accompts 

Remains  due  to  the  Churchwardens 

with  5**  allowed  for  other  charges 

Paid  them  this  16  day  of  May,  92 


£ 

S. 

d. 

...    0 

12 

0 

0 

6 

8 

...    0 

I 

2 

...    0 

I 

8 

...    0 

I 

8 

...    0 

0 

6 

...    0 

8 

0 

...    0 

14 

0 

...    0 

18 

3 

...    0 

4 

0 

...    0 

I 

8 

...    0 

II 

0 

...    0 

I 

0 

...    0 

I 

6 

...    0 

5 

0 

...    0 

12 

0 

GO 

17 

05 

...00 

17 

05 

Methley. 
1700. 


These    be    the   Acounts   of  James  Ward 
Church  Wardens,  for  the  yeare  1700. 


and    William    Heselgraue, 


Charges  at  the  Visitations  the  last  day  of  Aprill    . . . 

For  our  booke  

Laide  downe  for  bread  and  wine  at  Whisson  tide... 

Paid  for  Ringinge  on  the  29  day  of  May,  one  bel  mending 

Paid  to  Robert  Lake  for  the  Belles  mending 

Paid  for  a  Bell  Rope  mending         

Paid  to  Joseph  Walsha  and  John  Turpin  for  mendinge  the 

Beles  and  for  a  pece  of  wood 

Paid  to  Joseph  Walsha  for  a  shouell  and  a  spad  euen     .. 

Paid  to  Edward  Man  for  2  bell  stayes  makeing 

Paid  to  Edward  Fosterd  for  making  a  spad  and  shouill.. 
Laid  downe  for  bread  and  wine  the  29  of  September    .. 

^  6d.  was  paid  in  1686  for  a  Book  of  Articles. 
2  The  date  was  April  11,  1689. 


£ 
o 


J. 
10 
2 
3 
7 
3 
I 

3 
I 
I 

2 
3 


o 
6 

2 
2 
6 
3 


CHURCHWARDENS*  ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY. 

cjuembcr  Paid  to  the  Ringinge  and  for  a  pound  of  candles 
the  5.      ^. 

Given  to  a  passenger 

Paid  to  Edward  Man  his  wages,  oyle  and  bessomes 

Payed  for  bread  and  wine  at  Chrismas       

Paid  to  John  Stones  for  lookinge  to  the  Clock    ... 

Paid  to  Robert  Lake  for  mending  the  beles 

Paid   to  Thomas  Downer  for  glasing  the  Church  and  for 

sowderinge  the  Leades  and  mending  them     ... 

William  Heselgrave  2  days  serueinge  him 

For  lime  and  hare  for  the  Church 

Paid  to  John  Wiat  for  makeinge  a  hoope  and  Bras  for  the 

great  Bell 

Paid  to  Robert  Cowwod  for  wire  for  the  Clock    ... 

Laid  downe  for  bread  and  wine   for  Palm  Sunday,  Good 

Friday  and  Ester  day      

For  gooinge  to  markit  for  it 

For  cleaning  the  plate  

Paid  to  James  Sharpe  for  aboute  the  Church  working  and 

settinge  a  molion  in  the  steple  window  

Paid  to  John  Wiat  for  mending  the  beles  and  for  nales  .. 

Paid  for  sendinge  our  R^ester  to  Yorke 

Paid  to  Edward  Man  for  2  bell  stayes  makeing     .. 

Paid  for  parchment  for  the  Regester  

Paid  for  Layinge  the  flagcs  upon  Mrs.  Nunes* 

Paid  to  Mr.  Caluerley  and  William  Caill  to  imburs  them 

For  our  ssesment  makeing 

Paid  for  the  Regester  writinge         

Paid  for  the  surples  and  linans  washing 

Charges  at  visitations 

The  sum  totall        ...     9    3     2 
May  the  ii***,  1702.     Alowed  by  us 
whose  names  are  here  subscribed. 

M'Shan 

William  Robert 

Anthony  Robert 

^Register  of  burials  for  1700:— **J"'**  *he  12,  M"  Barbara  Nunns  was  buryed." 
Rtfisterof  baptisms,  1634:— **  Barbara  daughter  of  John  Nunns  baptiied  the  27th 
of  Dccemb." 


2 

77 

£ 

5, 

d. 

0 

9 

6 

0 

2 

0 

0 

5 

0 

0 

3 

2 

0 

14 

0 

0 

13 

3 

0 

8 

4 

0 

I 

0 

0 

0 

6 

0 

2 

2 

0 

1 

4 

8 

1 
0 

16 

6 

0 

I 

0 

0 

1 

I 

6 

0 

2 

0 

0 

0 

8 

0 

I 

4 

0 

I 

0 

0 

I 

0 

0 

0 

6 

I 

19 

0 

0 

I 

0 

0 

I 

0 

0 

3 

0 

0 

10 

0 

278  churchwardens'  accounts. — METHLEY. 

Methlcy.      These   be  the  Acounts   of    George    Higham   and   Thomas    Shillito, 
Church  Warddins,  for  the  year  1704. 

^"^P-  Charges  at  the  Vissitations 

May  the  29,  paid  to  the  Ringers 

Paid  for  Candles         

For  the  sirpleas  mending       

Paid  to  the  Ringers  on  a  thanksgiving  day 

Paid  for  the  Little  Bell  Rope  spliseing       

Paid  for  the  sirpleas  and  the  table  Linan  washing 

Paid  for  the  plate  cleaninge 

Paid  for  Bread  and  Wine  at  Wissantide 

Paid  for  a  stay  for  midle  Bell  

Paid  for  the  great  Bell  Robe  splising         

Paid  for  a  puUe  for  the  Litle  bell 

Paid  for  Bread  and  Wine  at  Michaellmas 

Paid  to  the  Ringers  on  the  5  day  of  Nouember 

Paid  for  Candles         

Paid  for  a  Boult  for  the  great  Bell 

Paid  for  thre  Bell  Ropes       

Paid  to  Robert  Lake  for  a  new  gudgon  the  Littell  Bell . . . 

Paid  for  takeing  it  up  

And  for  my  owne  labour 

Paid  for  a  gudgeon  mendind  the  midle  Bell  and  wedges 

For  taking  it  up  ...         

For  a  plate  for  the  great  Bell  whelle  and  for  wedges  and  nales 
Paid  for  two  crookes  and  a  hesp  for  hanginge  up  the  lader 
Paid  for  two  puUies  axelling  buseses  for  them  for  the  Clock 

Paid  for  Bread  and  Wine  at  Crismas  

Paid  to  the  Ringers,  Queen  Ann  Coronation  Day... 

Paid  for  a  neck  for  the  sirpleas  and  mendinge     

Paid  for  parchment  for  Coppeing  the  Redgester^ 

Paid  for  drawinge  of  the  Redgcster  

Paid  for  sendinge  the  Redgesler  to  Yorke 

Paid  for  Bread  and  Wine  at  Palme  Sunday  

Paid  for  Bread  and  Wine  on  Good  Friday  


s. 

d. 

12 

6 

9 

0 

0 

2 

0 

6 

5 

0 

0 

4 

5 

0 

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0 

4 

8 

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0 

0 

6 

0 

6 

4 

8 

9 

0 

0 

2 

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0 

12 

6 

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8 

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6 

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0 

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6 

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8 

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8 

4 

8 

1  i.e.  a  copy  of  the  Parish  Register  for  the  Archbishop,  to  be  sent  to  York. 


churchwardens'  accounts,  -mkthley. 

Paid  for  Bread  and  Wine  on  Easter  day 

Paid  to  Cuthbert  Pease  for  two  pullies  for  the  Clock 
Spent  of  him  for  cominge  to  view  the  Bell  frame 

Charges  at  the  vissitations     

Paid  Clarke  wages  fo:  lookinge  to  the  Clock 

Paid  saxton  wages 

Paid  for  kepinge  Joshua  Reads   and   his  wife  2  days  and 

two  nights  by  an  order 

For  goinge  to  Sir  William  Lowther  about  them     . . . 
Paid  to  David  Boacok  for  goeinge  in  

These  acounts 
alowed  by  us 
Thomas  Shillito  Mr.  Adkinson^ 

owes  to  the  Towne  Mr.  John  Shan 

sixtene  shillinges  William  Roberts 


279 


9 

I 

1 

12 

14 

5 

5 

I 


7 


d. 
8 


These  be  the  Acounts  of  William  Young  and  John  Crosfeld,  Church- 
wardins,  for  the  yeare  1705. 

Paid  at  the  Vissitations  

Paid  for  Bread  and  Wine  at  Whissuntide 

Paid  to  Saxton  for  his  whole  yeare  wage 

Paid  for  a  Tun  of  Slate  and  goeinge  for  it 

Paid  for  ^vq  seeks  of  Lime  and  one  bunsh  of  Lates 
Paid  for  thre  hundred  of  stone  brods  and  nales^... 

Paid  to  Robert  Lund  for  Belles  mending 

Paid  to  Thomas  Turner  for  smith  work  about  Bells 

Paid  to  the  Ringers  on  the  29  day  of  May  

Paid  for  Bell  Chamber  Windowes  and  midell  wedginge  . 
Paid  for  mending  the  Leads  and  glasinge  the  windowes.. 
Paid  for  Coles  and  my  Atendance  for  heating  theirform  . 
Paid  to  the  Ringers  on  the  23  day  of  August'     

*  Gilbert  Atkinson,  Rector  1687-1709.     See  the  account  of  his  tragic  death  in 
Atkinson's  Life  of  Thoresby. 

*  Brods  or  broddes,  slate  pins  of  wood   or  bone,  more  commonly  the  latter 
(Surtees  Society). 

=*The  battle  of  Blenheim  was  fought  on  August  13,  1705. 


s. 

d. 

9 

0 

4 

0 

5 

4 

12 

6 

5 

I 

2 

8 

2 

2 

5 

0 

8 

0 

0 

8 

10 

6 

I 

2 

6 

0 

2So 


CHURCHWARDENS*  ACCOUNTS. — METHLEY. 


Paid  to  James  Sharp  for  slatinge  the  vestre 

Paid  for  a  Bushell  of  hare 

And  my  attendance     

Paid  for  Bread  and  Wine  at  Mickilmas 
Paid  at  the  Corrections 
Paid  to  Saxton  for  swepinge  Church 
Paid  to  Clark  for  lookinge  to  Clocke 

And  for  Writinge  Redgester 

Paid  to  John  Wadson  for  Bell  Ropes  and  a  Clock  Cord 

Nouember  the  5,  paid  to  Ringers  and  for  Candles 

Paid  for  Bread  and  Wine  at  Crismas 

Paid  to  glasner  for  glasing  windowes 

For  Linnen  wasshing  and  surples  mendinge 

Paid  to  Gorge  Higham  for  a  ssesment  writinge 

Paid  to  the  Ringers 

Paid  for  Bread  and  Wine  for  the  Communion  at  Ester 
Paid  for  a  shet  of  parchment  for  the  Redgester 
Paid  for  Redgester  sendinge  to  Yorke 
Paid  at  the  Vissitations  

These  accounts 
alowed  by  us 

Mr.  Adkinson 
Mr.  John  Shan 
William  Roberts 


s. 

d. 

'4 

6 

0 

6 

0 

8 

4 

0 

2 

0 

0 

6 

14 

0 

I 

0 

17 

0 

9 

2 

6 

0 

4 

8 

6 

0 

I 

0 

3 

0 

18 

10 

0 

10 

0 

10 

9 

0 

£    s. 

if. 

9     5 

7 

v-^ 


1 


LIST  OF  OFFICERS  for  1902. 


Edmund  Wilson,  F.S.A.,  Red  Hall,  Leeds. 
It)fce«pre6fdent6. 

John  Rawlinson  Ford,  Quarrydene,  Weetwood. 
John  Henry  Wurtzburg,  Clavering  House,  Leeds. 
Rev.  Preb.  E.  C.  S.  Gibson,  D.D.,  The  Vicarage,  Leeds. 
Rev. Charles  Hargrove,  M.A.,  10,  De  Grey  Terrace,  Leeds. 

CouncU. 

W.  Faley  Baildon,  F.S.A.,  Lincoln's  Inn,  London,  VV.C. 

J.  N.  Barran,  M.A.,  St.  Paul's  Street,  Leeds. 

F.  W.  Bedford,  Greek  Street  Chambers,  Leeds. 

Godfrey  Bingley,  Thomiehurst,  Headingley. 

W.  Braithwaite,  St.  George's  Terrace,  Headingley. 

W.  S.  Cameron,  57,  Caledonian  Road,  Leeds. 

E.  KiTSON  Clark,  M.A.,  F.S.A.,  9,  Hyde  Terrace,  Leeds. 

H.  T.  Kelsey,  M.A.,  Cromer  House,  Leeds. 

S.  D.  KiTSON,  M.A.,  Greek  Street  Chambers,  Leeds. 

W.  T.  Lancaster,  Yorkshire  Banking  Co.,  Leeds. 

S.  Margerison,  The  Lodge,  Calverley. 

B.  p.  Scattergood,  M.A.,  7,  Cookridge  Street,  Leeds. 

t>on.  Xibrarfan  and  Curator. 

S.  Denison,  4,  St.  George's  Terrace,  Headingley. 

t>on.  treasurer. 
Edmund  Wilson,  Red  Hall,  Leeds. 

1>om  Secretari?. 

G.  D.  LUMB,  65,  Albion  Street,  Leeds. 


REPORT  FOR   190 1. 


'^'HE  Council  of  the  Thoresby  Society  have  the  pleasure  to 
present  their  Thirteenth  Annual  Report.  During  the  year  two 
Life  and  twenty-two  Annual  Members  have  joined  the  Society,  and 
the  number  on  the  Roll  at  the  close  of  the  year  was  336,  of  whom 
55  were  Life  and  281  Annual. 

During  the  year  further  parts  of  the  **  Miscellanea "  and  "  Leeds 
Parish  Church  Registers "  have  been  issued  to  members  for  the  year 
1900.  The  "  Miscellanea"  contained  a  valuable  article  by  Mr.  Baildon 
on  the  I.,eathley  family;  a  plan  of  Leeds  in  1806,  with  description; 
further  portion  of  local  Wills,  1531  to  1533;  Justice's  Note-Book  of 
Captain  John  Pickering;  and  Lay  Subsidies  of  Agbrigg  and  Morley 
Wapentakes. 

During  the  summer  enjoyable  excursions  were  made  to  the 
Roman  Road  on  Blackstone  Edge  Moor,  to  Nun  Monkton  and 
Kirkhammerton,  and  to  Tickhill  Church  and  Castle  and  Roche 
Abbey,  under  the  able  direction  and  guidance  of  Messrs.  Barran, 
Bilson,  Clark,  and  Witherby. 

The  Council  gratefully  acknowledge  gifts  from  the  family  of  the 
late  Mr.  John  Killingbeck,  of  Kidderminster,  of  his  collections 
relating  to  Hunslet ;  from  Mrs.  John  Stansfeld,  of  a  walking  stick, 
inscribed  "Jeremiah  Thoresby  1690";  from  Miss  Dixon,  of  Harrogate, 
of  two  water-colour  drawings  of  the  Shambles  of  1830  and  of  the 
interior  of  Leeds  Parish  Church  of  that  date;  from  Mr.  Arthur 
Middleton,  a  picture  of  a  Review  of  Volunteers,  circa  1800;  from 
Mr.  J.  R.  Ford,  a  plan  of  Leeds,  dated  1806;  from  Mr.  S.  Denison, 


an  engraved  portrait  of  John  Smeaton  and  a  framed  trade  list  of 
S.  Hirst,  Briggate;  and  from  Mr.  G.  Bingley,  two  photographs  of  a 
stone  coffin  found  at  Chapeltown. 

The  most  important  event  in  connection  with  the  history  of  the 
Society,  which  has  happened  during  the  past  year,  was  the  purchase 
of  the  premises,  No.  lo,  Park  Street,  Leeds.  The  Society  was  formed 
in  1889,  and  amongst  its  objects  the  first  is  the  "collection  and 
preservation  of  books,  pamphlets,  MSS.,  deeds,  engravings,  drawings, 
coins,  antiquities,  and  other  objects  relating  to  the  town  and 
neighbourhood  of  Leeds." 

It  is  obvious  that  this  object  cannot  be  carried  out  unless  the 
Society  possesses  a  permanent  home  in  the  district.  It  is  now  five 
years  since,  by  arrangement- with  the  Yorkshire  Archaeological  Society, 
a  portion  of  the  Old  Medical  School  in  Park  Street  was  secured  on 
lease.  Here  the  two  Societies  have  ever  since  had  a  home.  The 
portion  of  the  premises  occupied  by  the  Societies  forms  only  a  small 
part  of  the  estate,  but  the  terms  of  tenancy  included  an  option 
to  purchase  the  whole,  which  has  just  been  exercised.  The  two 
Societies  are  now  joint  owners  in  fee  simple  of  the  entire  estate, 
extending  to  about  1,000  square  yards  of  land,  nearly  all  covered 
with  buildings. 

Due  prominence  should  be  given  to  this  event,  and  the  Council 
desire  to  call  the  attention  of  the  members  to  the  fact  that  the 
premises  have  been  acquired  for  the  purpose  of  enabling  the  Society 
to  carry  out  the  first  of  its  objects,  above  referred  to. 

The  Council  acknowledge  with  gratitude  the  liberality  of  some 
of  the  members,  from  whom  they  have  received  interesting  gifts.  It 
is  believed  that  there  is  not  a  member  of  the  Society  who  cannot  in 
some  way  help  forward  its  objects;  and  the  Council  will  be  glad 
indeed   to   receive   any  article   of  interest ;    and   they  desire   to   call 


attention  to  the  fact  that  a  valuable  collection  of  objects  of  local 
interest  includes  many  things  which  in  themselves  are  of  small 
intrinsic  value. 

The  purchase  of  the  premises  above  referred  to  involves  a  duty 
to  which  attention  must  now  be  called.  The  Society  has  not 
sufficient  invested  funds  for  the  payment  of  its  share  of  the 
purchase  money,  and  a  temporary  arrangement  has  had  to  be  made 
involving  an  annual  capital  outlay.  The  Council  appeal  to  the 
members  to  help  them  to  discharge  this  liability.  They  have  in 
their  store  room  a  stock  of  publications,  and  they  appeal  to  members 
to  complete  their  sets. 

Several  members  have  recently  compounded  for  their  future 
subscriptions.  This  is  another  way  in  which  the  unpaid  purchase 
money  may  be  provided.  The  Life  Fee  is  at  present  only  five 
guineas,  and  the  Council  will  be  glad  to  increase  the  number  of 
Life  Members. 

As   the  demands   upon  the  finances  of  the  Society  have  been 

of  an   exceptional  character  during  the  past  year,  the  Council   beg 

that  members  will  oblige  them  by  prompt  payment  of  their 
subscriptions. 


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-  3 


LIST  OF  OFFICERS  for  1903. 


preeident 
Edmund  Wilson,  F.S.A.,  Red  Hall,  Leeds. 

John  Rawlinson  Ford,  61,  Albion  Street,  Leeds. 
John  Henry  Wurtzhurg,  Clavering  House,  Leeds. 
Rev.  Freb.  E.  C.  S.  Gibson,  D.D.,  The  Vicarage,  Leeds. 
Rev.  Charles  Hargrove,  M.A.,  10,  De  Grey  Terrace,  Leeds. 

CouncU. 

W.  Paley  Baildon,  F.S.A.,  Lincoln's  Inn,  London,  W.C. 

J.  N.  Barran,  M.A.,  St.  Paul's  Street,  Leeds. 

Godfrey  Bingley,  Thomiehurst,  Headingley. 

W.  Braithwaite,  2,  St.  George's  Terrace,  Headingley. 

W.  S.  Cameron,  57,  Caledonian  Road,  Leeds. 

H.  S.  Chorley,  M.A.,  16,  Park  Place,  Leeds. 

E.  KiTSON  Clark,  M.A.,  F.S.A.,  Meanwoodside,  Leeds. 

Frank  Gott,  3,  East  Parade,  Leeds. 

H.  T.  Kelsey,  M.A.,  Cromer  House,  Leeds. 

S.  D.  KiTSON,  M.A.,  Greek  Street  Chambers,  Leeds. 

W.  T.  Lancaster,  Yorkshire  Banking  Co.,  Leeds. 

S.  Margerison,  The  Lodge,  Calverley. 

t>on.  Xibrarlan  an^  Curator* 

S.  Denlson,  4,  St.  George's  Terrace,  Headingley. 

t>oiu  ^rea6urer. 

Edmund  Wilson,  F.S.A.,  Red  Hall,  Leeds. 

tyon.  Secretarfee* 

G.  D.  LUMB,  65,  Albion  Street,  Leeds. 
B.  P.  Scattergood,  M.A.,  7,  Cookridge  Street,  Leeds. 


REPORT   FOR    1902. 


^TTHE  Council  of  the  Thoresby  Society  have  the  pleasure 
to  present  their  Fourteenth  Annual  Report.  During 
the  year  ten  Life  Members,  some  of  whom  were  already 
Annual  Members,  and  twenty  new  Annual  Members  have 
joined  the  Society,  and  the  number  on  the  Roll  at  the 
close  of  the  year  was  338,  of  whom  63  were  Life  and  275 
Annual  Members. 

During  the  year  further  parts  of  the  Coucher  Books  of 
Kirkstall  Abbey  and  Calverley  Charters  have  been  issued 
to  members  for  1901. 

During  the  summer  enjoyable  excursions  were  made  to 
Knaresborough  Castle  and  Church ;  to  Giggleswick  Church, 
Museum  and  School  Chapel,  and  the  Victoria  Cave;  to 
Gilling  Castle,  Byland  Abbey,  and  Coxwold;  and  to 
Beverley  Minster  and  St.  Mary's  Church,  under  the  able 
direction  and  guidance  of  Messrs.  J.  N.  Barran,  J.  Bilson, 
E.  Kitson  Clark,  S.  D.  Kitson,  and  W.  H.  Witherby. 

During  the  year  Mr.  Hargrove  resigned  his  position  as 
an  ordinary  Member  of  Council,  and  was  elected  a  Vice- 
President  ;   Mr.  Scattergood  was  chosen  to  fill  his  place. 

The  Council  have  also  to  announce  with  gfreat  regret 
the  retirement  of  Mr.  W.  H.  Witherby  from  his  position  as 


IV 

one  of  the  Honorary  Secretaries,  in  consequence  of  his 
leaving  Leeds.  Mr.  Witherby's  services  to  the  Society  have 
been  invaluable,  especially  in  connection  with  the  excur- 
sions. Mr.  Scattergood  was  elected  by  the  Council  to  fill 
the  vacancy. 

There  is  thus  one  vacant  place  on  the  Council,  for 
which  Mr.  Frank  Gott  has  been  nominated. 

The  Council  have  to  acknowledge  with  gratitude  the 
following  amongst  other  gifts  to  the  Society : —From  Mr. 
A.  C.  Lupton,  portrait  in  oils  of  Mr.  Benjamin  Goodman  ; 
from  Dr.  Eddison,  minute  books  and  reports  of  the  Female 
Servants'  Aid  Society  ;  from  Miss  Killingbeck,  water-colour 
drawing  of  Old  Hunslet ;  from  Mr.  S.  Denison,  a  portrait  of 
Dr.  Chadwick,  an  engraved  portrait  of  Ralph  Thoresby,  and 
some  dozens  of  lantern  slides;  from  Councillor  Lawson, 
album  of  Leeds  views ;  from  Mr.  B.  P.  Scattergood,  a  con- 
temporary account  of  the  Battle  of  Waterloo,  etc.  etc. 

In  this  connection  the  Council  would,  while  putting  on 
record  their  sense  of  the  liberality  of  some  of  the  members, 
again  urge  upon  all  the  benefit  which  the  Society  would 
derive  if  it  received  a  larger  number  of  gifts  of  this  kind. 
Objects  of  local  or  antiquarian  interest,  in  themselves 
insignificant  and  of  small  intrinsic  value,  may  form  in  the 
aggregate  a  collection  of  great  interest  and  value. 
Amongst  things  which  the  Society  would  greatly  appreciate 
may  be  named — Old  Leeds  printed  books  or  books  of  local 
interest,  portraits  of  Leeds  Worthies,  records  of  extinct 
local  societies,  prints,  engravings,  and  pamphlets  of  local 
interest. 


With  regard  to  the  balance-sheet  now  presented,  which 
shows  a  balance  in  favour  of  the  Society  of  ;^  1 80  2^.,  in 
addition  to  the  stock  of  publications  and  other  articles 
which  have  been  acquired  for  the  purpose  of  sale,  the 
Council  would  point  out  that  this  really  represents  the 
financial  state  of  the  Society  in  a  less  favourable  light 
than  the  reality,  for  in  the  accounts  the  Society  is  debited 
with  the  Life  Fees  paid  by  all  Life  Members  who  are  still 
living.  If  this  debit  were  cancelled  the  balance  shown 
would  be  more  than  £s^o. 

The  Council  desire  to  call  the  attention  of  Members  to 
the  large  stock  of  publications  which  are  still  undisposed 
of,  and  to  urge  upon  them  the  desirability,  both  from  their 
own  point  of  view  individually  and  from  that  of  the  Society 
as  a  body,  of  completing  their  sets  of  the  publications  by 
buying  these  surplus  copies. 

Finally,  the  Council  wish  to  ask  for  a  larger  measure 
of  co-operation  on  the  part  of  the  Members  of  the  Society 
in  the  work  which  is  to  be  done.  At  present  the  number 
of  workers  forms  but  a  very  small  proportion  of  the  whole 
membership;  and  the  work  of  the  Society  might  be 
augmented  and  its  usefulness  increased  to  a  very  large 
extent  if  its  Members  were  more  universally  impressed 
with  the  conviction  that  their  responsibility  ought  not  to 
end  with  the  payment  of  the  annual  subscription.  There 
are  very  many  fields  of  activity  open,  if  the  workers  would 
but  come  forward. 


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LIST    OF     MEMBERS. 


XCbe  XtboresbB  Society. 


LIST   OF   MEMBERS 


Those  marked  (*)  are  Life  Members. 


•Allerton,  The  Rt  Hon.  Lord 

Ambler,  Thomas 
"Appleton,  Charles 

Appleton,  Henry 

Armistead,  Edwin 

Armytage,  Sir  George,  Bart.,  F. 

Arnold,  Edmund  James 
•Atkinson,  Rev.  Edward,  D.D, 

Atkinson,  Henry  Geo. . . 

Atkinson,  John  Cecil    . . 

Atkinson,  George  Walter 

*Badcock,  Miss  Isabel  Baynes 
Bagshawe,  Bemal 
Bailes,  Miss  Kate  G. . . 
Bailes,  Richard   .. 
Baildon,  William  Paley,  F.S.A. 


S.A. 


Banks,  Joseph     . . 
Barker,  Aldred  F. 
Barker,  Joseph  Henry 
Barker,  Thos.  Henry 


Barran,  Alfred     . . 
*Barran,  John  Nicholson,  M.A. 

Barran,  Miss  Edith 
•Barran.  Rowland  Hirst,  M.P. 

Barraclough,  Samuel 
•Barwick,  John  Marshall,  M.A. 

Batley,  Edwin  William.. 

Beaumont,  James 

Beck,  Wm.  James 

Beckett,  Ernest  William,  M.P. 

Bedford,  Miss     .. 

Bedford,  Charles  Samuel 

Bedford,  James  Edward,  F.G.S. 

Bedford,  Francis  W..  A.R.LB.A. 


Allerton  Hall,  Leeds 

Broomhill,  Moor-Allerton 

Outwood  House,  Spencer  Place,  Leeds 

79,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

8,  Avenue  Hill,  Harehills  Avenue,  Leeds 

Kirklees  Park,  Brighouse 

8,  Cumberland  Road,  Leeds 

Clare  Collie,  Cambridge 

28,  The  Calls,  Leeds 

Butts  Court,  Leeds 

I,  Mark  Lane,  Leeds 

Somerleaze,  Wells,  Somerset 

The  Cedars,  Headingley 

Ridge  Villa,  Meanwood  Road,  Leeds 

Ridge  Villa,  Meanwood  Road,  Leeds 

5,  Stone  Buildings,  Lincoln's  Inn,  London, 
W.C. 

Neville  Hill,  Pontefract  Lane,  Leeds 

44,  Ash  Grove,  Bradford 

Perseverance  Mills,  Kirkstall  Road,  Leeds 

36,  Judges*  Drive,  Newsham  Park,  Liver- 
pool 

Moor  House,  Headingley 

St.  Paul  Street,  I^eeds 

The  Hollies,  Weetwood,  Leeds 

Beech  wood,  Roundhay 

Aire  and  Calder  Navigation,  Leeds 

24,  Basinghall  Street,  Leeds 

99,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

St.  John's  Cottage,  Leeds 

Basinghall  Street,  Leeds 

Kirkstall  Grange,  Leeds 

14^  Monkbridge  Road,  Headingley 

Broomleigh,  Chapel  Lane,  Headingley 

Shire  Oak  Road,  Headingley 

Greek  Street  Chambers,  Leeds 


LIST   OF  MEMBERS.  Ill 

Bcevers,  Charles,  F.C.  A 92,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Bcthell,  W Rise  Park,  Hull 

Bilson,  John,  F.S.A Hessle,  Hull 

Bingley,  Godfrey  Thomiehurst,  Headingley 

Blackburn,  Walter  Stephen      . .         . .  Central  Bank  Chambers,  Leeds 

Bodington,  Nathan,  M.A.,  Litt.D.      ..  Field  Head,  Shire  Oak  Road,  Headingley 

Bointon,  Mrs.  Eleanor  E Chadlea,  Far  Headingley 

Boston,  Richard 9,  Boar  T^ne,  Leeds 

Bowman,  W.  Powell Messrs.  Goodall,  Backhouse  &  Co.,  Leeds 

Bowring,  Henry  Illingworth    . .         . .  Ailerton  Hall,  Gledhow 

Bowring,  Miss  S.  C Ailerton  Hall,  Gledhow 

Bradley,  John Abbey  Mills,  Kirkstall 

Braithwaite,  Walter St.  George's  Terrace,  Headingley 

Braithwaite,  Walter  Samuel    . .         . .  6,  South  Parade,  Leeds 

Branson,  Fredk.  Woodward,  F.C.S.  ..  14,  Commercial  Street,  Leeds 

•Bray,  George Belmont,  Headmgley 

Brearley,  Arthur  140,  Woodsley  Road,  Leeds 

Brigg,  William,  B. A Cowthorpe  Hail,  Wetherby 

Brigg,  Wm.  Anderton,  M.A.,  LL.M.  . .  Kildwick  Hall,  near  Keighley 

Briggs,  Arthur  N.  c/o    Messrs.     Miiligan,    Forbes    &    Co., 

Bradford 

•Brooke,  John  Arthur Fenay  Hall,  Huddersfield 

•Brotherton,  Edwd.  Allen,  M.P.  ..  Arlhington  Hall,  via  Leeds 

Brown,  William,  F.S.A.  ..         ..  Whilehouse,  Northallerton 

Bruce,  Wm Greek  Street  Chambers,  Leeds 

Bullock,  R.  L. 8,  Woodbine  Terrace,  Headingley 

Bulmer,  Miss  Ada         Blenheim  Lodge,  Leeds 

Bulmer,  George  Bertram,  F.R. LB. A...  Central  Bank  Chambers,  Leeds 

Burrell,  B.  A.      . .       *. 5,  Mount  Preston,  Leeds 

Burrow,  Alfred  Linley Ridge  Mount  Villa,  Cliff  Road,  Leeds 

Butler,  Ambrose  Edmund        .  •         . .  Kepstorn,  Kirkstall,  near  Leeds 

Cadman,  His  Honour  Judge  . .         . .  Ackworth,  Pontefract 

Cameron,  James  Spottiswoode,  M.D.  6,  Ridge  Mount,  Leeds 

•Cameron,  William  S 57,  Caledonian  Road,  Leeds 

Carter,  Francis  Richard  . .         . .  Savile  House,  Pottemewton 

Carter,  Thos.  Scales 26,  Park  Square,  Leeds 

Chadwick,  Samuel  Joseph,  F.S.A.     ..  Church  Street,  Dewsbury 

Chamliers,  Joseph  Charles       . .         •  •  7,  Cardigan  Road,  Headingley 

Cheesman,  William  Norwood . .         . .  The  Crescent,  Selby 

Chorlcy,  H.  Sutton,  M.A.,  A.R.LB.A.  16,  Park  Place,  Leeds 

Clapham,  J.  Harold 13,  Beech  Grove  Terrace,  Leeds 

•Clark,  Edwin  Kitson,  M.A.,  F.S.A.  ..  Meanwoodside 

•Clark,  Mrs.  E.  Kitson Meanwoodside 

Clay,  John  William,  F.S.A Rastrick  House,  Brighouse 

Coieits,  Thomas   . .      * 3,  Fallowfield  Terrace,  Leeds 

•Collins,  Francis,  M.D Pateley  Bridge 

Colman,  Rev.  Frederick  Selincourt,M.  A.  The  Rectory,  Barwick-in-Elmet 

Comber,  John Myddleton  Hall,  near  Warrington 

Connon,  J.  Wieghitt,  F.R. LB. A.       ..  16,  Park  Place,  Leeds 


IV  LIST  OF  MEMBERS. 

Cookson,  Rev.  Edward,  M.  A.  . .  Marlesford  House,  34,  Warrington  Road, 

Ipswich 

Cookson,  Miss  F.  C 25,  Weetwood  Lane,  Leeds 

Cousins,  William  James  . .         . .  Greek  Street  Chambers,  Leeds 

Crampton,  William  Thomas     . .         . .  Parcmont,  Roundhay 

CrDjTsdale,  Charles         102, , Cardigan  Road,  Headingley 

Dalton,  Thomas 65,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Darwin,  Francis,  M.  A. Creskeld  Hall,  Arthington,  Leeds 

Denham,  Walter  FxJward         . .         . .  Pearce's  Chambers,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

•Denison,  Samuel  4,  St.  George*s  Terrace,  Headingley 

Denison,  Herbert  10,  East  Parade,  Leeds 

Denison,  Miss  Frances The  Grange,  Methley 

•Denison,  George  Henry  . .         . .  32,  Clarendon  Road,  Leeds 

Derry,  William Municipal  Buildings,  Leeds 

Dodgshun,  Edward  J.,  F.R.LB.A.    ..  14,  Park  Square,  Leeds 

Dodgson,  E.  O Souihleigh,  Kirkstall  Lane,  Headingley 

Draper,  Rev.  Wm.  Hy.  . .  . .  The  Rectory,  Adel 

•Dufton,  Henry  Tempest,  B. A.  . .  Bridge  House,  Brockford,  Stowmarket 

Duke,  Rev.  Rashleigh  E.  H Maltby  Rectory,  Alford,  Lincolnshire 

•Eckersley,  James  Cailton         ..         ..  Carlton  Manor,  Yeadon,  Leeds 

*Eddison,  John  Edwin,  M.D The  Lodge,  Adel 

Eddison,  John  Percy Cragside,  Ben  Rhydding 

Edmondson,  Thomas  Wm Cardigan  Lodge,  Cardigan  Road,  Leeds 

Elsworth,  Alfred  Ivy  House,  Meanwood 

Embleton,  Henry  Cawood       . .         . .  Central  Bank  Chambers,  Leeds 

•Eshelby,  Henry  Douglas,  F.S.A.       ..  80,  Shrewsbury  Road,  Oxton,  Birkenhead 

m 

•Ferrand,  W St.  Ives,  Bingley 

Fillingham,  George        16,  East  Parade,  Leeds 

•Ford,  John  Rawlinson 61,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Foster,  George Castlestead,  Boston  Spa 

Foster,  Jno.  Wm.  The  Prospect,  Pool,  near  Leeds 

Fourness,  John  William  . .         . .  Victoria  Chambers,  Leeds 

Gardner,  Wilson  10,  Norwood  Terrace,  Headingley 

Gibson,  Rev.  Edgar  Charies  S.,  D.D.  The  Vicarage,  Leeds 

•Gill,  Christopher  Coleman       . .         . .  42,  Park  Street,  Bath 

Gordon,  John Bond  Place,  I>eeds 

Golt,  Frank        3,  East  Parade,  Leeds 

Grant,  Prof.  Arthur  J.,  M.A.  ..         ..     Yorkshire  College,  Leeds 

•Green,  John  Hartley Hartley  Hill,  Leeds 

Greenwood,  Arthur       16,  Great  George  Street,  Westminster 

Hainsworth,  Lewis        Oakwell  Cottage,  Farsley,  near  Leeds 

Hall,  Rev.  Hy.  Armstrong,  B.D.        ..  The  Rectory,  Methley 

Hannam,  Wm.  Simpson  . .         -  •  4»  East  Parade,  Leeds 

*  Hansom,  Joseph  Stanislaus      . .         . .  27,  Alfred  Place  West,  South  Kensington, 

S.W. 


LIST   OF  MEMBERS.  V 

Hardcastle,  Mdvill  Joseph      . .         . .  Bank  of  England,  Leeds 

•Harding,  W.  Ambrose Histon  Manor,  Cambridgeshire 

Hargrove,  Rev.  Charles,  M.A.  ..  lo,  De  Grey  Terrace,  Leeds 

•Harvey,  William  The  Grove,  Roundhay,  Leeds 

Harvey,  William  Marsh  . .         .  •  58,  Queen's  Gate  Terrace,  South  Kensing- 

ton, London,  S.W. 

'""rs^a!'^''^*.^'^'".  "''"■.!^"'' }  ^"^"^  ^^^y'  ^"'^ 

Hawkyard,  Arthur         138,  Jack  Lane,  Hunslet 

Hebblethwaiie,  Rhodes  . .         . .  Highthorne,  Husthwaite,  near  ElasingwoUl 

Hepper,  Edward  Henry  . .         . .  Woodcote,  Wood  Lane,  Headingley 

Hepper,  John East  Parade,  Leeds 

Hepworth,  Joseph         Hazelwood,  Torquay 

Hepworth,  Norris  Rhodes       . .         . .  Torridon,  Headingley 

Hindle,  J.  E 10,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

Hirst,  John  Audus         5,  East  Parade,  Leeds 

Hobson,  Walter  Arthur  ..         ..82,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Holbrook,  Wm 4,  Monkbridge  Road,  Headingley 

Holding,  Rev.  John,  M.A Stotfold,  Baldock,  R.S.O.,  Herts. 

Horsfield,  Richanl  Marshall    . .         . .  West  Garth,  Meanwood,  Leeds 

•Hovenden,  Roliert,  F.S.A Heathcote,  Park  Hill  Road,  Croydon 

Howdill,  Chas.  Barker,  A.R.LB.A.  ..  7,  Oxford  Row,  Leeds 

•Illingworth,  William Bramhope  Manor,  Leeds 

Ingham,  Samuel Headingley  Hall,  Leeds 

Iveson,  Lancelot  105,  Mount  Street,  London,  W. 

Jackson,  Richard  Commercial  Street,  Leeds 

Jone5,  Frank  Wolstencroft       ..         ..  5^,  Ridge  End  Villas,  Headingley 

Kelsey,  Henry T.,  M.A.  ..         ..  Cromer  House,  Cromer  Terrace,  Leeds 

Kinder,  Fred Woodlands,  Kirkstall 

Kirk,  Albert  Edward,  A.R.LB.A.     ..  Buckingham  Villas,  Headingley 

Kirk,  Arthur Rosehurst,  Headingley 

Kirk,  John  Castle  Grove,  Headingley 

Kirk,  Jno.  Croisdale 38,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

Kirk,  Miss  Hannah  F.  . .         . .  Buckinghim  Villas,  Headingley 

Kirk,  Samuel Castle  Grove,  Headingley 

Kitchingman,  Jas.  Gawthorp    ..         ..  112,   Fulham    Road,    South    Kensington, 

London 

*Kitson,  Sir  James,  Bart.,  M.P.  . .  Gledhow  Hall,  Leeds 

*Kitson,  Frederick  J Gledhow  Grove,  Leeds 

Kitson,  Albert  E.  Cloughton,  near  Scarborough 

Kitson,  Miss  (Ethel) Elmet  Hall,  Leeds 

Kitson,  Miss  J.  Beatrice  . .         . .  Elmet  Hall,  Leeds 

Kitson,  Sydney  D Greek  Street  Chambers,  Leeds 

Knight,  Arthur  Langford  . .         . .  Water  Lane  Works,  Leeds 

Knight,  John 47,  Boar  Lane,  Leeds 


VI  LIST   OF  MEMBERS. 

Lancaster,  William  Thomas     ..         ..  The  London  City  &  Midland  Bank  Ltd., 

City  Square,  Leeds 

Lawson,  Edward  Ernest  ..         ••  2,  Osborne  Terrace,  Leeds 

•lAwson,  Frederick  William     ..         ..  Oaklands,  Adel 

Leadman,  Alex.  Dionysius  H.,  F.S.A.  Oak  House,  Pocklington,  near  York 

Leather,  George  Herbert         . .         . .  Central  Bank  Chambers,  Leeds 

Legard,  Albert  George,  M.  A Gibraltar  Cottage,  Monmouth 

Leigh,  Rev.  Neville  Egerton,  M.A.  ..  The  Vicarage,  Kirkstall 

Levitt,  Robert 17 A,  East  Parade,  Leeds 

Linley,  David  Mann 5,  East  Parade,  Leeds 

Littlewood,  Henry,  F.R.C.S 25,  Park  Square,  Leeds 

•Lumb,  Alfred  Overton 57 J,  Old  Broad  Street,  London,  E.C. 

*Lumb,  George  Denison 65,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

I^upton,  Charles,  M.A.  ..         ..  Carr  Head,  Roundhay,  Leeds 

Lupton,  Francis  Martineau,  M.A.      ..  Rocklands,  Newton  Park,  Leeds 

•Lupton,  Sydney,  M.A 102,  Park  St.,Grosvenor  Sq.,  London,  W. 

*.\fargerison,  .Samuel Calverley  Lodge,  near  Leeds 

Marshall,  G.  W.,  LL.D Samesfield  Court,  Weobley,  R.S.O. 

Marshall,  Thomas,  M.A.  ..  Highfield,  Chapel  AUerton 

Mason,  Charles  Letch 12,  East  Parade,  Leeds 

Matheson,  Ewing  31,  Clarendon  Road,  Leeds 

Maude,  William  C Brackenwood,  Bournemouth 

May,  Rev.  Thos.  H.,  M.A Ileswall  Rectory,  Chester 

•  Mayne,  Frederic  George  . .  •  •  40,  Park  Row,  Leeds 
Medhurst,  Rev.  Charles  E.,  M.A.  ..  Rectory,  Thorp  Arch 
Meredith,  Mrs The  Cottage,  Bramley 

♦Mexborough,  The  Rt.  Hon.  The  Earl  of  Methley  Park 

Middleton,  Arthur         ..         ..         ..  Calverley  Chambers,  Victoria  Sq.,  Leeds 

Midgley,  James  ..         ..         ..         ..  White  Horse  Street,  Leeds 

Miles,  James Guildford  Street,  Leeds 

*Milner- Gibson -CuUum,  George  Gery, 

F.S.A.  ..         ..  ..         ..  Hardwick  House,  Bury  St.  Edmunds 

Mitchell,  Fred 9,  Upper  Fountaine  Street,  Leeds 

•Morkill,  John  William,  M.A Newfield  Hall,  Bell  Busk,  via  Leeds 

Motley,  Lewis Spen  Lane,  Kirkstall,  Leeds 

Nixon,  Sidney  Ernest St.  Chad's  Hill,  Far  Headingley 

Norfolk-Johnson,  W (Jliffe  Cottage,  Horbury,  near  Wakefield 

Nussey,  Geo.  Leathley,  B.A Ardenlea,  Ilkley 

Oates,  Caroline  A.  (Mrs.)        ..         ..  Gestingthorpe    Hall,   Castle   Hedingham, 

Essex 

*Oxley,  Rev.  William  Henry,  M.A.     ..  Petersham  Vicarage,  Surrey 

Pape,  William 39,  Aire  Street,  Leeds 

•Parker,  Colonel  John  W.  R Browsholme  Hall,  Clilheroe 

•  Peake,  A.  Copson  24,  Basinghall  Street,  Leeds 

*Peate,  Jonathan Nun  Royd,  Guiseley,  near  Leeds 

Peck,  Harry  Wadkin Lloyd's  Bank  Ltd.,  Hunslet 

♦Peglcr,  Thos.  Boyne 12,  Great  George  Street,  Leeds 


LIST   OF   MEMBERS.  Vll 

Piercy,  Thomas 38,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

*Pocklington,  Henry 20,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

•Powell,  Sir  Francis  Sharp,  Bart.,  M.P.       Horton  Old  Hall,  Bradford 

Prater,  T.  Herbert         Parlington,  Aberford,  near  Leeds 

Reay,  Thos.  Purvis        Weetwood,  Leeds 

Redmayne,  John  Albion  Place,  Leeds 

Richardson,  Walter  W i,  Montpelier  Terrace,  Cliff  Road,  Leeds 

Rider,  Haywood  . .         . .         . .  Ashwood  Terrace,  Headingley 

•Riley-Smith,  Henry  Herbert    . .         . .  Toulston  Lodge,  Tadcaster 

Robins,  Rev.  Hy.  Temple       . .         •  •     35.  Wellclose  Mount,  Leeds 

Robinson,  John 48,  Wellington  Street,  Leeds 

•Robinson,  Percy 53,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Robinson,  W.  P.  1739,   Seventeenth    Street,   Washington, 

D.C.,  U.S.A. 

Roebuck,  Wm.  Denison,  F.L.S.         ..  259,  Hyde  Park  Road,  Leeds 

Rogers,  Professor   Leonard  J.,  M.A., 

Mus.B.  Yorkshire  College,  Leeds 

Rooke,  Chas.[]Staveley Newton  Hill,  Leeds 

Roscoe,  James Oatlands,  Harrogate 

Rowc,  Geo.  Herbert      . .         . .  . .  Lyddon  Hall,  Leeds 

Rowley,  Walter,  F.S.A.  ..         ..  Alder  Hill,  Meanwood,  Leeds 

.Sanders,  Alfred  J.  . .         . .         . .  2,  Moorland  Road,  Leeds 

Scattergood,  Bernard  Page,  M.  A.      . .  Moorside,  Headingley 

•Scott,  John,  Junr.  . .         . .  . .  High  Street,  Skipton 

Scott,  Joseph      . .         . .         . .         . .  98,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Scott,  Robert  Forsyth St.  John's  College,  Cambridge 

Scott,  Ernest  Kilburn Beesfield,  Farningham,  Eynsford,  S.O., 

Shackleton,  Wm Architect,  Pudsey  [Kent 

•Simpson,  John King  Lane,  Moor-Allerton 

Simpson,  Rev.  James  Gilliland,  M.A.  Clergy  School,  Leeds 

Singleton,  James  43,  Delph  Mount,  Hyde  Park,  Leeds 

Skevinglon,  Thos.  Wm.  . .         . .  Wood  Rhydding,  Ilkley 

Smith,  Edmund Nelson's  Yard,  Leeds 

•Smith,  Geo.  Alderson Wheatcroft  Cliff,  Scarborough 

Smith,  Stephen  Ernest,  F.R.LB  A.  ..  South  Parade,  Leeds 

Spark,  Fredk.  Robert Hyde  Terrace,  Leeds 

Stables,  Rev.  Wm.  Herbert     ..         ..  Over,  Winsford,  R.S.O.,  Cheshire 

•Stables,  Mrs.  Henry 2,  College  Lawn,  Cheltenham 

Stapleton,  Rev.  H The  Vicarage,  Calverley 

Stead,  John  Walter        . .         . .         •  •  3»  Cookridge  Street,  Leeds 

Swayne,  Mrs.  Eva  Margaret   . .         . .  St.  Aldan's  Vicarage,  Leeds 

*Sykes,  Arthur The  Grange,  Houndhay 

Taylor,  Rev.  Richard  Vickerman,  B.A.  Melbccks,  Richmond,  Yorks. 

Teasdale,  Washington 255,  Hyde  Park  Road,  Leeds 

Tempest,  Mrs.  Arthur  . .         . .         . .  Broughton  Hall,  Skipton 

•Tetley,  Chas.  Francis,  M.A.    ..         ..  Spring  Bank,  Headingley 

Thonger,  Charles  W. . .  . .         . .  139,  Victoria  Parade,  Filzroy,  Melbourne 


VUl  LIST  OF  MEMBERS. 

Thrippleton,  John         Burley  View,  Leeds 

Thursby,  Fortescue       122,  Queen's  Gate,  London,  S.W. 

Turner,  Chas Weetwood  Garth,  Leeds 

*Turton,  Robert Crown  Point  Bridge,  Leeds 

Vincent,  Rev.  Matson,  M.  A Great  Ousebum,  York 

Waide,  Thos Appleyard  House,  Woodlesford 

*Wailes-Fairbaim,  W.  F.  . .  Askham  Grange,  York 

Wallis,  Edwin  Cooper 27,  Ash  Grove,  Headingley 

Ward,  William 36,  Hyde  Terrace,  Leeds 

•Ward,  George,  F.LC,  F.C.S.  ..  Messrs.  Hirst,  Brooke,  &  Hirst's,  Manu- 

facturing Chemists,  Leeds 

Ward,  H.  Snowden Hadlow,  Tonbridge,  Kent 

Wardman,  Geo Patriotic  Assurance  Co.,  9,  South  Parade, 

Leeds 

*  Watson,  George Donisthorpe   House,  Moor- Allerton 

Webb,  Joseph  Stenson 26,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

White,  John        19,  Grange  Terrace,  Chapeltown  Road, 

Leeds 

Whitehead,  Tom  Alfred  Street,  Boar  Lane,  Leeds 

Whitehouse,  Edwin       89,  Clarendon  Road,  Leeds 

Wilkinson,  Wm.  Musgrave      . .         . .  Brecondene,  220,  Newton  Hill,  Leeds 

Wilkinson,  Jno.  Hy 53,  Albion  Street,  Leeds 

Wilson,  Charles  Henry 5,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

•Wilson,  Edmund,  F.S.A Red  Hall,  Leeds 

Wilson,  Henry,  M.A.,  F.S.A.  ..  Famborough  Lodge,  Famborough,R.S.O. 

(Kent) 

Wilson,  Jas Ormonde  House,  Headingley 

Wilson,  Richard Lloyds  Bank,  Limited,  Park  Row,  Leeds 

•Wilson,  Henry  S.  Lee The  Hall,  Crofton,  Wakefield 

Wilson,  Robert  Lancelot         ..         ..  21,  Lyddon  Terrace,  Leeds 

Witherby,  Walter  H.,  M. A The  School,  Shrewsbury 

Woffindin,  Mrs.  Mary..  ..         ..  i,  Albion  Place,  Leeds 

Wood,  Rev.  Canon  Fred.  Jno.,  M.A.  The  Vicarage,  Headingley 

Woods,  Sir  All)ertWm.,  K.C.M.G.,  ..  69,  St.  George's  Road,  Warwick  Square. 
C.B., F.S.A.  London,  S.W. 

*Wurtzburg,  John  Henry  . .  . .  2,  De  Grey  Road,  Leeds 

Wylde,  Rev.  John,  M.A.  . .         . .  St.  Saviour's  Vicarage,  Leeds 

Wynne-Edwards,    Rev.    John    Rosin- 
dale,  M.A Sheafield  House,  Clarendon  Road,  Leeds. 

Yorke,  Reginald  S The  Hall,  Burley-in-Wharfedale 

Yewdall,  Zechariah        Brookfield,  Calverley 


LIBRARIES   AND    PUBLIC   INSTITUTIONS.  iX 


LIBRARIES   AND    PUBLIC   INSTITUTIONS. 


Barrow-in-Furness  Free  Public  Library. 

Battersea  Central  Public  Library,  265,  Lavender  Hill,  S.W. 

Berlin,  The  Royal  Library  (Asher  &  Co.,  13,  Bedford  Street,  Covent  Garden,  W.C., 

Bingley  Free  Library.  Agents). 

Birmingham  Central  Free  Library. 

Boston,  Public  Library  of  the  City  of,  U.S.  A.  (Kegan  Paul,  Trench,  Triibner  &  Co. 

Limited,  Paternoster  House,  Charing  Cross  Road,  W.C,  Agents). 
Bradford  Historical  and  Antiquarian  Society. 
Bradford  Free  Library. 
Buffalo  Public  Library,  Buffalo,  N.Y.,  U.S.A.  (G.  E.  Stechert,  2,  Star  Yard,  Carey 

Street,  London,  W.C,  Agent). 
Cambridge,  St  Catherine's  College. 
Chetham's  Library,  Manchester. 
Chicago,  111.,  U.S.A.      The   Newberry    Library  (Stevens  &   Brown,  4,  Trafalgar 

Square,  London,  W.C.,  Agents). 
Cornell  University  Library,  Ithaca,  New  York,  U.S.A.  (E.  G.  Allen,  28,  Henrietta 

Street,  Covent  Garden,  W.C,  Agent). 
Dewsbury  Public  Free  Library. 

Detroit,  The  Public  Library  of,  Michigan,  U.S.A.  (B.  F.  Stevens  &  Brown,  Agents). 
Glasgow,  The  Mitchell  Library. 
The  Guildhall  Library,  London. 
Halifiuc  Public  Library. 
Harrogate  Public  Library. 
Leeds  Church  Institute. 

Leeds  Institute  of  Science,  Art,  and  Literature. 
Leeds  Library. 
Leeds  Public  Library. 
Lincoln's  Inn  Library,  W.C. 
Manchester  Free  Library. 

Manchester.    The  Jno.  Rylands'  Library,  Deansgate. 
Newcastle  Literary  and  Philosophical  Society. 
Newcastle-upon-Tyne  Public  Libraries. 

New  York  Historical  Society,  170,  Second  Avenue,  New  York. 
New  York  Stote  Library  (G.  E.  Stechert,  Agent). 
New  York  Public  Library,  Astor  Library  Buildings,  New  York,  U.S.A.  (Stevens  & 

Brown,  Agents). 
New  Hampshire  State  Library,  Concord,  N.H.,  U.S.A. 
Nottingham  Free  Public  Library. 


X  LIBRARIES   AND    PUBLIC    INSTITUTIONS. 

Oldham  Free  Public  Library. 

Pennsylvania,  State  Library  of,  Harrisburg,  U.S.A. 

Preston  Free  Public  Library. 

Record  Office,  The  Public  (Eyre  &  Spottiswoode,  5,  Middle  New  Street,  E.G.) 

Reform  Club,  Pall  Mall,  London,  S.W. 

Rochdale  Free  Public  Library. 

Sheffield  Public  Library. 

Strasburg,  Kais.  Universitais  &  Landesbibliothek. 

Syracuse  Central  Library,  Syracuse,  N.Y.,  U.S.A. 

Victoria,  Public  Library,  Museums,  and   National  (jallery  of,  Melbourne   (Melville 

and  Mullen,  12,  Ludgate  Square,  London,  Agents). 
V^ienna.     The   Imperial   Library  (Agents,    Messrs.   Gerold    &    Co.,   Booksellers,    I, 

Stefansplatz  8,  Vienna). 
Watkinson  Library,  Hartford,  U.S.A.  (Edwd.  G.  Allen,  Agent). 
Wigan  Free  Public  Library. 
Worcester  Public  Library. 

Yale  University  Library,  New  Haven,  U.S.A.  (Edwd.  G.  Allen,  Agent). 
York  Subscription  Library. 
Yorkshire  Philosophical  Society,  York. 


SOCIETIES  WITH  WHOM    PUBLICATIONS   ARE   EXCHANGED.  XI 


LIST  OF  SOCIETIES   WITH   WHOM   PUBLICATIONS 
ARE    EXCHANGED. 

The  Society  of  Antiquaries     Burlington  House,  London,  W. 

Royal  Archaeological  Institute  of  Great 

Britain  and  Ireland       20,  Hanover  Square,  London,  W* 

A.   H.  Lyell,  Hon,  Sec. 
Bradford  Antiquarian  Society. 

Cambridge  Antiquarian  Society         ...  T.  D.  Atkinson,  Hon, Sec,y  St.  Mary's  Passage, 

Cambridge. 
Cumberland  and  Westmorland 

Archaeological  Society T.  Wilson,  Aynam  Lodge,  Kendal. 

Derbyshire  Archaeological  Society      ...  Percy  N.  Currey,  3,  Market  Place,  Derby. 
Elast  Riding  Antiquarian  Society       ...  Rev.  A.  N.  Cooper,  The  Vicarage,  Filey. 
Essex  Archaeological  Society  ..  ...  G.  T,  Beaumont,  F.S.A.,  Hon,  Sec, 

The  Lawn,  Coggleshall,  Kelvedon. 
Lancashire     and     Cheshire     Historic 

Society         R.  D.  Radcliffe,  Old  Swan,  Liverpool. 

Leicester  Archaeological  Society         ...  W.  J.   Freer,  Hon,  Src.^  10,   New    Street, 

Leicester. 
Oxfordshire  Archaeological  Society. 

Sr.  Albans  Architectural 

and  Archaeological  Society  ...  Mrs.  Knight,  Killaha,  BeaconsF.eld  Road, 

St.  Albans. 
Shropshire  Archaeological  Society      ...  Francis  Goyne,  Sec,  Dogpole,  Shrewsbury. 

5>omersetshire  Archaeological  Society...  The  Castle,  Taunton. 

Stockholm.      Academy  of  Antiquities, 

National  Museum,  Dr  Anton  Blomberg,  Librctrian, 

Surrey  Archaeological   Society..  ...  Castle  Aich,  Guildford. 

Sussex  Archaeological  Society Chas.T.  Phillips,  .^^w.Zi^rarww,  The  Castle, 

Lewes 

The  Viking  Club         A.  W.  Johnston,  36,  Margaretta  Terrace, 

Chelsea,  S.W. 
Upsala  (Sweden),  Ro3^1  University  of,  Chief  Librarian, 

Yorkshire  Archaeological  Society         ..  E.  K.  Clark,  Hon,  Libratian,  10,  Park  Street, 

Leeds. 


The  Publications  are  also  sent  to  the  following : — 
The  Chief  Librarian,  British  Museum,  London,  W. 
The  Chief  Librarian,  Bodleian  Library,  Oxford. 
The  Chief  Librarian,  University  Library,  Cambridge. 
The  Minster  Library,  York. 


Cije  lorksljire  ^xtlfmbgitul  Soctetg. 

The  Society  was  formed  to  promote  the  study  of  the  archaeology 
and  antiquities  of  the  County,  and  issues  to  its  members  a  Journal 
containing  articles  of  antiquarian  and  genealogical  interest. 

Subscription,  ws.  td.  per  annum.  Life  Fee,  £']  ys.  Hon. 
Treasurer:  M.  H.  Peacock,  M.A.,  The  Grammar  School,  Wake- 
field; Hon.  Secretaries:  William  Brown,  F.S.A.,  White  House, 
Northallerton  ;   JOHN  ScOTT,  Croft  House,  Skipton. 


The  Record  Series  of  the  Society  was  commenced  in  1885  ^^^ 
the  purpose  of  publishing  Yorkshire  records.  It  has  printed  Feet 
of  Fines,  Index  of  Wills,  Inquisitions,  Subsidy  Rolls,  Chartularies, 
Monastic  Notes,  &c.  Subscription,  One  Guinea  per  annum.  Hon. 
Secretary:  J.  W.  Clay,  F.S.A.,  Rastrick    House,  Brighouse. 


Che  gorksliirt  '^m%^  l^tgistct  Somtg. 

The  Society  was  formed  in  1899  for  the  purpose  of  printing  the 
older  Registers  of  the  County.  The  following  have  been  either  issued 
or  are  in  the  press: — York— St.  Michael-le-Belfrey,  Burton  Fleming, 
Horbury,  Winestead,  Linton -in -Craven,  Stokesley,  Patrington. 
Scorborough,  Blacktoft,  Bingley,  Kippax,  Wath-on-Dearne,  Hamps- 
thwaite,  Brantingham,  Cherry  Burton,  Marske-in-Cleveland,  Harts- 
head,  Bolton-by-Bolland,  Howden,  and  Pickhill. 

Subscription,  One  Guinea  per  annum.  President :  Sir  George 
Armytage,  Bart.;  Hon.  Treasurer:  J.  W.  Fourness,  Victoria 
Chambers,  South  Parade,  Leeds;  Hon.  Secretaries:  Francis 
Collins,  M.D.,  Pateley  Bridge;  G.  D.  LUMB,  65,  Albion  Street, 
I^eds,  to  whom  applications  for  membership  should  be  sent. 


^^%i  Itbtttg  Entiriuatian  Soctetg. 

The  Society  was  formed  in  1892  to  study  and  preserve  the 
antiquities  of  the  East  Riding  of  the  County  of  York.  It  has 
already  done  important  work,  making  extensive  excavations  at 
Watton  Priory,  a  Gilbert ine  house,  near  DriflBeld ;  and  has  also 
taken  part  in  excavations  at  Warter  Priory,  near  Pocklington. 
Valuable  papers  on  these,  by  Mr.  St.  John  Hope,  with  plan  and 
illustrations,  appear  in  the  Transactions  for  igoo. 

Subscription,  \os.  bd.  per  annum.  President :  THE  LORD 
Hawkkshury,  F.S.A.;  Hon,  Secretary:  Rev.  A.  N.  CoOPER, 
Filey  Vicarage. 


1904.  Vol  XI.  Pattm. 
ipublicalions.of  Ihc 


<3rf2^ 


J3ascellanea. 


Index 


:X>  <X> 


€\ft  Cbombg  Societg. 

The  Society  was  formed  in  1889  for  antiquarian  objects  in 
connection  with  Leeds  and  District  Its  publications  include 
the  Leeds  Parish  Church  Register,  Adel  Register,  Methley 
Register,  Kirkstall  Abbey  Coucher  Book,  Calverley  Charters,  local 
Wills  and  Subsidy  Rolls,  Leeds  Plans,  and  Miscellanea. 

Subscription,  los.  6d.  per  annum.     Life  Fee,  ^5  55. 

President  and  Hon.  Treasurer :  Edmund  Wilson,  F.S.A.,  Red 
Hall,  Leeds;  Hon.  Secretaries:  G.  D.  Lumb,  65,  Albion  Street, 
Leeds;  B.  P.  Scattergood,  M.A.,  7,  Cookridge  Street,  Leeds. 


The     following    is    a    list    of    publications    which     may    be 
purchased  by  members. 

Applications — accompanied  by  remittance — to  be  addressed  to 
the  Treasurer,  Mr.  Edmund  Wilson,  Red  Hall,  Leeds. 
Of  some  of  these  the  stock  is  very  small. 
Plan  of  Leeds,  date  1806,  i/- 

Atkinson's   "Ralph    Thoresbv,  his   Town    and   Times," 

2  vols.,  containing  886  pages,  bound  in  buckram,  10/6 

(by    post    11/-).      Published     at     25/-  net.      A    most 

interesting  and  valuable  work. 

Warden's   "Antiquities    of    the    Borough    of    Leeds," 

coloured  plates,  3/-      Published  at  7/6. 
Pettingell's  Lithographed  Bird's-eye  View  of  Leeds,  40  inches 

by  15,  and  margin,  2/-- 
Stooks   Smith's  "Parliaments  of  England,"  3  vols,  in  i, 
contiiining  765  pages,  2,6.    London,  1844-50.    Published 
at  106. 
Stooks   Smith's  "Parliaments  of  Yorkshire  from  the 

Earliest  Times,"  60  pages,  i/-      l^ndon,  1854. 
Margerison's  "Calverley  Parish  Registers,"  Vol.  II, 

1 650- 1 680,  4/- 
„    Vol.  111,1681-1720,  4- 

The  Society's  Publications,  Bound,  viz.:— 

Vol.        I. — Leeds  Register,  1572-16 12. 

„  II. — Miscellanea. 

„  III. — Leeds  Register,  1612-1639. 

„  IV. — Miscellanea. 

„  V. — Adel  Register,  1 606-1 81 2 

„  VI. — Calverley  Charters. 

„  VII. —Leeds  Register,  1639-1667. 

^,  VIIL— Kirkstall  Abbey  Coucher  Book. 

„  IX. — Miscellanea. 

„  X. — Leeds  Register,  1 667-1695. 

„  XI. — Miscellanea. 

„  XII.— Methley  Register,  1560-1812. 

„  XIII. — Leeds  Register,  1695-1722  (in  progress). 


t"TOatcrIo0"«:ap  of  letlrs. 


The  members  will  look  with  pleasure  at  the  map  which  precedes 
this  article.  It  is  a  facsimile  reproduction  of  a  map  which  I  have 
called  a  "Waterloo"  Map  of  Leeds,  because  it  was  published  in 
1815  by  Robinson,  Son  &  Holdsworth,  of  Leeds,  from  a  survey  by 
Netlam  and  Francis  Giles,  of  New  Inn,  London. 

*The  transcription,  reproduction  and  publication  of  documents 
relating  to  the  town  and  neighbourhood  of  Leeds'  is  one  of  the 
objects  for  which  the  Society  was  formed ;  and  there  is  no  better 
way  of  showing  the  growth  of  a  place  than  by  the  publication  of 
plans.  Pages  of  description  may  be  accurate  and  may  convey  a  fair 
idea  of  what  they  refer  to,  but  a  map  presents  the  whole  at  a 
glance.  We  know  that  Leeds  existed  as  a  centre  of  population  in 
the  middle  of  the  eleventh  century,  and  it  was  then  a  place  of 
sufficient  importance  to  have  "a  church,  a  priest,  and  a  mill  of  4 
shillings."  We  state  this  on  the  authority  of  the  officers  appointed 
by  William  the  Conqueror  to  make  a  survey  of  his  kingdom. 
Unfortunately,  we  have  no  map  of  eleventh  century  Leeds.  The 
one  which  we  now  reproduce,  is  the  fifth  of  the  series  now  in  the 
hands  of  members.  The  first,  (which  will  be  found  at  the  beginning 
of  volume  ix)  shows  what  Leeds  was  in  the  second  year  of  the 
reign  of  Queen  Elizabeth  ;  but  it  shows  it  very  roughly.  It  does  not 
pretend  to  be  an  accurate  survey,  but  it  is  interesting  in  several 
respects.  It  is  drawn  with  the  east  at  the  top;  it  shows  in  what 
parts  of  the  town  houses  then  existed;* and  it  shows  the  ownership 
of  the  land  upon  which  a  large  part  of  the  present  city  stands.  It 
does  not  show  the  Parish  Church,  but  it  does  show  the  Manor 
House;  and  it  throws  some  light  upon  the  question  of  whether 
there  was  a  castle  at  Leeds,  because  the  Manor  House  is  called 
"Castyll  HilL" 

There  were  then  but  few  streets  in  Leeds.  We  see  Briggate, 
Upper  and  I^ower  Head  Rows,  Kirkgate,  Vicar  Lane,  a  road  running 
east    from   Timble    Bridge,  Lady    Lane,   Quarry    Hill,   and    perhaps 


282  A  " WATERLOO ''  MAP  OF  LEEDS. 

Swinegate;  and  there  appears  to  have  been  a  road  from  the  town 
to  Sheepscar  Bridge  and  thence  to  Potternewton,  and  another  road 
in  the  direction  of  Woodhouse  Lane. 

The  next  two  maps  in  order  of  date  are  those  which  appear 
after  page  204  of  volume  ix.  These  have  been  already  described. 
It  may  be  added  that  since  the  description  of  the  Philosophical  Hall 
Map  was  written,  attention  has  been  called  to  the  fact  that  there  is 
or  was  a  similar  map  of  York ;  it  was  called  Cassins'  Map,  and  had 
views  of  buildings  at  each  side;  and  it  is  probable  that  it  was 
drawn  by  the  same  hand  as  the  map  of  Leeds  in  the  Philosophical 
Hall,  which  is  said  to  have  been  surveyed  by  *John  Cossins.'* 

The  next  map  is  one  published  by  C.  Livesey  in  1806,  which 
appears  after  page  136  of  this  volume.  This  is  not  an  accurate 
map,  for  almost  every  street  has  been  drawn  with  a  ruler. 

The  map  which  is  now  presented  to  the  members  is  of  about 
the  same  date,  but  it  is  a  very  different  work.  It  appears  to  be  the 
result  of  an  accurate  survey ;  and  it  has  this  special  advantage,  that 
the  boundaries  of  the  fields  are  shown.  The  Map  of  1806  shows 
practically  the  same  town  drawn  without  much  attempt  at  accuracy. 
It  must  not  be  supposed  that  on  this  account  the  Map  of  1806  is 
of  no  value.  It  is  probable  that,  though  it  does  not  show  any 
buildings  accurately,  it  shows  what  buildings  then  existed,  and  is 
therefore  useful  in  showing  the  size  of  the  town  at  the  time  when  it 
was  made.  A  comparison  of  the  Map  of  1806  with  the  one  of  18 15 
will  bear  this  out. 

The  1815  Map  well  deserves  careful  examination.  Its  accuracy 
and  the  fact  that  all  the  fields  are  carefully  marked  have  already 
been  mentioned.  The  closely  built  town  may  be  roughly  said  to  be 
bounded  on  the  west  by  Park  Row,  on  the  north  by  the  site  of 
Mark  Lane,  Harrison  Street  and  Lady  Lane,  and  on  the  south  by 
the  river.  These  boundaries  were,  however,  beginning  to  be  extended. 
To  the  west  we  find  the  Park  Square  i)arallelogram — the  land 
between  Park  Lane  and  Park  Place,  East  Parade  and  Somers  Street 
— being  fairly  closely  built  over.  South  Parade  is  shown,  and  the 
old  Court  House  at  the  bottom  of  Park  Row;  but,  with  the  excep- 
tion of  this  and  a  few  other  buildings,  the  land  between  Park  Row 
and  East  Parade  was  unbuilt  upon.  The  coloured  Cloth  Hall,  on 
the  site  of  City  Square,  and  the  old  Infirmary,  at  the  bottom  of  East 

1  See  JVa/ks  Through  the  City  of  York,  by  Robert   Davies,  F.S.A. 
London :  Chapman  &  Hall,  Limited.     1880.     p.  243. 


A  "WATERLOO"  MAP   OF   LEEDS.  283 

Parade,  are  shown,  and  the  buildings  opposite  to  the  entrance  to  the 
Wellington  Station,  which  were  called  Eye  Bright  Place. 

The  introduction  of  steam  power  had  already  led  to  the  erection 
of  some  large  factories.  What  was  Holdforth's  Bank  Low  Mill  is 
shown,  as  is  also  Benyon's  Mill  at  Holbeck ;  and  Gott's  Mills — called 
Park  Mills— are  shown,  lying  between  Drony  Laith  and  Bean  Ing ; 
and  there  are  others. 

The  *  pleasant  hamlet '  of  Little  Woodhouse  is  shown,  and  Denison 
Hall — then  called  Woodhouse  Place — has  pleasure  grounds  extending 
to  Park  Lane,  and  had  an  uninterrupted  view  down  to  the  river, 
Gott's  Mill  being  the  only  obstruction.  Further  east  we  find 
St.  James  Street,  which  is  thus  described  in  a  Leeds  Guide  of  the 
year  r8o8: — "Returning  from  an  examination  of  these  faint  vestiges 
of  former  days,  we  have  to  notice  a  street  on  the  west  side  of 
Woodhouse  Lane,  called  St.  James's  Street,  which  is  nearly  in  a  line 
with  the  upper  part  of  Providence  Row.  The  situation  of  this 
street  is  extremely  pleasant,  and  from  its  elevation  the  air  of  it  is 
remarkably  salutary  and  bracing,  from  which  circumstance  it  is 
preferred  by  invalids  to  any  part  of  the  town,  and  of  course  lodgings 
in  it  are  in  great  request.  As  this  place  is  out  of  the  reach  of  the 
waterworks,  soft  water  is  scarce,  and  its  supply  of  spring  water  is  not 
abundant.  The  west  or  bottom  end  of  this  street  commands  a  very 
pleasant  view  of  the  Aire  Dale,  and  also  of  the  principal  buildings 
at  the  west  end  of  the  town." 

Our  map  shows  Sunny  Bank,  and  Queen's  Square  was  formed, 
though  little  more  than  one  side  was  built.  Providence  Row  and 
part  of  Grove  Terrace  are  shown,  and  building  operations  are  well 
b^un  at  the  lower  end  of  Woodhouse  Lane  and  Wade  Lane. 
Along  North  Street  also  we  find  a  number  of  buildings,  and  the 
names  *  Nile  Street '  and  *  Trafalgar  Street '  will,  it  is  to  be  hoped, 
long  remain  to  tell  us  when  these  streets  were  laid  out.  The  triangle 
between  Quarry  Hill,  Duke  Street,  and  Marsh  Lane  was  not  half 
built  upon,  but  the  old  parts  of  the  town  along  Mabgate  and  on 
the  Bank  were  fairly  well  covered  with  buildings. 

South  of  the  river,  there  were  many  buildings  along  Meadow 
Lane  and  Hunslet  Lane.  Holbeck  was  still  a  village  and  Hunslet 
is  not  shown. 

It  may  be  well  to  say  a  few  words  about  the  highways.  The 
oldest  streets  in  the  town  are  no  doubt  those  which  are  called 
'gates.'     Briggate,  which  then  extended  from  the  bridge  to  the  end 


284  A  "WATERLOO"  MAP   OF    LEEDS. 

of  Kirkgate,  the  upper  part  being  divided  by  the  Moot  Hall  and  the 
Middle  Row  into  two  passages,  called  *  Shambles*  and  *Back  of 
Shambles';  Kirkgate,  from  Briggate  to  the  Parish  Church;  Swinegate ; 
Thoresby  mentions  another  thoroughfare  in  this  neighbourhood  called 
*  Cripplegate ';  and  Mabgate.  Most  of  the  old  thoroughfares  are 
called  lanes,  originally  pronounced  "loin,"  and,  in  consequence,  an 
inhabitant  of  Leeds  was  called  a  "  Leeds  Loiner."  There  are  several 
lanes  in  the  centre  of  the  town — Boar  Lane,  Butts  Lane,  now  called 
Basinghall  Street,  I^nds  l^ne.  Vicar  Lane,  High  Court  I^ne  and  Call 
Lane.  But  many  lanes  lead  from  the  town  to  the  surrounding  country; 
these  are,  beginning  on  the  north  and  reading  from  west  to  east — 
Park  Lane ;  ( Chorley  Lane,  Leighton  I^ne  and  Kendall  Lane,  though 
shown  on  the  map,  are  not  named);  Woodhouse  Lane  and  the 
branches,  Cankerwell  Lane,  Carlton  Lane  and  Claypit  Lane;  Wade 
Lane,  leading  into  Long  Balk  Lane  (now  called  Camp  Road); 
Sheepscar  Lane,  the  southern  portion  of  which  was  even  in  18 15 
called  North  Street ;  Skinner  Lane,  Lady  Lane,  Marsh  Lane ;  and 
on  the  south  of  the  river  from  east  to  west,  Bowman  Lane,  Hunslet 
I^ne,  Meadow  I^ne,  and  Water  Lane,  leading  to  Holbeck. 

Wellington  Street  had  not  then  been  formed,  nor  had  Clarendon 
Road.     Oxford  Row  was  then  called  Wellington  Street 

Commercial  Street  from  Briggate  to  Albion  Street  is  shown, 
though  the  part  of  it  between  Briggate  and  Trinity  Street  is  called 
Bond  Street.     What  we  now  call  Bond  Street  had  not  been  formed. 

There  are  one  or  two  names  which  suggest  enquiry.  What  is 
now  called  Dyer  Street,  between  George  Street  and  St  Peter's  Street, 
was  called  Jubilee  Street.  The  west  end  of  Boar  Lane  was  called 
Quebec,  and  the  island  between  the  river  and  King's  Mill  Goit  was 
called  School  Close.  It  probably  belonged  to  a  member  of  the 
Nevile  family,  for  the  streets  laid  out  across  it  are  named  Nevile 
and  Sandford  Streets:  the  latter  now  covered  by  the  North-Eastem 
Station. 

May  I  say  a  word  about  the  naming  of  streets  ?  I  would  express 
a  devout  hope  that  the  good  old  names  may  not  give  place  to  new 
names  copied  from  London  thoroughfares. 

Leeds  has  already  suffered  in  this  respect.  Butts  Lane  is  now 
called  Basinghall  Street,  probably  because  the  Bankruptcy  Court, 
which  is  there  no  longer,  was  once  at  its  south  end. 


A  "WATERLOO"  MAP   OF   LEEDS.  285 

The  Street  south  of  St.  John*s  Church  is  still  called  Mark  Lane, 
though  the  Corn  Exchange  is  no  longer  there.  Merry  Boys  Hill — 
Butts  Hill  on  our  map — is  now  known  as  Guildford  Street,  and 
only  a  few  months  ago  it  was  actually  proposed  to  call  Vicar  Lane 
**the  Strand" — a  monstrous  piece  of  vandalism.  The  Strand  in 
London  is  so  called  because  it  runs  along  the  north  bank  of  the 
Thames.     I  know  of  no  reason  for  giving  that  title  to  Vicar  Lane. 

I  ought  now  to  enumerate  some  of  the  principal  buildings  shown 
on  our  Waterloo  Map.  There  were  then  five  churches  in  Leeds. 
The  Parish  Church,  which  of  course  was  what  we  now  call  the  Old 
Church,  though  there  had  probably  been  more  than  one  prior  church 
on  the  site.  The  one  shown  on  the  map  was  pulled  down  in  1838. 
St.  John's,  built  by  John  Harrison  in  the  seventeenth  century ; 
Trinity,  the  cost  of  which  was  largely  defrayed  by  Lady  Betty 
Hastings ;  St.  Paul's,  in  Park  Square ;  and  St.  James's,  in  York  Street. 

The  last-named  church  was  built  about  1794  for  Dissenters  of 
Lady  Huntingdon's  connection. 

The  Leeds  vicarage  then  stood  in  Kirkgate,  at  the  south  end  of 
Vicar  Lane,  surrounded  by  ground  still  spoken  of  as  the  Vicar's  Croft. 

Of  the  chapels  shown  on  the  map  a  list  of  fifteen  is  given  in  the 
margin.  I  will  now  give  that  list,  with  such  remarks  with  regard  to 
each  as  occur  to  me.  Several  of  the  chapels  are  no  longer  used  for 
religious  purposes. 

Albion  Chapel,  Albion  Street.  This  is  in  Albion  Walk,  and  was 
formerly  used  as  an  Independent  Chapel.  It  is  now  used  as  offices, 
and  it  has  attached  to  it  a  graveyard,  lying  between  the  building  and 
the  premises  of  Powoln/s,  Limited. 

Bank  Chapel,  Richmond  Hill.  This  is  shown  on  the  map  as 
situate  at  the  top  of  Richmond  Street.  It  is  no  longer  used  as  a 
chapel;  but  it  may  be  stated  here  that  on  the  Ordnance  Map  of 
1847  there  is  a  building  in  Upper  Cross  Street,  called  Bank  Chapel, 
which  was  afterwards  used  as  a  school,  and  has  recently  been 
converted  into  a  rag  warehouse. 

Baptist  Cha[>el,  St.  Ann's  Street,  St.  Peter's.  This  is  known  as 
the  Old  Stone  Chapel  on  the  west  side  of  St  Peter's  Street.  It  has 
for  many  years  been  used  as  a  boot  factory. 

Bethel  Chapel,  St.  George  Street,  Vicar  Lane.  This  street  is  now 
called  George  Street.  There  is  no  building  there  now  used  as  a 
chapel. 


286  A  "WATERLOO"  MAP  OF   LEEDS. 

Call  Lane  Chapel.  This  is  one  of  the  oldest  Dissenting  chapels 
in  Leeds.  It  was  formerly  used  by  the  Arians.  It  is  still  used  as 
a  chapel. 

Ebenezer  Chapel.  This  was  at  the  top  of  Ebenezer  Street,  near 
George  Street.  The  building  is  still  standing,  but  it  is  now  used  as 
a  cooper's  shop. 

The  Friends'  Meeting  House  in  Water  Lane  is  still  standing,  and 
has  been  added  to  in  recent  years. 

The  Inghamite  Chapel  was  situate  in  Duke  Street  The  premises 
were  afterwards  known  as  Nos.  i6  and  17,  Duke  Street.  It  was 
used  as  a  chapel  in   1847. 

The  Old  Methodist  Chapel  was  said  to  be  situate  in  St.  Ann's 
Street,  St  Peter's,  now  called  St.  Peter's  Street;  there  is  still  a 
Methodist  Chapel  there,  though  it  is  believed  that  the  building 
shown  on  the  map  has  given  place  to  a  newer  structure. 

The  Old  White  Chapel  in  Hunslet  Lane  was  situate  south  of  the 
South  Market;  it  is  not  now  used  for  religious  purposes. 

The  New  Methodist  Chapel  in  Albion  Street  was  for  many  years 
used  as  a  cloth  warehouse  by  Vance  &  Co.  and  Robinson,  Clay 
and  Co.  It  now  forms  part  of  the  premises  occupied  by  the  Mutual 
Supply  Society. 

Mill  Hill  Chapel  was  a  very  old  Dissenting  place  of  worship. 
The  building  shown  on  our  map  gave  place  to  the  present  Gothic 
chapel  in  1847. 

The  Roman  Catholic  Chapel  was  situate  in  Lady  Lane. 
Thoresby  says  that  there  was  a  chapel  or  chantry  on  or  near  this 
site  before  the  Reformation,  but  the  present  chapel — which  is  now 
used  as  a  Methodist  chapel — was  the  first  Roman  Catholic  chapel  in 
Leeds,  though  before  its  erection  the  congregation  used  a  temporary 
building  in  a  yard  out  of  Briggate. 

An  interesting  account  of  the  Roman  Catholic  revival  in  Leeds 
has  recently  been  published  by  the  Rev.  N.  Waugh. 

Salem  Chapel  was  and  still  is  in  Hunslet  I^ne,  and  is  still  used 
by  the  Congregationalists,  as  also  is  the  Wesleyan  Chapel  in  Meadow 
Lane  by  the  Wesleyans.     This  is  now  called  Wesley  Chapel. 

Of  other  public  buildings  the  following  may  be  named; — The 
Coloured  Cloth  Hall,  on  the  site  of  the  Post  Office  and  City 
Square ;  the  White  Cloth  Hall,  in  the  Calls ;  the  old  Infirmary,  at 
the  bottom  of  East  Parade,  though  there  was  an  older  one  still  in  a 
yard  out  of  Kirkgate;  the  Court  House,  in  Park  Row,  afterwards 
used  as  a  post  office,  and   recently  demolished  to  make  way  for  the 


A  "WATERLOO"  MAP   OF   LEEDS.  287 

Standard  buildings;  the  Music-hall,  in  Albion  Street;  the  King's 
Mills,  in  Swinegate;  the  Lancasterian  School,  south  of  Boar  LanB; 
the  Library,  in  Commercial  Street;  Potter's  and  St.  John's  Alms- 
houses, and  Jenkinson's  Almshouses,  then  in  Boar  Lane;  the 
Workhouse,  at  the  comer  of  Lady  Lane  and  North  Street ;  the  House 
of  Recovery,  in  Vicar  Lane. 

The  Assembly  Rooms  were  over  part  of  the  White  Cloth  Hall. 
This  building  still  exists,  though  no  part  of  it  is  used  as  a  Cloth 
Hall,  and  the  North-Eastern  Railway  crosses  the  site. 

The  only  National  School  in  the  town  appears  to  have  been  one 
in  connection  with  the  Parish  Church,  situate  west  of  High  Court 
Lane.  There  appears  to  have  been  no  building  where  the  present 
Parish  Church  Schools  now  stand. 

The  Post  Office  was  in  Duncan  Street,  on  a  site  afterwards 
occupied  by  the  Central  Market.  At  one  time  it  was  in  Mill  Hill; 
afterwards  at  the  bottom  of  Albion  Street;  then  it  was  removed  to 
the  Old  Court  House  at  the  bottom  of  Park  Row,  where  the  work 
was  carried  on  until  the  present  Post  Office  was  built. 

Briggate,  as  has  already  been  mentioned,  terminated  at  the  end 
of  Kirkgate.  There  the  old  Moot  Hall  stood,  with  Queen  Anne's 
statue  in  the  front  of  it.  The  Market  Cross  was  higher  up,  in  the 
part  of  what  is  now  Briggate,  then  called  Cross  Parish. 

There  were  four  banks  in  the  town.  The  Old  Bank  (Beckett 
and  Co.),  on  the  east  side  of  Briggate,  below  Duncan  Street;  the 
Union  Bank  (William  Williams  Brown  &  Co.),  in  Commercial  Street ; 
the  Commercial  Bank,  on  the  west  side  of  Briggate,  at  the  entrance 
to  Commercial  Court;  and  the  New  Bank,  in  Bank  Street. 

Four  bars  are  shown,  which  might  lead  to  the  inference  that 
Leeds  was  once  a  walled  town.  North  Bar  was  in  North  Street,  a 
little  north  of  the  top  of  Lady  Lane;  East  Bar  was  at  the  end  of 
Kirkgate,  near  the  Parish  Church ;  West  Bar  was  in  Boar  Lane ;  and 
Hurley  Bar  in  what  is  now  called  Guildford  Street,  at  the  top  of 
Merry  Boys  HilL 

Before  the  present  admirable  and  copious  supply  of  water  was 
obtained  from  the  Washburn  and  the  Wharfe  Valley,  Leeds  was 
supplied  from  the  River  Aire  at  Leeds  Bridge,  and  our  map  reminds 
us  of  this,  for  it  shows  the  two  reservoirs  which  existed  in  Albion 
Street  and  near  St.  John's  Church,  as  well  as  the  pumping  station, 
known  as  Pitfall  Mill.  Other  buildings  shown  are  the  Charity 
School,  near  St  John's  Church,  the  Grammar  School,  North  Street, 
as   built   by  John    Harrison   before  it   was  enlarged   southward,  and 


288  A  "WATERLOO"  MAP   OF   LEEDS. 

before  the  Writing  School  and  Library  on  the  west  side  were  built ; 
the  Library,  in  Commercial  Street,  the  News-room,  on  the  east  side 
of  Briggate,  north  of  Duncan  Street,  the  Old  Theatre,  in  Hunslet  Lane. 

The  bridge  between  Kirkgate  and  Marsh  Lane  was  then,  as  now, 
called  Timble  Bridge,  a  name  which  has  been  said  to  be  derived 
from  Temple,  because  perhaps  the  road  over  it  was  not  the  way  to 
Temple  Newsam.  Perhaps  the  guesser  responsible  for  this  etymology 
did  not  know  that  in  1379  there  were  only  four  inhabitants  of  Leeds 
assessed  at  the  large  sum  of  12^/.,  and  one  of  these  was  Johannes 
de  Tymbill,  and  he  had  four  servants,  each  of  whom  was  assessed 
at  4^. 

Much  more  might  be  written  about  this  interesting  map,  but  it 
is  feared  the  length  of  this  paper  has  already  exceeded  reasonable 
dimensions. 

Edmund  Wilson. 


XTestamenta  tHeobtensla, 

{Continued  frofn  page  68.) 

Extracted   from  the  Probate  Registry  at  York. 


Robert  Hudson,  of  Pontefract,  Mercer. 

rxi.  86  a.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  xxviij***  day  of  the  moneth  of 
Nouembre,  in  the  yere  of  o*"  lord  God  mdxxxij***.  I  Roberte  Hudson, 
late  of  Pomfrete,  marcer,  beyng  in  hoole  mynde  and  good  in 
remembrance,  ordyneth  and  makith  this  my  testament  and  last  will 
in  this  maner  and  forme  foloing.  First  I  comende  and  bequeathe 
my  sail  to  the  holie  trinitie,  to  our  blissid  lady  sancte  Marie,  and 
to  an  the  holie  company  that  is  in  hevyn,  and  my  body  to  be  beried 
in  the  churche  yerde  of  Alhallos  in  Pomfrett.  Also  I  gif  and 
bequeath  in  the  name  of  my  mortuary  afte*"  the  use  and  the  costome 
of  the  churche.  Also  I  gif  and  bequeath  to  the  hie  altar  in  the  said 
churche  for  my  tithes  and  oblacons  forgottyn,  and  al  other  offenses 
don,  vj**.  To  Precius  Hudson  my  suster  on  peticote  of  white.  To 
John  Armetadge  on  Jacket  of  tawne.  To  John  Mylner  on  leddC 
dublet.  To  John  Wod  the  elder  on  pare  of  whit  hoose.  The 
residue  of  my  goodf  aboue  unbequeathed,  my  dettf  content  and 
paid,  my  fungal  costes  and  expenses  the  day  of  my  beriall  don  and 
maid,  I  gif  them  hooly  and  frely  to  Jenet  Hudson  my  wif,  to  Thomas 
Hudson  my  son,  to  Rauf  Hudson  my  son,  to  Dorothe  Hudson  my 
doughto"^.  The  whiche  Jenet,  Thomas,  Rauf  and  Dorothe  I  orden 
and  make  my  executors,  all  foure  joinctely  same.  And  Thomas 
Paget,  my  fade^  in  lawe,  to  be  supviso'  of  this  my  testament  and  last 
will.  Also  it  is  my  will  and  mynde  that  if  so  be  that  my  wif  be 
with  childe,  if  it  please  God  it  come  to  the  yeres  of  discretion,  hit 
to  haue  hit  parte  as  it  cometh  to.  Thies  being  wittenesses.  Sir 
Thomas  Bogge,  Lionell  Roolstone,  Roberte  Hereson,  and  Edward 
Estwood. — {Proved  3  December^  i533-] 


John  Smith,  alias  Walker,  of  Fairburn. 

(xL  97  a.) 

In  Dei  noTe  Amen :  the  xviij*^  day  of  March,  in  the  yere  of  our 
lord  God  a  thousand  fiw^  hundreth  xxxiij.  I  John  Smyth,  of 
Farborne,  otherwais  John  Walker,  holl  of  mynd  and  of  good  memorie, 
makf  and  ordans  this  my  last  will  and  testament  in  man^  and  forme 
folowyng.  First  I  give  my  saull  to  God  AUmyghty,  to  our  ladie 
sanct  Marie,  and  to  all  the  celestiall  compenye  of  hevyn,  and  my 
bodie  to  be  buried  in  the  churche  yeard  of  all  sanctf  in  Ledsame. 


290  TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA. 

I  bequeath  to  the  hee  Aulter  in  the  same  churche  for  my  tythes 
forgotten  xij«*.  Also  I  bequithe  to  Alisop  my  doughto""  xl%  and  a 
mere  amblyng  for  hir  childe  porcon.  To  Jennet  my  doughtor  xl% 
and  a  baye  felie  for  hir  child  porcon.  To  Isabell  my  doughto*^ 
childe  a  yew  and  a  lame.  Also  I  bequeath  to  Anne  my  doughtor  a 
whie  for  the  full  contentacon  of  hir  child  porcon  if  she  be  content 
therwith,  if  not  to  haue  nothyng  more  then  she  haith,  and  that  is 
my  will.  Also  I  bequeath  to  Robert  Smith,  my  sone  childe,  a  yew 
and  a  lame.  The  residewe  of  my  goodis,  my  dettes  paid  and  my 
will  fulfillid,  I  give  to  John  my  sone,  whome  I  make  my  executor  of 
this  my  last  will  and  testament  Wittenes  herof,  John  Studlay,  vicar 
of  Ledsame,  John  Lilborne,  Richard  Webster,  James  Nawlson,  Robert 
Jacson  and  Symon  Clarke. — \_Proved  6  May,  1534  ] 


Margaret  Walker,  of  Parsley. 

(xi.  zoo  b.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  x'^  day  of  March,  in  the  yere  of 
our  lord  God  myxxix'**.  I  Margarete  Walker,  of  Farcelay,  Widdo, 
hoole  of  mynd  and  remembrance,  makf  my  testament  and  last  will 
in  the  maner  and  forme  foloing.  First  I  bequeath  my  sail  to 
Almyghtie  God,  our  Lady,  and  all  the  sanctf  in  hevyn,  to  pray  for 
me,  and  my  body  to  be  beried  in  the  churche  yerde  of  Calu^ley,  or 
els  wher  hit  shall  please  God  to  call  for  me,  in  the  holy  sanctuary 
or  cristen  beriall.  Also  I  bequeath  to  Agnes  Balie,  the  doughto*"  of 
William  Balie,  the  irne  chymnaye  and  a  saltyng  fatt  in  the  kechyn, 
the  lesse  of  too.  Itm  a  mattres,  three  cou^lettf,  too  par  of  sheitf, 
and  too  pare  of  blankkettf.  It*  ij  grete  panes  and  ij  lesse  panys,  iij 
pottf,  vj  pewdc  vescell.  Itm  I  bequeath  al  my  parte  of  the  cattell, 
as  oxen,  hors,  kye  and  shepe,  with  other  cattell,  to  be  diuided 
equally  betwixt  Cristofer  Balie,  Thomas  Balie,  prestf,  John  Balie 
and  Agnes  Balie.  The  residue  of  my  goodf  not  bequeathed  I  gif 
to  the  said  Cristofer  Balie,  Thomas  Balye,  prestf,  John  Balye  and 
Agnes  Balie.  The  whiche  Cristofer  and  Thomas  and  John  I  make 
my  executors  of  this  my  last  will,  so  that  they  gif  to  the  highe 
alta^  for  tithes  necligently  paid  or  forgettyn  xij**,  surely  that  thies 
my  executors  will  dispose  parte  for  my  husbandf  saull  and  m}Ti, 
accorddyng  to  theire  discretion  and  our  saull  helthe.  Yeven  the  daye 
and  yere  aboue  writyn.  Thies  beyng  wittenes,  Thomas  Alanbrig, 
Robert  Belhouse,  John  Smyth,  with  other.  Also  I  will  that  the  parte 
of  goodf  aboue  bequeathed  to  Agnes  Balie  shall  remane  in  the  handf 
and  custodie  of  myn  executo''s  aforsaid  to  she  comto  the  age  of  xx^ 
yeres. — \_Praved  24  March,  1533-4-] 


Gilbert  Casson,  of  Hunslet. 

(xi.  109  b.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen  :  the  xxv*  day  of  Aprill,  in  the  yere 
of  o^  lorde  God  a  thowsaunde  fyve  hundreth  xxxiiij*^  I  Gilberte 
Casson,  of  Hunslet  Wodhouse,  of  Leid  pochie,  of  hoole  mynd  and  of 


TEST  AMENTA   LEODIENSIA.  29 1 

good  remembrance,  makf  my  will  and  present  testament  in  this  maner 
foloing.  First  I  gif  my  sail  unto  God  Almyghtie,  and  to  his  mode'" 
o"*  ladie  sancte  Marie,  and  to  all  the  sanctf  in  hevyn,  and  my  body 
to  be  beried  in  the  pish  kirk  of  sancte  Peter  in  Leede.  lA  primis, 
First  I  gif  unto  the  sacrament  of  the  hie  altar  for  oblacon  forgettyn 
iij*  iiij«*.  Also  I  gif  unto  the  prest  of  Jhu  Gild  at  Leed  xij**.  Also 
I  gif  unto  our  lady  prest  at  Leed  brig  ende  xij**.  Also  I  gif  unto 
Sir  Thomas  Brig,  preist,  to  pray  for  my  sail  xij**.  Also  I  gif  unto  the 
prest  of  the  new  chapell  of  Leed  .  xij**.  Also  I  gif  to  settyng  forth 
of  the  south  side  of  the  kirk  at  Leed  iij*  iiij**.  Also  I  gif  unto 
the  hye  waye  at  Hunslett  layne  and  hit  be  cauced  ij*.  Also  I  gif 
and  bequeath  unto  John  Casson  my  son  iiij  marc.  Unto  Roberte 
Casson  my  son  vj^  xiij*  iiij<^.  Unto  Agnes  Casson  my  doughto'" 
vj'*  xiij*  iiij**.  Unto  Isabell  Casson  my  doughto"^  vj**  xiij"  iiij**.  Unto 
John  Thomson  my  son  in  lawe  iiij  marc.  Unto  Richard  Denby  my 
son  in  lawe  iiij  marc.  Unto  Gilbert  Thomson  a  cowe  and  a  whie 
stirk.  Unto  Gilberte  Casson  a  whye  stirke.  Unto  Thomas  Wodham 
iij*  iiij**.  Unto  Roberte  Calbecke  iij»  iiij**.  Unto  Umfray  Johnson  iij* 
iiij**.  Also  I  gif  all  the  hoole  take  of  my  farmhold  unto  Margarete 
my  wif  duryng  terme  of  hir  lif,  and  than  after  her  decesse  it  is  my 
will  that  John  Casson,  Roberte  Casson,  my  sones,  wheddC  so  eu^ 
sone  pleases  their  mode*^  better  at  hir  departyng,  after  hir  decesse  to 
haue  hit.  The  residue  of  all  my  goodf  not  bequeathed  I  gif  unto 
Margarete  my  wif,  the  whiche  Margarete  I  orden  and  makf  my 
executrix  of  all  my  goodf  not  bequest,  and  she  forto  dispose  for 
my  sail  as  she  thinkf  good.  Thies  beyng  wittenes,  Robert  Caldbeke, 
Thomas  Hargraue,  John  Scoillf,  Laurencie  Talio'',  Edmude  Farebanke, 
and  other  moo. — \_Proved  28  February^  1534-5-] 


Robert  Oglesthorpe,  of  Thorparch. 

(xi.  no.) 

(Surtees   Society,  Test,  Ebor,^  vol.  vi,  p.  46.) 


Thomas  Astwike,  of  Calverley. 

(xi.  lit  b.) 

In  Dei  noTe  Amen :  Anno  D'ni  mittmo  qui'gen  trigesimo  quarto. 
I  Thomas  Astwike,  of  good  remembrance  and  a  hoole  mynde,  make 

my  last  will and  my  body  to  be  beried  in  the  churche  garth 

of  the  pishe  of  Calu^ley.  Also  I  gif  for  my  forgettyn  tithes  and 
offeryngf  iij*  iiij**.  Unto  a  prest  for  to  pray  for  my  sail  xx*.  Also 
I  gif  to  Alicie  Carvar  a  blake  whie.  To  John  Gregorie  on  stotte. 
To  Margarete  Wod  ij*.  Also  I  will  my  dettf  be  paid  of  my  hoole 
goodf  and  brought  forth  honestly  after  the  use  of  the  contre.  And 
moreou^  I  gif  to  my  wif,  my  dettf  paid,  the  half  of  the  goodf. 
The  residue  of  my  goodys  I  gif  unto  William  Astwicke  and  Richard 
Kidson  to  dispose  for  the  helthe  of  my  sail.  In  wittenes  herof.  Sir 
Richard  Langfelley,  Roberte  Stotte,  William  Leu^sedge,  w'  moo.— 
Improved  28  May,  1534.] 


292  tkstamenta  leodiensia. 

Richard  Lethome,  of  Soxjth  Milford. 

(xi.  it6  a.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen:  be  it  knowne  to  almen  that  I 
Richard  Lethome,  of  South  Mylneforth,  being  of  a  hoole  and  good 
remembrance  of  mynd,  makys  this  my  last  will  and  testament  in  maner 
and  forme  foloing.  First  I  bequeath  my  sail  to  God  and  to  o'  blissid 
lady  sancte  Marie  and  all  the  fare  felishipe  of  hevyn,  and  my  body 
to  be  beried  in  the  kirke  garthe  of  Alhalos  in  Shereburn.  To  the 
hie  altar  for  tithes  forgettyn  (if  there  be  any)  xij^.  To  the  churche 
warkes  of  Shereburn  iij»  iiij**.  Also  I  bequeath  to  John  Lethome  my 
brode'  on  acr  of  Barly,  the  best  he  will  chose.  To  Alicie  my  suste^ 
half  an  acre  of  barly  by  Steton  side.  To  Henry  my  eldest  son  my 
bond  wayne,  a  hed  yoke,  a  teyme,  a  bolte  and  a  shakill.  To  John 
Lethome,  my  brode*",  my  best  jackett.  To  William  Marshall  a  you 
hog.  To  Margarete  Goldesburgh,  my  s^unte,  a  wyndle  of  Barly. 
Also  I  make  Jenet  my  wif  and  my  iiij  childe^  my  executors  of  all  my 
goodf  unbequest,  my  dettf  paid,  my  will  fulfillid,  and  to  dispose  it  for 
my  sail  as  they  thinke  best.  Also  I  make  John  Lethome  of  Snydale, 
John  Sikes,  John  Wodhouse  yonge*^,  Roberte  Warde  and  Thomas 
Lethome,  sup^visors  of  this  my  last  will,  to  see  that  hit  be  fulfillid. 
And  also  I  make  the  said  John  Lethome,  John  Sikes,  John  Wodhouse 
yonge',  Roberte  Ward  and  Thomas  Lethome,  feoffes  in  and  of  all 
my  landf  within  the  lordshipe  of  Shereburn,  Friston  and  Hamylton, 
and  the  said  feoffes  to  stand  and  be  seased  in  all  my  said  landf  for 
the  terme  of  xiij  yeres  to  the  use  and  true  p^rmance  of  this  my 
last  will.  First  I  will  that  my  said  feoffes  shall  haue  their  costes  and 
chardges  reasonable  borne,  and  further  I  will  that  John  Lethome  of 
Snydale  shall  haue  Henry  my  son  and  his  parte,  and  the  pfittf  of  all 
my  landf  in  Mylforthe  salue  vj*  viij**,  which  shall  go  to  the  fyndyng 
and  bryngyng  upe  of  Richard  my  yongest  son  duryng  the  said  xiij^**, 
so  that  the  said  John  will  kepe  the  said  Henry  at  scole  within  the 
pishe  of  Shereburn,  and  if  he  be  not  apte  to  the  scole,  than  I  wiU 
that  the  said  John  shall  put  hym  to  som  crafte  by  the  mynd  and 
concell  of  my  said  feoffes,  but  I  will  in  nowise  that  he  be  at  Snydale, 
and  if  the  said  John  Lethom  will  not  so  do,  than  I  will  that  my  said 
feoffes  shall  take  my  said  son  Henry  his  childe  pte  and  the  pfittf  of 
his  landf  and  put  hym  to  suche  place  as  they  shall  thinke  most 
conuenient  and  pfitte  for  hym.  Also  I  will  that  they  that  hais 
Richard  my  son  shall  haue  his  pte  and  the  pfittf  of  my  landes  in 
Hamylton,  and  if  it  hapyn  Jenet  my  wif  to  dye  within  the  said  xiij**» 
yeres,  then  I  will  that  the  pfittf  of  my  landf  in  Friston  shall  go  to 
the  bryngyng  upe  of  Richard  my  son  duryng  the  said  terme  of  xiij***. 
And  reu^sion  after  the  said  xiij*^  yeres  I  gif  all  my  landf  in  Mylford 
to  Henry  my  eldest  son  and  his  heires  for  eu^  And  reu^sion  of  my 
landf  in  Hamylton  and  the  reu^sion  of  my  landes  in  Friston  after 
the  deith  of  Jenet  my  wif,  I  gif  to  Richard  my  yongest  son  and 
his  heires  for  eu^  Wittenes,  John  Sikes,  Thomas  Burman,  John 
Wodhouse  jun^,  Thomas  Lethome,  Robert  Sharphouse,  maid  the  viij 
day  of  June,  the  ycre  of  our  lord  God  Mdxxxiiij'**. — [Proved  i6  /uly\ 
1534]. 


testamenta  leodiensia.  293 

John  Musgrave,  of  Wortley. 

(xi.  123  a.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  ix***  day  of  June,  the  yere  of  o** 
lord  God  mdxxxiiij'^.  I  John  Musgrave,  of  Worteley,  within  the 
pishe  of  Leedes,  of  hoole  mynd  and  good  remembrance,  orden  and 
make  my  testament  and  last  will  in  maner  and  forme  foloyng.  First 
I  giff  and  bequeath  my  sail  to  Almyghtie  God,  to  o'  blissid  lady 
sancte  Marie  Virgyn,  and  to  all  the  sanctes  in  hevyn,  and  my  body 
to  be  beried  in  the  churche  yerde  of  sancte  Peter  in  Leedes,  and  to 
haue  placebo  and  dirige  and  messe  of  Requyem  song  the  daye  of 
my  beriall  for  my  sail  and  all  my  frendes  salles,  also  I  gif  to  the  hie 
altar  for  tythes  forgettyn  iij*  iiij<*.  It'  to  Sir  Henry  Smyth  xij<^.  It*  to 
Maister  Beiston  on  fatte  cowe  or  xiij'  iiij**  in  money.  It'  to  poore 
folkf  of  Beiston  xij**.  It'  to  poore  folkf  of  Armeley  xij<*.  It*  to  poore 
folke  of  Worteley  xij*^.  It*  to  the  poore  folkf  of  Holbeke  xij**.  It' 
to  Thomas  Godfrey  ij  oxen  whiche  borowid  of  me  [sic].  It'  Thomas 
Birkynshawe  on  oxe  now  at  Robert  Musgrave.  It'  to  Dowsabell 
Baynes  xl*,  and  John  and  William  my  sones  to  bring  her  upe  to  she 
be  XX'  yeres  of  adge,  and  then  to  gif  hir  xiij*  iiij<^.  It*  to  Henry 
Musgrave,  my  s*unte,  xx*.  It'  to  Esabell,  Elsabeth  and  Jenet,  my 
doughtors,  xl*  in  the  handes  of  Thomas  Sheffeld,  and  liij'  iiij**  of 
William  Huddeswell,  vij^*  vj*  viij«*  of  Giles  Yvenson,  and  xvj*  of  [d/ank] 
Wilbore  de  Wellyng  in  Tickhill.  It'  to  Henry  Musgrave  of  Worteley 
a  tawney  jackett,  and  to  Peter  Musgrave  a  russet  Jackett.  It'  to 
Thomas  Godfray  a  blewe  jackett,  and  to  John  Musgrave  a  sleveles 
Jackett.  It'  to  John  Huchynson  a  pare  hoose  clothe  of  white,  a 
bukeskynne  coote  and  a  tawney  Jerkyn.  The  residue  of  all  my 
goodf,  my  dettf  paid  and  my  fun^all  expenses  don,  I  gif  to  John 
and  William  my  sons,  whome  I  make  my  executors  of  this  my 
testament  and  last  will.  Also  I  will  that  John  my  son  take  not  to 
his  wif  Agnes  Bussye,  for  she  is  my  god  doughto"^,  and  if  he  will 
not  be  ordered  he  shall  haue  x^*  to  his  childes  porcon  and  be  no 
executo*^  of  my  testament.  Thies  recordes  and  wittenes,  Roberte 
Sampson,  James  Kitson,  Umfray  Nailer,  and  other  moo. — [Proved  27 
October y  1534,  by  John  and  William  Musgrave^  sons  of  deceased.] 


John  Memmot,  of  Normanton. 

(xi.  t28  b.) 

In  Dei  noie  Amen :  the  xxv^  daye  of  Septembre,  in  the  yeare  of 
oure  lorde  God  mccccc'^xxxiiij.  I  John  Memott,  of  Normanton,  hole 
of  mynde  and  good  memorie,  makith  my  last  will  and  testamente  in 
forme  folowing.  First  I  bequethe  my  saule  to  Almightie  God,  o"^ 
blessid  lady,  with  all  the  sainctes  in  hevyn,  and  my  body  to  be 
buriede  in  the  parishe  churche  yearde  off  Normantone.  Also  I 
bequethe  to  the  high  Altare  one  mette  of  Barlye.  Also  I  bequethe 
to  John  Meinott,  my  sone,  ij  yewes  and  ij  lambes.  To  Elisabeth 
Memot  ande  Eljm  Memot,  my  daughters,  a  great  panne.  To 
Margaret  Meiiiot  a  great  new  panne.      To  the  building  of  the  stepill 


294  TESTAMENTA    LEODIENSIA- 

iij*.  Also  I  bequethe  for  my  wif  v*  for  half  a  trentall.  The  residew 
of  my  goodes  not  given  nor  bequethide  I  give  and  bequethe  to 
William  Meinott,  Thomas  Memott,  John  Meinott,  my  sones,  Margaret 
Memott,  Alice  Meinott,  Elisabeth  Meiiiott  and  Elyne  Memott,  my 
doughters,  whom  I  ordayne  and  make  my  executors  to  dispose  for 
the  helthe  of  my  soule,  at  the  ouer  sight  of  Richard  Sheparde, 
William  Hansone,  Richard  Walkar  ande  Thomas  Blawicke,  whome  I 
make  superuisors  to  see  that  this  my  last  will  be  perfo^mede  and 
fulfillid.  Theise  witnes,  S'  James  Watmoghe,  vicare  of  Normantone, 
Robert  Wightone  of  the  same,  and  Richard  Firmarie,  of  Fledborowe. — 
[Proved  24  April,  1535.] 


William  Barker,  of  Morlev. 

(xi.  129  a.) 

In  Dei  noie  Amen:  I  William  Barkar,  of  Morley,  holle  of  mynde 
and  perfite  remembrance,  maketh  my  testamente  the  xx^  daie  of 
Nouembre,  in  the  yeare  of  o*^  lorde  God  myxxxiij***.  .  . ,  my  bodie  to 
be  beride  at  my  paroche  churche  at  Batlaye.  Also  I  give  to  my  wif 
the  ordre  of  my  goodes,  theise  men  witnessinge,  Robert  Grethede, 
John  Scotte,  William  Clarksone,  with  other,  the  daie  and  yeare 
aforescribed. — [Proved  16  November,  i534-] 


Thomas  Roper,  of  Tadcaster. 

(xi.  130  a.) 

In  Dei  note  Amen :  the  xxiij^**  daie  of  the  moneth  of  Julij,  in 
the  yeare  of  o*^  lord  God  mdxxxiiij.  I  Thomas  Roper,  of  holle 
mynde  and  good  remeberance,  maketh  my  testament  and  last  will  in 
maner  and  forme  folowing.  First  I  betake  my  soule  unto  Almyghtie 
God,  to  his  blessid  mother,  oure  ladye  sanct  Marye,  and  to  all  the 
sanctes  in  hevyn,  and  my  bodye  to  be  beried  in  the  churche  of  oure 
ladie  of  Tadcastre.  Also  I  give  and  bequethe  to  one  able  preiste 
for  one  trentall  to  be  said  for  my  soule  x*.  To  the  Abbaye  of  oure 
ladie  of  Sallay  xij^.  Also  I  bequeste  to  the  high  Altare  in  Tadcastre 
viij**.  Also  I  give  to  the  churche  warkes  in  Tadcastre  xij^.  Item  I 
will  that  Alisone,  my  wif,  haue  yearlie  forth  of  my  landes  to  this  my 
will  be  performide  xxxiij*  iiij*^.  And  aftre  my  said  will  be  perfo'^med 
I  will  that  she  haue  for  the  terme  of  hir  lif  as  is  recordid  in  hir 
feftemente.  Also  I  will  that  all  the  reste  of  my  landes  be  receyved 
and  applyed  to  and  for  the  use  of  my  ij  doughters  Anne  and 
Susanne,  to  aither  of  theme  xl^  Also  I  give  and  bequeste  to  my 
doughter  Issabell  of  my  goodes  xl*.  Also  I  will  that  my  feoffes  shall 
suffre  all  my  landes  to  be  applied  to  my  ryght  heires  lawfullie 
begotten.  Also  I  will  that  yff  my  son  John  be  abowtwarde  to  sell  or 
aliene  my  said  landes  or  any  percell  theroff,  that  then  all  my  said 
landes  to  be  at  the  ordre  of  my  said  feoffes  and  to  be  disposide 
aftre  ther  discretions  for  the  well  of  my  sawle,  and  if  my  said  landf 
may  be  lawfuUye  sollde   I  will  that  it  be  solde  to   Edwarde   Rodley. 


TESTAMENTA    LEODIENSIA.  295 

Also  I  give  to  Sir  Robert  Smyth  iij*  iiij«*.  Also  I  will  that  euerye 
prest  being  att  my  buriall  to  haue  iiij**.  Also  I  give  to  eu^y  of  iiij 
orders  of  Frears  in  Yorke  one  busshell  of  whete  or  a  busshell  of 
Barlye  malte.  Residew  of  all  my  goodes  not  bequested  I  give  to  my 
executors  for  my  dettf  to  be  paied  and  this  my  last  will  to  be 
performed,  and  to  dispose  for  the  well  of  my  saule  as  thay  will 
answer,  for  whom  I  maike  Xpofer  Bolton,  preist,  and  Alison  my  wif, 
and  I  maike  M"*  William  Hungate,  of  Saxtone,  esquier,  and  Richarde 
Appleyerde,  yoman,  superuisors  of  this  my  last  will  to  be  performid. 
Theise  wittenes,  Robert  Wright  and  Richard  Haye  of  Scotton. — 
[Proved  lo  May^  i.SSS] 


William  Ellis,  of  Kiddall, 

(xL  130  b.) 

(Surtees  Society,  Test  Ebor,^  vol.  vi,  p.  48.) 


James  Birtbie,  of  Birkenshaw. 

(xi  131  b.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen :  the  yeare  of  oure  lord  God 
m^ccccc'**xxxiiij'**,  the  xij^^  daie  of  the  moneth  of  Januarie.  I  James 
Birtbie,  of  Birkinshaye,  in  the  paroshing  of  Bristall,  of  hoU  and 
perfite  mynde,  maketh  my  last  testamente  and  will  after  this  maner  of 
form  that  foloweth.  First  I  bequethe  my  saule  to  God  Almightie,  to 
our  ladie  sancte  Marie,  and  to  all  the  sanctes  in  heven,  and  my 
bodie  to  be  buried  in  the  paroche  churche  of  Bristall  of  the  hoUie 
apostles  Peter  and  Paule,  &c.  In  primis  I  give  to  the  high  altare 
for  thinges  forgotone  xij**.  To  the  churche  workes  iij*  iiij**.  Also  I 
geve  to  my  wif  the  good  will  &  taike  of  my  farmholde  at  Dewesburie, 
and  also  viij  oxon,  with  the  yolkes,  teames,  waynes,  ploughes  and  all 
thinges  therto  belonging  that  is  at  Dewesburie,  and  the  half  of  all 
my  Kye  that  is  at  bothe  my  farmholdes,  and  the  half  of  the  yong 
beastes,  saving  I  give  to  Margaret  Akereide  a  whie  of  the  holl. 
And  I  give  to  my  wif  the  half  of  my  horses  &  maires  and  the 
sheipe  that  ar  at  Dewesburie,  and  the  goodes  that  was  belonging  to 
hir  the  daie  of  our  manage,  saving  that  of  all  this  part  of  goodes 
I  give  to  James  Birtbie  my  sone  iij^*  vj*  viij**.  And  I  give  to  the 
said  James  my  landes  that  I  purcheside  in  Dewesbury,  and  of  that 
parte  of  goodes  spoken  of  before  I  give  to  RoBt  Birtbie  my  sone 
vj**  xiij»  iiij**,  and  besides  that  I  give  to  hym  a  great  panne  and  my 
wifes  best  girdle,  and  I  give  to  Thomas  my  sone  the  other  girdle 
that  was  his  mothers.  And  morouer  I  give  to  my  wyff  x  siluer 
spones,  to  James  and  Robert  Birtbie  behove.  And  I  give  to  my 
wif  the  half  of  my  carre  tymbre,  and  of  theis  goodes  she  shall 
contente  and  paye  all  her  owne  children  hadde  and  goton  with 
Richard  Akeroide,  and  morouer  for  payeng  of  my  farmes  at  Candle- 
messe,  come  shalbe  taken  at  both  my  lathes  to  paye  it  with.  And 
furthermore  I   give  to  Thomas  Birtbie  my  soiie  the  tacke  and  good- 


296  TESTAMENTA    LEODIENSIA. 

will  of  my  farmeholde  at  Birkinshay,  with  my  draught  of  oxon,  yolkes, 
teames,  waynes,  ploughes  and  all  thing  therto  belonging,  and  the 
other  half  of  my  kye,  yong  beast,  horses  and  maires  that  remanes, 
and  all  the  sheipe  at  Birkinshay,  and  he  shall  paie  my  dettes  that  I 
owe  and  the  money  y*  I  am  owing,  when  it  is  gotone  it  shalbe 
diuided  to  my  wif  and  to  Thomas  my  soiie,  and  the  said  Thomas 
shall  haue  all  the  yrone  stone  that  is  gotone  of  my  grounde  at 
Dewesburie.  Finallie  all  the  goodes  that  I  have  that  remaneth  aftre 
my  decease  nather  given  nor  bequethed  I  give  theme  all  hollie  to 
Thomas  Birtbie  my  sone,  and  the  said  Thomas  and  Alice  my  wif 
shalbe  my  executors  aftre  my  decease,  and  they  shall  dispose  for  my 
saule  as  they  thinkes  the  beste.  And  I  maike  S'  Robert  Nevile, 
Knight,  the  survior  of  this  my  last  will.  Theise  men  being  witnes, 
Sir  William  Talyo"^,  Thomas  Grene  and  John  Stublay,  that  this  my 
last  will  be  fulfillede.  Writing  the  tyme  aforesaide. — \^Proved  14 
4^«^»  1 535-] 


Robert  Ward,  of  Methley,  Chaplain. 

(xi.  137  a.) 

In  the  name  of  God  Amen:  the  xxvij***  daie  of  Decembre,  in  the 
yeare  of  o*"  lord  God  m^dxxxiij*^.  I  Robert  Warde,  of  Methlaye, 
in  the  countie  of  York,  chapleyne,  holl  of  mynde  and  good 
remembrance,  lovid  be  Almyghtie  God,  makes  this  my  testament  and 
last  will  in  maner  and  forme  folloyng.  Firste  I  bequethe  my  soule 
unto  Almightie  Gode,  oure  ladie  saint  Marie,  and  to  all  the  companye 
of  heven,  and  my  bodie  to  be  buried  within  the  churche  yearde  of 
Sainct  Oswald  of  Methley  nighe  unto  where  my  elders  doe  lye.  Item 
I  doe  bequethe  to  the  high  Aulter  xij^.  Itm  unto  John  Wedderheede 
one  cowe  and  ij  stirkf.  Itm  to  Robert  Sharp  one  cowe.  Item 
Jenette  Saundre  one  qwhye.  Itm  to  Rauf  Wedderheed  one  cowe. 
Itm  I  will  that  Jenett  Appleyerde  shall  haue  hir  house  that  she 
dothe  dwell  in  for  the  terme  of  hir  live  without  anye  rent  payeng 
therfore.  Itm  I  will  that  my  dishe  benche  stand  in  my  house  for 
an  heirlome.  Itm  I  bequethe  to  the  churche  use  one  cowe  or  one 
cowe  price.  Itm  I  will  that  my  executors  shall  the  daie  of  my 
beriall  deale  at  the  churche  for  the  helthe  of  my  soule  xxxiij*  iiij<^. 
Itm  I  bequethe  to  the  mending  of  the  new  brigge  iij*  iiij^.  Item 
vj"  viij**  helpyng  yearlie  my  obett  for  the  terme  of  xx^  yeares.  Itm 
I  the  saide  Roberte  Warde,  chaplayne,  dothe  gyve  unto  John 
Wedderhedde  and  Henrye  Hogesone  and  their  heires  one  messuag, 
ij  houses,  one  crofte  and  xij  acres  of  lande  in  Windehill,  with 
app*tenances  in  Methley,  unto  suche  tyme  or  tymes  that  Robert 
Warde  doe  paie  or  cause  to  be  payde  to  Robert  Shane,  Robert 
Tailyo',  Thomas  Furthe  and  George  Sharpe,  maide  lawfull  ffeoffes  of 
&  upon  the  said  messuage,  ij  houses,  one  crofte  and  xij  acres  of 
lande  with  app'tenances  in  Methley,  to  the  use  of  the  said  John  and 
Henry,  by  me  the  said  Robert  Warde,  chaplayne,  x^»  of  lawfull  money 
of  Englond  to  the  use  and  profett  of  the  said  John  and  Henrie  and 


TESTAMENTA   LEODIENSIA.  297 

theire  heires.  The  witnes  therof,  Robert  Laburne,  William  Gierke, 
John  Hogesone  and  Robert  Sharpe.  Item  the  rcsidew  of  all  mye 
goodes  not  bequeathed  I  geve  to  William  Clercke  and  John  Hogesone 
to  thentent  that  they  shall  thereof  paye  my  dettf  and  dispos